KPI GUIDANCE TOOL

HOME AND PERSONAL CARE
Assessment NameKPI TitleCalculation & ScopeCertifications, Standards & ToolsBackground InformationDefinitions
Air FreshenersChemical footprintThe stewardship list is comprised of the following lists which describe the conditions under which the identified chemicals can or cannot be used. If a chemical on a stewardship list is listed with a qualifying statement on production, exposure, or threshold, the statement should be considered for this KPI.
• CA EPA Prop 65 - Reproductive and Developmental Toxicants, Carcinogens
• EPA Toxics Release Inventory PBTs
• EU REACH - Annex XVII CMRs (Appendices 1 - 6)
• IARC - Groups 1, 2A, 2B
These published lists have been referenced in public retailer chemical policies.
Where a chemical is accompanied by a specific route of exposure on these published lists and the exposure route is relevant to the product during consumer use or foreseeable misuse, then the chemical is relevant to this KPI.
For B, the program may be internal to an organization but must measure the chemical footprint as defined by the Chemical Footprint Project (CFP).
For C, the external program must measure the chemical footprint of the organization and must be multi-stakeholder (include representatives from government and/or NGO as well as industry) with transparent methodology and include actors from across the supply chain (raw material suppliers, manufacturers, and retailers).
This KPI set was developed by The Sustainability Consortium to be aligned with the Beauty and Personal Care Product Sustainability Rating System. TSC is a multi-stakeholder organization comprised of leading brands, manufacturers, retailers, and non-profit organizations that represent broad perspectives on sustainability. To build a KPI set that can be deployed across the beauty and personal care industry, TSC acknowledges that members have diverse points of view. As such, the attributes, activities, KPIs, and scoring used in this KPI set represent a composite perspective of the current market and are not necessarily the views, policies, or program of any single member of TSC.
N/AClean Production Action - Chemical Footprint Project: The Chemical Footprint Project (CFP), an initiative of Clean Production Action (CPA), has developed a tool to track and benchmark corporate activities to include safer chemicals in consumer products. The CFP survey also covers chemical selection at the manufacturing and supply chain phases and tracks progress according to four major elements: Management Strategy, Chemical Inventory, Footprint Measurement, and Public disclosure and Verification. https://www.chemicalfootprint.org/Chemical footprint: Defined by the Chemical Footprint Project™ as the total mass of chemicals sold by a company, used in its manufacturing operations and by its suppliers, and contained in packaging that meet any of the following criteria:
• Carcinogenic, mutagenic, or toxic to reproduction (CMR);
• Persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic substance (PBT);
• Any other chemical for which there is scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment that give rise to an equivalent level of concern (for example, an endocrine disruptor or neurotoxicant); or
• A chemical whose breakdown products result in a [chemical] that meets any of the above criteria.
The Chemical Footprint Project™ provides other specific guidance that can be used to identify chemicals that meet these criteria.

Public disclosure - Home and Personal Care: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Air FreshenersFormulation - Chemical selectionFor this KPI, “category” is defined by the Performance Assessment name and description.
Intentionally added ingredients in final formulations are in scope for this KPI.
For this KPI, the threshold for intentionally added chemicals on the stewardship list is 100 ppm. Intentionally added chemicals on the stewardship list below this threshold are not to be considered.
For C, chemicals on the stewardship list are those chemicals on any of the four authoritative and scientific lists referenced below. Even when a list specifies a particular route of exposure, C measures the presence of chemicals on the stewardship list regardless of the route of exposure.
Calculate C as the number of products that you sell in this product category that contain any intentionally added formulation ingredients that are on the stewardship list, divided by the total number of products that your organization sells in this product category, then multiply by 100.
For D, chemicals on the stewardship list are those chemicals on any of the six authoritative and scientific lists referenced below. When a list specifies a particular route of exposure, D measures the presence of chemicals on the stewardship list when that route of route of exposure is relevant to consumers under conditions of instructed use or foreseeable misuse. Foreseeable misuse is limited to consumer misuse during a product’s intended application and does not include exposure from intentional misuse (e.g., ingestion of rinse-off skin products).
Calculate D as the number of products that you sell in this product category that contain any intentionally added formulation ingredients that are on the stewardship list where exposure is relevant, divided by the total number of products that your organization sells in this product category, then multiply by 100.
For D, examples of authoritative or scientific hazard classifications where a route of exposure has been specified include: 1. Ethyl alcohol in alcoholic beverages 2. Titanium dioxide (airborne, unbound particles of respirable size) 3. Silica, crystalline (airborne particles of respirable size) 4. Carbon black (airborne, unbound particles of respirable size)
Example-1: Titanium dioxide
For C, ALL products containing titanium dioxide are to be included in the numerator of the calculation.
For D, for products containing titanium dioxide (unbound particles of respirable size), ONLY those products that can become airborne during instructed consumer use or foreseeable misuse are to be included in the numerator of the calculation.
Example-2: Ethyl alcohol
For C, ALL products containing ethyl alcohol are to be included in the numerator of the calculation. For D, for products containing ethyl alcohol, ONLY those products that are ingested under conditions of instructed use or foreseeable misuse are to be included in the numerator of the calculation.
For product categories without intentionally added formulation ingredients that are on the stewardship list with or without a specified route of exposure, enter zero for C.
For product categories without intentionally added formulation ingredients that are on the stewardship list, enter zero for C and D.
The stewardship list is comprised of the following lists which describe the conditions under which the identified chemicals can or cannot be used. If a chemical on a stewardship list is listed with a qualifying statement on production, exposure, or threshold, the statement should be considered for this KPI.
• CA EPA Prop 65 - Reproductive and Developmental Toxicants, Carcinogens
• EPA Toxics Release Inventory PBTs
• EU REACH - Annex XVII CMRs (Appendices 1 - 6)
• IARC - Groups 1, 2A, 2B
These published lists have been referenced in public retailer chemical policies.
This KPI set was developed by The Sustainability Consortium to be aligned with the Beauty and Personal Care Product Sustainability Rating System. TSC is a multi-stakeholder organization comprised of leading brands, manufacturers, retailers, and non-profit organizations that represent broad perspectives on sustainability. To build a KPI set that can be deployed across the beauty and personal care industry, TSC acknowledges that members have diverse points of view. As such, the attributes, activities, KPIs, and scoring used in this KPI set represent a composite perspective of the current market and are not necessarily the views, policies, or program of any single member of TSC.
EPA - Safer Choice: The EPA Safer Choice program (previously Design for the Environment) provides a voluntary standard for product designers who wish to choose ingredients based on established criteria. In this program, all ingredients are reviewed and must meet strict criteria for various impacts (e.g., human health and the environment, carcinogenicity, reproductive/developmental toxicity). Products meeting the standard are able to carry the Safer Choice label. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS): GHS provides specific human and environmental health criteria along with physical hazard criteria for chemicals in industry. These criteria are used for hazard communication and labeling of chemicals. https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/global.html
N/AContaminants: Naturally occurring impurities present in procured raw materials that are unintentionally incorporated into final formulations where they provide no function.

Incidental chemicals: Chemicals in raw materials present as a result of processing or for stabilization such as catalysts, solvents, residual monomers, reactive by-products, and raw material preservatives.

Intentionally added chemical: A chemical that provides a function to the final formulation during consumer use or is present as a result of formulating a product for safe use by consumers (e.g., pH balancing by acids or bases).

Unintentionally added ingredient: An ingredient that provides no function in a final formulation and is not present as a result of formulating a product for safe use by consumers (e.g., pH balancing by acids or bases). Unintentionally added ingredients include chemical contaminants (naturally occurring impurities present in procured raw materials that are unintentionally incorporated into final formulations where they provide no function) and incidental chemicals (chemicals in raw materials present as a result of processing or for stabilization such as catalysts, solvents, residual monomers, reactive by-products, and raw material preservatives).
Air FreshenersFragrance safety - IFRA StandardsFor (C), fragrances used in products must meet at the time of production with the prohibitions, restrictions, and specifications set forth by the most recent International Fragrance Association (IFRA) Standards.
For (D), restrictions that further limit potential sensitizers and allergens include those which prohibit or restrict ingredients to levels below those set forth by the most recent IFRA Standards.
International Fragrance Association (IFRA) Standards: According to this website, "The IFRA Standards form the basis for the globally accepted and recognized risk management system for the safe use of fragrance ingredients and are part of the IFRA Code of Practice. This self-regulating body of industry partners developed a set of risk-based assessments and are institutionalized by an independent Expert Panel." http://www.ifraorg.org/en-us/standards#.UikMpzasiSoIFRA Code of Practice: The International Fragrance Association (IFRA) code of practice for compliance of fragrances and products with fragrances with relevant legislation, national and/or international. https://ifrafragrance.org/safe-use/code-of-practice-newSensitizer: A chemical that induces a specific immune cell memory response by repeated allergen exposure which later results in an elicitation of an allergic immune system response in sensitized individuals that may be exposed to the sensitizer, typically at lower levels than during induction.
Air FreshenersGreenhouse gas - Supply chainScope 1, 2, and 3 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B as the spend on ingredient suppliers for air freshener products sold that reported scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions, divided by total spend on all ingredient suppliers for air freshener products sold, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
If suppliers responded to the most recent CDP Climate Change questionnaire you may refer to each supplier's CDP Climate Change responses to determine if they report emissions.
For C, public disclosure must have occurred within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Resources that can be used to establish and track greenhouse gas reduction goals include, but are not limited to, the Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard and GRI Performance Indicators.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools
The Global Reporting Initiative: The Global Reporting Initiative provides guidance globally on sustainable reporting standards. https://www.globalreporting.org/how-to-use-the-gri-standards/resource-center/Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.
Air FreshenersGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chain, printed wiring boardsScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate C1 as the total spend on printed wiring boards suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total spend on all printed wiring boards suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers responded to the most recent CDP Climate Change questionnaire you may refer to each supplier's CDP Climate Change responses to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Air FreshenersIngredient disclosure - Business to consumerThe scope of this question includes intentionally added ingredients.
Calculate B1 as the number of units sold for which you disclose ingredient identity online or via telephone, divided by the total number of units sold, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B2 as the number of units sold for which you disclose ingredient identity on-label divided by the total number of units sold, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B3 as the number of units sold for which you have disclosed information (online, via telephone, or on-label) about the functionality of the ingredients, divided by the total number of units sold, then multiply by 100.
For B1 - B3, when products have been bundled for sale under one SKU number or UPC code, the numerator should reflect the total number of product units sold, however bundled.
For B1 Online disclosure includes disclosure via websites, SmartLabel(TM), QR code at shelf, mobile apps, or similar measures. Telephone disclosure must be provided by a toll-free phone number on a product label for consumers to call to obtain ingredient information. Ingredients must be listed using a specific naming convention (e.g., CAS, IUPAC, HCPA Ingredient Dictionary, or common chemical name).
Where needed to ensure the protection of confidential business information, chemical function or chemical class labels may be used. Fragrances can reference a list or subset list of the ingredients authored by the International Fragrance Association (IFRA) or a "palette list" that represents the fragrance materials used in the product.
Ingredient functionality disclosure includes a statement of the function, or purpose, of the ingredient used in your product. The function is to be determined by the manufacturer and can be disclosed either online, via telephone, or on-label.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
American Cleaning Institute (ACI) Ingredient Central: ?In collaboration with the Household & Commercial Products Association (HCPA) and the Canadian Consumer Specialty Products Association (CCSPA), the American Cleaning Institute (ACI) has developed an ingredient communication initiative that provides consumers with ingredient information for four main product categories: air care, automotive care, cleaning, and polishes and floor maintenance products. https://www.cleaninginstitute.org/ingredient_central/

EPA Safer Choice Program: EPA developed the Safer Choice program in which companies can voluntarily participate by researching and reformulating their product to meet Safer Choice standards in order to earn the Safer Choice Label on their products. Safer Choice reviews the formulation of ingredients in terms of environmental and human health risk, and characteristics of concern within a functional class against the Master and Functional-Class Criteria documents. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
N/AN/A
Air FreshenersIngredient disclosure to manufacturersBoth intentionally and unintentionally added ingredients in final formulations are in scope for this KPI.
For D and E, chemicals that are reasonably expected to be present include intentionally and unintentionally added ingredients present above trace quantities where the manufacturer knows or should reasonably know of such ingredients, impurities, or contaminants, unless they are withheld as confidential business information (adapted from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation).
For D, the limit of detection is 100 ppm. Chemicals that are reasonably expected to be present at levels lower than 100 ppm are not included.
For E, chemicals that are reasonably expected to be present at detectable levels are included.
The stewardship list is comprised of the following lists which describe the conditions under which the identified chemicals can or cannot be used. If a chemical on a stewardship list is listed with a qualifying statement on production, exposure, or threshold, the statement should be considered for this KPI.
• CA EPA Prop 65 - Reproductive and Developmental Toxicants, Carcinogens
• EPA Toxics Release Inventory PBTs
• EU REACH - Annex XVII CMRs (Appendices 1 - 6)
• IARC - Groups 1, 2A, 2B
These published lists have been referenced in public retailer chemical policies.
Where a chemical is accompanied by a specific route of exposure on these published lists and the exposure route is relevant to the product during consumer use or foreseeable misuse, then the chemical is relevant to this KPI.
This KPI set was developed by The Sustainability Consortium to be aligned with the Beauty and Personal Care Product Sustainability Rating System. TSC is a multi-stakeholder organization comprised of leading brands, manufacturers, retailers, and non-profit organizations that represent broad perspectives on sustainability. To build a KPI set that can be deployed across the beauty and personal care industry, TSC acknowledges that members have diverse points of view. As such, the attributes, activities, KPIs, and scoring used in this KPI set represent a composite perspective of the current market and are not necessarily the views, policies, or program of any single member of TSC.
The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS): GHS provides specific human and environmental health criteria along with physical hazard criteria for chemicals in industry. These criteria are used for hazard communication and labeling of chemicals. https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/global.htmlN/AIntentionally added ingredient: A chemical that provides a function to the final formulation during consumer use or is present as a result of formulating a product for safe use by consumers (e.g., pH balancing by acids or bases).

Limit of detection: Defined by the IUPAC Compendium of Chemical Terminology, 2nd ed. (the "Gold Book") as: "[the concentration, or the quantity, derived from the smallest measure that can be detected with reasonable certainty for a given analytical procedure.]"

Unintentionally added ingredient: An ingredient that provides no function in a final formulation and is not present as a result of formulating a product for safe use by consumers (e.g., pH balancing by acids or bases). Unintentionally added ingredients include chemical contaminants (naturally occurring impurities present in procured raw materials that are unintentionally incorporated into final formulations where they provide no function) and incidental chemicals (chemicals in raw materials present as a result of processing or for stabilization such as catalysts, solvents, residual monomers, reactive by-products, and raw material preservatives).
Air FreshenersPackaging - Design, policy, and goalsFor this KPI, resources that can be used to establish goals and track progress on weight or volume optimization of packaging include, but are not limited to, assessment of packaging against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\) or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\). Life cycle impact assessment can be used to establish goals and track progress on environmental impact reduction.
For E, methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment or assessment against ISO Standard 14040.
For B, an assessment of material efficiency and weight or volume optimization must have been made.
For D, goals must have been established based on these assessments.
EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

ISO 14040: ISO 14040 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Principles and Framework" document for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/37456.html

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging - Design, policy, and goals KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging - Design, policy, and goals KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520106433
N/AEnvironmental impact: Any change to the environment, whether adverse or beneficial, wholly or partially resulting from an organization's activities, products or services. (ISO definition)

Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency - Home and Personal Care: The practice of minimizing material use and waste in production processes.

Public disclosure - Home and Personal Care: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)
Air FreshenersPackaging - Recycle LabelingCalculate C1 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

Recycle Now: Recycle Now is the national recycling effort in England. The website contains examples of recycling labels that may be used on packaging and how to interpret them. http://www.recyclenow.com/recycle/packaging-symbols-explained

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging
Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.
Air FreshenersPackaging - Sustainable SourcingFor this KPI, “category” is defined by the Performance Assessment name and description.
The total point value earned for C - G equals the total percentage of PCR, PIR, and sustainably sourced renewable content across all materials multiplied by 0.8. This value is calculated by:
% wood/paper composition × (% PCR or PIR content + % sustainably sourced renewable content)
+ % plastic composition × (% PCR content + % PIR content + % sustainably sourced renewable content)
+ % glass composition × (% PCR content + % PIR content) + % metal composition × (% PCR content + % PIR content)
+ % other materials composition × (% PCR content + % PIR content + % sustainably sourced renewable content)
For example, if the total percentage of PCR, PIR, or sustainably sourced renewable content across all materials is 25%, then the points earned for D - H would be 25% × 0.8 points available = 0.2 points earned.
Product sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer, is to be considered. For products that are shipped directly to an end consumer, include the transportation-related packaging.
Perform the calculations for this KPI in two steps:
Step 1. Enter the percentage composition, by mass, for each component type in this product category’s sales packaging:
• C1: Wood or paper
• D1: Plastic
• E1: Glass
• F1: Metal
• G1: Other materials
Step 2. Enter the percentage by mass for each material type in this product category’s sales packaging that is PCR, PIR, or sustainably sourced renewable content. For this step, be sure to enter the percentage of content based on each respective component type. Do not enter percentages based on the total mass of this product's category’s sales packaging.
• C2: Post-consumer or post-industrial recycled content
• D2, E2, F2, G2: Post-consumer recycled content
• D3, E3, F3, G3: Post-industrial recycled content
• C3, D4, G4: Sustainably sourced renewable content
For this KPI, post-consumer recycled content is defined by ISO 14021 or the Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0 and post-industrial (pre-consumer) recycled content is defined by ISO 14021. Sustainably sourced renewable content is defined by the Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0. Sustainable sourcing may be demonstrated by second or third party verification that the raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities.
Calculate C1, D1, E1, F1, and G1, as the mass of packaging composition for each component type in this product category’s sales packaging, divided by the total mass of this product category’s sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
For G1, "other materials" include, but are not limited to, textile packaging.
Calculate D2, E2, F2, and G2 as the mass of post-consumer recycled content for each component type in this product category’s sales packaging, divided by the total mass of each respective component type in this product category’s sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
For C2, sum the mass of post-consumer recycled and post-industrial recycled wood or paper content in this product category’s sales packaging and divide this value by the total mass of wood or paper in this product category’s sales packaging.
Calculate D3, E3, F3, and G3 as the mass of post-industrial recycled content for each component type in this product category’s sales packaging, divided by the total mass of each respective component type in this product category’s sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3, D4, and G4 as the mass of sustainably sourced renewable content for each component type in this product category’s sales packaging, divided by the total mass of each respective component type in this product category’s sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

ISO 14021: ISO 14021 (Environmental labels and declarations -- Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling)) provides measurement standards for determining how recyclable a particular product is. https://www.iso.org/standard/66652.html

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/
N/APost-consumer recycled (PCR) content: Materials obtained from a product that has been disposed of after its intended consumer use.

Post-industrial recycled (PIR) content: Materials obtained from a manufacturing process that has been disposed of after its intended use.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably sourced renewable content: Materials obtained from living biomass that is continually replenished at a rate equal to, or greater than, the rate of depletion.
Air FreshenersProduct CertificationsCalculate B1-B3 as the sales of your product that underwent the specified certification, divided by the total sales of the product, them multiply by 100. The sum of B1-B3 may exceed 100% if product has more than one certification.Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

EPA Safer Choice Program: EPA developed the Safer Choice program in which companies can voluntarily participate by researching and reformulating their product to meet Safer Choice standards in order to earn the Safer Choice Label on their products. Safer Choice reviews the formulation of ingredients in terms of environmental and human health risk, and characteristics of concern within a functional class against the Master and Functional-Class Criteria documents. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

Environmental Working Group EWG VERIFIED™ Standard: The Environmental Working Group (EWG) is a non-profit, non-partisan organization dedicated to protecting human health and the environment. EWG produces research and educational guides on health hazards in food and personal care products. Companies work with EWG by disclosing ingredients not listed on labels and manufacturing processes that is then compared to EWG’s strict criteria standards and if they meet the criteria they receive the EWG verified mark. http://www.ewg.org/ewgverified/
N/AN/A
Air FreshenersProduct recycling - Consumer educationFor (C), examples of providing easily accessible information regarding the recyclability of products to consumers include, but are not limited to, those in the Background Information. For (D), labels must have instructions on how to recycle metal canisters when not fully empty as well as when fully empty. For (E), labels must have instructions on how to empty the canister before recycling. N/ATerraCycle - Air Care Recycling Program: TerraCycle is a recycling company that deals with hard to recycle waste and offers free recycling programs and recycling solutions for purchase for almost all forms of waste. One of the programs is the Air Care Recycling program that focuses on the recycling of air freshener products that include wall plug-ins, spray bottles, car fresheners, and aerosol canisters. https://www.terracycle.com/en-US/brigades/febreze#how-it-worksN/A
Air FreshenersRisk assessment and product safetyFinal formulations, not packaging materials, are in scope for this KPI.
For B, ingredient risk assessments must consider the aggregate exposure to individual ingredients from all products that are sold by a manufacturer and arrive at an acceptable margin of safety. These risk assessments should take into account exposure to vulnerable populations such as children under the age of three, the elderly, pregnant and breast-feeding women, and people with compromised immune systems (as described in the EU Cosmetic Products Regulation (EC) No 1223/2009).
Product level risk assessments must be performed for all products that are sold by a manufacturer and must account for interactions between individual ingredients in final formulations to justify safe use by consumers.
Resources for performing risk assessment, formulating products for adequate microbiological protection, and post market safety surveillance include, but are not limited to, those listed in the Background Information for this KPI.
American Cleaning Institute Exposure and Risk Screening Methods: The American Cleaning Institute released their exposure and risk screening document as a guide for brand manufacturers selling cleaning products with relevant human and environmental exposures. https://www.aciscience.org/docs/Consumer_Product_Ingredient_Safety_v2.0.pdf

Australian Industrial Chemicals Introduction Scheme (AICIS): The Australian Industrial Chemicals Introduction Scheme (AICIS)protects the Australian public by assessing chemical risks and sharing information for their safe industrial use. https://www.industrialchemicals.gov.au/

European Chemicals Agency Guidance on Information Requirements and Chemical Safety Assessment (ECHA): This guidance document describes the information requirements under REACH with regard to substance properties, exposure, use and risk management measures, in the context of the chemical safety assessment. https://echa.europa.eu/guidance-documents/guidance-on-information-requirements-and-chemical-safety-assessment

Human and Environmental Risk Assessment (HERA) Initiative: The Human and Environmental Risk Assessment (HERA) project is a voluntary initiative launched by A.I.S.E. and Cefic. This initiative provides a common risk assessment framework for the household cleaning products industry and works towards greater transparency of risk assessment information. http://www.heraproject.com/RiskAssessment.cfm

International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS): The International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS) consolidates science-based peer-reviewed data on chemicals that are used globally into a single database. IPCS’s goal is to aid in the proper and sound management of these chemicals. http://www.inchem.org/
Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR): The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) is part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and is focused on protecting communities from human health impacts associated with exposure to both natural and man-made substances. https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/

Australian Industrial Chemicals Introduction Scheme (AICIS): The Australian Industrial Chemicals Introduction Scheme (AICIS)protects the Australian public by assessing chemical risks and sharing information for their safe industrial use. https://www.industrialchemicals.gov.au/

National Toxicology Program (NTP): The National Toxicology Program (NTP) is an interagency program affiliated across the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services that works to enhance the science of toxicology, its testing methodology, and sharing of information across government entities and scientific communities. NTP also focuses on making this information publicly available. https://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/index.cfm

USA-EPA Human Health Risk Assessment Program: The EPA Human Health Risk Assessment Program (HHRA) studies the human health effects of chemical exposure and their specific impact on biological and physical processes. Their health assessments describe the potential risk to the public. Resources to perform risk assessments are publicly available on their website. https://www.epa.gov/risk/human-health-risk-assessment
Post market surveillance: The practice of monitoring the safety of products after they have been released on the market.

Risk assessment - Home and Personal Care: A systematic process to evaluate the potential risks associated with consumer exposure to individual ingredient hazards or final formulations when used in products under conditions of instructed use or foreseeable misuse.
Air FreshenersTransportation to retailersInclude shipments of your product from final manufacturing facilities to downstream retailers or distributors. Include both company-owned and contracted fleet. Exclude data for return trips. If retailers are responsible for the transportation of some or all of your final product, the retailer may hold the information necessary to calculate your response. It may be made available in a public report or by request.
Calculate B1 as the mass of product transported by carriers that reported emissions, divided by total mass of product transported, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If a supplier completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, you may count that as compliance with this question. Examples of other compliant standards are provided in the Certifications, Standards, & Tools section below.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Transportation and Air Quality: SmartWay: This program provides information about how to improve fuel efficiency in trucking. Carriers can use the SmartWays carbon emission calculator to track and publicly report emissions associated with their trucking operations. https://www.epa.gov/smartway
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Transportation and Air Quality: SmartWay: This program provides information about how to improve fuel efficiency in trucking. Carriers can use the SmartWays carbon emission calculator to track and publicly report emissions associated with their trucking operations. https://www.epa.gov/smartway
N/A
CandlesChemical footprintThe stewardship list is comprised of the following lists which describe the conditions under which the identified chemicals can or cannot be used. If a chemical on a stewardship list is listed with a qualifying statement on production, exposure, or threshold, the statement should be considered for this KPI.
• CA EPA Prop 65 - Reproductive and Developmental Toxicants, Carcinogens
• EPA Toxics Release Inventory PBTs
• EU REACH - Annex XVII CMRs (Appendices 1 - 6)
• IARC - Groups 1, 2A, 2B
These published lists have been referenced in public retailer chemical policies.
Where a chemical is accompanied by a specific route of exposure on these published lists and the exposure route is relevant to the product during consumer use or foreseeable misuse, then the chemical is relevant to this KPI.
For B, the program may be internal to an organization but must measure the chemical footprint as defined by the Chemical Footprint Project (CFP).
For C, the external program must measure the chemical footprint of the organization and must be multi-stakeholder (include representatives from government and/or NGO as well as industry) with transparent methodology and include actors from across the supply chain (raw material suppliers, manufacturers, and retailers).
This KPI set was developed by The Sustainability Consortium to be aligned with the Beauty and Personal Care Product Sustainability Rating System. TSC is a multi-stakeholder organization comprised of leading brands, manufacturers, retailers, and non-profit organizations that represent broad perspectives on sustainability. To build a KPI set that can be deployed across the beauty and personal care industry, TSC acknowledges that members have diverse points of view. As such, the attributes, activities, KPIs, and scoring used in this KPI set represent a composite perspective of the current market and are not necessarily the views, policies, or program of any single member of TSC.
N/AClean Production Action - Chemical Footprint Project: The Chemical Footprint Project (CFP), an initiative of Clean Production Action (CPA), has developed a tool to track and benchmark corporate activities to include safer chemicals in consumer products. The CFP survey also covers chemical selection at the manufacturing and supply chain phases and tracks progress according to four major elements: Management Strategy, Chemical Inventory, Footprint Measurement, and Public disclosure and Verification. https://www.chemicalfootprint.org/Chemical footprint: Defined by the Chemical Footprint Project™ as the total mass of chemicals sold by a company, used in its manufacturing operations and by its suppliers, and contained in packaging that meet any of the following criteria:
• Carcinogenic, mutagenic, or toxic to reproduction (CMR);
• Persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic substance (PBT);
• Any other chemical for which there is scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment that give rise to an equivalent level of concern (for example, an endocrine disruptor or neurotoxicant); or
• A chemical whose breakdown products result in a [chemical] that meets any of the above criteria.
The Chemical Footprint Project™ provides other specific guidance that can be used to identify chemicals that meet these criteria.

Public disclosure - Home and Personal Care: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
CandlesFormulation - Chemical selectionFor this KPI, “category” is defined by the Performance Assessment name and description.
Intentionally added ingredients in final formulations are in scope for this KPI.
For this KPI, the threshold for intentionally added chemicals on the stewardship list is 100 ppm. Intentionally added chemicals on the stewardship list below this threshold are not to be considered.
For C, chemicals on the stewardship list are those chemicals on any of the four authoritative and scientific lists referenced below. Even when a list specifies a particular route of exposure, C measures the presence of chemicals on the stewardship list regardless of the route of exposure.
Calculate C as the number of products that you sell in this product category that contain any intentionally added formulation ingredients that are on the stewardship list, divided by the total number of products that your organization sells in this product category, then multiply by 100.
For D, chemicals on the stewardship list are those chemicals on any of the six authoritative and scientific lists referenced below. When a list specifies a particular route of exposure, D measures the presence of chemicals on the stewardship list when that route of route of exposure is relevant to consumers under conditions of instructed use or foreseeable misuse. Foreseeable misuse is limited to consumer misuse during a product’s intended application and does not include exposure from intentional misuse (e.g., ingestion of rinse-off skin products).
Calculate D as the number of products that you sell in this product category that contain any intentionally added formulation ingredients that are on the stewardship list where exposure is relevant, divided by the total number of products that your organization sells in this product category, then multiply by 100.
For D, examples of authoritative or scientific hazard classifications where a route of exposure has been specified include: 1. Ethyl alcohol in alcoholic beverages 2. Titanium dioxide (airborne, unbound particles of respirable size) 3. Silica, crystalline (airborne particles of respirable size) 4. Carbon black (airborne, unbound particles of respirable size)
Example-1: Titanium dioxide
For C, ALL products containing titanium dioxide are to be included in the numerator of the calculation.
For D, for products containing titanium dioxide (unbound particles of respirable size), ONLY those products that can become airborne during instructed consumer use or foreseeable misuse are to be included in the numerator of the calculation.
Example-2: Ethyl alcohol
For C, ALL products containing ethyl alcohol are to be included in the numerator of the calculation. For D, for products containing ethyl alcohol, ONLY those products that are ingested under conditions of instructed use or foreseeable misuse are to be included in the numerator of the calculation.
For product categories without intentionally added formulation ingredients that are on the stewardship list with or without a specified route of exposure, enter zero for C.
For product categories without intentionally added formulation ingredients that are on the stewardship list, enter zero for C and D.
The stewardship list is comprised of the following lists which describe the conditions under which the identified chemicals can or cannot be used. If a chemical on a stewardship list is listed with a qualifying statement on production, exposure, or threshold, the statement should be considered for this KPI.
• CA EPA Prop 65 - Reproductive and Developmental Toxicants, Carcinogens
• EPA Toxics Release Inventory PBTs
• EU REACH - Annex XVII CMRs (Appendices 1 - 6)
• IARC - Groups 1, 2A, 2B
These published lists have been referenced in public retailer chemical policies.
This KPI set was developed by The Sustainability Consortium to be aligned with the Beauty and Personal Care Product Sustainability Rating System. TSC is a multi-stakeholder organization comprised of leading brands, manufacturers, retailers, and non-profit organizations that represent broad perspectives on sustainability. To build a KPI set that can be deployed across the beauty and personal care industry, TSC acknowledges that members have diverse points of view. As such, the attributes, activities, KPIs, and scoring used in this KPI set represent a composite perspective of the current market and are not necessarily the views, policies, or program of any single member of TSC.
EPA - Safer Choice: The EPA Safer Choice program (previously Design for the Environment) provides a voluntary standard for product designers who wish to choose ingredients based on established criteria. In this program, all ingredients are reviewed and must meet strict criteria for various impacts (e.g., human health and the environment, carcinogenicity, reproductive/developmental toxicity). Products meeting the standard are able to carry the Safer Choice label. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS): GHS provides specific human and environmental health criteria along with physical hazard criteria for chemicals in industry. These criteria are used for hazard communication and labeling of chemicals. https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/global.html
N/AContaminants: Naturally occurring impurities present in procured raw materials that are unintentionally incorporated into final formulations where they provide no function.

Incidental chemicals: Chemicals in raw materials present as a result of processing or for stabilization such as catalysts, solvents, residual monomers, reactive by-products, and raw material preservatives.

Intentionally added chemical: A chemical that provides a function to the final formulation during consumer use or is present as a result of formulating a product for safe use by consumers (e.g., pH balancing by acids or bases).

Unintentionally added ingredient: An ingredient that provides no function in a final formulation and is not present as a result of formulating a product for safe use by consumers (e.g., pH balancing by acids or bases). Unintentionally added ingredients include chemical contaminants (naturally occurring impurities present in procured raw materials that are unintentionally incorporated into final formulations where they provide no function) and incidental chemicals (chemicals in raw materials present as a result of processing or for stabilization such as catalysts, solvents, residual monomers, reactive by-products, and raw material preservatives).
CandlesFragrance safety - IFRA StandardsFor (C), fragrances used in products must meet at the time of production with the prohibitions, restrictions, and specifications set forth by the most recent International Fragrance Association (IFRA) Standards.
For (D), restrictions that further limit potential sensitizers and allergens include those which prohibit or restrict ingredients to levels below those set forth by the most recent IFRA Standards.
International Fragrance Association (IFRA) Standards: According to this website, "The IFRA Standards form the basis for the globally accepted and recognized risk management system for the safe use of fragrance ingredients and are part of the IFRA Code of Practice. This self-regulating body of industry partners developed a set of risk-based assessments and are institutionalized by an independent Expert Panel." http://www.ifraorg.org/en-us/standards#.UikMpzasiSoIFRA Code of Practice: The International Fragrance Association (IFRA) code of practice for compliance of fragrances and products with fragrances with relevant legislation, national and/or international. https://ifrafragrance.org/safe-use/code-of-practice-newSensitizer: A chemical that induces a specific immune cell memory response by repeated allergen exposure which later results in an elicitation of an allergic immune system response in sensitized individuals that may be exposed to the sensitizer, typically at lower levels than during induction.
CandlesGreenhouse gas - Supply chainScope 1, 2, and 3 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B as the spend on ingredient suppliers for air freshener products sold that reported scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions, divided by total spend on all ingredient suppliers for air freshener products sold, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
If suppliers responded to the most recent CDP Climate Change questionnaire you may refer to each supplier's CDP Climate Change responses to determine if they report emissions.
For C, public disclosure must have occurred within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Resources that can be used to establish and track greenhouse gas reduction goals include, but are not limited to, the Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard and GRI Performance Indicators.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools
The Global Reporting Initiative: The Global Reporting Initiative provides guidance globally on sustainable reporting standards. https://www.globalreporting.org/how-to-use-the-gri-standards/resource-center/Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.
CandlesGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chain, printed wiring boardsScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate C1 as the total spend on printed wiring boards suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total spend on all printed wiring boards suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers responded to the most recent CDP Climate Change questionnaire you may refer to each supplier's CDP Climate Change responses to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
CandlesIngredient disclosure - Business to consumerThe scope of this question includes intentionally added ingredients.
Calculate B1 as the number of units sold for which you disclose ingredient identity online or via telephone, divided by the total number of units sold, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B2 as the number of units sold for which you disclose ingredient identity on-label divided by the total number of units sold, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B3 as the number of units sold for which you have disclosed information (online, via telephone, or on-label) about the functionality of the ingredients, divided by the total number of units sold, then multiply by 100.
For B1 - B3, when products have been bundled for sale under one SKU number or UPC code, the numerator should reflect the total number of product units sold, however bundled.
For B1 Online disclosure includes disclosure via websites, SmartLabel(TM), QR code at shelf, mobile apps, or similar measures. Telephone disclosure must be provided by a toll-free phone number on a product label for consumers to call to obtain ingredient information. Ingredients must be listed using a specific naming convention (e.g., CAS, IUPAC, HCPA Ingredient Dictionary, or common chemical name).
Where needed to ensure the protection of confidential business information, chemical function or chemical class labels may be used. Fragrances can reference a list or subset list of the ingredients authored by the International Fragrance Association (IFRA) or a "palette list" that represents the fragrance materials used in the product.
Ingredient functionality disclosure includes a statement of the function, or purpose, of the ingredient used in your product. The function is to be determined by the manufacturer and can be disclosed either online, via telephone, or on-label.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
American Cleaning Institute (ACI) Ingredient Central: ?In collaboration with the Household & Commercial Products Association (HCPA) and the Canadian Consumer Specialty Products Association (CCSPA), the American Cleaning Institute (ACI) has developed an ingredient communication initiative that provides consumers with ingredient information for four main product categories: air care, automotive care, cleaning, and polishes and floor maintenance products. https://www.cleaninginstitute.org/ingredient_central/

EPA Safer Choice Program: EPA developed the Safer Choice program in which companies can voluntarily participate by researching and reformulating their product to meet Safer Choice standards in order to earn the Safer Choice Label on their products. Safer Choice reviews the formulation of ingredients in terms of environmental and human health risk, and characteristics of concern within a functional class against the Master and Functional-Class Criteria documents. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
N/AN/A
CandlesIngredient disclosure to manufacturersBoth intentionally and unintentionally added ingredients in final formulations are in scope for this KPI.
For D and E, chemicals that are reasonably expected to be present include intentionally and unintentionally added ingredients present above trace quantities where the manufacturer knows or should reasonably know of such ingredients, impurities, or contaminants, unless they are withheld as confidential business information (adapted from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation).
For D, the limit of detection is 100 ppm. Chemicals that are reasonably expected to be present at levels lower than 100 ppm are not included.
For E, chemicals that are reasonably expected to be present at detectable levels are included.
The stewardship list is comprised of the following lists which describe the conditions under which the identified chemicals can or cannot be used. If a chemical on a stewardship list is listed with a qualifying statement on production, exposure, or threshold, the statement should be considered for this KPI.
• CA EPA Prop 65 - Reproductive and Developmental Toxicants, Carcinogens
• EPA Toxics Release Inventory PBTs
• EU REACH - Annex XVII CMRs (Appendices 1 - 6)
• IARC - Groups 1, 2A, 2B
These published lists have been referenced in public retailer chemical policies.
Where a chemical is accompanied by a specific route of exposure on these published lists and the exposure route is relevant to the product during consumer use or foreseeable misuse, then the chemical is relevant to this KPI.
This KPI set was developed by The Sustainability Consortium to be aligned with the Beauty and Personal Care Product Sustainability Rating System. TSC is a multi-stakeholder organization comprised of leading brands, manufacturers, retailers, and non-profit organizations that represent broad perspectives on sustainability. To build a KPI set that can be deployed across the beauty and personal care industry, TSC acknowledges that members have diverse points of view. As such, the attributes, activities, KPIs, and scoring used in this KPI set represent a composite perspective of the current market and are not necessarily the views, policies, or program of any single member of TSC.
The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS): GHS provides specific human and environmental health criteria along with physical hazard criteria for chemicals in industry. These criteria are used for hazard communication and labeling of chemicals. https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/global.htmlN/AIntentionally added ingredient: A chemical that provides a function to the final formulation during consumer use or is present as a result of formulating a product for safe use by consumers (e.g., pH balancing by acids or bases).

Limit of detection: Defined by the IUPAC Compendium of Chemical Terminology, 2nd ed. (the "Gold Book") as: "[the concentration, or the quantity, derived from the smallest measure that can be detected with reasonable certainty for a given analytical procedure.]"

Unintentionally added ingredient: An ingredient that provides no function in a final formulation and is not present as a result of formulating a product for safe use by consumers (e.g., pH balancing by acids or bases). Unintentionally added ingredients include chemical contaminants (naturally occurring impurities present in procured raw materials that are unintentionally incorporated into final formulations where they provide no function) and incidental chemicals (chemicals in raw materials present as a result of processing or for stabilization such as catalysts, solvents, residual monomers, reactive by-products, and raw material preservatives).
CandlesPackaging - Design, policy, and goalsFor this KPI, resources that can be used to establish goals and track progress on weight or volume optimization of packaging include, but are not limited to, assessment of packaging against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\) or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\). Life cycle impact assessment can be used to establish goals and track progress on environmental impact reduction.
For E, methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment or assessment against ISO Standard 14040.
For B, an assessment of material efficiency and weight or volume optimization must have been made.
For D, goals must have been established based on these assessments.
EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

ISO 14040: ISO 14040 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Principles and Framework" document for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/37456.html

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging - Design, policy, and goals KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging - Design, policy, and goals KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520106433
N/AEnvironmental impact: Any change to the environment, whether adverse or beneficial, wholly or partially resulting from an organization's activities, products or services. (ISO definition)

Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency - Home and Personal Care: The practice of minimizing material use and waste in production processes.

Public disclosure - Home and Personal Care: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)
CandlesPackaging - Recycle LabelingCalculate C1 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

Recycle Now: Recycle Now is the national recycling effort in England. The website contains examples of recycling labels that may be used on packaging and how to interpret them. http://www.recyclenow.com/recycle/packaging-symbols-explained

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging
Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.
CandlesPackaging - Sustainable SourcingFor this KPI, “category” is defined by the Performance Assessment name and description.
The total point value earned for C - G equals the total percentage of PCR, PIR, and sustainably sourced renewable content across all materials multiplied by 0.8. This value is calculated by:
% wood/paper composition × (% PCR or PIR content + % sustainably sourced renewable content)
+ % plastic composition × (% PCR content + % PIR content + % sustainably sourced renewable content)
+ % glass composition × (% PCR content + % PIR content) + % metal composition × (% PCR content + % PIR content)
+ % other materials composition × (% PCR content + % PIR content + % sustainably sourced renewable content)
For example, if the total percentage of PCR, PIR, or sustainably sourced renewable content across all materials is 25%, then the points earned for D - H would be 25% × 0.8 points available = 0.2 points earned.
Product sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer, is to be considered. For products that are shipped directly to an end consumer, include the transportation-related packaging.
Perform the calculations for this KPI in two steps:
Step 1. Enter the percentage composition, by mass, for each component type in this product category’s sales packaging:
• C1: Wood or paper
• D1: Plastic
• E1: Glass
• F1: Metal
• G1: Other materials
Step 2. Enter the percentage by mass for each material type in this product category’s sales packaging that is PCR, PIR, or sustainably sourced renewable content. For this step, be sure to enter the percentage of content based on each respective component type. Do not enter percentages based on the total mass of this product's category’s sales packaging.
• C2: Post-consumer or post-industrial recycled content
• D2, E2, F2, G2: Post-consumer recycled content
• D3, E3, F3, G3: Post-industrial recycled content
• C3, D4, G4: Sustainably sourced renewable content
For this KPI, post-consumer recycled content is defined by ISO 14021 or the Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0 and post-industrial (pre-consumer) recycled content is defined by ISO 14021. Sustainably sourced renewable content is defined by the Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0. Sustainable sourcing may be demonstrated by second or third party verification that the raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities.
Calculate C1, D1, E1, F1, and G1, as the mass of packaging composition for each component type in this product category’s sales packaging, divided by the total mass of this product category’s sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
For G1, "other materials" include, but are not limited to, textile packaging.
Calculate D2, E2, F2, and G2 as the mass of post-consumer recycled content for each component type in this product category’s sales packaging, divided by the total mass of each respective component type in this product category’s sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
For C2, sum the mass of post-consumer recycled and post-industrial recycled wood or paper content in this product category’s sales packaging and divide this value by the total mass of wood or paper in this product category’s sales packaging.
Calculate D3, E3, F3, and G3 as the mass of post-industrial recycled content for each component type in this product category’s sales packaging, divided by the total mass of each respective component type in this product category’s sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3, D4, and G4 as the mass of sustainably sourced renewable content for each component type in this product category’s sales packaging, divided by the total mass of each respective component type in this product category’s sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

ISO 14021: ISO 14021 (Environmental labels and declarations -- Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling)) provides measurement standards for determining how recyclable a particular product is. https://www.iso.org/standard/66652.html

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/
N/APost-consumer recycled (PCR) content: Materials obtained from a product that has been disposed of after its intended consumer use.

Post-industrial recycled (PIR) content: Materials obtained from a manufacturing process that has been disposed of after its intended use.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably sourced renewable content: Materials obtained from living biomass that is continually replenished at a rate equal to, or greater than, the rate of depletion.
CandlesProduct CertificationsCalculate B1-B3 as the sales of your product that underwent the specified certification, divided by the total sales of the product, them multiply by 100. The sum of B1-B3 may exceed 100% if product has more than one certification.Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

EPA Safer Choice Program: EPA developed the Safer Choice program in which companies can voluntarily participate by researching and reformulating their product to meet Safer Choice standards in order to earn the Safer Choice Label on their products. Safer Choice reviews the formulation of ingredients in terms of environmental and human health risk, and characteristics of concern within a functional class against the Master and Functional-Class Criteria documents. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

Environmental Working Group EWG VERIFIED™ Standard: The Environmental Working Group (EWG) is a non-profit, non-partisan organization dedicated to protecting human health and the environment. EWG produces research and educational guides on health hazards in food and personal care products. Companies work with EWG by disclosing ingredients not listed on labels and manufacturing processes that is then compared to EWG’s strict criteria standards and if they meet the criteria they receive the EWG verified mark. http://www.ewg.org/ewgverified/
N/AN/A
CandlesProduct recycling - Consumer educationFor (C), examples of providing easily accessible information regarding the recyclability of products to consumers include, but are not limited to, those in the Background Information. For (D), labels must have instructions on how to recycle metal canisters when not fully empty as well as when fully empty. For (E), labels must have instructions on how to empty the canister before recycling. N/ATerraCycle - Air Care Recycling Program: TerraCycle is a recycling company that deals with hard to recycle waste and offers free recycling programs and recycling solutions for purchase for almost all forms of waste. One of the programs is the Air Care Recycling program that focuses on the recycling of air freshener products that include wall plug-ins, spray bottles, car fresheners, and aerosol canisters. https://www.terracycle.com/en-US/brigades/febreze#how-it-worksN/A
CandlesRisk assessment and product safetyFinal formulations, not packaging materials, are in scope for this KPI.
For B, ingredient risk assessments must consider the aggregate exposure to individual ingredients from all products that are sold by a manufacturer and arrive at an acceptable margin of safety. These risk assessments should take into account exposure to vulnerable populations such as children under the age of three, the elderly, pregnant and breast-feeding women, and people with compromised immune systems (as described in the EU Cosmetic Products Regulation (EC) No 1223/2009).
Product level risk assessments must be performed for all products that are sold by a manufacturer and must account for interactions between individual ingredients in final formulations to justify safe use by consumers.
Resources for performing risk assessment, formulating products for adequate microbiological protection, and post market safety surveillance include, but are not limited to, those listed in the Background Information for this KPI.
American Cleaning Institute Exposure and Risk Screening Methods: The American Cleaning Institute released their exposure and risk screening document as a guide for brand manufacturers selling cleaning products with relevant human and environmental exposures. https://www.aciscience.org/docs/Consumer_Product_Ingredient_Safety_v2.0.pdf

Australian Industrial Chemicals Introduction Scheme (AICIS): The Australian Industrial Chemicals Introduction Scheme (AICIS)protects the Australian public by assessing chemical risks and sharing information for their safe industrial use. https://www.industrialchemicals.gov.au/

European Chemicals Agency Guidance on Information Requirements and Chemical Safety Assessment (ECHA): This guidance document describes the information requirements under REACH with regard to substance properties, exposure, use and risk management measures, in the context of the chemical safety assessment. https://echa.europa.eu/guidance-documents/guidance-on-information-requirements-and-chemical-safety-assessment

Human and Environmental Risk Assessment (HERA) Initiative: The Human and Environmental Risk Assessment (HERA) project is a voluntary initiative launched by A.I.S.E. and Cefic. This initiative provides a common risk assessment framework for the household cleaning products industry and works towards greater transparency of risk assessment information. http://www.heraproject.com/RiskAssessment.cfm

International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS): The International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS) consolidates science-based peer-reviewed data on chemicals that are used globally into a single database. IPCS’s goal is to aid in the proper and sound management of these chemicals. http://www.inchem.org/
Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR): The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) is part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and is focused on protecting communities from human health impacts associated with exposure to both natural and man-made substances. https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/

Australian Industrial Chemicals Introduction Scheme (AICIS): The Australian Industrial Chemicals Introduction Scheme (AICIS)protects the Australian public by assessing chemical risks and sharing information for their safe industrial use. https://www.industrialchemicals.gov.au/

National Toxicology Program (NTP): The National Toxicology Program (NTP) is an interagency program affiliated across the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services that works to enhance the science of toxicology, its testing methodology, and sharing of information across government entities and scientific communities. NTP also focuses on making this information publicly available. https://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/index.cfm

USA-EPA Human Health Risk Assessment Program: The EPA Human Health Risk Assessment Program (HHRA) studies the human health effects of chemical exposure and their specific impact on biological and physical processes. Their health assessments describe the potential risk to the public. Resources to perform risk assessments are publicly available on their website. https://www.epa.gov/risk/human-health-risk-assessment
Post market surveillance: The practice of monitoring the safety of products after they have been released on the market.

Risk assessment - Home and Personal Care: A systematic process to evaluate the potential risks associated with consumer exposure to individual ingredient hazards or final formulations when used in products under conditions of instructed use or foreseeable misuse.
CandlesTransportation to retailersInclude shipments of your product from final manufacturing facilities to downstream retailers or distributors. Include both company-owned and contracted fleet. Exclude data for return trips. If retailers are responsible for the transportation of some or all of your final product, the retailer may hold the information necessary to calculate your response. It may be made available in a public report or by request.
Calculate B1 as the mass of product transported by carriers that reported emissions, divided by total mass of product transported, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If a supplier completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, you may count that as compliance with this question. Examples of other compliant standards are provided in the Certifications, Standards, & Tools section below.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Transportation and Air Quality: SmartWay: This program provides information about how to improve fuel efficiency in trucking. Carriers can use the SmartWays carbon emission calculator to track and publicly report emissions associated with their trucking operations. https://www.epa.gov/smartway
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Transportation and Air Quality: SmartWay: This program provides information about how to improve fuel efficiency in trucking. Carriers can use the SmartWays carbon emission calculator to track and publicly report emissions associated with their trucking operations. https://www.epa.gov/smartway
N/A
DiapersBleaching chemicals - Virgin fluff pulp productionCalculate C1 as the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply which was produced using elemental chlorine, divided by the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was produced using ECF or enhanced ECF processes, divided by the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was produced using PCF processes divided by the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was produced using TCF processes, divided by the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C5 as the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was not bleached, divided by the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
The sum of C1, C2, C3, C4, and C5 must not exceed 100%.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Include both wet lap and air dry pulps.
N/AN/AN/A
DiapersCertification - Virgin fluff pulpCalculate C1 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that only underwent third-party legality verification, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100. Do not include in this calculation any supply that is included under one of the other response options.
Calculate C2 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that had FSC Controlled Wood certification, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was certified to the SFI Fiber Sourcing Standard or sourced under a PEFC-Due Diligence System, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was FSC-certified, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C5 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was SFI-certified or certified under another PEFC-endorsed program, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
The sum of C1, C2, C3, C4, and C5 must not exceed 100%. Do not include the same fluff pulp supply in the calculation of more than one response option. The last day of the 12-month reporting period must be within 12 months of the completion date of this question.
CERFLOR - Brazilian Forest Certification Program: This organization is an independent, third-party certification program that focuses on sustainable management of natural and planted Amazonian tropical forests. CERFLOR is a PEFC-endorsed certification. https://www.pefc.org/discover-pefc/our-pefc-members/national-members/brazilian-forest-certification-programme-cerflor

CSA - Canadian Standards Association: CSA Group is an internationally-accredited standards development and testing and certification organization that provides consumer product evaluation, education, and training services dedicated to advancing safety, sustainability, and social good. Some programs include environmental product performance, management systems and processes, registry services, worker and workplace safety, energy efficiency verification, and greenhouse gas clean projects. Programs specific to wood sourcing are outlined in Canada's National Standard for Sustainable Forest Management. CSA is a PEFC-endorsed program. http://www.csagroup.org/

EU Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade Volunteer Partnership Agreement: Voluntary Partnership Agreements (VPAs) are a central element of the EU's strategy in the fight against illegal logging. A VPA is a bilateral trade agreement between the EU and a timber-exporting country outside the EU. https://www.euflegt.efi.int/vpa

FSC Forest Certification: Products with FSC certification come from responsibly managed forests that provide environmental, social, and economic benefits. The following website provides more information related to the principles that guide the certification process. https://us.fsc.org/en-us/certification

Forest Legality Alliance's Risk Tool: This tool is designed to present useful information about the sourcing of forest products. You can search the tool's content by country or by species to find specific information.? https://forestlegality.org/risk-tool/

PEFC - Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification: The Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC) provides guidance for integrating best practices for the entire forest supply chain to ensure that timber and non-timber forest products are produced with consideration of ecological, social, and ethical standards. http://www.pefc.org

Rainforest Alliance Legality Verification: The Rainforest Alliance's legality verification standards verify the legality of the wood at the forest level and ensures the traceability of legal timber at all points in the supply chain (Chain of Custody). http://www.rainforest-alliance.org/business/forestry/verification/legal

SFI - Sustainable Forestry Initiative - Standard: The SFI Standard addresses sustainable forest management and responsible sourcing. SFI also has a chain of custody standard to track wood and paper flow through the supply chain. SFI is a PEFC-endorsed program. https://forests.org/sficertifiedsourcingstandard/
N/AN/A
DiapersGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate C1 as the total spend on polymers (e.g., polypropylene, polyethylene, superabsorbent polymer) from suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total spend on all polymers (e.g., polypropylene, polyethylene, superabsorbent polymer) from suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers responded to the most recent CDP Climate Change questionnaire you may refer to each supplier's CDP Climate Change responses to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
DiapersGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the revenue from each product.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the revenue from final product produced. If the manufacturing facilities produce more than one category of product, only weight using revenue data specific to the product category in question.
Calculate B2 as the revenue from final products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total revenue from final products, then multiply by 100. For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the most recent CDP Climate Change questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response. The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardGreenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
DiapersPackaging Raw Material SourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
ISO 18604: ISO 18604 (Packaging and the environment -- Material recycling) provides measurement standards for determining how recyclable a particular product is. https://www.iso.org/standard/55872.html

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Renewable material: “Material that is composed of biomass from a living source and that can be continually replenished. To be defined as renewable, virgin materials shall come from sources which are replenished at a rate equal to or greater than the rate of depletion.” (FTC Green Guides:2012)

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably-sourced material: Material for which it can be demonstrated through second- or third-party verification that the virgin raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities. Materials such as paper can be included in this definition if the source of the packaging content comes from sustainably-managed forests with no deforestation.
DiapersProduct CertificationsCalculate B1-B3 as the sales of your product that underwent the specified certification, divided by the total sales of the product, them multiply by 100. The sum of B1-B3 may exceed 100% if product has more than one certification.Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

EPA Safer Choice Program: EPA developed the Safer Choice program in which companies can voluntarily participate by researching and reformulating their product to meet Safer Choice standards in order to earn the Safer Choice Label on their products. Safer Choice reviews the formulation of ingredients in terms of environmental and human health risk, and characteristics of concern within a functional class against the Master and Functional-Class Criteria documents. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

Environmental Working Group EWG VERIFIED™ Standard: The Environmental Working Group (EWG) is a non-profit, non-partisan organization dedicated to protecting human health and the environment. EWG produces research and educational guides on health hazards in food and personal care products. Companies work with EWG by disclosing ingredients not listed on labels and manufacturing processes that is then compared to EWG’s strict criteria standards and if they meet the criteria they receive the EWG verified mark. http://www.ewg.org/ewgverified/
N/AN/A
DiapersSustainable Packaging Design and ProductionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

Recycle Now: Recycle Now is the national recycling effort in England. The website contains examples of recycling labels that may be used on packaging and how to interpret them. http://www.recyclenow.com/recycle/packaging-symbols-explained

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: The practice of minimizing material use and waste in production processes.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
Baby WipesBleaching chemicals - Virgin fluff pulp productionCalculate C1 as the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply which was produced using elemental chlorine, divided by the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was produced using ECF or enhanced ECF processes, divided by the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was produced using PCF processes divided by the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was produced using TCF processes, divided by the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C5 as the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was not bleached, divided by the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
The sum of C1, C2, C3, C4, and C5 must not exceed 100%.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Include both wet lap and air dry pulps.
N/AN/AN/A
Baby WipesCertification - Virgin fluff pulp fiberCalculate C1 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp fiber supply that only underwent third-party legality verification, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp fiber supply, then multiply by 100. Do not include in this calculation any supply that is included under one of the other response options.
Calculate C2 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp fiber supply that had FSC Controlled Wood certification, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp fiber supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp fiber supply that was certified to the SFI Fiber Sourcing Standard or sourced under a PEFC-Due Diligence System, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp fiber supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp fiber supply that was FSC-certified, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp fiber supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C5 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp fiber supply that was SFI-certified or certified under another PEFC-endorsed program, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp fiber supply, then multiply by 100.
The sum of C1, C2, C3, C4, and C5 must not exceed 100%. Do not include the same fluff pulp fiber supply in the calculation of more than one response option. The last day of the 12-month reporting period must be within 12 months of the completion date of this question.
CERFLOR - Brazilian Forest Certification Program: This organization is an independent, third-party certification program that focuses on sustainable management of natural and planted Amazonian tropical forests. CERFLOR is a PEFC-endorsed certification. https://www.pefc.org/discover-pefc/our-pefc-members/national-members/brazilian-forest-certification-programme-cerflor

CSA - Canadian Standards Association: CSA Group is an internationally-accredited standards development and testing and certification organization that provides consumer product evaluation, education, and training services dedicated to advancing safety, sustainability, and social good. Some programs include environmental product performance, management systems and processes, registry services, worker and workplace safety, energy efficiency verification, and greenhouse gas clean projects. Programs specific to wood sourcing are outlined in Canada's National Standard for Sustainable Forest Management. CSA is a PEFC-endorsed program. http://www.csagroup.org/

EU Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade Volunteer Partnership Agreement: Voluntary Partnership Agreements (VPAs) are a central element of the EU's strategy in the fight against illegal logging. A VPA is a bilateral trade agreement between the EU and a timber-exporting country outside the EU. https://www.euflegt.efi.int/vpa

FSC Forest Certification: Products with FSC certification come from responsibly managed forests that provide environmental, social, and economic benefits. The following website provides more information related to the principles that guide the certification process. https://us.fsc.org/en-us/certification

Forest Legality Alliance's Risk Tool: This tool is designed to present useful information about the sourcing of forest products. You can search the tool's content by country or by species to find specific information.? https://forestlegality.org/risk-tool/

PEFC - Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification: The Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC) provides guidance for integrating best practices for the entire forest supply chain to ensure that timber and non-timber forest products are produced with consideration of ecological, social, and ethical standards. http://www.pefc.org

Rainforest Alliance Legality Verification: The Rainforest Alliance's legality verification standards verify the legality of the wood at the forest level and ensures the traceability of legal timber at all points in the supply chain (Chain of Custody). http://www.rainforest-alliance.org/business/forestry/verification/legal

SFI - Sustainable Forestry Initiative - Standard: The SFI Standard addresses sustainable forest management and responsible sourcing. SFI also has a chain of custody standard to track wood and paper flow through the supply chain. SFI is a PEFC-endorsed program. https://forests.org/sficertifiedsourcingstandard/
N/AN/A
Baby WipesChemical footprintThe stewardship list is comprised of the following lists which describe the conditions under which the identified chemicals can or cannot be used. If a chemical on a stewardship list is listed with a qualifying statement on production, exposure, or threshold, the statement should be considered for this KPI.
• CA EPA Prop 65 - Reproductive and Developmental Toxicants, Carcinogens
• EPA Toxics Release Inventory PBTs
• EU REACH - Annex XVII CMRs (Appendices 1 - 6)
• IARC - Groups 1, 2A, 2B
These published lists have been referenced in public retailer chemical policies.
Where a chemical is accompanied by a specific route of exposure on these published lists and the exposure route is relevant to the product during consumer use or foreseeable misuse, then the chemical is relevant to this KPI.
For B, the program may be internal to an organization but must measure the chemical footprint as defined by the Chemical Footprint Project (CFP).
For C, the external program must measure the chemical footprint of the organization and must be multi-stakeholder (include representatives from government and/or NGO as well as industry) with transparent methodology and include actors from across the supply chain (raw material suppliers, manufacturers, and retailers).
This KPI set was developed by The Sustainability Consortium to be aligned with the Beauty and Personal Care Product Sustainability Rating System. TSC is a multi-stakeholder organization comprised of leading brands, manufacturers, retailers, and non-profit organizations that represent broad perspectives on sustainability. To build a KPI set that can be deployed across the beauty and personal care industry, TSC acknowledges that members have diverse points of view. As such, the attributes, activities, KPIs, and scoring used in this KPI set represent a composite perspective of the current market and are not necessarily the views, policies, or program of any single member of TSC.
N/AClean Production Action - Chemical Footprint Project: The Chemical Footprint Project (CFP), an initiative of Clean Production Action (CPA), has developed a tool to track and benchmark corporate activities to include safer chemicals in consumer products. The CFP survey also covers chemical selection at the manufacturing and supply chain phases and tracks progress according to four major elements: Management Strategy, Chemical Inventory, Footprint Measurement, and Public disclosure and Verification. https://www.chemicalfootprint.org/Chemical footprint: Defined by the Chemical Footprint Project™ as the total mass of chemicals sold by a company, used in its manufacturing operations and by its suppliers, and contained in packaging that meet any of the following criteria:
• Carcinogenic, mutagenic, or toxic to reproduction (CMR);
• Persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic substance (PBT);
• Any other chemical for which there is scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment that give rise to an equivalent level of concern (for example, an endocrine disruptor or neurotoxicant); or
• A chemical whose breakdown products result in a [chemical] that meets any of the above criteria.
The Chemical Footprint Project™ provides other specific guidance that can be used to identify chemicals that meet these criteria.

Public disclosure - Home and Personal Care: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Baby WipesChemical recovery and recyclingExamples of chemical recovery and recycling during cellulosic fiber production include, but are not limited to, recovery of water, solvent, zinc, alkalis, and/or acids for reuse.N/AN/AN/A
Baby WipesFormulation - Chemical selectionFor this KPI, “category” is defined by the Performance Assessment name and description.
Intentionally added ingredients in final formulations are in scope for this KPI.
For this KPI, the threshold for intentionally added chemicals on the stewardship list is 100 ppm. Intentionally added chemicals on the stewardship list below this threshold are not to be considered.
For C, chemicals on the stewardship list are those chemicals on any of the four authoritative and scientific lists referenced below. Even when a list specifies a particular route of exposure, C measures the presence of chemicals on the stewardship list regardless of the route of exposure.
Calculate C as the number of products that you sell in this product category that contain any intentionally added formulation ingredients that are on the stewardship list, divided by the total number of products that your organization sells in this product category, then multiply by 100.
For D, chemicals on the stewardship list are those chemicals on any of the six authoritative and scientific lists referenced below. When a list specifies a particular route of exposure, D measures the presence of chemicals on the stewardship list when that route of route of exposure is relevant to consumers under conditions of instructed use or foreseeable misuse. Foreseeable misuse is limited to consumer misuse during a product’s intended application and does not include exposure from intentional misuse (e.g., ingestion of rinse-off skin products).
Calculate D as the number of products that you sell in this product category that contain any intentionally added formulation ingredients that are on the stewardship list where exposure is relevant, divided by the total number of products that your organization sells in this product category, then multiply by 100.
For D, examples of authoritative or scientific hazard classifications where a route of exposure has been specified include: 1. Ethyl alcohol in alcoholic beverages 2. Titanium dioxide (airborne, unbound particles of respirable size) 3. Silica, crystalline (airborne particles of respirable size) 4. Carbon black (airborne, unbound particles of respirable size)
Example-1: Titanium dioxide
For C, ALL products containing titanium dioxide are to be included in the numerator of the calculation.
For D, for products containing titanium dioxide (unbound particles of respirable size), ONLY those products that can become airborne during instructed consumer use or foreseeable misuse are to be included in the numerator of the calculation.
Example-2: Ethyl alcohol
For C, ALL products containing ethyl alcohol are to be included in the numerator of the calculation. For D, for products containing ethyl alcohol, ONLY those products that are ingested under conditions of instructed use or foreseeable misuse are to be included in the numerator of the calculation.
For product categories without intentionally added formulation ingredients that are on the stewardship list with or without a specified route of exposure, enter zero for C.
For product categories without intentionally added formulation ingredients that are on the stewardship list, enter zero for C and D.
The stewardship list is comprised of the following lists which describe the conditions under which the identified chemicals can or cannot be used. If a chemical on a stewardship list is listed with a qualifying statement on production, exposure, or threshold, the statement should be considered for this KPI.
• CA EPA Prop 65 - Reproductive and Developmental Toxicants, Carcinogens
• EPA Toxics Release Inventory PBTs
• EU REACH - Annex XVII CMRs (Appendices 1 - 6)
• IARC - Groups 1, 2A, 2B
These published lists have been referenced in public retailer chemical policies.
This KPI set was developed by The Sustainability Consortium to be aligned with the Beauty and Personal Care Product Sustainability Rating System. TSC is a multi-stakeholder organization comprised of leading brands, manufacturers, retailers, and non-profit organizations that represent broad perspectives on sustainability. To build a KPI set that can be deployed across the beauty and personal care industry, TSC acknowledges that members have diverse points of view. As such, the attributes, activities, KPIs, and scoring used in this KPI set represent a composite perspective of the current market and are not necessarily the views, policies, or program of any single member of TSC.
EPA - Safer Choice: The EPA Safer Choice program (previously Design for the Environment) provides a voluntary standard for product designers who wish to choose ingredients based on established criteria. In this program, all ingredients are reviewed and must meet strict criteria for various impacts (e.g., human health and the environment, carcinogenicity, reproductive/developmental toxicity). Products meeting the standard are able to carry the Safer Choice label. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS): GHS provides specific human and environmental health criteria along with physical hazard criteria for chemicals in industry. These criteria are used for hazard communication and labeling of chemicals. https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/global.html
N/AContaminants: Naturally occurring impurities present in procured raw materials that are unintentionally incorporated into final formulations where they provide no function.

Incidental chemicals: Chemicals in raw materials present as a result of processing or for stabilization such as catalysts, solvents, residual monomers, reactive by-products, and raw material preservatives.

Intentionally added chemical: A chemical that provides a function to the final formulation during consumer use or is present as a result of formulating a product for safe use by consumers (e.g., pH balancing by acids or bases).

Unintentionally added ingredient: An ingredient that provides no function in a final formulation and is not present as a result of formulating a product for safe use by consumers (e.g., pH balancing by acids or bases). Unintentionally added ingredients include chemical contaminants (naturally occurring impurities present in procured raw materials that are unintentionally incorporated into final formulations where they provide no function) and incidental chemicals (chemicals in raw materials present as a result of processing or for stabilization such as catalysts, solvents, residual monomers, reactive by-products, and raw material preservatives).
Baby WipesGreenhouse gas - Reduction goalResources that can be used to establish and track greenhouse gas reduction goals include, but are not limited to, the Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard and GRI Performance Indicators.
For B, intensity based goals include, but are not limited to, reducing emissions intensity to a defined amount, interim carbon intensity goals, and increasing non-carbon generating capacity by a target time frame.
For C, an absolute GHG reduction goal is one that is set using one of a number of methodologies, including, but not limited to, those established by the Science Based Targets Initiative.
For D, absolute science based goals are defined by WRI and must be in line with the two degree Celsius temperature limit as described by IPCC.
For E, public disclosure must have occurred within 12 months of the completion date of this questionnaire.
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard

Science Based Targets: This initiative, a collaboration between CDP, World Resources Institute (WRI), the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF), and the United Nations Global Compact (UNGC), and one of the We Mean Business Coalition commitments, aims to showcase and promote science based targets for GHG emission reduction. Science Based Targets sets best practices for science-based target setting, offers resources for adoption, and independently assesses company targets. http://sciencebasedtargets.org/
The Global Reporting Initiative: The Global Reporting Initiative provides guidance globally on sustainable reporting standards. https://www.globalreporting.org/how-to-use-the-gri-standards/resource-center/

World Resources Institute, WRI Report - Target: Intensity: This analysis provides an overview of GHG Intensity targets along with rationales for establishing these targets and an assessment of the environmental effectiveness of establishing and achieving these goals. Complex issues surrounding public interpretation and compliance are also addressed. https://www.wri.org/publication/target-intensity
Absolute GHG reduction goal: A goal for GHG reduction based on a reduction in total emissions expressed as tons of CO2 equivalent per year.

Absolute science based goal: Defined by Science Based Targets as "Targets adopted by companies to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are considered “science-based” if they are in line with the level of decarbonization required to keep global temperature increase below 2 degrees Celsius compared to pre- industrial temperatures, as described in the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC AR5)."

Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.

Intensity based goals: A goal for GHG reduction based on decreased emissions per unit of output (e.g., tons CO2e per unit produced).

Public disclosure - Home and Personal Care: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Baby WipesGreenhouse gas - Supply chainScope 1, 2, and 3 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B as the spend on ingredient suppliers for disposable wipe products sold that reported scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions, divided by total spend on all ingredient suppliers for disposable wipe products sold, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
If suppliers responded to the most recent CDP Climate Change questionnaire you may refer to each supplier's CDP Climate Change responses to determine if they report emissions.
For C, public disclosure must have occurred within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Resources that can be used to establish and track greenhouse gas reduction goals include, but are not limited to, the Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard and GRI Performance Indicators.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools
The Global Reporting Initiative: The Global Reporting Initiative provides guidance globally on sustainable reporting standards. https://www.globalreporting.org/how-to-use-the-gri-standards/resource-center/Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.

Public disclosure - Home and Personal Care: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Baby WipesGreenhouse gas emissions - ManufacturingIf your organization reports to CDP or is able to determine its GHG emissions intensity then answer either B OR C, not both.
Included in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities for disposable wipe products, as well as trace gases released during the manufacture of these products. This may include some or all corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within an organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
For B, enter your most recent CDP Climate Change score for company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities. This score must have been earned within 12 months of the completion date of this questionnaire.
C1 may be calculated using product-specific data or the intensity may be estimated via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate C1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the mass of each product.
If using facility data, calculate C1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the mass in tonnes, of home care products. If the manufacturing facilities produce more than one category of product, only weight using the total weight of production specific to disposable wipe products.
Calculate C2 as the mass of disposable wipe products sold for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total mass of disposable wipe products sold, then multiply by 100. For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the completion date of this questionnaire.
The data required for the most recent CDP Climate Change questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response. The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
N/ACompany-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.

Public disclosure - Home and Personal Care: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Baby WipesIngredient disclosure to manufacturersBoth intentionally and unintentionally added ingredients in final formulations are in scope for this KPI.
For D and E, chemicals that are reasonably expected to be present include intentionally and unintentionally added ingredients present above trace quantities where the manufacturer knows or should reasonably know of such ingredients, impurities, or contaminants, unless they are withheld as confidential business information (adapted from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation).
For D, the limit of detection is 100 ppm. Chemicals that are reasonably expected to be present at levels lower than 100 ppm are not included.
For E, chemicals that are reasonably expected to be present at detectable levels are included.
The stewardship list is comprised of the following lists which describe the conditions under which the identified chemicals can or cannot be used. If a chemical on a stewardship list is listed with a qualifying statement on production, exposure, or threshold, the statement should be considered for this KPI.
• CA EPA Prop 65 - Reproductive and Developmental Toxicants, Carcinogens
• EPA Toxics Release Inventory PBTs
• EU REACH - Annex XVII CMRs (Appendices 1 - 6)
• IARC - Groups 1, 2A, 2B
These published lists have been referenced in public retailer chemical policies.
Where a chemical is accompanied by a specific route of exposure on these published lists and the exposure route is relevant to the product during consumer use or foreseeable misuse, then the chemical is relevant to this KPI.
This KPI set was developed by The Sustainability Consortium to be aligned with the Beauty and Personal Care Product Sustainability Rating System. TSC is a multi-stakeholder organization comprised of leading brands, manufacturers, retailers, and non-profit organizations that represent broad perspectives on sustainability. To build a KPI set that can be deployed across the beauty and personal care industry, TSC acknowledges that members have diverse points of view. As such, the attributes, activities, KPIs, and scoring used in this KPI set represent a composite perspective of the current market and are not necessarily the views, policies, or program of any single member of TSC.
The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS): GHS provides specific human and environmental health criteria along with physical hazard criteria for chemicals in industry. These criteria are used for hazard communication and labeling of chemicals. https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/global.htmlN/AIntentionally added ingredient: A chemical that provides a function to the final formulation during consumer use or is present as a result of formulating a product for safe use by consumers (e.g., pH balancing by acids or bases).

Limit of detection: Defined by the IUPAC Compendium of Chemical Terminology, 2nd ed. (the "Gold Book") as: "[the concentration, or the quantity, derived from the smallest measure that can be detected with reasonable certainty for a given analytical procedure.]"

Unintentionally added ingredient: An ingredient that provides no function in a final formulation and is not present as a result of formulating a product for safe use by consumers (e.g., pH balancing by acids or bases). Unintentionally added ingredients include chemical contaminants (naturally occurring impurities present in procured raw materials that are unintentionally incorporated into final formulations where they provide no function) and incidental chemicals (chemicals in raw materials present as a result of processing or for stabilization such as catalysts, solvents, residual monomers, reactive by-products, and raw material preservatives).
Baby WipesPackaging - Design, policy, and goalsFor this KPI, resources that can be used to establish goals and track progress on weight or volume optimization of packaging include, but are not limited to, assessment of packaging against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\) or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\). Life cycle impact assessment can be used to establish goals and track progress on environmental impact reduction.
For E, methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment or assessment against ISO Standard 14040.
For B, an assessment of material efficiency and weight or volume optimization must have been made.
For D, goals must have been established based on these assessments.
EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

ISO 14040: ISO 14040 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Principles and Framework" document for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/37456.html

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging - Design, policy, and goals KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging - Design, policy, and goals KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520106433
N/AEnvironmental impact: Any change to the environment, whether adverse or beneficial, wholly or partially resulting from an organization's activities, products or services. (ISO definition)

Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency - Home and Personal Care: The practice of minimizing material use and waste in production processes.

Public disclosure - Home and Personal Care: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)
Baby WipesPackaging - Recycle LabelingCalculate C1 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

Recycle Now: Recycle Now is the national recycling effort in England. The website contains examples of recycling labels that may be used on packaging and how to interpret them. http://www.recyclenow.com/recycle/packaging-symbols-explained

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging
Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.
Baby WipesPackaging - Sustainable SourcingFor this KPI, “category” is defined by the Performance Assessment name and description.
The total point value earned for C - G equals the total percentage of PCR, PIR, and sustainably sourced renewable content across all materials multiplied by 0.8. This value is calculated by:
% wood/paper composition × (% PCR or PIR content + % sustainably sourced renewable content)
+ % plastic composition × (% PCR content + % PIR content + % sustainably sourced renewable content)
+ % glass composition × (% PCR content + % PIR content) + % metal composition × (% PCR content + % PIR content)
+ % other materials composition × (% PCR content + % PIR content + % sustainably sourced renewable content)
For example, if the total percentage of PCR, PIR, or sustainably sourced renewable content across all materials is 25%, then the points earned for D - H would be 25% × 0.8 points available = 0.2 points earned.
Product sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer, is to be considered. For products that are shipped directly to an end consumer, include the transportation-related packaging.
Perform the calculations for this KPI in two steps:
Step 1. Enter the percentage composition, by mass, for each component type in this product category’s sales packaging:
• C1: Wood or paper
• D1: Plastic
• E1: Glass
• F1: Metal
• G1: Other materials
Step 2. Enter the percentage by mass for each material type in this product category’s sales packaging that is PCR, PIR, or sustainably sourced renewable content. For this step, be sure to enter the percentage of content based on each respective component type. Do not enter percentages based on the total mass of this product's category’s sales packaging.
• C2: Post-consumer or post-industrial recycled content
• D2, E2, F2, G2: Post-consumer recycled content
• D3, E3, F3, G3: Post-industrial recycled content
• C3, D4, G4: Sustainably sourced renewable content
For this KPI, post-consumer recycled content is defined by ISO 14021 or the Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0 and post-industrial (pre-consumer) recycled content is defined by ISO 14021. Sustainably sourced renewable content is defined by the Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0. Sustainable sourcing may be demonstrated by second or third party verification that the raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities.
Calculate C1, D1, E1, F1, and G1, as the mass of packaging composition for each component type in this product category’s sales packaging, divided by the total mass of this product category’s sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
For G1, "other materials" include, but are not limited to, textile packaging.
Calculate D2, E2, F2, and G2 as the mass of post-consumer recycled content for each component type in this product category’s sales packaging, divided by the total mass of each respective component type in this product category’s sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
For C2, sum the mass of post-consumer recycled and post-industrial recycled wood or paper content in this product category’s sales packaging and divide this value by the total mass of wood or paper in this product category’s sales packaging.
Calculate D3, E3, F3, and G3 as the mass of post-industrial recycled content for each component type in this product category’s sales packaging, divided by the total mass of each respective component type in this product category’s sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3, D4, and G4 as the mass of sustainably sourced renewable content for each component type in this product category’s sales packaging, divided by the total mass of each respective component type in this product category’s sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

ISO 14021: ISO 14021 (Environmental labels and declarations -- Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling)) provides measurement standards for determining how recyclable a particular product is. https://www.iso.org/standard/66652.html

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/
N/APost-consumer recycled (PCR) content: Materials obtained from a product that has been disposed of after its intended consumer use.

Post-industrial recycled (PIR) content: Materials obtained from a manufacturing process that has been disposed of after its intended use.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably sourced renewable content: Materials obtained from living biomass that is continually replenished at a rate equal to, or greater than, the rate of depletion.
Baby WipesProduct CertificationsCalculate B1-B3 as the sales of your product that underwent the specified certification, divided by the total sales of the product, them multiply by 100. The sum of B1-B3 may exceed 100% if product has more than one certification.Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

EPA Safer Choice Program: EPA developed the Safer Choice program in which companies can voluntarily participate by researching and reformulating their product to meet Safer Choice standards in order to earn the Safer Choice Label on their products. Safer Choice reviews the formulation of ingredients in terms of environmental and human health risk, and characteristics of concern within a functional class against the Master and Functional-Class Criteria documents. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

Environmental Working Group EWG VERIFIED™ Standard: The Environmental Working Group (EWG) is a non-profit, non-partisan organization dedicated to protecting human health and the environment. EWG produces research and educational guides on health hazards in food and personal care products. Companies work with EWG by disclosing ingredients not listed on labels and manufacturing processes that is then compared to EWG’s strict criteria standards and if they meet the criteria they receive the EWG verified mark. http://www.ewg.org/ewgverified/
N/AN/A
Baby WipesRisk assessment and product safetyFinal formulations, not packaging materials, are in scope for this KPI.
For B, ingredient risk assessments must consider the aggregate exposure to individual ingredients from all products that are sold by a manufacturer and arrive at an acceptable margin of safety. These risk assessments should take into account exposure to vulnerable populations such as children under the age of three, the elderly, pregnant and breast-feeding women, and people with compromised immune systems (as described in the EU Cosmetic Products Regulation (EC) No 1223/2009).
Product level risk assessments must be performed for all products that are sold by a manufacturer and must account for interactions between individual ingredients in final formulations to justify safe use by consumers.
Resources for performing risk assessment, formulating products for adequate microbiological protection, and post market safety surveillance include, but are not limited to, those listed in the Background Information for this KPI.
American Cleaning Institute Exposure and Risk Screening Methods: The American Cleaning Institute released their exposure and risk screening document as a guide for brand manufacturers selling cleaning products with relevant human and environmental exposures. https://www.aciscience.org/docs/Consumer_Product_Ingredient_Safety_v2.0.pdf

Australian Industrial Chemicals Introduction Scheme (AICIS): The Australian Industrial Chemicals Introduction Scheme (AICIS)protects the Australian public by assessing chemical risks and sharing information for their safe industrial use. https://www.industrialchemicals.gov.au/

European Chemicals Agency Guidance on Information Requirements and Chemical Safety Assessment (ECHA): This guidance document describes the information requirements under REACH with regard to substance properties, exposure, use and risk management measures, in the context of the chemical safety assessment. https://echa.europa.eu/guidance-documents/guidance-on-information-requirements-and-chemical-safety-assessment

Human and Environmental Risk Assessment (HERA) Initiative: The Human and Environmental Risk Assessment (HERA) project is a voluntary initiative launched by A.I.S.E. and Cefic. This initiative provides a common risk assessment framework for the household cleaning products industry and works towards greater transparency of risk assessment information. http://www.heraproject.com/RiskAssessment.cfm

International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS): The International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS) consolidates science-based peer-reviewed data on chemicals that are used globally into a single database. IPCS’s goal is to aid in the proper and sound management of these chemicals. http://www.inchem.org/
Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR): The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) is part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and is focused on protecting communities from human health impacts associated with exposure to both natural and man-made substances. https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/

Australian Industrial Chemicals Introduction Scheme (AICIS): The Australian Industrial Chemicals Introduction Scheme (AICIS)protects the Australian public by assessing chemical risks and sharing information for their safe industrial use. https://www.industrialchemicals.gov.au/

National Toxicology Program (NTP): The National Toxicology Program (NTP) is an interagency program affiliated across the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services that works to enhance the science of toxicology, its testing methodology, and sharing of information across government entities and scientific communities. NTP also focuses on making this information publicly available. https://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/index.cfm

USA-EPA Human Health Risk Assessment Program: The EPA Human Health Risk Assessment Program (HHRA) studies the human health effects of chemical exposure and their specific impact on biological and physical processes. Their health assessments describe the potential risk to the public. Resources to perform risk assessments are publicly available on their website. https://www.epa.gov/risk/human-health-risk-assessment
Post market surveillance: The practice of monitoring the safety of products after they have been released on the market.

Risk assessment - Home and Personal Care: A systematic process to evaluate the potential risks associated with consumer exposure to individual ingredient hazards or final formulations when used in products under conditions of instructed use or foreseeable misuse.
Baby WipesWater use - Formulation raw material suppliersCalculate B as the total spend on ingredient suppliers for your disposable wipe products sold that reported their annual water use, divided by the total spend on all ingredient suppliers for your disposable wipe products sold, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the completion date of this questionnaire.
Supplier water use reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
If suppliers completed CDP's Water Security Questionnaire you may refer to their answers to determine if they report water use.
CDP Water Information Request: The CDP Water Information Request provides questions that assess a company's water use, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. CDP can be contacted to respond to the Water Information Request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/
N/AN/A
Cleaning WipesBleaching chemicals - Virgin fluff pulp productionCalculate C1 as the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply which was produced using elemental chlorine, divided by the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was produced using ECF or enhanced ECF processes, divided by the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was produced using PCF processes divided by the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was produced using TCF processes, divided by the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C5 as the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was not bleached, divided by the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
The sum of C1, C2, C3, C4, and C5 must not exceed 100%.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Include both wet lap and air dry pulps.
N/AN/AN/A
Cleaning WipesCertification - Virgin fluff pulp fiberCalculate C1 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp fiber supply that only underwent third-party legality verification, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp fiber supply, then multiply by 100. Do not include in this calculation any supply that is included under one of the other response options.
Calculate C2 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp fiber supply that had FSC Controlled Wood certification, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp fiber supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp fiber supply that was certified to the SFI Fiber Sourcing Standard or sourced under a PEFC-Due Diligence System, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp fiber supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp fiber supply that was FSC-certified, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp fiber supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C5 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp fiber supply that was SFI-certified or certified under another PEFC-endorsed program, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp fiber supply, then multiply by 100.
The sum of C1, C2, C3, C4, and C5 must not exceed 100%. Do not include the same fluff pulp fiber supply in the calculation of more than one response option. The last day of the 12-month reporting period must be within 12 months of the completion date of this question.
CERFLOR - Brazilian Forest Certification Program: This organization is an independent, third-party certification program that focuses on sustainable management of natural and planted Amazonian tropical forests. CERFLOR is a PEFC-endorsed certification. https://www.pefc.org/discover-pefc/our-pefc-members/national-members/brazilian-forest-certification-programme-cerflor

CSA - Canadian Standards Association: CSA Group is an internationally-accredited standards development and testing and certification organization that provides consumer product evaluation, education, and training services dedicated to advancing safety, sustainability, and social good. Some programs include environmental product performance, management systems and processes, registry services, worker and workplace safety, energy efficiency verification, and greenhouse gas clean projects. Programs specific to wood sourcing are outlined in Canada's National Standard for Sustainable Forest Management. CSA is a PEFC-endorsed program. http://www.csagroup.org/

EU Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade Volunteer Partnership Agreement: Voluntary Partnership Agreements (VPAs) are a central element of the EU's strategy in the fight against illegal logging. A VPA is a bilateral trade agreement between the EU and a timber-exporting country outside the EU. https://www.euflegt.efi.int/vpa

FSC Forest Certification: Products with FSC certification come from responsibly managed forests that provide environmental, social, and economic benefits. The following website provides more information related to the principles that guide the certification process. https://us.fsc.org/en-us/certification

Forest Legality Alliance's Risk Tool: This tool is designed to present useful information about the sourcing of forest products. You can search the tool's content by country or by species to find specific information.? https://forestlegality.org/risk-tool/

PEFC - Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification: The Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC) provides guidance for integrating best practices for the entire forest supply chain to ensure that timber and non-timber forest products are produced with consideration of ecological, social, and ethical standards. http://www.pefc.org

Rainforest Alliance Legality Verification: The Rainforest Alliance's legality verification standards verify the legality of the wood at the forest level and ensures the traceability of legal timber at all points in the supply chain (Chain of Custody). http://www.rainforest-alliance.org/business/forestry/verification/legal

SFI - Sustainable Forestry Initiative - Standard: The SFI Standard addresses sustainable forest management and responsible sourcing. SFI also has a chain of custody standard to track wood and paper flow through the supply chain. SFI is a PEFC-endorsed program. https://forests.org/sficertifiedsourcingstandard/
N/AN/A
Cleaning WipesChemical footprintThe stewardship list is comprised of the following lists which describe the conditions under which the identified chemicals can or cannot be used. If a chemical on a stewardship list is listed with a qualifying statement on production, exposure, or threshold, the statement should be considered for this KPI.
• CA EPA Prop 65 - Reproductive and Developmental Toxicants, Carcinogens
• EPA Toxics Release Inventory PBTs
• EU REACH - Annex XVII CMRs (Appendices 1 - 6)
• IARC - Groups 1, 2A, 2B
These published lists have been referenced in public retailer chemical policies.
Where a chemical is accompanied by a specific route of exposure on these published lists and the exposure route is relevant to the product during consumer use or foreseeable misuse, then the chemical is relevant to this KPI.
For B, the program may be internal to an organization but must measure the chemical footprint as defined by the Chemical Footprint Project (CFP).
For C, the external program must measure the chemical footprint of the organization and must be multi-stakeholder (include representatives from government and/or NGO as well as industry) with transparent methodology and include actors from across the supply chain (raw material suppliers, manufacturers, and retailers).
This KPI set was developed by The Sustainability Consortium to be aligned with the Beauty and Personal Care Product Sustainability Rating System. TSC is a multi-stakeholder organization comprised of leading brands, manufacturers, retailers, and non-profit organizations that represent broad perspectives on sustainability. To build a KPI set that can be deployed across the beauty and personal care industry, TSC acknowledges that members have diverse points of view. As such, the attributes, activities, KPIs, and scoring used in this KPI set represent a composite perspective of the current market and are not necessarily the views, policies, or program of any single member of TSC.
N/AClean Production Action - Chemical Footprint Project: The Chemical Footprint Project (CFP), an initiative of Clean Production Action (CPA), has developed a tool to track and benchmark corporate activities to include safer chemicals in consumer products. The CFP survey also covers chemical selection at the manufacturing and supply chain phases and tracks progress according to four major elements: Management Strategy, Chemical Inventory, Footprint Measurement, and Public disclosure and Verification. https://www.chemicalfootprint.org/Chemical footprint: Defined by the Chemical Footprint Project™ as the total mass of chemicals sold by a company, used in its manufacturing operations and by its suppliers, and contained in packaging that meet any of the following criteria:
• Carcinogenic, mutagenic, or toxic to reproduction (CMR);
• Persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic substance (PBT);
• Any other chemical for which there is scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment that give rise to an equivalent level of concern (for example, an endocrine disruptor or neurotoxicant); or
• A chemical whose breakdown products result in a [chemical] that meets any of the above criteria.
The Chemical Footprint Project™ provides other specific guidance that can be used to identify chemicals that meet these criteria.

Public disclosure - Home and Personal Care: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Cleaning WipesChemical recovery and recyclingExamples of chemical recovery and recycling during cellulosic fiber production include, but are not limited to, recovery of water, solvent, zinc, alkalis, and/or acids for reuse.N/AN/AN/A
Cleaning WipesFormulation - Chemical selectionFor this KPI, “category” is defined by the Performance Assessment name and description.
Intentionally added ingredients in final formulations are in scope for this KPI.
For this KPI, the threshold for intentionally added chemicals on the stewardship list is 100 ppm. Intentionally added chemicals on the stewardship list below this threshold are not to be considered.
For C, chemicals on the stewardship list are those chemicals on any of the four authoritative and scientific lists referenced below. Even when a list specifies a particular route of exposure, C measures the presence of chemicals on the stewardship list regardless of the route of exposure.
Calculate C as the number of products that you sell in this product category that contain any intentionally added formulation ingredients that are on the stewardship list, divided by the total number of products that your organization sells in this product category, then multiply by 100.
For D, chemicals on the stewardship list are those chemicals on any of the six authoritative and scientific lists referenced below. When a list specifies a particular route of exposure, D measures the presence of chemicals on the stewardship list when that route of route of exposure is relevant to consumers under conditions of instructed use or foreseeable misuse. Foreseeable misuse is limited to consumer misuse during a product’s intended application and does not include exposure from intentional misuse (e.g., ingestion of rinse-off skin products).
Calculate D as the number of products that you sell in this product category that contain any intentionally added formulation ingredients that are on the stewardship list where exposure is relevant, divided by the total number of products that your organization sells in this product category, then multiply by 100.
For D, examples of authoritative or scientific hazard classifications where a route of exposure has been specified include: 1. Ethyl alcohol in alcoholic beverages 2. Titanium dioxide (airborne, unbound particles of respirable size) 3. Silica, crystalline (airborne particles of respirable size) 4. Carbon black (airborne, unbound particles of respirable size)
Example-1: Titanium dioxide
For C, ALL products containing titanium dioxide are to be included in the numerator of the calculation.
For D, for products containing titanium dioxide (unbound particles of respirable size), ONLY those products that can become airborne during instructed consumer use or foreseeable misuse are to be included in the numerator of the calculation.
Example-2: Ethyl alcohol
For C, ALL products containing ethyl alcohol are to be included in the numerator of the calculation. For D, for products containing ethyl alcohol, ONLY those products that are ingested under conditions of instructed use or foreseeable misuse are to be included in the numerator of the calculation.
For product categories without intentionally added formulation ingredients that are on the stewardship list with or without a specified route of exposure, enter zero for C.
For product categories without intentionally added formulation ingredients that are on the stewardship list, enter zero for C and D.
The stewardship list is comprised of the following lists which describe the conditions under which the identified chemicals can or cannot be used. If a chemical on a stewardship list is listed with a qualifying statement on production, exposure, or threshold, the statement should be considered for this KPI.
• CA EPA Prop 65 - Reproductive and Developmental Toxicants, Carcinogens
• EPA Toxics Release Inventory PBTs
• EU REACH - Annex XVII CMRs (Appendices 1 - 6)
• IARC - Groups 1, 2A, 2B
These published lists have been referenced in public retailer chemical policies.
This KPI set was developed by The Sustainability Consortium to be aligned with the Beauty and Personal Care Product Sustainability Rating System. TSC is a multi-stakeholder organization comprised of leading brands, manufacturers, retailers, and non-profit organizations that represent broad perspectives on sustainability. To build a KPI set that can be deployed across the beauty and personal care industry, TSC acknowledges that members have diverse points of view. As such, the attributes, activities, KPIs, and scoring used in this KPI set represent a composite perspective of the current market and are not necessarily the views, policies, or program of any single member of TSC.
EPA - Safer Choice: The EPA Safer Choice program (previously Design for the Environment) provides a voluntary standard for product designers who wish to choose ingredients based on established criteria. In this program, all ingredients are reviewed and must meet strict criteria for various impacts (e.g., human health and the environment, carcinogenicity, reproductive/developmental toxicity). Products meeting the standard are able to carry the Safer Choice label. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS): GHS provides specific human and environmental health criteria along with physical hazard criteria for chemicals in industry. These criteria are used for hazard communication and labeling of chemicals. https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/global.html
N/AContaminants: Naturally occurring impurities present in procured raw materials that are unintentionally incorporated into final formulations where they provide no function.

Incidental chemicals: Chemicals in raw materials present as a result of processing or for stabilization such as catalysts, solvents, residual monomers, reactive by-products, and raw material preservatives.

Intentionally added chemical: A chemical that provides a function to the final formulation during consumer use or is present as a result of formulating a product for safe use by consumers (e.g., pH balancing by acids or bases).

Unintentionally added ingredient: An ingredient that provides no function in a final formulation and is not present as a result of formulating a product for safe use by consumers (e.g., pH balancing by acids or bases). Unintentionally added ingredients include chemical contaminants (naturally occurring impurities present in procured raw materials that are unintentionally incorporated into final formulations where they provide no function) and incidental chemicals (chemicals in raw materials present as a result of processing or for stabilization such as catalysts, solvents, residual monomers, reactive by-products, and raw material preservatives).
Cleaning WipesGreenhouse gas - Reduction goalResources that can be used to establish and track greenhouse gas reduction goals include, but are not limited to, the Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard and GRI Performance Indicators.
For B, intensity based goals include, but are not limited to, reducing emissions intensity to a defined amount, interim carbon intensity goals, and increasing non-carbon generating capacity by a target time frame.
For C, an absolute GHG reduction goal is one that is set using one of a number of methodologies, including, but not limited to, those established by the Science Based Targets Initiative.
For D, absolute science based goals are defined by WRI and must be in line with the two degree Celsius temperature limit as described by IPCC.
For E, public disclosure must have occurred within 12 months of the completion date of this questionnaire.
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard

Science Based Targets: This initiative, a collaboration between CDP, World Resources Institute (WRI), the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF), and the United Nations Global Compact (UNGC), and one of the We Mean Business Coalition commitments, aims to showcase and promote science based targets for GHG emission reduction. Science Based Targets sets best practices for science-based target setting, offers resources for adoption, and independently assesses company targets. http://sciencebasedtargets.org/
The Global Reporting Initiative: The Global Reporting Initiative provides guidance globally on sustainable reporting standards. https://www.globalreporting.org/how-to-use-the-gri-standards/resource-center/

World Resources Institute, WRI Report - Target: Intensity: This analysis provides an overview of GHG Intensity targets along with rationales for establishing these targets and an assessment of the environmental effectiveness of establishing and achieving these goals. Complex issues surrounding public interpretation and compliance are also addressed. https://www.wri.org/publication/target-intensity
Absolute GHG reduction goal: A goal for GHG reduction based on a reduction in total emissions expressed as tons of CO2 equivalent per year.

Absolute science based goal: Defined by Science Based Targets as "Targets adopted by companies to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are considered “science-based” if they are in line with the level of decarbonization required to keep global temperature increase below 2 degrees Celsius compared to pre- industrial temperatures, as described in the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC AR5)."

Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.

Intensity based goals: A goal for GHG reduction based on decreased emissions per unit of output (e.g., tons CO2e per unit produced).

Public disclosure - Home and Personal Care: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Cleaning WipesGreenhouse gas - Supply chainScope 1, 2, and 3 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B as the spend on ingredient suppliers for disposable wipe products sold that reported scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions, divided by total spend on all ingredient suppliers for disposable wipe products sold, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
If suppliers responded to the most recent CDP Climate Change questionnaire you may refer to each supplier's CDP Climate Change responses to determine if they report emissions.
For C, public disclosure must have occurred within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Resources that can be used to establish and track greenhouse gas reduction goals include, but are not limited to, the Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard and GRI Performance Indicators.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools
The Global Reporting Initiative: The Global Reporting Initiative provides guidance globally on sustainable reporting standards. https://www.globalreporting.org/how-to-use-the-gri-standards/resource-center/Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.

Public disclosure - Home and Personal Care: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Cleaning WipesGreenhouse gas emissions - ManufacturingIf your organization reports to CDP or is able to determine its GHG emissions intensity then answer either B OR C, not both.
Included in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities for disposable wipe products, as well as trace gases released during the manufacture of these products. This may include some or all corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within an organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
For B, enter your most recent CDP Climate Change score for company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities. This score must have been earned within 12 months of the completion date of this questionnaire.
C1 may be calculated using product-specific data or the intensity may be estimated via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate C1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the mass of each product.
If using facility data, calculate C1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the mass in tonnes, of home care products. If the manufacturing facilities produce more than one category of product, only weight using the total weight of production specific to disposable wipe products.
Calculate C2 as the mass of disposable wipe products sold for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total mass of disposable wipe products sold, then multiply by 100. For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the completion date of this questionnaire.
The data required for the most recent CDP Climate Change questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response. The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
N/ACompany-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.

Public disclosure - Home and Personal Care: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Cleaning WipesIngredient disclosure to manufacturersBoth intentionally and unintentionally added ingredients in final formulations are in scope for this KPI.
For D and E, chemicals that are reasonably expected to be present include intentionally and unintentionally added ingredients present above trace quantities where the manufacturer knows or should reasonably know of such ingredients, impurities, or contaminants, unless they are withheld as confidential business information (adapted from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation).
For D, the limit of detection is 100 ppm. Chemicals that are reasonably expected to be present at levels lower than 100 ppm are not included.
For E, chemicals that are reasonably expected to be present at detectable levels are included.
The stewardship list is comprised of the following lists which describe the conditions under which the identified chemicals can or cannot be used. If a chemical on a stewardship list is listed with a qualifying statement on production, exposure, or threshold, the statement should be considered for this KPI.
• CA EPA Prop 65 - Reproductive and Developmental Toxicants, Carcinogens
• EPA Toxics Release Inventory PBTs
• EU REACH - Annex XVII CMRs (Appendices 1 - 6)
• IARC - Groups 1, 2A, 2B
These published lists have been referenced in public retailer chemical policies.
Where a chemical is accompanied by a specific route of exposure on these published lists and the exposure route is relevant to the product during consumer use or foreseeable misuse, then the chemical is relevant to this KPI.
This KPI set was developed by The Sustainability Consortium to be aligned with the Beauty and Personal Care Product Sustainability Rating System. TSC is a multi-stakeholder organization comprised of leading brands, manufacturers, retailers, and non-profit organizations that represent broad perspectives on sustainability. To build a KPI set that can be deployed across the beauty and personal care industry, TSC acknowledges that members have diverse points of view. As such, the attributes, activities, KPIs, and scoring used in this KPI set represent a composite perspective of the current market and are not necessarily the views, policies, or program of any single member of TSC.
The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS): GHS provides specific human and environmental health criteria along with physical hazard criteria for chemicals in industry. These criteria are used for hazard communication and labeling of chemicals. https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/global.htmlN/AIntentionally added ingredient: A chemical that provides a function to the final formulation during consumer use or is present as a result of formulating a product for safe use by consumers (e.g., pH balancing by acids or bases).

Limit of detection: Defined by the IUPAC Compendium of Chemical Terminology, 2nd ed. (the "Gold Book") as: "[the concentration, or the quantity, derived from the smallest measure that can be detected with reasonable certainty for a given analytical procedure.]"

Unintentionally added ingredient: An ingredient that provides no function in a final formulation and is not present as a result of formulating a product for safe use by consumers (e.g., pH balancing by acids or bases). Unintentionally added ingredients include chemical contaminants (naturally occurring impurities present in procured raw materials that are unintentionally incorporated into final formulations where they provide no function) and incidental chemicals (chemicals in raw materials present as a result of processing or for stabilization such as catalysts, solvents, residual monomers, reactive by-products, and raw material preservatives).
Cleaning WipesPackaging - Design, policy, and goalsFor this KPI, resources that can be used to establish goals and track progress on weight or volume optimization of packaging include, but are not limited to, assessment of packaging against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\) or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\). Life cycle impact assessment can be used to establish goals and track progress on environmental impact reduction.
For E, methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment or assessment against ISO Standard 14040.
For B, an assessment of material efficiency and weight or volume optimization must have been made.
For D, goals must have been established based on these assessments.
EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

ISO 14040: ISO 14040 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Principles and Framework" document for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/37456.html

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging - Design, policy, and goals KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging - Design, policy, and goals KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520106433
N/AEnvironmental impact: Any change to the environment, whether adverse or beneficial, wholly or partially resulting from an organization's activities, products or services. (ISO definition)

Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency - Home and Personal Care: The practice of minimizing material use and waste in production processes.

Public disclosure - Home and Personal Care: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)
Cleaning WipesPackaging - Recycle LabelingCalculate C1 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

Recycle Now: Recycle Now is the national recycling effort in England. The website contains examples of recycling labels that may be used on packaging and how to interpret them. http://www.recyclenow.com/recycle/packaging-symbols-explained

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging
Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.
Cleaning WipesPackaging - Sustainable SourcingFor this KPI, “category” is defined by the Performance Assessment name and description.
The total point value earned for C - G equals the total percentage of PCR, PIR, and sustainably sourced renewable content across all materials multiplied by 0.8. This value is calculated by:
% wood/paper composition × (% PCR or PIR content + % sustainably sourced renewable content)
+ % plastic composition × (% PCR content + % PIR content + % sustainably sourced renewable content)
+ % glass composition × (% PCR content + % PIR content) + % metal composition × (% PCR content + % PIR content)
+ % other materials composition × (% PCR content + % PIR content + % sustainably sourced renewable content)
For example, if the total percentage of PCR, PIR, or sustainably sourced renewable content across all materials is 25%, then the points earned for D - H would be 25% × 0.8 points available = 0.2 points earned.
Product sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer, is to be considered. For products that are shipped directly to an end consumer, include the transportation-related packaging.
Perform the calculations for this KPI in two steps:
Step 1. Enter the percentage composition, by mass, for each component type in this product category’s sales packaging:
• C1: Wood or paper
• D1: Plastic
• E1: Glass
• F1: Metal
• G1: Other materials
Step 2. Enter the percentage by mass for each material type in this product category’s sales packaging that is PCR, PIR, or sustainably sourced renewable content. For this step, be sure to enter the percentage of content based on each respective component type. Do not enter percentages based on the total mass of this product's category’s sales packaging.
• C2: Post-consumer or post-industrial recycled content
• D2, E2, F2, G2: Post-consumer recycled content
• D3, E3, F3, G3: Post-industrial recycled content
• C3, D4, G4: Sustainably sourced renewable content
For this KPI, post-consumer recycled content is defined by ISO 14021 or the Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0 and post-industrial (pre-consumer) recycled content is defined by ISO 14021. Sustainably sourced renewable content is defined by the Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0. Sustainable sourcing may be demonstrated by second or third party verification that the raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities.
Calculate C1, D1, E1, F1, and G1, as the mass of packaging composition for each component type in this product category’s sales packaging, divided by the total mass of this product category’s sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
For G1, "other materials" include, but are not limited to, textile packaging.
Calculate D2, E2, F2, and G2 as the mass of post-consumer recycled content for each component type in this product category’s sales packaging, divided by the total mass of each respective component type in this product category’s sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
For C2, sum the mass of post-consumer recycled and post-industrial recycled wood or paper content in this product category’s sales packaging and divide this value by the total mass of wood or paper in this product category’s sales packaging.
Calculate D3, E3, F3, and G3 as the mass of post-industrial recycled content for each component type in this product category’s sales packaging, divided by the total mass of each respective component type in this product category’s sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3, D4, and G4 as the mass of sustainably sourced renewable content for each component type in this product category’s sales packaging, divided by the total mass of each respective component type in this product category’s sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

ISO 14021: ISO 14021 (Environmental labels and declarations -- Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling)) provides measurement standards for determining how recyclable a particular product is. https://www.iso.org/standard/66652.html

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/
N/APost-consumer recycled (PCR) content: Materials obtained from a product that has been disposed of after its intended consumer use.

Post-industrial recycled (PIR) content: Materials obtained from a manufacturing process that has been disposed of after its intended use.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably sourced renewable content: Materials obtained from living biomass that is continually replenished at a rate equal to, or greater than, the rate of depletion.
Cleaning WipesProduct CertificationsCalculate B1-B3 as the sales of your product that underwent the specified certification, divided by the total sales of the product, them multiply by 100. The sum of B1-B3 may exceed 100% if product has more than one certification.Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

EPA Safer Choice Program: EPA developed the Safer Choice program in which companies can voluntarily participate by researching and reformulating their product to meet Safer Choice standards in order to earn the Safer Choice Label on their products. Safer Choice reviews the formulation of ingredients in terms of environmental and human health risk, and characteristics of concern within a functional class against the Master and Functional-Class Criteria documents. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

Environmental Working Group EWG VERIFIED™ Standard: The Environmental Working Group (EWG) is a non-profit, non-partisan organization dedicated to protecting human health and the environment. EWG produces research and educational guides on health hazards in food and personal care products. Companies work with EWG by disclosing ingredients not listed on labels and manufacturing processes that is then compared to EWG’s strict criteria standards and if they meet the criteria they receive the EWG verified mark. http://www.ewg.org/ewgverified/
N/AN/A
Cleaning WipesRisk assessment and product safetyFinal formulations, not packaging materials, are in scope for this KPI.
For B, ingredient risk assessments must consider the aggregate exposure to individual ingredients from all products that are sold by a manufacturer and arrive at an acceptable margin of safety. These risk assessments should take into account exposure to vulnerable populations such as children under the age of three, the elderly, pregnant and breast-feeding women, and people with compromised immune systems (as described in the EU Cosmetic Products Regulation (EC) No 1223/2009).
Product level risk assessments must be performed for all products that are sold by a manufacturer and must account for interactions between individual ingredients in final formulations to justify safe use by consumers.
Resources for performing risk assessment, formulating products for adequate microbiological protection, and post market safety surveillance include, but are not limited to, those listed in the Background Information for this KPI.
American Cleaning Institute Exposure and Risk Screening Methods: The American Cleaning Institute released their exposure and risk screening document as a guide for brand manufacturers selling cleaning products with relevant human and environmental exposures. https://www.aciscience.org/docs/Consumer_Product_Ingredient_Safety_v2.0.pdf

Australian Industrial Chemicals Introduction Scheme (AICIS): The Australian Industrial Chemicals Introduction Scheme (AICIS)protects the Australian public by assessing chemical risks and sharing information for their safe industrial use. https://www.industrialchemicals.gov.au/

European Chemicals Agency Guidance on Information Requirements and Chemical Safety Assessment (ECHA): This guidance document describes the information requirements under REACH with regard to substance properties, exposure, use and risk management measures, in the context of the chemical safety assessment. https://echa.europa.eu/guidance-documents/guidance-on-information-requirements-and-chemical-safety-assessment

Human and Environmental Risk Assessment (HERA) Initiative: The Human and Environmental Risk Assessment (HERA) project is a voluntary initiative launched by A.I.S.E. and Cefic. This initiative provides a common risk assessment framework for the household cleaning products industry and works towards greater transparency of risk assessment information. http://www.heraproject.com/RiskAssessment.cfm

International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS): The International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS) consolidates science-based peer-reviewed data on chemicals that are used globally into a single database. IPCS’s goal is to aid in the proper and sound management of these chemicals. http://www.inchem.org/
Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR): The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) is part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and is focused on protecting communities from human health impacts associated with exposure to both natural and man-made substances. https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/

Australian Industrial Chemicals Introduction Scheme (AICIS): The Australian Industrial Chemicals Introduction Scheme (AICIS)protects the Australian public by assessing chemical risks and sharing information for their safe industrial use. https://www.industrialchemicals.gov.au/

National Toxicology Program (NTP): The National Toxicology Program (NTP) is an interagency program affiliated across the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services that works to enhance the science of toxicology, its testing methodology, and sharing of information across government entities and scientific communities. NTP also focuses on making this information publicly available. https://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/index.cfm

USA-EPA Human Health Risk Assessment Program: The EPA Human Health Risk Assessment Program (HHRA) studies the human health effects of chemical exposure and their specific impact on biological and physical processes. Their health assessments describe the potential risk to the public. Resources to perform risk assessments are publicly available on their website. https://www.epa.gov/risk/human-health-risk-assessment
Post market surveillance: The practice of monitoring the safety of products after they have been released on the market.

Risk assessment - Home and Personal Care: A systematic process to evaluate the potential risks associated with consumer exposure to individual ingredient hazards or final formulations when used in products under conditions of instructed use or foreseeable misuse.
Cleaning WipesWater use - Formulation raw material suppliersCalculate B as the total spend on ingredient suppliers for your disposable wipe products sold that reported their annual water use, divided by the total spend on all ingredient suppliers for your disposable wipe products sold, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the completion date of this questionnaire.
Supplier water use reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
If suppliers completed CDP's Water Security Questionnaire you may refer to their answers to determine if they report water use.
CDP Water Information Request: The CDP Water Information Request provides questions that assess a company's water use, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. CDP can be contacted to respond to the Water Information Request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/
N/AN/A
Personal Care WipesBleaching chemicals - Virgin fluff pulp productionCalculate C1 as the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply which was produced using elemental chlorine, divided by the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was produced using ECF or enhanced ECF processes, divided by the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was produced using PCF processes divided by the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was produced using TCF processes, divided by the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C5 as the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was not bleached, divided by the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
The sum of C1, C2, C3, C4, and C5 must not exceed 100%.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Include both wet lap and air dry pulps.
N/AN/AN/A
Personal Care WipesCertification - Virgin fluff pulp fiberCalculate C1 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp fiber supply that only underwent third-party legality verification, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp fiber supply, then multiply by 100. Do not include in this calculation any supply that is included under one of the other response options.
Calculate C2 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp fiber supply that had FSC Controlled Wood certification, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp fiber supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp fiber supply that was certified to the SFI Fiber Sourcing Standard or sourced under a PEFC-Due Diligence System, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp fiber supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp fiber supply that was FSC-certified, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp fiber supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C5 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp fiber supply that was SFI-certified or certified under another PEFC-endorsed program, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp fiber supply, then multiply by 100.
The sum of C1, C2, C3, C4, and C5 must not exceed 100%. Do not include the same fluff pulp fiber supply in the calculation of more than one response option. The last day of the 12-month reporting period must be within 12 months of the completion date of this question.
CERFLOR - Brazilian Forest Certification Program: This organization is an independent, third-party certification program that focuses on sustainable management of natural and planted Amazonian tropical forests. CERFLOR is a PEFC-endorsed certification. https://www.pefc.org/discover-pefc/our-pefc-members/national-members/brazilian-forest-certification-programme-cerflor

CSA - Canadian Standards Association: CSA Group is an internationally-accredited standards development and testing and certification organization that provides consumer product evaluation, education, and training services dedicated to advancing safety, sustainability, and social good. Some programs include environmental product performance, management systems and processes, registry services, worker and workplace safety, energy efficiency verification, and greenhouse gas clean projects. Programs specific to wood sourcing are outlined in Canada's National Standard for Sustainable Forest Management. CSA is a PEFC-endorsed program. http://www.csagroup.org/

EU Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade Volunteer Partnership Agreement: Voluntary Partnership Agreements (VPAs) are a central element of the EU's strategy in the fight against illegal logging. A VPA is a bilateral trade agreement between the EU and a timber-exporting country outside the EU. https://www.euflegt.efi.int/vpa

FSC Forest Certification: Products with FSC certification come from responsibly managed forests that provide environmental, social, and economic benefits. The following website provides more information related to the principles that guide the certification process. https://us.fsc.org/en-us/certification

Forest Legality Alliance's Risk Tool: This tool is designed to present useful information about the sourcing of forest products. You can search the tool's content by country or by species to find specific information.? https://forestlegality.org/risk-tool/

PEFC - Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification: The Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC) provides guidance for integrating best practices for the entire forest supply chain to ensure that timber and non-timber forest products are produced with consideration of ecological, social, and ethical standards. http://www.pefc.org

Rainforest Alliance Legality Verification: The Rainforest Alliance's legality verification standards verify the legality of the wood at the forest level and ensures the traceability of legal timber at all points in the supply chain (Chain of Custody). http://www.rainforest-alliance.org/business/forestry/verification/legal

SFI - Sustainable Forestry Initiative - Standard: The SFI Standard addresses sustainable forest management and responsible sourcing. SFI also has a chain of custody standard to track wood and paper flow through the supply chain. SFI is a PEFC-endorsed program. https://forests.org/sficertifiedsourcingstandard/
N/AN/A
Personal Care WipesChemical footprintThe stewardship list is comprised of the following lists which describe the conditions under which the identified chemicals can or cannot be used. If a chemical on a stewardship list is listed with a qualifying statement on production, exposure, or threshold, the statement should be considered for this KPI.
• CA EPA Prop 65 - Reproductive and Developmental Toxicants, Carcinogens
• EPA Toxics Release Inventory PBTs
• EU REACH - Annex XVII CMRs (Appendices 1 - 6)
• IARC - Groups 1, 2A, 2B
These published lists have been referenced in public retailer chemical policies.
Where a chemical is accompanied by a specific route of exposure on these published lists and the exposure route is relevant to the product during consumer use or foreseeable misuse, then the chemical is relevant to this KPI.
For B, the program may be internal to an organization but must measure the chemical footprint as defined by the Chemical Footprint Project (CFP).
For C, the external program must measure the chemical footprint of the organization and must be multi-stakeholder (include representatives from government and/or NGO as well as industry) with transparent methodology and include actors from across the supply chain (raw material suppliers, manufacturers, and retailers).
This KPI set was developed by The Sustainability Consortium to be aligned with the Beauty and Personal Care Product Sustainability Rating System. TSC is a multi-stakeholder organization comprised of leading brands, manufacturers, retailers, and non-profit organizations that represent broad perspectives on sustainability. To build a KPI set that can be deployed across the beauty and personal care industry, TSC acknowledges that members have diverse points of view. As such, the attributes, activities, KPIs, and scoring used in this KPI set represent a composite perspective of the current market and are not necessarily the views, policies, or program of any single member of TSC.
N/AClean Production Action - Chemical Footprint Project: The Chemical Footprint Project (CFP), an initiative of Clean Production Action (CPA), has developed a tool to track and benchmark corporate activities to include safer chemicals in consumer products. The CFP survey also covers chemical selection at the manufacturing and supply chain phases and tracks progress according to four major elements: Management Strategy, Chemical Inventory, Footprint Measurement, and Public disclosure and Verification. https://www.chemicalfootprint.org/Chemical footprint: Defined by the Chemical Footprint Project™ as the total mass of chemicals sold by a company, used in its manufacturing operations and by its suppliers, and contained in packaging that meet any of the following criteria:
• Carcinogenic, mutagenic, or toxic to reproduction (CMR);
• Persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic substance (PBT);
• Any other chemical for which there is scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment that give rise to an equivalent level of concern (for example, an endocrine disruptor or neurotoxicant); or
• A chemical whose breakdown products result in a [chemical] that meets any of the above criteria.
The Chemical Footprint Project™ provides other specific guidance that can be used to identify chemicals that meet these criteria.

Public disclosure - Home and Personal Care: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Personal Care WipesChemical recovery and recyclingExamples of chemical recovery and recycling during cellulosic fiber production include, but are not limited to, recovery of water, solvent, zinc, alkalis, and/or acids for reuse.N/AN/AN/A
Personal Care WipesFormulation - Chemical selectionFor this KPI, “category” is defined by the Performance Assessment name and description.
Intentionally added ingredients in final formulations are in scope for this KPI.
For this KPI, the threshold for intentionally added chemicals on the stewardship list is 100 ppm. Intentionally added chemicals on the stewardship list below this threshold are not to be considered.
For C, chemicals on the stewardship list are those chemicals on any of the four authoritative and scientific lists referenced below. Even when a list specifies a particular route of exposure, C measures the presence of chemicals on the stewardship list regardless of the route of exposure.
Calculate C as the number of products that you sell in this product category that contain any intentionally added formulation ingredients that are on the stewardship list, divided by the total number of products that your organization sells in this product category, then multiply by 100.
For D, chemicals on the stewardship list are those chemicals on any of the six authoritative and scientific lists referenced below. When a list specifies a particular route of exposure, D measures the presence of chemicals on the stewardship list when that route of route of exposure is relevant to consumers under conditions of instructed use or foreseeable misuse. Foreseeable misuse is limited to consumer misuse during a product’s intended application and does not include exposure from intentional misuse (e.g., ingestion of rinse-off skin products).
Calculate D as the number of products that you sell in this product category that contain any intentionally added formulation ingredients that are on the stewardship list where exposure is relevant, divided by the total number of products that your organization sells in this product category, then multiply by 100.
For D, examples of authoritative or scientific hazard classifications where a route of exposure has been specified include: 1. Ethyl alcohol in alcoholic beverages 2. Titanium dioxide (airborne, unbound particles of respirable size) 3. Silica, crystalline (airborne particles of respirable size) 4. Carbon black (airborne, unbound particles of respirable size)
Example-1: Titanium dioxide
For C, ALL products containing titanium dioxide are to be included in the numerator of the calculation.
For D, for products containing titanium dioxide (unbound particles of respirable size), ONLY those products that can become airborne during instructed consumer use or foreseeable misuse are to be included in the numerator of the calculation.
Example-2: Ethyl alcohol
For C, ALL products containing ethyl alcohol are to be included in the numerator of the calculation. For D, for products containing ethyl alcohol, ONLY those products that are ingested under conditions of instructed use or foreseeable misuse are to be included in the numerator of the calculation.
For product categories without intentionally added formulation ingredients that are on the stewardship list with or without a specified route of exposure, enter zero for C.
For product categories without intentionally added formulation ingredients that are on the stewardship list, enter zero for C and D.
The stewardship list is comprised of the following lists which describe the conditions under which the identified chemicals can or cannot be used. If a chemical on a stewardship list is listed with a qualifying statement on production, exposure, or threshold, the statement should be considered for this KPI.
• CA EPA Prop 65 - Reproductive and Developmental Toxicants, Carcinogens
• EPA Toxics Release Inventory PBTs
• EU REACH - Annex XVII CMRs (Appendices 1 - 6)
• IARC - Groups 1, 2A, 2B
These published lists have been referenced in public retailer chemical policies.
This KPI set was developed by The Sustainability Consortium to be aligned with the Beauty and Personal Care Product Sustainability Rating System. TSC is a multi-stakeholder organization comprised of leading brands, manufacturers, retailers, and non-profit organizations that represent broad perspectives on sustainability. To build a KPI set that can be deployed across the beauty and personal care industry, TSC acknowledges that members have diverse points of view. As such, the attributes, activities, KPIs, and scoring used in this KPI set represent a composite perspective of the current market and are not necessarily the views, policies, or program of any single member of TSC.
EPA - Safer Choice: The EPA Safer Choice program (previously Design for the Environment) provides a voluntary standard for product designers who wish to choose ingredients based on established criteria. In this program, all ingredients are reviewed and must meet strict criteria for various impacts (e.g., human health and the environment, carcinogenicity, reproductive/developmental toxicity). Products meeting the standard are able to carry the Safer Choice label. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS): GHS provides specific human and environmental health criteria along with physical hazard criteria for chemicals in industry. These criteria are used for hazard communication and labeling of chemicals. https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/global.html
N/AContaminants: Naturally occurring impurities present in procured raw materials that are unintentionally incorporated into final formulations where they provide no function.

Incidental chemicals: Chemicals in raw materials present as a result of processing or for stabilization such as catalysts, solvents, residual monomers, reactive by-products, and raw material preservatives.

Intentionally added chemical: A chemical that provides a function to the final formulation during consumer use or is present as a result of formulating a product for safe use by consumers (e.g., pH balancing by acids or bases).

Unintentionally added ingredient: An ingredient that provides no function in a final formulation and is not present as a result of formulating a product for safe use by consumers (e.g., pH balancing by acids or bases). Unintentionally added ingredients include chemical contaminants (naturally occurring impurities present in procured raw materials that are unintentionally incorporated into final formulations where they provide no function) and incidental chemicals (chemicals in raw materials present as a result of processing or for stabilization such as catalysts, solvents, residual monomers, reactive by-products, and raw material preservatives).
Personal Care WipesGreenhouse gas - Reduction goalResources that can be used to establish and track greenhouse gas reduction goals include, but are not limited to, the Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard and GRI Performance Indicators.
For B, intensity based goals include, but are not limited to, reducing emissions intensity to a defined amount, interim carbon intensity goals, and increasing non-carbon generating capacity by a target time frame.
For C, an absolute GHG reduction goal is one that is set using one of a number of methodologies, including, but not limited to, those established by the Science Based Targets Initiative.
For D, absolute science based goals are defined by WRI and must be in line with the two degree Celsius temperature limit as described by IPCC.
For E, public disclosure must have occurred within 12 months of the completion date of this questionnaire.
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard

Science Based Targets: This initiative, a collaboration between CDP, World Resources Institute (WRI), the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF), and the United Nations Global Compact (UNGC), and one of the We Mean Business Coalition commitments, aims to showcase and promote science based targets for GHG emission reduction. Science Based Targets sets best practices for science-based target setting, offers resources for adoption, and independently assesses company targets. http://sciencebasedtargets.org/
The Global Reporting Initiative: The Global Reporting Initiative provides guidance globally on sustainable reporting standards. https://www.globalreporting.org/how-to-use-the-gri-standards/resource-center/

World Resources Institute, WRI Report - Target: Intensity: This analysis provides an overview of GHG Intensity targets along with rationales for establishing these targets and an assessment of the environmental effectiveness of establishing and achieving these goals. Complex issues surrounding public interpretation and compliance are also addressed. https://www.wri.org/publication/target-intensity
Absolute GHG reduction goal: A goal for GHG reduction based on a reduction in total emissions expressed as tons of CO2 equivalent per year.

Absolute science based goal: Defined by Science Based Targets as "Targets adopted by companies to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are considered “science-based” if they are in line with the level of decarbonization required to keep global temperature increase below 2 degrees Celsius compared to pre- industrial temperatures, as described in the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC AR5)."

Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.

Intensity based goals: A goal for GHG reduction based on decreased emissions per unit of output (e.g., tons CO2e per unit produced).

Public disclosure - Home and Personal Care: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Personal Care WipesGreenhouse gas - Supply chainScope 1, 2, and 3 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B as the spend on ingredient suppliers for disposable wipe products sold that reported scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions, divided by total spend on all ingredient suppliers for disposable wipe products sold, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
If suppliers responded to the most recent CDP Climate Change questionnaire you may refer to each supplier's CDP Climate Change responses to determine if they report emissions.
For C, public disclosure must have occurred within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Resources that can be used to establish and track greenhouse gas reduction goals include, but are not limited to, the Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard and GRI Performance Indicators.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools
The Global Reporting Initiative: The Global Reporting Initiative provides guidance globally on sustainable reporting standards. https://www.globalreporting.org/how-to-use-the-gri-standards/resource-center/Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.

Public disclosure - Home and Personal Care: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Personal Care WipesGreenhouse gas emissions - ManufacturingIf your organization reports to CDP or is able to determine its GHG emissions intensity then answer either B OR C, not both.
Included in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities for disposable wipe products, as well as trace gases released during the manufacture of these products. This may include some or all corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within an organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
For B, enter your most recent CDP Climate Change score for company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities. This score must have been earned within 12 months of the completion date of this questionnaire.
C1 may be calculated using product-specific data or the intensity may be estimated via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate C1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the mass of each product.
If using facility data, calculate C1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the mass in tonnes, of home care products. If the manufacturing facilities produce more than one category of product, only weight using the total weight of production specific to disposable wipe products.
Calculate C2 as the mass of disposable wipe products sold for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total mass of disposable wipe products sold, then multiply by 100. For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the completion date of this questionnaire.
The data required for the most recent CDP Climate Change questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response. The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
N/ACompany-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.

Public disclosure - Home and Personal Care: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Personal Care WipesIngredient disclosure to manufacturersBoth intentionally and unintentionally added ingredients in final formulations are in scope for this KPI.
For D and E, chemicals that are reasonably expected to be present include intentionally and unintentionally added ingredients present above trace quantities where the manufacturer knows or should reasonably know of such ingredients, impurities, or contaminants, unless they are withheld as confidential business information (adapted from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation).
For D, the limit of detection is 100 ppm. Chemicals that are reasonably expected to be present at levels lower than 100 ppm are not included.
For E, chemicals that are reasonably expected to be present at detectable levels are included.
The stewardship list is comprised of the following lists which describe the conditions under which the identified chemicals can or cannot be used. If a chemical on a stewardship list is listed with a qualifying statement on production, exposure, or threshold, the statement should be considered for this KPI.
• CA EPA Prop 65 - Reproductive and Developmental Toxicants, Carcinogens
• EPA Toxics Release Inventory PBTs
• EU REACH - Annex XVII CMRs (Appendices 1 - 6)
• IARC - Groups 1, 2A, 2B
These published lists have been referenced in public retailer chemical policies.
Where a chemical is accompanied by a specific route of exposure on these published lists and the exposure route is relevant to the product during consumer use or foreseeable misuse, then the chemical is relevant to this KPI.
This KPI set was developed by The Sustainability Consortium to be aligned with the Beauty and Personal Care Product Sustainability Rating System. TSC is a multi-stakeholder organization comprised of leading brands, manufacturers, retailers, and non-profit organizations that represent broad perspectives on sustainability. To build a KPI set that can be deployed across the beauty and personal care industry, TSC acknowledges that members have diverse points of view. As such, the attributes, activities, KPIs, and scoring used in this KPI set represent a composite perspective of the current market and are not necessarily the views, policies, or program of any single member of TSC.
The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS): GHS provides specific human and environmental health criteria along with physical hazard criteria for chemicals in industry. These criteria are used for hazard communication and labeling of chemicals. https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/global.htmlN/AIntentionally added ingredient: A chemical that provides a function to the final formulation during consumer use or is present as a result of formulating a product for safe use by consumers (e.g., pH balancing by acids or bases).

Limit of detection: Defined by the IUPAC Compendium of Chemical Terminology, 2nd ed. (the "Gold Book") as: "[the concentration, or the quantity, derived from the smallest measure that can be detected with reasonable certainty for a given analytical procedure.]"

Unintentionally added ingredient: An ingredient that provides no function in a final formulation and is not present as a result of formulating a product for safe use by consumers (e.g., pH balancing by acids or bases). Unintentionally added ingredients include chemical contaminants (naturally occurring impurities present in procured raw materials that are unintentionally incorporated into final formulations where they provide no function) and incidental chemicals (chemicals in raw materials present as a result of processing or for stabilization such as catalysts, solvents, residual monomers, reactive by-products, and raw material preservatives).
Personal Care WipesPackaging - Design, policy, and goalsFor this KPI, resources that can be used to establish goals and track progress on weight or volume optimization of packaging include, but are not limited to, assessment of packaging against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\) or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\). Life cycle impact assessment can be used to establish goals and track progress on environmental impact reduction.
For E, methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment or assessment against ISO Standard 14040.
For B, an assessment of material efficiency and weight or volume optimization must have been made.
For D, goals must have been established based on these assessments.
EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

ISO 14040: ISO 14040 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Principles and Framework" document for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/37456.html

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging - Design, policy, and goals KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging - Design, policy, and goals KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520106433
N/AEnvironmental impact: Any change to the environment, whether adverse or beneficial, wholly or partially resulting from an organization's activities, products or services. (ISO definition)

Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency - Home and Personal Care: The practice of minimizing material use and waste in production processes.

Public disclosure - Home and Personal Care: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)
Personal Care WipesPackaging - Recycle LabelingCalculate C1 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

Recycle Now: Recycle Now is the national recycling effort in England. The website contains examples of recycling labels that may be used on packaging and how to interpret them. http://www.recyclenow.com/recycle/packaging-symbols-explained

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging
Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.
Personal Care WipesPackaging - Sustainable SourcingFor this KPI, “category” is defined by the Performance Assessment name and description.
The total point value earned for C - G equals the total percentage of PCR, PIR, and sustainably sourced renewable content across all materials multiplied by 0.8. This value is calculated by:
% wood/paper composition × (% PCR or PIR content + % sustainably sourced renewable content)
+ % plastic composition × (% PCR content + % PIR content + % sustainably sourced renewable content)
+ % glass composition × (% PCR content + % PIR content) + % metal composition × (% PCR content + % PIR content)
+ % other materials composition × (% PCR content + % PIR content + % sustainably sourced renewable content)
For example, if the total percentage of PCR, PIR, or sustainably sourced renewable content across all materials is 25%, then the points earned for D - H would be 25% × 0.8 points available = 0.2 points earned.
Product sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer, is to be considered. For products that are shipped directly to an end consumer, include the transportation-related packaging.
Perform the calculations for this KPI in two steps:
Step 1. Enter the percentage composition, by mass, for each component type in this product category’s sales packaging:
• C1: Wood or paper
• D1: Plastic
• E1: Glass
• F1: Metal
• G1: Other materials
Step 2. Enter the percentage by mass for each material type in this product category’s sales packaging that is PCR, PIR, or sustainably sourced renewable content. For this step, be sure to enter the percentage of content based on each respective component type. Do not enter percentages based on the total mass of this product's category’s sales packaging.
• C2: Post-consumer or post-industrial recycled content
• D2, E2, F2, G2: Post-consumer recycled content
• D3, E3, F3, G3: Post-industrial recycled content
• C3, D4, G4: Sustainably sourced renewable content
For this KPI, post-consumer recycled content is defined by ISO 14021 or the Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0 and post-industrial (pre-consumer) recycled content is defined by ISO 14021. Sustainably sourced renewable content is defined by the Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0. Sustainable sourcing may be demonstrated by second or third party verification that the raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities.
Calculate C1, D1, E1, F1, and G1, as the mass of packaging composition for each component type in this product category’s sales packaging, divided by the total mass of this product category’s sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
For G1, "other materials" include, but are not limited to, textile packaging.
Calculate D2, E2, F2, and G2 as the mass of post-consumer recycled content for each component type in this product category’s sales packaging, divided by the total mass of each respective component type in this product category’s sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
For C2, sum the mass of post-consumer recycled and post-industrial recycled wood or paper content in this product category’s sales packaging and divide this value by the total mass of wood or paper in this product category’s sales packaging.
Calculate D3, E3, F3, and G3 as the mass of post-industrial recycled content for each component type in this product category’s sales packaging, divided by the total mass of each respective component type in this product category’s sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3, D4, and G4 as the mass of sustainably sourced renewable content for each component type in this product category’s sales packaging, divided by the total mass of each respective component type in this product category’s sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

ISO 14021: ISO 14021 (Environmental labels and declarations -- Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling)) provides measurement standards for determining how recyclable a particular product is. https://www.iso.org/standard/66652.html

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/
N/APost-consumer recycled (PCR) content: Materials obtained from a product that has been disposed of after its intended consumer use.

Post-industrial recycled (PIR) content: Materials obtained from a manufacturing process that has been disposed of after its intended use.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably sourced renewable content: Materials obtained from living biomass that is continually replenished at a rate equal to, or greater than, the rate of depletion.
Personal Care WipesProduct CertificationsCalculate B1-B3 as the sales of your product that underwent the specified certification, divided by the total sales of the product, them multiply by 100. The sum of B1-B3 may exceed 100% if product has more than one certification.Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

EPA Safer Choice Program: EPA developed the Safer Choice program in which companies can voluntarily participate by researching and reformulating their product to meet Safer Choice standards in order to earn the Safer Choice Label on their products. Safer Choice reviews the formulation of ingredients in terms of environmental and human health risk, and characteristics of concern within a functional class against the Master and Functional-Class Criteria documents. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

Environmental Working Group EWG VERIFIED™ Standard: The Environmental Working Group (EWG) is a non-profit, non-partisan organization dedicated to protecting human health and the environment. EWG produces research and educational guides on health hazards in food and personal care products. Companies work with EWG by disclosing ingredients not listed on labels and manufacturing processes that is then compared to EWG’s strict criteria standards and if they meet the criteria they receive the EWG verified mark. http://www.ewg.org/ewgverified/
N/AN/A
Personal Care WipesRisk assessment and product safetyFinal formulations, not packaging materials, are in scope for this KPI.
For B, ingredient risk assessments must consider the aggregate exposure to individual ingredients from all products that are sold by a manufacturer and arrive at an acceptable margin of safety. These risk assessments should take into account exposure to vulnerable populations such as children under the age of three, the elderly, pregnant and breast-feeding women, and people with compromised immune systems (as described in the EU Cosmetic Products Regulation (EC) No 1223/2009).
Product level risk assessments must be performed for all products that are sold by a manufacturer and must account for interactions between individual ingredients in final formulations to justify safe use by consumers.
Resources for performing risk assessment, formulating products for adequate microbiological protection, and post market safety surveillance include, but are not limited to, those listed in the Background Information for this KPI.
American Cleaning Institute Exposure and Risk Screening Methods: The American Cleaning Institute released their exposure and risk screening document as a guide for brand manufacturers selling cleaning products with relevant human and environmental exposures. https://www.aciscience.org/docs/Consumer_Product_Ingredient_Safety_v2.0.pdf

Australian Industrial Chemicals Introduction Scheme (AICIS): The Australian Industrial Chemicals Introduction Scheme (AICIS)protects the Australian public by assessing chemical risks and sharing information for their safe industrial use. https://www.industrialchemicals.gov.au/

European Chemicals Agency Guidance on Information Requirements and Chemical Safety Assessment (ECHA): This guidance document describes the information requirements under REACH with regard to substance properties, exposure, use and risk management measures, in the context of the chemical safety assessment. https://echa.europa.eu/guidance-documents/guidance-on-information-requirements-and-chemical-safety-assessment

Human and Environmental Risk Assessment (HERA) Initiative: The Human and Environmental Risk Assessment (HERA) project is a voluntary initiative launched by A.I.S.E. and Cefic. This initiative provides a common risk assessment framework for the household cleaning products industry and works towards greater transparency of risk assessment information. http://www.heraproject.com/RiskAssessment.cfm

International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS): The International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS) consolidates science-based peer-reviewed data on chemicals that are used globally into a single database. IPCS’s goal is to aid in the proper and sound management of these chemicals. http://www.inchem.org/
Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR): The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) is part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and is focused on protecting communities from human health impacts associated with exposure to both natural and man-made substances. https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/

Australian Industrial Chemicals Introduction Scheme (AICIS): The Australian Industrial Chemicals Introduction Scheme (AICIS)protects the Australian public by assessing chemical risks and sharing information for their safe industrial use. https://www.industrialchemicals.gov.au/

National Toxicology Program (NTP): The National Toxicology Program (NTP) is an interagency program affiliated across the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services that works to enhance the science of toxicology, its testing methodology, and sharing of information across government entities and scientific communities. NTP also focuses on making this information publicly available. https://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/index.cfm

USA-EPA Human Health Risk Assessment Program: The EPA Human Health Risk Assessment Program (HHRA) studies the human health effects of chemical exposure and their specific impact on biological and physical processes. Their health assessments describe the potential risk to the public. Resources to perform risk assessments are publicly available on their website. https://www.epa.gov/risk/human-health-risk-assessment
Post market surveillance: The practice of monitoring the safety of products after they have been released on the market.

Risk assessment - Home and Personal Care: A systematic process to evaluate the potential risks associated with consumer exposure to individual ingredient hazards or final formulations when used in products under conditions of instructed use or foreseeable misuse.
Personal Care WipesWater use - Formulation raw material suppliersCalculate B as the total spend on ingredient suppliers for your disposable wipe products sold that reported their annual water use, divided by the total spend on all ingredient suppliers for your disposable wipe products sold, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the completion date of this questionnaire.
Supplier water use reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
If suppliers completed CDP's Water Security Questionnaire you may refer to their answers to determine if they report water use.
CDP Water Information Request: The CDP Water Information Request provides questions that assess a company's water use, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. CDP can be contacted to respond to the Water Information Request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/
N/AN/A
Menstrual Hygiene ProductsBleaching chemicals - Virgin fluff pulp productionCalculate C1 as the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply which was produced using elemental chlorine, divided by the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was produced using ECF or enhanced ECF processes, divided by the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was produced using PCF processes divided by the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was produced using TCF processes, divided by the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C5 as the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was not bleached, divided by the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
The sum of C1, C2, C3, C4, and C5 must not exceed 100%.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Include both wet lap and air dry pulps.
N/AN/AN/A
Menstrual Hygiene ProductsCertification - Virgin fluff pulpCalculate C1 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that only underwent third-party legality verification, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100. Do not include in this calculation any supply that is included under one of the other response options.
Calculate C2 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that had FSC Controlled Wood certification, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was certified to the SFI Fiber Sourcing Standard or sourced under a PEFC-Due Diligence System, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was FSC-certified, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C5 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was SFI-certified or certified under another PEFC-endorsed program, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
The sum of C1, C2, C3, C4, and C5 must not exceed 100%. Do not include the same fluff pulp supply in the calculation of more than one response option. The last day of the 12-month reporting period must be within 12 months of the completion date of this question.
CERFLOR - Brazilian Forest Certification Program: This organization is an independent, third-party certification program that focuses on sustainable management of natural and planted Amazonian tropical forests. CERFLOR is a PEFC-endorsed certification. https://www.pefc.org/discover-pefc/our-pefc-members/national-members/brazilian-forest-certification-programme-cerflor

CSA - Canadian Standards Association: CSA Group is an internationally-accredited standards development and testing and certification organization that provides consumer product evaluation, education, and training services dedicated to advancing safety, sustainability, and social good. Some programs include environmental product performance, management systems and processes, registry services, worker and workplace safety, energy efficiency verification, and greenhouse gas clean projects. Programs specific to wood sourcing are outlined in Canada's National Standard for Sustainable Forest Management. CSA is a PEFC-endorsed program. http://www.csagroup.org/

EU Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade Volunteer Partnership Agreement: Voluntary Partnership Agreements (VPAs) are a central element of the EU's strategy in the fight against illegal logging. A VPA is a bilateral trade agreement between the EU and a timber-exporting country outside the EU. https://www.euflegt.efi.int/vpa

FSC Forest Certification: Products with FSC certification come from responsibly managed forests that provide environmental, social, and economic benefits. The following website provides more information related to the principles that guide the certification process. https://us.fsc.org/en-us/certification

Forest Legality Alliance's Risk Tool: This tool is designed to present useful information about the sourcing of forest products. You can search the tool's content by country or by species to find specific information.? https://forestlegality.org/risk-tool/

PEFC - Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification: The Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC) provides guidance for integrating best practices for the entire forest supply chain to ensure that timber and non-timber forest products are produced with consideration of ecological, social, and ethical standards. http://www.pefc.org

Rainforest Alliance Legality Verification: The Rainforest Alliance's legality verification standards verify the legality of the wood at the forest level and ensures the traceability of legal timber at all points in the supply chain (Chain of Custody). http://www.rainforest-alliance.org/business/forestry/verification/legal

SFI - Sustainable Forestry Initiative - Standard: The SFI Standard addresses sustainable forest management and responsible sourcing. SFI also has a chain of custody standard to track wood and paper flow through the supply chain. SFI is a PEFC-endorsed program. https://forests.org/sficertifiedsourcingstandard/
N/AN/A
Menstrual Hygiene ProductsChemical recovery and recyclingExamples of chemical recovery and recycling during cellulosic fiber production include, but are not limited to, recovery of water, solvent, zinc, alkalis, and/or acids for reuse.N/AN/AN/A
Menstrual Hygiene ProductsCotton cultivation - Environmental impactsFor B and F, supply chain engagement and public disclosure of goals and progress must have occurred within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
For E and F, tools and programs such as Better Cotton Initiative, Cool Farm Tool, Field to Market Tools, Global G.A.P., and SAI Platform - Sustainable Performance Assessment can be used by cotton growers to measure progress on environmental impacts in cotton production.
N/ABetter Cotton Initiative: The Better Cotton Initiative offers publically available resources to provided background information on best practices for growing cotton. https://bettercotton.org/resources/

Cool Farm Tool: This calculator is available globally and calculates greenhouse gas emissions associated with farms, processing facilities, and transportation for many agriculture and livestock products. http://www.coolfarmtool.org/CoolFarmTool

Cotton Inc. - Life Cycle Assessment: Cotton Incorporated has created a resource to make several life cycle documents available for public download. http://cottontoday.cottoninc.com/reference-material/

Field to Market's Fieldprint Platform: Utilized by Insight and Innovation Projects enrolled in Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator, the Fieldprint Platform calculates and aggregates field-level outcomes for land use efficiency, soil conservation, irrigation water use efficiency, energy use efficiency, and greenhouse gas emissions for U.S. alfalfa, barley, corn, cotton, peanuts, potato, rice, sorghum, soy, sugar beet, and wheat farms. It also provides index scores for soil carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus impacts on water quality, and biodiversity at the field and farm level. The Platform offers an optional module to quantify soil carbon estimates if projects wish to calculate sequestration alongside avoided emissions. In addition, farmers have the ability to compare individual sustainability performance against project, state, and national benchmarks to assess opportunities for continuous improvement. https://fieldtomarket.org/our-programs/fieldprint-platform/

International Plant Nutrition Institute 4R Nutrient Stewardship Portal: Optimization activities can include implementing the 4Rs Nutrient Stewardship Program, monitoring field fuel and inputs, and rotating crops.  Nutrient best-management practices should follow the 4Rs (right amount, right timing, right placement, right form).  According to the IPNI website, "The 4R Plant Nutrition Manual - available both in North American and Metric unit versions - includes chapters on the scientific principles behind each of the four R’s or "rights." It discusses the adoption of 4R practices on the farm, approaches to nutrient management planning, and measurement of sustainability performance. The manual is intended to help the reader adapt and integrate the fundamental 4R principles into a comprehensive method of nutrient management that meets the criteria of sustainability. A mix of learning modules and case studies demonstrate the universality of the 4R Nutrient Stewardship concept through its application to diverse cropping systems used within small enterprises, large commercial farms, and plantations." http://www.ipni.net/4R

Natural Resources Conservation Service - Integrated Pest Management Definition: Integrated pest management is defined as an ecosystem-based strategy that focuses on long-term prevention of pests or their damage through a combination of techniques such as biological control, habitat manipulation, modification of cultural practices, and the use of resistant varieties. It entails field scouting to determine the level of infestation; preventative, non-chemical measures such as a first line of defense; consideration of the economic balance between crop loss due to pests, crop quality, yield and the costs of crop protection chemicals and harvest aid application; and consideration of soil type, height of water table, slope, presence and size of macropores/cracks, actual application rate, foliar/non-foliar/soil integration, soil moisture, rainfall probability, weather conditions, planned and actual irrigation. According to the USDA's Natural Resource Conservation Service, "IPM is environmentally responsible and economically practical crop protection. IPM includes prevention, avoidance, monitoring, and suppression of weeds, insects, diseases and other pests. IPM combines biological, cultural, and other alternatives to chemical control with the planned use of pesticides to keep pest populations below damaging levels while minimizing harmful effects of pest control on humans and natural resources. The practice is site-specific in nature, based on approaches suited for the particular crop, pest, and location." https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/detailfull/national/energy/?cid=nrcs143_023640

Responsible Sourcing Network Cotton Sourcing Snapshot: This website provides cotton sourcing information and a link to a document that outlines steps companies can make to prevent child labor and forced labor in their cotton supply chains. https://www.sourcingnetwork.org/cotton

SAI Platform: Sustainable Performance Assessment (SAI-SPA): The SAI Platform provides fact sheets and guidelines for sustainable agriculture assessment including metrics. https://saiplatform.org/our-work/

The GLOBALG.A.P. Aquaculture Standard: The GLOBALG.A.P. Aquaculture Standard covers, amongst other criteria, animal welfare at all the stages of production. https://www.globalgap.org/uk_en/media-events/news/articles/New-GLOBALG.A.P.-Aquaculture-Standard-Version-5/

What is Integrated Pest Management (IPM)?: Integrated pest management (IPM) is a process that you can use to solve pest problems while minimizing risks to people and the environment. IPM can be used to manage all kinds of pests anywhere "in urban, agricultural, and wildland or natural areas." Pest-control materials are selected and applied in a manner that minimizes risks to human health, beneficial and non-target organisms, and the environment (adapted from the University of California Davis). http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/GENERAL/whatisipm.html
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Program: An annually updated document that farmers can demonstrate on-site. The program should summarize concrete goals and a plan for how to achieve these goals.

Public disclosure: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Menstrual Hygiene ProductsGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate C1 as the total spend on polymers (e.g., polypropylene, polyethylene, superabsorbent polymer) from suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total spend on all polymers (e.g., polypropylene, polyethylene, superabsorbent polymer) from suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers responded to the most recent CDP Climate Change questionnaire you may refer to each supplier's CDP Climate Change responses to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Menstrual Hygiene ProductsPackaging Raw Material SourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
ISO 18604: ISO 18604 (Packaging and the environment -- Material recycling) provides measurement standards for determining how recyclable a particular product is. https://www.iso.org/standard/55872.html

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Renewable material: “Material that is composed of biomass from a living source and that can be continually replenished. To be defined as renewable, virgin materials shall come from sources which are replenished at a rate equal to or greater than the rate of depletion.” (FTC Green Guides:2012)

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably-sourced material: Material for which it can be demonstrated through second- or third-party verification that the virgin raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities. Materials such as paper can be included in this definition if the source of the packaging content comes from sustainably-managed forests with no deforestation.
Menstrual Hygiene ProductsProduct CertificationsCalculate B1-B3 as the sales of your product that underwent the specified certification, divided by the total sales of the product, them multiply by 100. The sum of B1-B3 may exceed 100% if product has more than one certification.Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

EPA Safer Choice Program: EPA developed the Safer Choice program in which companies can voluntarily participate by researching and reformulating their product to meet Safer Choice standards in order to earn the Safer Choice Label on their products. Safer Choice reviews the formulation of ingredients in terms of environmental and human health risk, and characteristics of concern within a functional class against the Master and Functional-Class Criteria documents. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

Environmental Working Group EWG VERIFIED™ Standard: The Environmental Working Group (EWG) is a non-profit, non-partisan organization dedicated to protecting human health and the environment. EWG produces research and educational guides on health hazards in food and personal care products. Companies work with EWG by disclosing ingredients not listed on labels and manufacturing processes that is then compared to EWG’s strict criteria standards and if they meet the criteria they receive the EWG verified mark. http://www.ewg.org/ewgverified/
N/AN/A
Menstrual Hygiene ProductsSustainable Packaging Design and ProductionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

Recycle Now: Recycle Now is the national recycling effort in England. The website contains examples of recycling labels that may be used on packaging and how to interpret them. http://www.recyclenow.com/recycle/packaging-symbols-explained

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: The practice of minimizing material use and waste in production processes.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
Nursing PadsBleaching chemicals - Virgin fluff pulp productionCalculate C1 as the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply which was produced using elemental chlorine, divided by the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was produced using ECF or enhanced ECF processes, divided by the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was produced using PCF processes divided by the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was produced using TCF processes, divided by the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C5 as the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was not bleached, divided by the total mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
The sum of C1, C2, C3, C4, and C5 must not exceed 100%.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Include both wet lap and air dry pulps.
N/AN/AN/A
Nursing PadsCertification - Virgin fluff pulpCalculate C1 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that only underwent third-party legality verification, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100. Do not include in this calculation any supply that is included under one of the other response options.
Calculate C2 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that had FSC Controlled Wood certification, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was certified to the SFI Fiber Sourcing Standard or sourced under a PEFC-Due Diligence System, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was FSC-certified, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C5 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was SFI-certified or certified under another PEFC-endorsed program, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
The sum of C1, C2, C3, C4, and C5 must not exceed 100%. Do not include the same fluff pulp supply in the calculation of more than one response option. The last day of the 12-month reporting period must be within 12 months of the completion date of this question.
CERFLOR - Brazilian Forest Certification Program: This organization is an independent, third-party certification program that focuses on sustainable management of natural and planted Amazonian tropical forests. CERFLOR is a PEFC-endorsed certification. https://www.pefc.org/discover-pefc/our-pefc-members/national-members/brazilian-forest-certification-programme-cerflor

CSA - Canadian Standards Association: CSA Group is an internationally-accredited standards development and testing and certification organization that provides consumer product evaluation, education, and training services dedicated to advancing safety, sustainability, and social good. Some programs include environmental product performance, management systems and processes, registry services, worker and workplace safety, energy efficiency verification, and greenhouse gas clean projects. Programs specific to wood sourcing are outlined in Canada's National Standard for Sustainable Forest Management. CSA is a PEFC-endorsed program. http://www.csagroup.org/

EU Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade Volunteer Partnership Agreement: Voluntary Partnership Agreements (VPAs) are a central element of the EU's strategy in the fight against illegal logging. A VPA is a bilateral trade agreement between the EU and a timber-exporting country outside the EU. https://www.euflegt.efi.int/vpa

FSC Forest Certification: Products with FSC certification come from responsibly managed forests that provide environmental, social, and economic benefits. The following website provides more information related to the principles that guide the certification process. https://us.fsc.org/en-us/certification

Forest Legality Alliance's Risk Tool: This tool is designed to present useful information about the sourcing of forest products. You can search the tool's content by country or by species to find specific information.? https://forestlegality.org/risk-tool/

PEFC - Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification: The Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC) provides guidance for integrating best practices for the entire forest supply chain to ensure that timber and non-timber forest products are produced with consideration of ecological, social, and ethical standards. http://www.pefc.org

Rainforest Alliance Legality Verification: The Rainforest Alliance's legality verification standards verify the legality of the wood at the forest level and ensures the traceability of legal timber at all points in the supply chain (Chain of Custody). http://www.rainforest-alliance.org/business/forestry/verification/legal

SFI - Sustainable Forestry Initiative - Standard: The SFI Standard addresses sustainable forest management and responsible sourcing. SFI also has a chain of custody standard to track wood and paper flow through the supply chain. SFI is a PEFC-endorsed program. https://forests.org/sficertifiedsourcingstandard/
N/AN/A
Nursing PadsChemical recovery and recyclingExamples of chemical recovery and recycling during cellulosic fiber production include, but are not limited to, recovery of water, solvent, zinc, alkalis, and/or acids for reuse.N/AN/AN/A
Nursing PadsCotton cultivation - Environmental impactsFor B and F, supply chain engagement and public disclosure of goals and progress must have occurred within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
For E and F, tools and programs such as Better Cotton Initiative, Cool Farm Tool, Field to Market Tools, Global G.A.P., and SAI Platform - Sustainable Performance Assessment can be used by cotton growers to measure progress on environmental impacts in cotton production.
N/ABetter Cotton Initiative: The Better Cotton Initiative offers publically available resources to provided background information on best practices for growing cotton. https://bettercotton.org/resources/

Cool Farm Tool: This calculator is available globally and calculates greenhouse gas emissions associated with farms, processing facilities, and transportation for many agriculture and livestock products. http://www.coolfarmtool.org/CoolFarmTool

Cotton Inc. - Life Cycle Assessment: Cotton Incorporated has created a resource to make several life cycle documents available for public download. http://cottontoday.cottoninc.com/reference-material/

Field to Market's Fieldprint Platform: Utilized by Insight and Innovation Projects enrolled in Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator, the Fieldprint Platform calculates and aggregates field-level outcomes for land use efficiency, soil conservation, irrigation water use efficiency, energy use efficiency, and greenhouse gas emissions for U.S. alfalfa, barley, corn, cotton, peanuts, potato, rice, sorghum, soy, sugar beet, and wheat farms. It also provides index scores for soil carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus impacts on water quality, and biodiversity at the field and farm level. The Platform offers an optional module to quantify soil carbon estimates if projects wish to calculate sequestration alongside avoided emissions. In addition, farmers have the ability to compare individual sustainability performance against project, state, and national benchmarks to assess opportunities for continuous improvement. https://fieldtomarket.org/our-programs/fieldprint-platform/

International Plant Nutrition Institute 4R Nutrient Stewardship Portal: Optimization activities can include implementing the 4Rs Nutrient Stewardship Program, monitoring field fuel and inputs, and rotating crops.  Nutrient best-management practices should follow the 4Rs (right amount, right timing, right placement, right form).  According to the IPNI website, "The 4R Plant Nutrition Manual - available both in North American and Metric unit versions - includes chapters on the scientific principles behind each of the four R’s or "rights." It discusses the adoption of 4R practices on the farm, approaches to nutrient management planning, and measurement of sustainability performance. The manual is intended to help the reader adapt and integrate the fundamental 4R principles into a comprehensive method of nutrient management that meets the criteria of sustainability. A mix of learning modules and case studies demonstrate the universality of the 4R Nutrient Stewardship concept through its application to diverse cropping systems used within small enterprises, large commercial farms, and plantations." http://www.ipni.net/4R

Natural Resources Conservation Service - Integrated Pest Management Definition: Integrated pest management is defined as an ecosystem-based strategy that focuses on long-term prevention of pests or their damage through a combination of techniques such as biological control, habitat manipulation, modification of cultural practices, and the use of resistant varieties. It entails field scouting to determine the level of infestation; preventative, non-chemical measures such as a first line of defense; consideration of the economic balance between crop loss due to pests, crop quality, yield and the costs of crop protection chemicals and harvest aid application; and consideration of soil type, height of water table, slope, presence and size of macropores/cracks, actual application rate, foliar/non-foliar/soil integration, soil moisture, rainfall probability, weather conditions, planned and actual irrigation. According to the USDA's Natural Resource Conservation Service, "IPM is environmentally responsible and economically practical crop protection. IPM includes prevention, avoidance, monitoring, and suppression of weeds, insects, diseases and other pests. IPM combines biological, cultural, and other alternatives to chemical control with the planned use of pesticides to keep pest populations below damaging levels while minimizing harmful effects of pest control on humans and natural resources. The practice is site-specific in nature, based on approaches suited for the particular crop, pest, and location." https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/detailfull/national/energy/?cid=nrcs143_023640

Responsible Sourcing Network Cotton Sourcing Snapshot: This website provides cotton sourcing information and a link to a document that outlines steps companies can make to prevent child labor and forced labor in their cotton supply chains. https://www.sourcingnetwork.org/cotton

SAI Platform: Sustainable Performance Assessment (SAI-SPA): The SAI Platform provides fact sheets and guidelines for sustainable agriculture assessment including metrics. https://saiplatform.org/our-work/

The GLOBALG.A.P. Aquaculture Standard: The GLOBALG.A.P. Aquaculture Standard covers, amongst other criteria, animal welfare at all the stages of production. https://www.globalgap.org/uk_en/media-events/news/articles/New-GLOBALG.A.P.-Aquaculture-Standard-Version-5/

What is Integrated Pest Management (IPM)?: Integrated pest management (IPM) is a process that you can use to solve pest problems while minimizing risks to people and the environment. IPM can be used to manage all kinds of pests anywhere "in urban, agricultural, and wildland or natural areas." Pest-control materials are selected and applied in a manner that minimizes risks to human health, beneficial and non-target organisms, and the environment (adapted from the University of California Davis). http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/GENERAL/whatisipm.html
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Program: An annually updated document that farmers can demonstrate on-site. The program should summarize concrete goals and a plan for how to achieve these goals.

Public disclosure: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Nursing PadsGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate C1 as the total spend on polymers (e.g., polypropylene, polyethylene, superabsorbent polymer) from suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total spend on all polymers (e.g., polypropylene, polyethylene, superabsorbent polymer) from suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers responded to the most recent CDP Climate Change questionnaire you may refer to each supplier's CDP Climate Change responses to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Nursing PadsPackaging Raw Material SourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
ISO 18604: ISO 18604 (Packaging and the environment -- Material recycling) provides measurement standards for determining how recyclable a particular product is. https://www.iso.org/standard/55872.html

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Renewable material: “Material that is composed of biomass from a living source and that can be continually replenished. To be defined as renewable, virgin materials shall come from sources which are replenished at a rate equal to or greater than the rate of depletion.” (FTC Green Guides:2012)

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably-sourced material: Material for which it can be demonstrated through second- or third-party verification that the virgin raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities. Materials such as paper can be included in this definition if the source of the packaging content comes from sustainably-managed forests with no deforestation.
Nursing PadsProduct CertificationsCalculate B1-B3 as the sales of your product that underwent the specified certification, divided by the total sales of the product, them multiply by 100. The sum of B1-B3 may exceed 100% if product has more than one certification.Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

EPA Safer Choice Program: EPA developed the Safer Choice program in which companies can voluntarily participate by researching and reformulating their product to meet Safer Choice standards in order to earn the Safer Choice Label on their products. Safer Choice reviews the formulation of ingredients in terms of environmental and human health risk, and characteristics of concern within a functional class against the Master and Functional-Class Criteria documents. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

Environmental Working Group EWG VERIFIED™ Standard: The Environmental Working Group (EWG) is a non-profit, non-partisan organization dedicated to protecting human health and the environment. EWG produces research and educational guides on health hazards in food and personal care products. Companies work with EWG by disclosing ingredients not listed on labels and manufacturing processes that is then compared to EWG’s strict criteria standards and if they meet the criteria they receive the EWG verified mark. http://www.ewg.org/ewgverified/
N/AN/A
Nursing PadsSustainable Packaging Design and ProductionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

Recycle Now: Recycle Now is the national recycling effort in England. The website contains examples of recycling labels that may be used on packaging and how to interpret them. http://www.recyclenow.com/recycle/packaging-symbols-explained

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: The practice of minimizing material use and waste in production processes.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
First Aid SuppliesCertification - Virgin fluff pulpCalculate C1 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that only underwent third-party legality verification, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100. Do not include in this calculation any supply that is included under one of the other response options.
Calculate C2 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that had FSC Controlled Wood certification, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was certified to the SFI Fiber Sourcing Standard or sourced under a PEFC-Due Diligence System, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was FSC-certified, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C5 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was SFI-certified or certified under another PEFC-endorsed program, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
The sum of C1, C2, C3, C4, and C5 must not exceed 100%. Do not include the same fluff pulp supply in the calculation of more than one response option. The last day of the 12-month reporting period must be within 12 months of the completion date of this question.
CERFLOR - Brazilian Forest Certification Program: This organization is an independent, third-party certification program that focuses on sustainable management of natural and planted Amazonian tropical forests. CERFLOR is a PEFC-endorsed certification. https://www.pefc.org/discover-pefc/our-pefc-members/national-members/brazilian-forest-certification-programme-cerflor

CSA - Canadian Standards Association: CSA Group is an internationally-accredited standards development and testing and certification organization that provides consumer product evaluation, education, and training services dedicated to advancing safety, sustainability, and social good. Some programs include environmental product performance, management systems and processes, registry services, worker and workplace safety, energy efficiency verification, and greenhouse gas clean projects. Programs specific to wood sourcing are outlined in Canada's National Standard for Sustainable Forest Management. CSA is a PEFC-endorsed program. http://www.csagroup.org/

EU Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade Volunteer Partnership Agreement: Voluntary Partnership Agreements (VPAs) are a central element of the EU's strategy in the fight against illegal logging. A VPA is a bilateral trade agreement between the EU and a timber-exporting country outside the EU. https://www.euflegt.efi.int/vpa

FSC Forest Certification: Products with FSC certification come from responsibly managed forests that provide environmental, social, and economic benefits. The following website provides more information related to the principles that guide the certification process. https://us.fsc.org/en-us/certification

PEFC - Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification: The Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC) provides guidance for integrating best practices for the entire forest supply chain to ensure that timber and non-timber forest products are produced with consideration of ecological, social, and ethical standards. http://www.pefc.org

Rainforest Alliance Legality Verification: The Rainforest Alliance's legality verification standards verify the legality of the wood at the forest level and ensures the traceability of legal timber at all points in the supply chain (Chain of Custody). http://www.rainforest-alliance.org/business/forestry/verification/legal

SFI - Sustainable Forestry Initiative - Standard: The SFI Standard addresses sustainable forest management and responsible sourcing. SFI also has a chain of custody standard to track wood and paper flow through the supply chain. SFI is a PEFC-endorsed program. https://forests.org/sficertifiedsourcingstandard/
N/AN/A
First Aid SuppliesChemical recovery and recyclingExamples of chemical recovery and recycling during cellulosic fiber production include, but are not limited to, recovery of water, solvent, zinc, alkalis, and/or acids for reuse.N/AN/AN/A
First Aid SuppliesGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chain, fabricsScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate C1 as the spend on fabric from suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total spend on all fabric from suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers responded to the most recent CDP Climate Change questionnaire you may refer to each supplier's CDP Climate Change responses to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
First Aid SuppliesGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chain, plasticsScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate C1 as the spend on plastics from suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total spend on all plastics from suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers responded to the most recent CDP Climate Change questionnaire you may refer to each supplier's CDP Climate Change responses to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
First Aid SuppliesPackaging Raw Material SourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
ISO 18604: ISO 18604 (Packaging and the environment -- Material recycling) provides measurement standards for determining how recyclable a particular product is. https://www.iso.org/standard/55872.html

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Renewable material: “Material that is composed of biomass from a living source and that can be continually replenished. To be defined as renewable, virgin materials shall come from sources which are replenished at a rate equal to or greater than the rate of depletion.” (FTC Green Guides:2012)

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably-sourced material: Material for which it can be demonstrated through second- or third-party verification that the virgin raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities. Materials such as paper can be included in this definition if the source of the packaging content comes from sustainably-managed forests with no deforestation.
First Aid SuppliesPriority chemicals - Disclosure For this question, a priority chemical is one that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis. For (C) and (D), “chemicals present” refers to those chemicals which would be reasonably anticipated or suspected to be present in procured materials whether intentionally added or not. This includes reactive byproducts, residual monomers, and contaminants.
Relevant criteria in US EPA Safer Choice Program and Global Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals, listed below, may be used to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment.
Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Disclosure KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Disclosure KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750684

The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS): GHS provides specific human and environmental health criteria along with physical hazard criteria for chemicals in industry. These criteria are used for hazard communication and labeling of chemicals. https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/global.html
N/APriority chemical: A chemical that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis.
First Aid SuppliesPriority chemicals - ManagementFor this question, a priority chemical is one that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis.
Relevant criteria in the US EPA Safer Choice Program and Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals, listed below, may be used to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment.
For B, informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles.
For C, goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound. Public disclosure of goals and progress must have occurred within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Examples of tools and protocols for screening chemicals and assessing alternatives include green chemistry, alternatives analysis, restricted substances lists, and other tools that are listed in the Background Information.
GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

GreenSuite: GreenSuite is an environmental sustainability tool that can be customized to specific users' needs. Environmental issues throughout the supply chain are covered by this web based solution. http://greensuite360.com/index.html

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815

PRIO: PRIO is a web-based tool developed by the Swedish government to facilitate the assessment of environmental and health risks of chemicals. ? https://www.kemi.se/prioguiden/english/start

Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Management KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Management KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528286

The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS): GHS provides specific human and environmental health criteria along with physical hazard criteria for chemicals in industry. These criteria are used for hazard communication and labeling of chemicals. https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/global.html

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Exposure Assessment Tools and Models: According to their website, "The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) has developed several exposure assessment methods, databases, and predictive models to help in evaluating what happens to chemicals when they are used and released to the environment and how workers, the general public, consumers and the aquatic ecosystems may be exposed to chemicals." https://www.epa.gov/ceam/tools-data-exposure-assessment

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Sustainable Futures: According to their website, "The goal of the Sustainable Futures Initiative (SF) is to make new chemicals safer, available faster, and at lower cost. It works by giving chemical developers the same risk-screening models that EPA uses to evaluate new chemicals before they enter the market."? https://www.epa.gov/sustainable-futures
BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

Greenlist Process: According to their website, "In 2001, SC Johnson developed the Greenlist Process to classify ingredients in order to minimize the human and environmental impacts of their products." The process is now available for license to other companies and organizations. https://www.scjohnson.com/en/our-purpose/sustainability-report/explaining-the-sc-johnson-greenlist-program-an-excerpt-from-our-2017-sustainability-report

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Existing Chemicals Program: According to their website, "EPA's existing chemical programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and characterization, and risk management for chemical substances in commercial use." The current chemicals management program is undergoing review and update, including how the agency identifies and prioritizes priority chemicals for review and assessment under TSCA. https://www.epa.gov/compliance/toxic-substances-control-act-tsca-compliance-monitoring#chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
Public disclosure: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
First Aid SuppliesPriority chemicals - SafetyFor this question, a priority chemical is one that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis.
Relevant criteria in the US EPA Safer Choice Program and Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals, listed below, may be used to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment.
Examples of frameworks that define exposure scenarios and/or margins of safety include the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety's Notes of Guidance for the Testing of Cosmetic Substances and Their Safety Evaluation (10th Revision), the American Cleaning Institute's Consumer Product Ingredient Safety Handbook (2nd Edition), the Human and Environmental Risk Assessment project (HERA), and REACH's Guidance on Information Requirements and Chemical Safety Assessment.
Aggregate exposure is the total exposure to a consumer for a single ingredient from multiple product types. Cumulative risk assessment is "an analysis, characterization, and possible quantification of the combined risks to health or the environment from multiple agents or stressors" (EPA, 2003).
American Cleaning Institute's Consumer Product Ingredient Safety: Exposure and Risk Screening Methods for Consumer Product Ingredients: The main purpose of this book is to present methodologies and specific consumer exposure information that can be used for screening-level risk assessments of environmental and human exposures to high production volume (HPV) chemicals through the manufacturing and use of consumer products, mainly laundry, cleaning, and personal care products. The book is produced by the American Cleaning Institute (ACI; formerly, the Soap and Detergent Association) in collaboration with its partners and member companies. https://www.aciscience.org/docs/Consumer_Product_Ingredient_Safety_v2.0.pdf

European Chemicals Agency Guidance on Information Requirements and Chemical Safety Assessment (ECHA): This guidance document describes the information requirements under REACH with regard to substance properties, exposure, use and risk management measures, in the context of the chemical safety assessment. https://echa.europa.eu/guidance-documents/guidance-on-information-requirements-and-chemical-safety-assessment

Human and Environmental Risk Assessment (HERA): A voluntary industry programme to carry out Human and Environmental Risk Assessments on ingredients of household cleaning products. http://www.heraproject.com/RiskAssessment.cfm

Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Safety KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Safety KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528300

The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS): GHS provides specific human and environmental health criteria along with physical hazard criteria for chemicals in industry. These criteria are used for hazard communication and labeling of chemicals. https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/global.html

The SCCS Notes of Guidance for the Testing of Cosmetic Substances and Their Safety Evaluation - 10th Revision: The SCCS Notes of Guidance for the Testing of Cosmetic Ingredients and Their Safety Evaluation is a document compiled by the members of the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety (SCCS). The document contains information on the different aspects of testing and safety evaluation of cosmetic substances in Europe, with an emphasis on cosmetic ingredients and finished products. It is designed to provide guidance to public authorities and to the cosmetic industry in order to improve harmonized compliance with the current cosmetic EU legislation. https://op.europa.eu/en/publication-detail/-/publication/1d5f1653-38ce-11e9-8d04-01aa75ed71a1/language-en/format-PDF/source-87840423
EPA - Framework for Cumulative Risk Assessment: This EPA document provides background information for cumulative risk assessment. The presented framework outlines important factors for addressing scientific issues of cumulative risk assessment and presents a foundation of key elements for the cumulative risk assessment process. https://www.epa.gov/risk/framework-cumulative-risk-assessment

REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57, Annex XIV: This annex of the European Community's Registration, Evaluation, Authorization, and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) regulations describes substances to be included in regulation in accordance with the procedure described in Article 58. http://www.reachonline.eu/REACH/EN/REACH_EN/article57.html

UL Assessing the Safety of Personal Care Products: Original research paper published by UL, entitled: "Assessing the Safety of Personal Care Products: Comparative Analysis of Health Risk Assessment Frameworks and Recommendations for Best Practices. UL conducted its research in order to facilitate a path forward for improved personal care product development. This research includes an assessment of views expressed by non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and activists, as well as views from safety, stewardship, and sustainability experts from the retail, brand, and chemical supplier communities. It explores various elements of a full safety assessment, including hazard characterization, exposure assessment, dose response, and risk characterization. https://msc.ul.com/en/resources/white-papers/personal-care-product-health-risk-assessment-study/
Cumulative risk assessment: An analysis of the combined risks to health or the environment from multiple agents or stressors.
First Aid SuppliesProduct CertificationsCalculate B1-B3 as the sales of your product that underwent the specified certification, divided by the total sales of the product, them multiply by 100. The sum of B1-B3 may exceed 100% if product has more than one certification.Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

EPA Safer Choice Program: EPA developed the Safer Choice program in which companies can voluntarily participate by researching and reformulating their product to meet Safer Choice standards in order to earn the Safer Choice Label on their products. Safer Choice reviews the formulation of ingredients in terms of environmental and human health risk, and characteristics of concern within a functional class against the Master and Functional-Class Criteria documents. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

Environmental Working Group EWG VERIFIED™ Standard: The Environmental Working Group (EWG) is a non-profit, non-partisan organization dedicated to protecting human health and the environment. EWG produces research and educational guides on health hazards in food and personal care products. Companies work with EWG by disclosing ingredients not listed on labels and manufacturing processes that is then compared to EWG’s strict criteria standards and if they meet the criteria they receive the EWG verified mark. http://www.ewg.org/ewgverified/
N/AN/A
First Aid SuppliesSustainable Packaging Design and ProductionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

Recycle Now: Recycle Now is the national recycling effort in England. The website contains examples of recycling labels that may be used on packaging and how to interpret them. http://www.recyclenow.com/recycle/packaging-symbols-explained

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: The practice of minimizing material use and waste in production processes.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
First Aid SuppliesWater use - Supply chain, nonwovensCalculate C1 as the total spend on nonwoven material suppliers that reported their annual water use, divided by total spend on all nonwoven material suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using spend data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Water use is defined as the total amount of withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells. Supplier water use reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
If suppliers completed the CDP Water Security Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report water use.
N/ACDP Water Information Request: The CDP Water Information Request provides questions that assess a company's water use, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. CDP can be contacted to respond to the Water Information Request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/
Water use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.
Sexual Health ProductsCertification - Virgin fluff pulpCalculate C1 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that only underwent third-party legality verification, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100. Do not include in this calculation any supply that is included under one of the other response options.
Calculate C2 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that had FSC Controlled Wood certification, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was certified to the SFI Fiber Sourcing Standard or sourced under a PEFC-Due Diligence System, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was FSC-certified, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C5 as the dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply that was SFI-certified or certified under another PEFC-endorsed program, divided by the total dry mass of your virgin fluff pulp supply, then multiply by 100.
The sum of C1, C2, C3, C4, and C5 must not exceed 100%. Do not include the same fluff pulp supply in the calculation of more than one response option. The last day of the 12-month reporting period must be within 12 months of the completion date of this question.
CERFLOR - Brazilian Forest Certification Program: This organization is an independent, third-party certification program that focuses on sustainable management of natural and planted Amazonian tropical forests. CERFLOR is a PEFC-endorsed certification. https://www.pefc.org/discover-pefc/our-pefc-members/national-members/brazilian-forest-certification-programme-cerflor

CSA - Canadian Standards Association: CSA Group is an internationally-accredited standards development and testing and certification organization that provides consumer product evaluation, education, and training services dedicated to advancing safety, sustainability, and social good. Some programs include environmental product performance, management systems and processes, registry services, worker and workplace safety, energy efficiency verification, and greenhouse gas clean projects. Programs specific to wood sourcing are outlined in Canada's National Standard for Sustainable Forest Management. CSA is a PEFC-endorsed program. http://www.csagroup.org/

EU Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade Volunteer Partnership Agreement: Voluntary Partnership Agreements (VPAs) are a central element of the EU's strategy in the fight against illegal logging. A VPA is a bilateral trade agreement between the EU and a timber-exporting country outside the EU. https://www.euflegt.efi.int/vpa

FSC Forest Certification: Products with FSC certification come from responsibly managed forests that provide environmental, social, and economic benefits. The following website provides more information related to the principles that guide the certification process. https://us.fsc.org/en-us/certification

PEFC - Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification: The Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC) provides guidance for integrating best practices for the entire forest supply chain to ensure that timber and non-timber forest products are produced with consideration of ecological, social, and ethical standards. http://www.pefc.org

Rainforest Alliance Legality Verification: The Rainforest Alliance's legality verification standards verify the legality of the wood at the forest level and ensures the traceability of legal timber at all points in the supply chain (Chain of Custody). http://www.rainforest-alliance.org/business/forestry/verification/legal

SFI - Sustainable Forestry Initiative - Standard: The SFI Standard addresses sustainable forest management and responsible sourcing. SFI also has a chain of custody standard to track wood and paper flow through the supply chain. SFI is a PEFC-endorsed program. https://forests.org/sficertifiedsourcingstandard/
N/AN/A
Sexual Health ProductsChemical recovery and recyclingExamples of chemical recovery and recycling during cellulosic fiber production include, but are not limited to, recovery of water, solvent, zinc, alkalis, and/or acids for reuse.N/AN/AN/A
Sexual Health ProductsGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chain, fabricsScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate C1 as the spend on fabric from suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total spend on all fabric from suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers responded to the most recent CDP Climate Change questionnaire you may refer to each supplier's CDP Climate Change responses to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Sexual Health ProductsGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chain, plasticsScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate C1 as the spend on plastics from suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total spend on all plastics from suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers responded to the most recent CDP Climate Change questionnaire you may refer to each supplier's CDP Climate Change responses to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Sexual Health ProductsPackaging Raw Material SourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
ISO 18604: ISO 18604 (Packaging and the environment -- Material recycling) provides measurement standards for determining how recyclable a particular product is. https://www.iso.org/standard/55872.html

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Renewable material: “Material that is composed of biomass from a living source and that can be continually replenished. To be defined as renewable, virgin materials shall come from sources which are replenished at a rate equal to or greater than the rate of depletion.” (FTC Green Guides:2012)

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably-sourced material: Material for which it can be demonstrated through second- or third-party verification that the virgin raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities. Materials such as paper can be included in this definition if the source of the packaging content comes from sustainably-managed forests with no deforestation.
Sexual Health ProductsPriority chemicals - Disclosure For this question, a priority chemical is one that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis. For (C) and (D), “chemicals present” refers to those chemicals which would be reasonably anticipated or suspected to be present in procured materials whether intentionally added or not. This includes reactive byproducts, residual monomers, and contaminants.
Relevant criteria in US EPA Safer Choice Program and Global Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals, listed below, may be used to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment.
Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Disclosure KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Disclosure KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750684

The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS): GHS provides specific human and environmental health criteria along with physical hazard criteria for chemicals in industry. These criteria are used for hazard communication and labeling of chemicals. https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/global.html
N/APriority chemical: A chemical that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis.
Sexual Health ProductsPriority chemicals - ManagementFor this question, a priority chemical is one that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis.
Relevant criteria in the US EPA Safer Choice Program and Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals, listed below, may be used to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment.
For B, informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles.
For C, goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound. Public disclosure of goals and progress must have occurred within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Examples of tools and protocols for screening chemicals and assessing alternatives include green chemistry, alternatives analysis, restricted substances lists, and other tools that are listed in the Background Information.
GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

GreenSuite: GreenSuite is an environmental sustainability tool that can be customized to specific users' needs. Environmental issues throughout the supply chain are covered by this web based solution. http://greensuite360.com/index.html

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815

PRIO: PRIO is a web-based tool developed by the Swedish government to facilitate the assessment of environmental and health risks of chemicals. ? https://www.kemi.se/prioguiden/english/start

Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Management KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Management KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528286

The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS): GHS provides specific human and environmental health criteria along with physical hazard criteria for chemicals in industry. These criteria are used for hazard communication and labeling of chemicals. https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/global.html

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Exposure Assessment Tools and Models: According to their website, "The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) has developed several exposure assessment methods, databases, and predictive models to help in evaluating what happens to chemicals when they are used and released to the environment and how workers, the general public, consumers and the aquatic ecosystems may be exposed to chemicals." https://www.epa.gov/ceam/tools-data-exposure-assessment

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Sustainable Futures: According to their website, "The goal of the Sustainable Futures Initiative (SF) is to make new chemicals safer, available faster, and at lower cost. It works by giving chemical developers the same risk-screening models that EPA uses to evaluate new chemicals before they enter the market."? https://www.epa.gov/sustainable-futures
BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

Greenlist Process: According to their website, "In 2001, SC Johnson developed the Greenlist Process to classify ingredients in order to minimize the human and environmental impacts of their products." The process is now available for license to other companies and organizations. https://www.scjohnson.com/en/our-purpose/sustainability-report/explaining-the-sc-johnson-greenlist-program-an-excerpt-from-our-2017-sustainability-report

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Existing Chemicals Program: According to their website, "EPA's existing chemical programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and characterization, and risk management for chemical substances in commercial use." The current chemicals management program is undergoing review and update, including how the agency identifies and prioritizes priority chemicals for review and assessment under TSCA. https://www.epa.gov/compliance/toxic-substances-control-act-tsca-compliance-monitoring#chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
Public disclosure: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Sexual Health ProductsPriority chemicals - SafetyFor this question, a priority chemical is one that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis.
Relevant criteria in the US EPA Safer Choice Program and Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals, listed below, may be used to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment.
Examples of frameworks that define exposure scenarios and/or margins of safety include the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety's Notes of Guidance for the Testing of Cosmetic Substances and Their Safety Evaluation (10th Revision), the American Cleaning Institute's Consumer Product Ingredient Safety Handbook (2nd Edition), the Human and Environmental Risk Assessment project (HERA), and REACH's Guidance on Information Requirements and Chemical Safety Assessment.
Aggregate exposure is the total exposure to a consumer for a single ingredient from multiple product types. Cumulative risk assessment is "an analysis, characterization, and possible quantification of the combined risks to health or the environment from multiple agents or stressors" (EPA, 2003).
American Cleaning Institute's Consumer Product Ingredient Safety: Exposure and Risk Screening Methods for Consumer Product Ingredients: The main purpose of this book is to present methodologies and specific consumer exposure information that can be used for screening-level risk assessments of environmental and human exposures to high production volume (HPV) chemicals through the manufacturing and use of consumer products, mainly laundry, cleaning, and personal care products. The book is produced by the American Cleaning Institute (ACI; formerly, the Soap and Detergent Association) in collaboration with its partners and member companies. https://www.aciscience.org/docs/Consumer_Product_Ingredient_Safety_v2.0.pdf

European Chemicals Agency Guidance on Information Requirements and Chemical Safety Assessment (ECHA): This guidance document describes the information requirements under REACH with regard to substance properties, exposure, use and risk management measures, in the context of the chemical safety assessment. https://echa.europa.eu/guidance-documents/guidance-on-information-requirements-and-chemical-safety-assessment

Human and Environmental Risk Assessment (HERA): A voluntary industry programme to carry out Human and Environmental Risk Assessments on ingredients of household cleaning products. http://www.heraproject.com/RiskAssessment.cfm

Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Safety KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Safety KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528300

The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS): GHS provides specific human and environmental health criteria along with physical hazard criteria for chemicals in industry. These criteria are used for hazard communication and labeling of chemicals. https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/global.html

The SCCS Notes of Guidance for the Testing of Cosmetic Substances and Their Safety Evaluation - 10th Revision: The SCCS Notes of Guidance for the Testing of Cosmetic Ingredients and Their Safety Evaluation is a document compiled by the members of the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety (SCCS). The document contains information on the different aspects of testing and safety evaluation of cosmetic substances in Europe, with an emphasis on cosmetic ingredients and finished products. It is designed to provide guidance to public authorities and to the cosmetic industry in order to improve harmonized compliance with the current cosmetic EU legislation. https://op.europa.eu/en/publication-detail/-/publication/1d5f1653-38ce-11e9-8d04-01aa75ed71a1/language-en/format-PDF/source-87840423
EPA - Framework for Cumulative Risk Assessment: This EPA document provides background information for cumulative risk assessment. The presented framework outlines important factors for addressing scientific issues of cumulative risk assessment and presents a foundation of key elements for the cumulative risk assessment process. https://www.epa.gov/risk/framework-cumulative-risk-assessment

REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57, Annex XIV: This annex of the European Community's Registration, Evaluation, Authorization, and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) regulations describes substances to be included in regulation in accordance with the procedure described in Article 58. http://www.reachonline.eu/REACH/EN/REACH_EN/article57.html

UL Assessing the Safety of Personal Care Products: Original research paper published by UL, entitled: "Assessing the Safety of Personal Care Products: Comparative Analysis of Health Risk Assessment Frameworks and Recommendations for Best Practices. UL conducted its research in order to facilitate a path forward for improved personal care product development. This research includes an assessment of views expressed by non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and activists, as well as views from safety, stewardship, and sustainability experts from the retail, brand, and chemical supplier communities. It explores various elements of a full safety assessment, including hazard characterization, exposure assessment, dose response, and risk characterization. https://msc.ul.com/en/resources/white-papers/personal-care-product-health-risk-assessment-study/
Cumulative risk assessment: An analysis of the combined risks to health or the environment from multiple agents or stressors.
Sexual Health ProductsProduct CertificationsCalculate B1-B3 as the sales of your product that underwent the specified certification, divided by the total sales of the product, them multiply by 100. The sum of B1-B3 may exceed 100% if product has more than one certification.Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

EPA Safer Choice Program: EPA developed the Safer Choice program in which companies can voluntarily participate by researching and reformulating their product to meet Safer Choice standards in order to earn the Safer Choice Label on their products. Safer Choice reviews the formulation of ingredients in terms of environmental and human health risk, and characteristics of concern within a functional class against the Master and Functional-Class Criteria documents. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

Environmental Working Group EWG VERIFIED™ Standard: The Environmental Working Group (EWG) is a non-profit, non-partisan organization dedicated to protecting human health and the environment. EWG produces research and educational guides on health hazards in food and personal care products. Companies work with EWG by disclosing ingredients not listed on labels and manufacturing processes that is then compared to EWG’s strict criteria standards and if they meet the criteria they receive the EWG verified mark. http://www.ewg.org/ewgverified/
N/AN/A
Sexual Health ProductsSustainable Packaging Design and ProductionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

Recycle Now: Recycle Now is the national recycling effort in England. The website contains examples of recycling labels that may be used on packaging and how to interpret them. http://www.recyclenow.com/recycle/packaging-symbols-explained

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: The practice of minimizing material use and waste in production processes.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
Sexual Health ProductsWater use - Supply chain, nonwovensCalculate C1 as the total spend on nonwoven material suppliers that reported their annual water use, divided by total spend on all nonwoven material suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using spend data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Water use is defined as the total amount of withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells. Supplier water use reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
If suppliers completed the CDP Water Security Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report water use.
N/ACDP Water Information Request: The CDP Water Information Request provides questions that assess a company's water use, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. CDP can be contacted to respond to the Water Information Request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/
Water use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.
AdhesivesAnimal testing - Alternative approachesThe scope of this question includes testing that is performed by your organization or a contracted organization.
Toxicity endpoints include those that are used to perform a hazard assessment that may be required for by regulatory agencies or authorities. An overview of applicable toxicity endpoints and animal alternatives along with their validation status can be found at "AltTox.org - Toxicity Endpoints & Tests" in the Background Information section of this KPI.
Major research initiatives are government, university, or privately based programs that are dedicated to the replacement, reduction, and refinement of animal testing by advancing non-animal alternative testing methods through effective development, validation, use, and/or communication. Examples of major research initiatives include, but are not limited to, JaCVAM, ECVAM, ICCVAM, CAAT, and ZEBET.
N/AAltTox.org: According to their website, "AltTox.org is a website dedicated to advancing non-animal methods of toxicity testing, both to better protect the health of humans, animals, and the environment and to reduce the numbers and suffering of animals used in current toxicology assessments." http://www.alttox.org/spotlight/055.html

Doerenkamp-Zbinden Foundation (DZF): According to their website, "The Doerenkamp-Zbinden Foundation has continued to actively support a number of projects in the field of alternatives to animal testing in biomedical sciences." http://www.doerenkamp.ch/en/default.html?id=11

European Union Reference Laboratory for Alternatives to Animal Testing (EURL ECVAM): EURL ECVAM is dedicated to the advancement of animal testing alternatives by promoting non-animal alternatives through scientific research, validation, and independent evaluation. ECVAM’s ultimate goal is enhanced safety at multiple life cycle stages with decreased reliance on animal testing. https://ec.europa.eu/jrc/en/eurl/ecvam

Japanese Center for Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM): JaCVAM is an institute that is dedicated to the promotion of the reduction, refinement, and replacement of animal testing used to justify chemical safety in Japan. This mission is achieved in part through international collaboration. https://www.jacvam.jp/en/index.html

Japanese Society for Alternatives to Animal Experiments: This site contains a link to The Center of Alternatives Methods for Safety Evaluation of Cosmetics. http://www.asas.or.jp/jsaae/eng/outline/index.html

National Center for Evaluation and Documentation of Alternative Methods to Animal Experiments at the Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (ZEBET): According to the BfR website, the ZEBET "Unit supports the development and use of alternative methods to animal experiments." https://www.bfr.bund.de/en/unit__centre_for_documentation_and_evaluation_of_alternative_methods_to_animal_experiments__zebet_-53868.html

National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research: According to their website, "The National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs) is a leader in the discovery and application of new technologies and approaches to minimize the use of animals for research purposes and improve their welfare (the 3Rs). Primarily funded by the government, charitable and private donations, NC3R funds research, supports training and development, and stimulates changes in regulations and practice." https://www.nc3rs.org.uk/

The Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM): ICCVAM is an interagency committee composed of representatives from 15 U.S. federal regulatory and research agencies that require, use, generate, or disseminate toxicological and safety testing information used to determine the safety or potential adverse health effects of chemicals and products to which workers and consumers may be exposed. https://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/whatwestudy/niceatm/iccvam/index.html
N/A
AdhesivesDesign for the environment - FormulationThis question does not address packaging materials.
For formulated goods, minimization of negative impacts to humans and the environment can be achieved through actions such as prioritization and continual reduction, elimination, or restriction of hazardous substances.
Examples of tools, standards, and certifications that can be used to minimize negative impacts include, but are not limited to, those below.
You may select response A if you do not produce products for end consumers.
Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

EPA Safer Choice Program: EPA developed the Safer Choice program in which companies can voluntarily participate by researching and reformulating their product to meet Safer Choice standards in order to earn the Safer Choice Label on their products. Safer Choice reviews the formulation of ingredients in terms of environmental and human health risk, and characteristics of concern within a functional class against the Master and Functional-Class Criteria documents. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

OECD Guideline for the Testing of Chemicals, Ready Biodegradability: Test Number 301 of the OECD Guidelines for the Testing of Chemicals (Section 3) outlines six methods for the screening of ready biodegradability. "The methods are: the DOC Die-Away, the CO2 Evolution (Modified Sturm Test), the MITI (I) (Ministry of International Trade and Industry, Japan), the Closed Bottle, the Modified OECD Screening and the Manometric Respirometry." http://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/environment/test-no-301-ready-biodegradability_9789264070349-en
Autodesk - Design for Sustainability: Autodesk® Sustainability Workshop provides resources, tools and online learning opportunities to teach the principles of sustainable design. https://academy.autodesk.com/sustainable-design

BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

Guidelines for Formulating and Designing Green Products: Earth Friendly Products provides a technical overview of the factors to consider when formulating and designing sustainable products. Key aspects of design include life cycle assessment of products, minimization of resource consumption, synergy of ingredients, and effective package design. http://ecos.com/assets/uploads/2013/10/EFP-Guidelines-for-Product-Development-and-Designedited2016.pdf

The Guide to Safer Chemicals: The Guide to Safer Chemicals provides guidance on how to design and implement a chemicals management program based on the Principles for Safer Chemicals. The Principles and Guide were developed by BizNGO, a collaboration of business and NGO leaders to create and adopt "safer chemicals and sustainable materials." https://www.bizngo.org/safer-chemicals/guide-to-safer-chemicals
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Public disclosure: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
AdhesivesGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the total spend on ingredients from suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total spend on all ingredients from suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers responded to the most recent CDP Climate Change questionnaire you may refer to each supplier's CDP Climate Change responses to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.

Public disclosure: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
AdhesivesIngredient transparency - Business to consumerCalculate B1 as the revenue generated from your products for which you disclose ingredient identity online or via telephone, divided by the total revenue from all of your products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B2 as the revenue generated from your products for which you have on-label disclosure of ingredient identity, divided by the total revenue from all of your products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B3 as the revenue generated from your products for which you have disclosed information about the functionality of the ingredients (online, via telephone, or on-label), divided by the total revenue from all of your products, then multiply by 100.
Online disclosure includes either websites or mobile applications referenced on the product label. Telephone disclosure includes providing a toll-free phone number on a product label for consumers to call to obtain ingredient information. On-label disclosure includes ingredient information printed directly on your product’s packaging. Ingredient functionality disclosure includes a statement of the purpose of the ingredient used in your product either online, via telephone, or on-label.
Best-in-class practices for ingredient disclosure outlined by the nationally recognized standards listed below include listing ingredients by INCI, CAS, IUPAC, CSPA Ingredient Dictionary, or common chemical name in descending order of concentration. Where needed to ensure the protection of confidential business information, chemical function or chemical class labels may be used. Fragrance components may reference a list or subset list of the ingredients authored by the International Fragrance Association (IFRA) or another list that represents the fragrance materials used in the product.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
American Cleaning Institute (ACI) Ingredient Central: ?In collaboration with the Household & Commercial Products Association (HCPA) and the Canadian Consumer Specialty Products Association (CCSPA), the American Cleaning Institute (ACI) has developed an ingredient communication initiative that provides consumers with ingredient information for four main product categories: air care, automotive care, cleaning, and polishes and floor maintenance products. https://www.cleaninginstitute.org/ingredient_central/

EPA Safer Choice Program: EPA developed the Safer Choice program in which companies can voluntarily participate by researching and reformulating their product to meet Safer Choice standards in order to earn the Safer Choice Label on their products. Safer Choice reviews the formulation of ingredients in terms of environmental and human health risk, and characteristics of concern within a functional class against the Master and Functional-Class Criteria documents. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

The Household & Commercial Products Association (HCPA) Dictionary: The Household & Commercial Products Association (HCPA) Dictionary is the only source for definitions of the chemicals used specifically in household and automotive care consumer products. Companies engaged in ingredient communication can use the HCPA Dictionary to assure maximum transparency for consumers who want to know what ingredients are in the products they buy and use. Consumers can access information on product ingredients through the free HCPA Consumer Product Ingredients Dictionary Guides, which cross-reference HCPA Names with trade names, CAS numbers, and other technical names. Through referencing these Guides, consumers can better understand the ingredients lists on company web sites. https://www.thehcpa.org/resources/ingredient-dictionary/
N/AN/A
AdhesivesPackaging raw material sourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

ISO 18604: ISO 18604 (Packaging and the environment -- Material recycling) provides measurement standards for determining how recyclable a particular product is. https://www.iso.org/standard/55872.html

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)
AdhesivesPalm Oil, Palm Kernel Oil, and Derivative Ingredient SourcingYour palm oil supply includes all palm oil, palm kernel oil, and their chemically-derived ingredients purchased or produced for inclusion in your final products. "Chemically-derived ingredients" refers to any material that originated from a chemical reaction that included palm oil or palm kernel oil as a raw material.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your certified palm oil ingredient supply for your products that was purchased through RSPO book and claim (e.g., GreenPalm), divided by the total mass of your palm oil ingredient supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your certified palm oil ingredient supply for your products that was purchased through RSPO mass balance, divided by the total mass of your palm oil ingredient supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your certified palm oil ingredient supply for your products that was purchased through RSPO segregated, divided by the total mass of your palm oil ingredient supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the mass of your certified palm oil ingredient supply for your products that was purchased through RSPO identity preserved, divided by the total mass of your palm oil ingredient supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Consumer Goods Forum Palm Oil Roadmap (CGF - Palm Oil 2021): The Consumer Good Forum (CGF) Palm Oil Roadmap is a guide for companies implementing their own policies and practices for sourcing palm oil more sustainably and achieving deforestation reduction goals. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/20150810-Sustainable-Plam-Oil-Sourcing-Guidelines-Final-Version-1.pdf

GreenPalm - Certified Sustainable Palm Oil: The GreenPalm trading program allows companies to support RSPO growers and suppliers by allowing them to purchase book and claim certificates of RSPO to offset their use of palm and palm kernel oil. http://greenpalm.org/

RSPO - Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil - Certification: The RSPO certification is a seal of approval ensuring that the palm oil is traceable through the supply chain by certifying each facility that processes or uses it. RSPO was founded on and supports principles for palm oil production including transparency, regulatory compliance, financial viability, natural resource conservation, and continuous improvement. http://www.rspo.org/about

RSPO supply chain models Book and Claim, Mass Balance, Segregated, and Identity Preserved: The palm oil and palm oil-derived ingredients may go through many production and logistical stages between plantations and the end product. Any individual batch of palm oil and palm oil-derived ingredients can be traded through one of four supply chain models that are approved by RSPO - Book and Claim, Mass Balance, Segregated, and Identity Preserved. https://rspo.org/certification/supply-chains
Palm Oil Innovation Group Charter (2019): The Palm Oil Innovation Group (POIG) Charter supports the group's goals to support innovation and improvements in palm oil plantation management, create value for those using the practices outlined, and be a platform for communication for plantation managers and governments. http://poig.org/the-poig-charter/

Walmart Sustainability Hub Forest Conservation (Walmart 2021): This website offers resources and guidance to support supplier engagement for deforestation-risk commodities (i.e. beef, cocoa, palm oil, and soy) in the jurisdictional approach to encourage forest conservation in places at highest risk of deforestation. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/forest-conservation
Chemically-derived ingredients: Any material that originated from a chemical reaction that included palm oil or palm kernel oil as a raw material. Examples of ingredients that may be derived from palm oil or palm kernel oil include, but are not limited to: surfactants such as sodium lauryl sulfate, sodium laureth sulfate, and sodium dodecyl sulphate; emulsifiers such as glyceryl stearate, steareth-20, and cetyl alcohol, as well as emollients such as palmitic acid.
AdhesivesPriority chemicals - Disclosure For this question, a priority chemical is one that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis. For (C) and (D), “chemicals present” refers to those chemicals which would be reasonably anticipated or suspected to be present in procured materials whether intentionally added or not. This includes reactive byproducts, residual monomers, and contaminants.
Relevant criteria in US EPA Safer Choice Program and Global Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals, listed below, may be used to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment.
Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Disclosure KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Disclosure KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750684

The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS): GHS provides specific human and environmental health criteria along with physical hazard criteria for chemicals in industry. These criteria are used for hazard communication and labeling of chemicals. https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/global.html
N/AN/A
AdhesivesPriority chemicals - ManagementFor this question, a priority chemical is one that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis.
Relevant criteria in the US EPA Safer Choice Program and Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals, listed below, may be used to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment.
For B, informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles.
For C, goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound. Public disclosure of goals and progress must have occurred within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Examples of tools and protocols for screening chemicals and assessing alternatives include green chemistry, alternatives analysis, restricted substances lists, and other tools that are listed in the Background Information.
GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

GreenSuite: GreenSuite is an environmental sustainability tool that can be customized to specific users' needs. Environmental issues throughout the supply chain are covered by this web based solution. http://greensuite360.com/index.html

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815

PRIO: PRIO is a web-based tool developed by the Swedish government to facilitate the assessment of environmental and health risks of chemicals. ? https://www.kemi.se/prioguiden/english/start

Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Management KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Management KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528286

The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS): GHS provides specific human and environmental health criteria along with physical hazard criteria for chemicals in industry. These criteria are used for hazard communication and labeling of chemicals. https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/global.html

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Exposure Assessment Tools and Models: According to their website, "The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) has developed several exposure assessment methods, databases, and predictive models to help in evaluating what happens to chemicals when they are used and released to the environment and how workers, the general public, consumers and the aquatic ecosystems may be exposed to chemicals." https://www.epa.gov/ceam/tools-data-exposure-assessment

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Sustainable Futures: According to their website, "The goal of the Sustainable Futures Initiative (SF) is to make new chemicals safer, available faster, and at lower cost. It works by giving chemical developers the same risk-screening models that EPA uses to evaluate new chemicals before they enter the market."? https://www.epa.gov/sustainable-futures
BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

Greenlist Process: According to their website, "In 2001, SC Johnson developed the Greenlist Process to classify ingredients in order to minimize the human and environmental impacts of their products." The process is now available for license to other companies and organizations. https://www.scjohnson.com/en/our-purpose/sustainability-report/explaining-the-sc-johnson-greenlist-program-an-excerpt-from-our-2017-sustainability-report

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Existing Chemicals Program: According to their website, "EPA's existing chemical programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and characterization, and risk management for chemical substances in commercial use." The current chemicals management program is undergoing review and update, including how the agency identifies and prioritizes priority chemicals for review and assessment under TSCA. https://www.epa.gov/compliance/toxic-substances-control-act-tsca-compliance-monitoring#chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
Public disclosure: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
AdhesivesPriority chemicals - SafetyFor this question, a priority chemical is one that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis.
Relevant criteria in the US EPA Safer Choice Program and Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals, listed below, may be used to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment.
Examples of frameworks that define exposure scenarios and/or margins of safety include the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety's Notes of Guidance for the Testing of Cosmetic Substances and Their Safety Evaluation (10th Revision), the American Cleaning Institute's Consumer Product Ingredient Safety Handbook (2nd Edition), the Human and Environmental Risk Assessment project (HERA), and REACH's Guidance on Information Requirements and Chemical Safety Assessment.
Aggregate exposure is the total exposure to a consumer for a single ingredient from multiple product types. Cumulative risk assessment is "an analysis, characterization, and possible quantification of the combined risks to health or the environment from multiple agents or stressors" (EPA, 2003).
American Cleaning Institute's Consumer Product Ingredient Safety: Exposure and Risk Screening Methods for Consumer Product Ingredients: The main purpose of this book is to present methodologies and specific consumer exposure information that can be used for screening-level risk assessments of environmental and human exposures to high production volume (HPV) chemicals through the manufacturing and use of consumer products, mainly laundry, cleaning, and personal care products. The book is produced by the American Cleaning Institute (ACI; formerly, the Soap and Detergent Association) in collaboration with its partners and member companies. https://www.aciscience.org/docs/Consumer_Product_Ingredient_Safety_v2.0.pdf

European Chemicals Agency Guidance on Information Requirements and Chemical Safety Assessment (ECHA): This guidance document describes the information requirements under REACH with regard to substance properties, exposure, use and risk management measures, in the context of the chemical safety assessment. https://echa.europa.eu/guidance-documents/guidance-on-information-requirements-and-chemical-safety-assessment

Human and Environmental Risk Assessment (HERA): A voluntary industry programme to carry out Human and Environmental Risk Assessments on ingredients of household cleaning products. http://www.heraproject.com/RiskAssessment.cfm

Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Safety KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Safety KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528300

The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS): GHS provides specific human and environmental health criteria along with physical hazard criteria for chemicals in industry. These criteria are used for hazard communication and labeling of chemicals. https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/global.html

The SCCS Notes of Guidance for the Testing of Cosmetic Substances and Their Safety Evaluation - 10th Revision: The SCCS Notes of Guidance for the Testing of Cosmetic Ingredients and Their Safety Evaluation is a document compiled by the members of the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety (SCCS). The document contains information on the different aspects of testing and safety evaluation of cosmetic substances in Europe, with an emphasis on cosmetic ingredients and finished products. It is designed to provide guidance to public authorities and to the cosmetic industry in order to improve harmonized compliance with the current cosmetic EU legislation. https://op.europa.eu/en/publication-detail/-/publication/1d5f1653-38ce-11e9-8d04-01aa75ed71a1/language-en/format-PDF/source-87840423
EPA - Framework for Cumulative Risk Assessment: This EPA document provides background information for cumulative risk assessment. The presented framework outlines important factors for addressing scientific issues of cumulative risk assessment and presents a foundation of key elements for the cumulative risk assessment process. https://www.epa.gov/risk/framework-cumulative-risk-assessment

REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57, Annex XIV: This annex of the European Community's Registration, Evaluation, Authorization, and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) regulations describes substances to be included in regulation in accordance with the procedure described in Article 58. http://www.reachonline.eu/REACH/EN/REACH_EN/article57.html

UL Assessing the Safety of Personal Care Products: Original research paper published by UL, entitled: "Assessing the Safety of Personal Care Products: Comparative Analysis of Health Risk Assessment Frameworks and Recommendations for Best Practices. UL conducted its research in order to facilitate a path forward for improved personal care product development. This research includes an assessment of views expressed by non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and activists, as well as views from safety, stewardship, and sustainability experts from the retail, brand, and chemical supplier communities. It explores various elements of a full safety assessment, including hazard characterization, exposure assessment, dose response, and risk characterization. https://msc.ul.com/en/resources/white-papers/personal-care-product-health-risk-assessment-study/
Cumulative risk assessment: An analysis of the combined risks to health or the environment from multiple agents or stressors.
AdhesivesProduct CertificationsCalculate B1-B3 as the sales of your product that underwent the specified certification, divided by the total sales of the product, them multiply by 100. The sum of B1-B3 may exceed 100% if product has more than one certification.Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

EPA Safer Choice Program: EPA developed the Safer Choice program in which companies can voluntarily participate by researching and reformulating their product to meet Safer Choice standards in order to earn the Safer Choice Label on their products. Safer Choice reviews the formulation of ingredients in terms of environmental and human health risk, and characteristics of concern within a functional class against the Master and Functional-Class Criteria documents. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

Environmental Working Group EWG VERIFIED™ Standard: The Environmental Working Group (EWG) is a non-profit, non-partisan organization dedicated to protecting human health and the environment. EWG produces research and educational guides on health hazards in food and personal care products. Companies work with EWG by disclosing ingredients not listed on labels and manufacturing processes that is then compared to EWG’s strict criteria standards and if they meet the criteria they receive the EWG verified mark. http://www.ewg.org/ewgverified/
N/AN/A
AdhesivesProduct stewardshipThis question addresses takeback programs that an organization may fund, contract, or physically operate, in whole or in part, to enable consumers to return products for responsible end-of-life management. Include only products and materials for which an organization has the ability to decide or influence the handling, treatment, and disposal of returned materials. These calculations should be made at the program level rather than category level. The same percentage can be reported across multiple product categories if the products are collected and managed in the same program within the organization. Separate programs require separate percentage calculations when reported in different product category questionnaires. If products under the same category are collected in separate programs, average the recycling performance of the two programs and report that value in D1.
Calculate D1 as the number of product units returned through the program(s) for recycling divided by the total number of product units sold, then multiply by 100. If this number exceeds 100, report it as 100.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Data for both the unit volume returned and unit volume sold should come from the same year, even though units may be returned in a different year than they were sold.
Examples of stewardship programs include extended producer responsibility programs and product takeback programs. Such programs should ensure that materials are recycled or disposed of in an environmentally sensitive manner.
THESIS Help Center Video: Product Stewardship KPI: Short video tutorial on the Product Stewardship KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750712N/AProduct stewardship: The set of activities by which those who participate in a product’s life cycle share responsibility for its total life cycle impacts.

Takeback program: A collection method whereby consumers return specific products or classes of products at the end of their useful lives for potential reuse and refurbishment, followed by material recovery and appropriate disposal.
AdhesivesSustainable packaging design and productionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

Recycle Now: Recycle Now is the national recycling effort in England. The website contains examples of recycling labels that may be used on packaging and how to interpret them. http://www.recyclenow.com/recycle/packaging-symbols-explained

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: The practice of minimizing material use and waste in production processes.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
AdhesivesWater use - Supply chainCalculate B1 as the total spend on ingredient suppliers that reported their annual water use, divided by total spend on all ingredient suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using spend data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Water use is defined as the total amount of withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells. Supplier water use reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
If suppliers completed the CDP Water Security Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report water use.
THESIS Help Center Video: Water use - Supply chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Water use - Supply chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/528558948CDP Water Information Request: The CDP Water Information Request provides questions that assess a company's water use, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. CDP can be contacted to respond to the Water Information Request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/
Public disclosure: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.

Water use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.
AdhesivesWorker Health and Safety - ManufacturingThis question aligns with the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Injury and Illness rate. This rate can be normalized for global applicability.
Calculate B1 according to OSHA's injury and illness rate by multiplying the number of recordable injuries and illnesses by 200,000. Divide this number by the total employee hours worked to produce your final product. For laundry detergents, in order to convert the AISE accident rate derived from the occupational health and safety indicator #3 found in the AISE Charter, multiply that number by 2 to calculate the requested number. If multiple facilities manufacture the final product, the injury and illness rate will need to be adjusted using a weighted average based on each facility's percentage of total production. Include all employees at a facility that participate in the production of the final product. This includes both full-time and contracted employees.
Calculate B2 as the revenue from your final product for which you were able to obtain data, divided by the total revenue from your final product, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS General Guidance document provides guidance to calculate the weighted average. See Background Information for access to this document.
The Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool is an online calculator that will compute your injury and illness rate. The OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses provides forms and information for computing your facility injury and illness rate.
Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool: This tool calculates the injury and illness incidence rate for employers. https://data.bls.gov/iirc/

OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses: This webpage contains information on how to record workplace injuries and illnesses and provides the worksheets needed to correctly do so. https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/forms

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520108472
How to Compute a Firm's Incidence Rate for Safety Management: This website from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics provides in-depth guidance on computing injury and illness numbers. https://www.bls.gov/iif/osheval.htm

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

TSC General Guidance for Key Performance Indicators: The General Guidance Document for Key Performance Indicators (KPI) provides essential guidance to complement the specific guidance provided for each KPI. TSC recommends reading this document before you begin your first questionnaire and revisiting it as often as necessary for clarification and additional information. https://www.sustainabilityconsortium.org/tsc-downloads/general-guidance-document/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
AdhesivesWorker health and safety - Supply chainTo be included in B1-B5, risk assessments, training programs, safety plans, performance monitoring systems, and audits must be verifiable and address health and safety issues such as worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. The assessments and audits must be conducted by second or third parties. The risk assessment must be conducted once per year while the audit must have been conducted at least once every three years, both using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles such as International Labour Organization Occupational Safety and Health Conventions (e.g., No. 155). The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions, which can inform your responses. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for examples of initiatives that meet these requirements.
Calculate B1 as the mass of your raw material supply that came from operations that have performed a risk assessment to identify high risk areas for health and safety, divided by the total mass of your raw material supply, then multiply by 100.
To determine if an operation is high risk for health and safety, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic review assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. It must be conducted at least once per year. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your raw material supply that came from operations that train workers on health and safety procedures, divided by the total mass of your raw material supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B2, the training on health and safety procedures must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and must be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for workers on health and safety procedures and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional worker training may be required to perform job duties. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your raw material supply that came from operations that implement a verifiable worker health and safety plan, divided by the total mass of your raw material supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B3, a worker health and safety plan must be verifiable and must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and be prominently displayed in the workplace where employees normally report. The plan should include best practices specific to ergonomics; repetitive motions; chemical and particulate exposure; appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE); and proper use of tools, machinery, and the handling of animals (if applicable). On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B4 as the mass of your raw material supply that came from operations that have a worker health and safety performance monitoring system in place, divided by the total mass of your raw material supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B4, a worker health and safety performance monitoring system should include metrics on issues including, but not limited to, incidence of worker injuries and prevalence of diseases. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B5 as the mass of your raw material supply that came from operations that were audited in the last three years on worker health and safety issues, divided by the total mass of your raw material supply, then multiply by 100. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
To be included in B5, the audits must be verifiable and address preventive measures, freely provided personal protective equipment, identification of worker health and safety hazards and effects on the exposed people, statistics and reasons behind injuries, design of work area, processes, installations, machinery/work equipment, operating processes and work organization, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Standards on Occupational Health and Safety.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification List: The risk classification of countries is based on the Worldwide Governance Indicators. These determine the level of risks related to Governance in sourcing countries. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

GlobalG.A.P. Risk Assessment on Social Practice (GRASP): GRASP is an add-on module for GLOBALG.A.P. developed to assess social practices on the farm, addressing specific aspects of workers’ health, safety and welfare, and labor rights. https://www.globalgap.org/uk_en/for-producers/globalg.a.p.-add-on/grasp/

Rainforest Alliance Sustainable Agriculture Standard: Rainforest Alliance has two certifications: farm and chain of custody. The standard encompasses all three pillars of sustainability—social, economic, and environmental. RA is currently developing a new certification program, following their 2018 merger with UTZ. Since 2018 RA has also become the sole owner and operator of the 2017 SAN Standard. https://www.rainforest-alliance.org/business/solutions/certification/agriculture/

Recommended Practices for Safety and Health Programs: Defines and enforces standards for the safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women. OHSA also provides training, outreach education, and assistance. The OSHA tools can be used for self-evaluations, to compare elements and actions of different health and safety standards, to track implemented actions, identify remaining weaknesses, and strategies for continued improvement. https://www.osha.gov/shpguidelines/explore-tools.html

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit: Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit is an auditing system that aligns with Ethical Trading Initiative's Base Code as well International Labour Organization Conventions. It has been developed to provide a public auditing methodology and format for companies to use to assess compliance. https://www.sedex.com/our-services/smeta-audit/

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528345
IS0 26000 Social Responsibility: ISO 2600 is not a certification tool, but it offers guidance about social responsibility to all sorts of organizations regardless of their activity, size or location. https://www.iso.org/iso-26000-social-responsibility.html

Social Accountability International Guidance Document for Social Accountability 8000: According to Social Accountability International, "this guidance document provides various tools and information for users of the Social Accountability 8000 standard, including definitions, background information, and examples." https://sa-intl.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/SA8000-2014-Guidance-Document.pdf

United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9
Corrective actions: Prompt actions taken to eliminate the causes of a problem, thus preventing their recurrence.

First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Risk assessment: A systematic process to evaluate the potential risks associated with consumer exposure to individual ingredient hazards or final formulations when used in products under conditions of instructed use or foreseeable misuse.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
FertilizersAnimal testing - Alternative approachesThe scope of this question includes testing that is performed by your organization or a contracted organization.
Toxicity endpoints include those that are used to perform a hazard assessment that may be required for by regulatory agencies or authorities. An overview of applicable toxicity endpoints and animal alternatives along with their validation status can be found at "AltTox.org - Toxicity Endpoints & Tests" in the Background Information section of this KPI.
Major research initiatives are government, university, or privately based programs that are dedicated to the replacement, reduction, and refinement of animal testing by advancing non-animal alternative testing methods through effective development, validation, use, and/or communication. Examples of major research initiatives include, but are not limited to, JaCVAM, ECVAM, ICCVAM, CAAT, and ZEBET.
N/AAltTox.org: According to their website, "AltTox.org is a website dedicated to advancing non-animal methods of toxicity testing, both to better protect the health of humans, animals, and the environment and to reduce the numbers and suffering of animals used in current toxicology assessments." http://www.alttox.org/spotlight/055.html

Doerenkamp-Zbinden Foundation (DZF): According to their website, "The Doerenkamp-Zbinden Foundation has continued to actively support a number of projects in the field of alternatives to animal testing in biomedical sciences." http://www.doerenkamp.ch/en/default.html?id=11

European Union Reference Laboratory for Alternatives to Animal Testing (EURL ECVAM): EURL ECVAM is dedicated to the advancement of animal testing alternatives by promoting non-animal alternatives through scientific research, validation, and independent evaluation. ECVAM’s ultimate goal is enhanced safety at multiple life cycle stages with decreased reliance on animal testing. https://ec.europa.eu/jrc/en/eurl/ecvam

Japanese Center for Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM): JaCVAM is an institute that is dedicated to the promotion of the reduction, refinement, and replacement of animal testing used to justify chemical safety in Japan. This mission is achieved in part through international collaboration. https://www.jacvam.jp/en/index.html

Japanese Society for Alternatives to Animal Experiments: This site contains a link to The Center of Alternatives Methods for Safety Evaluation of Cosmetics. http://www.asas.or.jp/jsaae/eng/outline/index.html

National Center for Evaluation and Documentation of Alternative Methods to Animal Experiments at the Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (ZEBET): According to the BfR website, the ZEBET "Unit supports the development and use of alternative methods to animal experiments." https://www.bfr.bund.de/en/unit__centre_for_documentation_and_evaluation_of_alternative_methods_to_animal_experiments__zebet_-53868.html

National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research: According to their website, "The National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs) is a leader in the discovery and application of new technologies and approaches to minimize the use of animals for research purposes and improve their welfare (the 3Rs). Primarily funded by the government, charitable and private donations, NC3R funds research, supports training and development, and stimulates changes in regulations and practice." https://www.nc3rs.org.uk/

The Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM): ICCVAM is an interagency committee composed of representatives from 15 U.S. federal regulatory and research agencies that require, use, generate, or disseminate toxicological and safety testing information used to determine the safety or potential adverse health effects of chemicals and products to which workers and consumers may be exposed. https://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/whatwestudy/niceatm/iccvam/index.html
N/A
FertilizersDesign for the environment - FormulationThis question does not address packaging materials.
For formulated goods, minimization of negative impacts to humans and the environment can be achieved through actions such as prioritization and continual reduction, elimination, or restriction of hazardous substances.
Examples of tools, standards, and certifications that can be used to minimize negative impacts include, but are not limited to, those below.
You may select response A if you do not produce products for end consumers.
Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

EPA Safer Choice Program: EPA developed the Safer Choice program in which companies can voluntarily participate by researching and reformulating their product to meet Safer Choice standards in order to earn the Safer Choice Label on their products. Safer Choice reviews the formulation of ingredients in terms of environmental and human health risk, and characteristics of concern within a functional class against the Master and Functional-Class Criteria documents. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

OECD Guideline for the Testing of Chemicals, Ready Biodegradability: Test Number 301 of the OECD Guidelines for the Testing of Chemicals (Section 3) outlines six methods for the screening of ready biodegradability. "The methods are: the DOC Die-Away, the CO2 Evolution (Modified Sturm Test), the MITI (I) (Ministry of International Trade and Industry, Japan), the Closed Bottle, the Modified OECD Screening and the Manometric Respirometry." http://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/environment/test-no-301-ready-biodegradability_9789264070349-en
Autodesk - Design for Sustainability: Autodesk® Sustainability Workshop provides resources, tools and online learning opportunities to teach the principles of sustainable design. https://academy.autodesk.com/sustainable-design

BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

Guidelines for Formulating and Designing Green Products: Earth Friendly Products provides a technical overview of the factors to consider when formulating and designing sustainable products. Key aspects of design include life cycle assessment of products, minimization of resource consumption, synergy of ingredients, and effective package design. http://ecos.com/assets/uploads/2013/10/EFP-Guidelines-for-Product-Development-and-Designedited2016.pdf

The Guide to Safer Chemicals: The Guide to Safer Chemicals provides guidance on how to design and implement a chemicals management program based on the Principles for Safer Chemicals. The Principles and Guide were developed by BizNGO, a collaboration of business and NGO leaders to create and adopt "safer chemicals and sustainable materials." https://www.bizngo.org/safer-chemicals/guide-to-safer-chemicals
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Public disclosure: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
FertilizersGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the total spend on ingredients from suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total spend on all ingredients from suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers responded to the most recent CDP Climate Change questionnaire you may refer to each supplier's CDP Climate Change responses to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.

Public disclosure: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
FertilizersIngredient transparency - Business to consumerCalculate B1 as the revenue generated from your products for which you disclose ingredient identity online or via telephone, divided by the total revenue from all of your products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B2 as the revenue generated from your products for which you have on-label disclosure of ingredient identity, divided by the total revenue from all of your products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B3 as the revenue generated from your products for which you have disclosed information about the functionality of the ingredients (online, via telephone, or on-label), divided by the total revenue from all of your products, then multiply by 100.
Online disclosure includes either websites or mobile applications referenced on the product label. Telephone disclosure includes providing a toll-free phone number on a product label for consumers to call to obtain ingredient information. On-label disclosure includes ingredient information printed directly on your product’s packaging. Ingredient functionality disclosure includes a statement of the purpose of the ingredient used in your product either online, via telephone, or on-label.
Best-in-class practices for ingredient disclosure outlined by the nationally recognized standards listed below include listing ingredients by INCI, CAS, IUPAC, CSPA Ingredient Dictionary, or common chemical name in descending order of concentration. Where needed to ensure the protection of confidential business information, chemical function or chemical class labels may be used. Fragrance components may reference a list or subset list of the ingredients authored by the International Fragrance Association (IFRA) or another list that represents the fragrance materials used in the product.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
American Cleaning Institute (ACI) Ingredient Central: ?In collaboration with the Household & Commercial Products Association (HCPA) and the Canadian Consumer Specialty Products Association (CCSPA), the American Cleaning Institute (ACI) has developed an ingredient communication initiative that provides consumers with ingredient information for four main product categories: air care, automotive care, cleaning, and polishes and floor maintenance products. https://www.cleaninginstitute.org/ingredient_central/

EPA Safer Choice Program: EPA developed the Safer Choice program in which companies can voluntarily participate by researching and reformulating their product to meet Safer Choice standards in order to earn the Safer Choice Label on their products. Safer Choice reviews the formulation of ingredients in terms of environmental and human health risk, and characteristics of concern within a functional class against the Master and Functional-Class Criteria documents. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

The Household & Commercial Products Association (HCPA) Dictionary: The Household & Commercial Products Association (HCPA) Dictionary is the only source for definitions of the chemicals used specifically in household and automotive care consumer products. Companies engaged in ingredient communication can use the HCPA Dictionary to assure maximum transparency for consumers who want to know what ingredients are in the products they buy and use. Consumers can access information on product ingredients through the free HCPA Consumer Product Ingredients Dictionary Guides, which cross-reference HCPA Names with trade names, CAS numbers, and other technical names. Through referencing these Guides, consumers can better understand the ingredients lists on company web sites. https://www.thehcpa.org/resources/ingredient-dictionary/
N/AN/A
FertilizersPackaging raw material sourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

ISO 18604: ISO 18604 (Packaging and the environment -- Material recycling) provides measurement standards for determining how recyclable a particular product is. https://www.iso.org/standard/55872.html

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)
FertilizersPalm Oil, Palm Kernel Oil, and Derivative Ingredient SourcingYour palm oil supply includes all palm oil, palm kernel oil, and their chemically-derived ingredients purchased or produced for inclusion in your final products. "Chemically-derived ingredients" refers to any material that originated from a chemical reaction that included palm oil or palm kernel oil as a raw material.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your certified palm oil ingredient supply for your products that was purchased through RSPO book and claim (e.g., GreenPalm), divided by the total mass of your palm oil ingredient supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your certified palm oil ingredient supply for your products that was purchased through RSPO mass balance, divided by the total mass of your palm oil ingredient supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your certified palm oil ingredient supply for your products that was purchased through RSPO segregated, divided by the total mass of your palm oil ingredient supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the mass of your certified palm oil ingredient supply for your products that was purchased through RSPO identity preserved, divided by the total mass of your palm oil ingredient supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Consumer Goods Forum Palm Oil Roadmap (CGF - Palm Oil 2021): The Consumer Good Forum (CGF) Palm Oil Roadmap is a guide for companies implementing their own policies and practices for sourcing palm oil more sustainably and achieving deforestation reduction goals. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/20150810-Sustainable-Plam-Oil-Sourcing-Guidelines-Final-Version-1.pdf

GreenPalm - Certified Sustainable Palm Oil: The GreenPalm trading program allows companies to support RSPO growers and suppliers by allowing them to purchase book and claim certificates of RSPO to offset their use of palm and palm kernel oil. http://greenpalm.org/

RSPO - Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil - Certification: The RSPO certification is a seal of approval ensuring that the palm oil is traceable through the supply chain by certifying each facility that processes or uses it. RSPO was founded on and supports principles for palm oil production including transparency, regulatory compliance, financial viability, natural resource conservation, and continuous improvement. http://www.rspo.org/about

RSPO supply chain models Book and Claim, Mass Balance, Segregated, and Identity Preserved: The palm oil and palm oil-derived ingredients may go through many production and logistical stages between plantations and the end product. Any individual batch of palm oil and palm oil-derived ingredients can be traded through one of four supply chain models that are approved by RSPO - Book and Claim, Mass Balance, Segregated, and Identity Preserved. https://rspo.org/certification/supply-chains
Palm Oil Innovation Group Charter (2019): The Palm Oil Innovation Group (POIG) Charter supports the group's goals to support innovation and improvements in palm oil plantation management, create value for those using the practices outlined, and be a platform for communication for plantation managers and governments. http://poig.org/the-poig-charter/

Walmart Sustainability Hub Forest Conservation (Walmart 2021): This website offers resources and guidance to support supplier engagement for deforestation-risk commodities (i.e. beef, cocoa, palm oil, and soy) in the jurisdictional approach to encourage forest conservation in places at highest risk of deforestation. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/forest-conservation
Chemically-derived ingredients: Any material that originated from a chemical reaction that included palm oil or palm kernel oil as a raw material. Examples of ingredients that may be derived from palm oil or palm kernel oil include, but are not limited to: surfactants such as sodium lauryl sulfate, sodium laureth sulfate, and sodium dodecyl sulphate; emulsifiers such as glyceryl stearate, steareth-20, and cetyl alcohol, as well as emollients such as palmitic acid.
FertilizersPriority chemicals - Disclosure For this question, a priority chemical is one that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis. For (C) and (D), “chemicals present” refers to those chemicals which would be reasonably anticipated or suspected to be present in procured materials whether intentionally added or not. This includes reactive byproducts, residual monomers, and contaminants.
Relevant criteria in US EPA Safer Choice Program and Global Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals, listed below, may be used to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment.
Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Disclosure KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Disclosure KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750684

The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS): GHS provides specific human and environmental health criteria along with physical hazard criteria for chemicals in industry. These criteria are used for hazard communication and labeling of chemicals. https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/global.html
N/AN/A
FertilizersPriority chemicals - ManagementFor this question, a priority chemical is one that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis.
Relevant criteria in the US EPA Safer Choice Program and Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals, listed below, may be used to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment.
For B, informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles.
For C, goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound. Public disclosure of goals and progress must have occurred within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Examples of tools and protocols for screening chemicals and assessing alternatives include green chemistry, alternatives analysis, restricted substances lists, and other tools that are listed in the Background Information.
GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

GreenSuite: GreenSuite is an environmental sustainability tool that can be customized to specific users' needs. Environmental issues throughout the supply chain are covered by this web based solution. http://greensuite360.com/index.html

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815

PRIO: PRIO is a web-based tool developed by the Swedish government to facilitate the assessment of environmental and health risks of chemicals. ? https://www.kemi.se/prioguiden/english/start

Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Management KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Management KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528286

The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS): GHS provides specific human and environmental health criteria along with physical hazard criteria for chemicals in industry. These criteria are used for hazard communication and labeling of chemicals. https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/global.html

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Exposure Assessment Tools and Models: According to their website, "The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) has developed several exposure assessment methods, databases, and predictive models to help in evaluating what happens to chemicals when they are used and released to the environment and how workers, the general public, consumers and the aquatic ecosystems may be exposed to chemicals." https://www.epa.gov/ceam/tools-data-exposure-assessment

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Sustainable Futures: According to their website, "The goal of the Sustainable Futures Initiative (SF) is to make new chemicals safer, available faster, and at lower cost. It works by giving chemical developers the same risk-screening models that EPA uses to evaluate new chemicals before they enter the market."? https://www.epa.gov/sustainable-futures
BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

Greenlist Process: According to their website, "In 2001, SC Johnson developed the Greenlist Process to classify ingredients in order to minimize the human and environmental impacts of their products." The process is now available for license to other companies and organizations. https://www.scjohnson.com/en/our-purpose/sustainability-report/explaining-the-sc-johnson-greenlist-program-an-excerpt-from-our-2017-sustainability-report

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Existing Chemicals Program: According to their website, "EPA's existing chemical programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and characterization, and risk management for chemical substances in commercial use." The current chemicals management program is undergoing review and update, including how the agency identifies and prioritizes priority chemicals for review and assessment under TSCA. https://www.epa.gov/compliance/toxic-substances-control-act-tsca-compliance-monitoring#chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
Public disclosure: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
FertilizersPriority chemicals - SafetyFor this question, a priority chemical is one that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis.
Relevant criteria in the US EPA Safer Choice Program and Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals, listed below, may be used to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment.
Examples of frameworks that define exposure scenarios and/or margins of safety include the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety's Notes of Guidance for the Testing of Cosmetic Substances and Their Safety Evaluation (10th Revision), the American Cleaning Institute's Consumer Product Ingredient Safety Handbook (2nd Edition), the Human and Environmental Risk Assessment project (HERA), and REACH's Guidance on Information Requirements and Chemical Safety Assessment.
Aggregate exposure is the total exposure to a consumer for a single ingredient from multiple product types. Cumulative risk assessment is "an analysis, characterization, and possible quantification of the combined risks to health or the environment from multiple agents or stressors" (EPA, 2003).
American Cleaning Institute's Consumer Product Ingredient Safety: Exposure and Risk Screening Methods for Consumer Product Ingredients: The main purpose of this book is to present methodologies and specific consumer exposure information that can be used for screening-level risk assessments of environmental and human exposures to high production volume (HPV) chemicals through the manufacturing and use of consumer products, mainly laundry, cleaning, and personal care products. The book is produced by the American Cleaning Institute (ACI; formerly, the Soap and Detergent Association) in collaboration with its partners and member companies. https://www.aciscience.org/docs/Consumer_Product_Ingredient_Safety_v2.0.pdf

European Chemicals Agency Guidance on Information Requirements and Chemical Safety Assessment (ECHA): This guidance document describes the information requirements under REACH with regard to substance properties, exposure, use and risk management measures, in the context of the chemical safety assessment. https://echa.europa.eu/guidance-documents/guidance-on-information-requirements-and-chemical-safety-assessment

Human and Environmental Risk Assessment (HERA): A voluntary industry programme to carry out Human and Environmental Risk Assessments on ingredients of household cleaning products. http://www.heraproject.com/RiskAssessment.cfm

Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Safety KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Safety KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528300

The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS): GHS provides specific human and environmental health criteria along with physical hazard criteria for chemicals in industry. These criteria are used for hazard communication and labeling of chemicals. https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/global.html

The SCCS Notes of Guidance for the Testing of Cosmetic Substances and Their Safety Evaluation - 10th Revision: The SCCS Notes of Guidance for the Testing of Cosmetic Ingredients and Their Safety Evaluation is a document compiled by the members of the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety (SCCS). The document contains information on the different aspects of testing and safety evaluation of cosmetic substances in Europe, with an emphasis on cosmetic ingredients and finished products. It is designed to provide guidance to public authorities and to the cosmetic industry in order to improve harmonized compliance with the current cosmetic EU legislation. https://op.europa.eu/en/publication-detail/-/publication/1d5f1653-38ce-11e9-8d04-01aa75ed71a1/language-en/format-PDF/source-87840423
EPA - Framework for Cumulative Risk Assessment: This EPA document provides background information for cumulative risk assessment. The presented framework outlines important factors for addressing scientific issues of cumulative risk assessment and presents a foundation of key elements for the cumulative risk assessment process. https://www.epa.gov/risk/framework-cumulative-risk-assessment

REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57, Annex XIV: This annex of the European Community's Registration, Evaluation, Authorization, and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) regulations describes substances to be included in regulation in accordance with the procedure described in Article 58. http://www.reachonline.eu/REACH/EN/REACH_EN/article57.html

UL Assessing the Safety of Personal Care Products: Original research paper published by UL, entitled: "Assessing the Safety of Personal Care Products: Comparative Analysis of Health Risk Assessment Frameworks and Recommendations for Best Practices. UL conducted its research in order to facilitate a path forward for improved personal care product development. This research includes an assessment of views expressed by non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and activists, as well as views from safety, stewardship, and sustainability experts from the retail, brand, and chemical supplier communities. It explores various elements of a full safety assessment, including hazard characterization, exposure assessment, dose response, and risk characterization. https://msc.ul.com/en/resources/white-papers/personal-care-product-health-risk-assessment-study/
Cumulative risk assessment: An analysis of the combined risks to health or the environment from multiple agents or stressors.
FertilizersProduct CertificationsCalculate B1-B3 as the sales of your product that underwent the specified certification, divided by the total sales of the product, them multiply by 100. The sum of B1-B3 may exceed 100% if product has more than one certification.Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

EPA Safer Choice Program: EPA developed the Safer Choice program in which companies can voluntarily participate by researching and reformulating their product to meet Safer Choice standards in order to earn the Safer Choice Label on their products. Safer Choice reviews the formulation of ingredients in terms of environmental and human health risk, and characteristics of concern within a functional class against the Master and Functional-Class Criteria documents. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

Environmental Working Group EWG VERIFIED™ Standard: The Environmental Working Group (EWG) is a non-profit, non-partisan organization dedicated to protecting human health and the environment. EWG produces research and educational guides on health hazards in food and personal care products. Companies work with EWG by disclosing ingredients not listed on labels and manufacturing processes that is then compared to EWG’s strict criteria standards and if they meet the criteria they receive the EWG verified mark. http://www.ewg.org/ewgverified/
N/AN/A
FertilizersProduct stewardshipThis question addresses takeback programs that an organization may fund, contract, or physically operate, in whole or in part, to enable consumers to return products for responsible end-of-life management. Include only products and materials for which an organization has the ability to decide or influence the handling, treatment, and disposal of returned materials. These calculations should be made at the program level rather than category level. The same percentage can be reported across multiple product categories if the products are collected and managed in the same program within the organization. Separate programs require separate percentage calculations when reported in different product category questionnaires. If products under the same category are collected in separate programs, average the recycling performance of the two programs and report that value in D1.
Calculate D1 as the number of product units returned through the program(s) for recycling divided by the total number of product units sold, then multiply by 100. If this number exceeds 100, report it as 100.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Data for both the unit volume returned and unit volume sold should come from the same year, even though units may be returned in a different year than they were sold.
Examples of stewardship programs include extended producer responsibility programs and product takeback programs. Such programs should ensure that materials are recycled or disposed of in an environmentally sensitive manner.
THESIS Help Center Video: Product Stewardship KPI: Short video tutorial on the Product Stewardship KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750712N/AProduct stewardship: The set of activities by which those who participate in a product’s life cycle share responsibility for its total life cycle impacts.

Takeback program: A collection method whereby consumers return specific products or classes of products at the end of their useful lives for potential reuse and refurbishment, followed by material recovery and appropriate disposal.
FertilizersSustainable packaging design and productionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

Recycle Now: Recycle Now is the national recycling effort in England. The website contains examples of recycling labels that may be used on packaging and how to interpret them. http://www.recyclenow.com/recycle/packaging-symbols-explained

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: The practice of minimizing material use and waste in production processes.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
FertilizersWater use - Supply chainCalculate B1 as the total spend on ingredient suppliers that reported their annual water use, divided by total spend on all ingredient suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using spend data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Water use is defined as the total amount of withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells. Supplier water use reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
If suppliers completed the CDP Water Security Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report water use.
THESIS Help Center Video: Water use - Supply chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Water use - Supply chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/528558948CDP Water Information Request: The CDP Water Information Request provides questions that assess a company's water use, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. CDP can be contacted to respond to the Water Information Request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/
Public disclosure: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.

Water use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.
FertilizersWorker Health and Safety - ManufacturingThis question aligns with the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Injury and Illness rate. This rate can be normalized for global applicability.
Calculate B1 according to OSHA's injury and illness rate by multiplying the number of recordable injuries and illnesses by 200,000. Divide this number by the total employee hours worked to produce your final product. For laundry detergents, in order to convert the AISE accident rate derived from the occupational health and safety indicator #3 found in the AISE Charter, multiply that number by 2 to calculate the requested number. If multiple facilities manufacture the final product, the injury and illness rate will need to be adjusted using a weighted average based on each facility's percentage of total production. Include all employees at a facility that participate in the production of the final product. This includes both full-time and contracted employees.
Calculate B2 as the revenue from your final product for which you were able to obtain data, divided by the total revenue from your final product, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS General Guidance document provides guidance to calculate the weighted average. See Background Information for access to this document.
The Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool is an online calculator that will compute your injury and illness rate. The OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses provides forms and information for computing your facility injury and illness rate.
Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool: This tool calculates the injury and illness incidence rate for employers. https://data.bls.gov/iirc/

OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses: This webpage contains information on how to record workplace injuries and illnesses and provides the worksheets needed to correctly do so. https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/forms

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520108472
How to Compute a Firm's Incidence Rate for Safety Management: This website from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics provides in-depth guidance on computing injury and illness numbers. https://www.bls.gov/iif/osheval.htm

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

TSC General Guidance for Key Performance Indicators: The General Guidance Document for Key Performance Indicators (KPI) provides essential guidance to complement the specific guidance provided for each KPI. TSC recommends reading this document before you begin your first questionnaire and revisiting it as often as necessary for clarification and additional information. https://www.sustainabilityconsortium.org/tsc-downloads/general-guidance-document/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
FertilizersWorker health and safety - Supply chainTo be included in B1-B5, risk assessments, training programs, safety plans, performance monitoring systems, and audits must be verifiable and address health and safety issues such as worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. The assessments and audits must be conducted by second or third parties. The risk assessment must be conducted once per year while the audit must have been conducted at least once every three years, both using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles such as International Labour Organization Occupational Safety and Health Conventions (e.g., No. 155). The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions, which can inform your responses. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for examples of initiatives that meet these requirements.
Calculate B1 as the mass of your raw material supply that came from operations that have performed a risk assessment to identify high risk areas for health and safety, divided by the total mass of your raw material supply, then multiply by 100.
To determine if an operation is high risk for health and safety, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic review assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. It must be conducted at least once per year. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your raw material supply that came from operations that train workers on health and safety procedures, divided by the total mass of your raw material supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B2, the training on health and safety procedures must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and must be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for workers on health and safety procedures and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional worker training may be required to perform job duties. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your raw material supply that came from operations that implement a verifiable worker health and safety plan, divided by the total mass of your raw material supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B3, a worker health and safety plan must be verifiable and must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and be prominently displayed in the workplace where employees normally report. The plan should include best practices specific to ergonomics; repetitive motions; chemical and particulate exposure; appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE); and proper use of tools, machinery, and the handling of animals (if applicable). On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B4 as the mass of your raw material supply that came from operations that have a worker health and safety performance monitoring system in place, divided by the total mass of your raw material supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B4, a worker health and safety performance monitoring system should include metrics on issues including, but not limited to, incidence of worker injuries and prevalence of diseases. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B5 as the mass of your raw material supply that came from operations that were audited in the last three years on worker health and safety issues, divided by the total mass of your raw material supply, then multiply by 100. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
To be included in B5, the audits must be verifiable and address preventive measures, freely provided personal protective equipment, identification of worker health and safety hazards and effects on the exposed people, statistics and reasons behind injuries, design of work area, processes, installations, machinery/work equipment, operating processes and work organization, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Standards on Occupational Health and Safety.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification List: The risk classification of countries is based on the Worldwide Governance Indicators. These determine the level of risks related to Governance in sourcing countries. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

GlobalG.A.P. Risk Assessment on Social Practice (GRASP): GRASP is an add-on module for GLOBALG.A.P. developed to assess social practices on the farm, addressing specific aspects of workers’ health, safety and welfare, and labor rights. https://www.globalgap.org/uk_en/for-producers/globalg.a.p.-add-on/grasp/

Rainforest Alliance Sustainable Agriculture Standard: Rainforest Alliance has two certifications: farm and chain of custody. The standard encompasses all three pillars of sustainability—social, economic, and environmental. RA is currently developing a new certification program, following their 2018 merger with UTZ. Since 2018 RA has also become the sole owner and operator of the 2017 SAN Standard. https://www.rainforest-alliance.org/business/solutions/certification/agriculture/

Recommended Practices for Safety and Health Programs: Defines and enforces standards for the safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women. OHSA also provides training, outreach education, and assistance. The OSHA tools can be used for self-evaluations, to compare elements and actions of different health and safety standards, to track implemented actions, identify remaining weaknesses, and strategies for continued improvement. https://www.osha.gov/shpguidelines/explore-tools.html

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit: Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit is an auditing system that aligns with Ethical Trading Initiative's Base Code as well International Labour Organization Conventions. It has been developed to provide a public auditing methodology and format for companies to use to assess compliance. https://www.sedex.com/our-services/smeta-audit/

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528345
IS0 26000 Social Responsibility: ISO 2600 is not a certification tool, but it offers guidance about social responsibility to all sorts of organizations regardless of their activity, size or location. https://www.iso.org/iso-26000-social-responsibility.html

Social Accountability International Guidance Document for Social Accountability 8000: According to Social Accountability International, "this guidance document provides various tools and information for users of the Social Accountability 8000 standard, including definitions, background information, and examples." https://sa-intl.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/SA8000-2014-Guidance-Document.pdf

United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9
Corrective actions: Prompt actions taken to eliminate the causes of a problem, thus preventing their recurrence.

First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Risk assessment: A systematic process to evaluate the potential risks associated with consumer exposure to individual ingredient hazards or final formulations when used in products under conditions of instructed use or foreseeable misuse.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Ice MeltAnimal testing - Alternative approachesThe scope of this question includes testing that is performed by your organization or a contracted organization.
Toxicity endpoints include those that are used to perform a hazard assessment that may be required for by regulatory agencies or authorities. An overview of applicable toxicity endpoints and animal alternatives along with their validation status can be found at "AltTox.org - Toxicity Endpoints & Tests" in the Background Information section of this KPI.
Major research initiatives are government, university, or privately based programs that are dedicated to the replacement, reduction, and refinement of animal testing by advancing non-animal alternative testing methods through effective development, validation, use, and/or communication. Examples of major research initiatives include, but are not limited to, JaCVAM, ECVAM, ICCVAM, CAAT, and ZEBET.
N/AAltTox.org: According to their website, "AltTox.org is a website dedicated to advancing non-animal methods of toxicity testing, both to better protect the health of humans, animals, and the environment and to reduce the numbers and suffering of animals used in current toxicology assessments." http://www.alttox.org/spotlight/055.html

Doerenkamp-Zbinden Foundation (DZF): According to their website, "The Doerenkamp-Zbinden Foundation has continued to actively support a number of projects in the field of alternatives to animal testing in biomedical sciences." http://www.doerenkamp.ch/en/default.html?id=11

European Union Reference Laboratory for Alternatives to Animal Testing (EURL ECVAM): EURL ECVAM is dedicated to the advancement of animal testing alternatives by promoting non-animal alternatives through scientific research, validation, and independent evaluation. ECVAM’s ultimate goal is enhanced safety at multiple life cycle stages with decreased reliance on animal testing. https://ec.europa.eu/jrc/en/eurl/ecvam

Japanese Center for Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM): JaCVAM is an institute that is dedicated to the promotion of the reduction, refinement, and replacement of animal testing used to justify chemical safety in Japan. This mission is achieved in part through international collaboration. https://www.jacvam.jp/en/index.html

Japanese Society for Alternatives to Animal Experiments: This site contains a link to The Center of Alternatives Methods for Safety Evaluation of Cosmetics. http://www.asas.or.jp/jsaae/eng/outline/index.html

National Center for Evaluation and Documentation of Alternative Methods to Animal Experiments at the Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (ZEBET): According to the BfR website, the ZEBET "Unit supports the development and use of alternative methods to animal experiments." https://www.bfr.bund.de/en/unit__centre_for_documentation_and_evaluation_of_alternative_methods_to_animal_experiments__zebet_-53868.html

National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research: According to their website, "The National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs) is a leader in the discovery and application of new technologies and approaches to minimize the use of animals for research purposes and improve their welfare (the 3Rs). Primarily funded by the government, charitable and private donations, NC3R funds research, supports training and development, and stimulates changes in regulations and practice." https://www.nc3rs.org.uk/

The Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM): ICCVAM is an interagency committee composed of representatives from 15 U.S. federal regulatory and research agencies that require, use, generate, or disseminate toxicological and safety testing information used to determine the safety or potential adverse health effects of chemicals and products to which workers and consumers may be exposed. https://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/whatwestudy/niceatm/iccvam/index.html
N/A
Ice MeltDesign for the environment - FormulationThis question does not address packaging materials.
For formulated goods, minimization of negative impacts to humans and the environment can be achieved through actions such as prioritization and continual reduction, elimination, or restriction of hazardous substances.
Examples of tools, standards, and certifications that can be used to minimize negative impacts include, but are not limited to, those below.
You may select response A if you do not produce products for end consumers.
Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

EPA Safer Choice Program: EPA developed the Safer Choice program in which companies can voluntarily participate by researching and reformulating their product to meet Safer Choice standards in order to earn the Safer Choice Label on their products. Safer Choice reviews the formulation of ingredients in terms of environmental and human health risk, and characteristics of concern within a functional class against the Master and Functional-Class Criteria documents. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

OECD Guideline for the Testing of Chemicals, Ready Biodegradability: Test Number 301 of the OECD Guidelines for the Testing of Chemicals (Section 3) outlines six methods for the screening of ready biodegradability. "The methods are: the DOC Die-Away, the CO2 Evolution (Modified Sturm Test), the MITI (I) (Ministry of International Trade and Industry, Japan), the Closed Bottle, the Modified OECD Screening and the Manometric Respirometry." http://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/environment/test-no-301-ready-biodegradability_9789264070349-en
Autodesk - Design for Sustainability: Autodesk® Sustainability Workshop provides resources, tools and online learning opportunities to teach the principles of sustainable design. https://academy.autodesk.com/sustainable-design

BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

Guidelines for Formulating and Designing Green Products: Earth Friendly Products provides a technical overview of the factors to consider when formulating and designing sustainable products. Key aspects of design include life cycle assessment of products, minimization of resource consumption, synergy of ingredients, and effective package design. http://ecos.com/assets/uploads/2013/10/EFP-Guidelines-for-Product-Development-and-Designedited2016.pdf

The Guide to Safer Chemicals: The Guide to Safer Chemicals provides guidance on how to design and implement a chemicals management program based on the Principles for Safer Chemicals. The Principles and Guide were developed by BizNGO, a collaboration of business and NGO leaders to create and adopt "safer chemicals and sustainable materials." https://www.bizngo.org/safer-chemicals/guide-to-safer-chemicals
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Public disclosure: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Ice MeltGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the total spend on ingredients from suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total spend on all ingredients from suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers responded to the most recent CDP Climate Change questionnaire you may refer to each supplier's CDP Climate Change responses to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.

Public disclosure: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Ice MeltIngredient transparency - Business to consumerCalculate B1 as the revenue generated from your products for which you disclose ingredient identity online or via telephone, divided by the total revenue from all of your products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B2 as the revenue generated from your products for which you have on-label disclosure of ingredient identity, divided by the total revenue from all of your products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B3 as the revenue generated from your products for which you have disclosed information about the functionality of the ingredients (online, via telephone, or on-label), divided by the total revenue from all of your products, then multiply by 100.
Online disclosure includes either websites or mobile applications referenced on the product label. Telephone disclosure includes providing a toll-free phone number on a product label for consumers to call to obtain ingredient information. On-label disclosure includes ingredient information printed directly on your product’s packaging. Ingredient functionality disclosure includes a statement of the purpose of the ingredient used in your product either online, via telephone, or on-label.
Best-in-class practices for ingredient disclosure outlined by the nationally recognized standards listed below include listing ingredients by INCI, CAS, IUPAC, CSPA Ingredient Dictionary, or common chemical name in descending order of concentration. Where needed to ensure the protection of confidential business information, chemical function or chemical class labels may be used. Fragrance components may reference a list or subset list of the ingredients authored by the International Fragrance Association (IFRA) or another list that represents the fragrance materials used in the product.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
American Cleaning Institute (ACI) Ingredient Central: ?In collaboration with the Household & Commercial Products Association (HCPA) and the Canadian Consumer Specialty Products Association (CCSPA), the American Cleaning Institute (ACI) has developed an ingredient communication initiative that provides consumers with ingredient information for four main product categories: air care, automotive care, cleaning, and polishes and floor maintenance products. https://www.cleaninginstitute.org/ingredient_central/

EPA Safer Choice Program: EPA developed the Safer Choice program in which companies can voluntarily participate by researching and reformulating their product to meet Safer Choice standards in order to earn the Safer Choice Label on their products. Safer Choice reviews the formulation of ingredients in terms of environmental and human health risk, and characteristics of concern within a functional class against the Master and Functional-Class Criteria documents. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

The Household & Commercial Products Association (HCPA) Dictionary: The Household & Commercial Products Association (HCPA) Dictionary is the only source for definitions of the chemicals used specifically in household and automotive care consumer products. Companies engaged in ingredient communication can use the HCPA Dictionary to assure maximum transparency for consumers who want to know what ingredients are in the products they buy and use. Consumers can access information on product ingredients through the free HCPA Consumer Product Ingredients Dictionary Guides, which cross-reference HCPA Names with trade names, CAS numbers, and other technical names. Through referencing these Guides, consumers can better understand the ingredients lists on company web sites. https://www.thehcpa.org/resources/ingredient-dictionary/
N/AN/A
Ice MeltPackaging raw material sourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

ISO 18604: ISO 18604 (Packaging and the environment -- Material recycling) provides measurement standards for determining how recyclable a particular product is. https://www.iso.org/standard/55872.html

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)
Ice MeltPalm Oil, Palm Kernel Oil, and Derivative Ingredient SourcingYour palm oil supply includes all palm oil, palm kernel oil, and their chemically-derived ingredients purchased or produced for inclusion in your final products. "Chemically-derived ingredients" refers to any material that originated from a chemical reaction that included palm oil or palm kernel oil as a raw material.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your certified palm oil ingredient supply for your products that was purchased through RSPO book and claim (e.g., GreenPalm), divided by the total mass of your palm oil ingredient supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your certified palm oil ingredient supply for your products that was purchased through RSPO mass balance, divided by the total mass of your palm oil ingredient supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your certified palm oil ingredient supply for your products that was purchased through RSPO segregated, divided by the total mass of your palm oil ingredient supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the mass of your certified palm oil ingredient supply for your products that was purchased through RSPO identity preserved, divided by the total mass of your palm oil ingredient supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Consumer Goods Forum Palm Oil Roadmap (CGF - Palm Oil 2021): The Consumer Good Forum (CGF) Palm Oil Roadmap is a guide for companies implementing their own policies and practices for sourcing palm oil more sustainably and achieving deforestation reduction goals. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/20150810-Sustainable-Plam-Oil-Sourcing-Guidelines-Final-Version-1.pdf

GreenPalm - Certified Sustainable Palm Oil: The GreenPalm trading program allows companies to support RSPO growers and suppliers by allowing them to purchase book and claim certificates of RSPO to offset their use of palm and palm kernel oil. http://greenpalm.org/

RSPO - Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil - Certification: The RSPO certification is a seal of approval ensuring that the palm oil is traceable through the supply chain by certifying each facility that processes or uses it. RSPO was founded on and supports principles for palm oil production including transparency, regulatory compliance, financial viability, natural resource conservation, and continuous improvement. http://www.rspo.org/about

RSPO supply chain models Book and Claim, Mass Balance, Segregated, and Identity Preserved: The palm oil and palm oil-derived ingredients may go through many production and logistical stages between plantations and the end product. Any individual batch of palm oil and palm oil-derived ingredients can be traded through one of four supply chain models that are approved by RSPO - Book and Claim, Mass Balance, Segregated, and Identity Preserved. https://rspo.org/certification/supply-chains
Palm Oil Innovation Group Charter (2019): The Palm Oil Innovation Group (POIG) Charter supports the group's goals to support innovation and improvements in palm oil plantation management, create value for those using the practices outlined, and be a platform for communication for plantation managers and governments. http://poig.org/the-poig-charter/

Walmart Sustainability Hub Forest Conservation (Walmart 2021): This website offers resources and guidance to support supplier engagement for deforestation-risk commodities (i.e. beef, cocoa, palm oil, and soy) in the jurisdictional approach to encourage forest conservation in places at highest risk of deforestation. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/forest-conservation
Chemically-derived ingredients: Any material that originated from a chemical reaction that included palm oil or palm kernel oil as a raw material. Examples of ingredients that may be derived from palm oil or palm kernel oil include, but are not limited to: surfactants such as sodium lauryl sulfate, sodium laureth sulfate, and sodium dodecyl sulphate; emulsifiers such as glyceryl stearate, steareth-20, and cetyl alcohol, as well as emollients such as palmitic acid.
Ice MeltPriority chemicals - Disclosure For this question, a priority chemical is one that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis. For (C) and (D), “chemicals present” refers to those chemicals which would be reasonably anticipated or suspected to be present in procured materials whether intentionally added or not. This includes reactive byproducts, residual monomers, and contaminants.
Relevant criteria in US EPA Safer Choice Program and Global Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals, listed below, may be used to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment.
Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Disclosure KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Disclosure KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750684

The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS): GHS provides specific human and environmental health criteria along with physical hazard criteria for chemicals in industry. These criteria are used for hazard communication and labeling of chemicals. https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/global.html
N/AN/A
Ice MeltPriority chemicals - ManagementFor this question, a priority chemical is one that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis.
Relevant criteria in the US EPA Safer Choice Program and Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals, listed below, may be used to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment.
For B, informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles.
For C, goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound. Public disclosure of goals and progress must have occurred within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Examples of tools and protocols for screening chemicals and assessing alternatives include green chemistry, alternatives analysis, restricted substances lists, and other tools that are listed in the Background Information.
GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

GreenSuite: GreenSuite is an environmental sustainability tool that can be customized to specific users' needs. Environmental issues throughout the supply chain are covered by this web based solution. http://greensuite360.com/index.html

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815

PRIO: PRIO is a web-based tool developed by the Swedish government to facilitate the assessment of environmental and health risks of chemicals. ? https://www.kemi.se/prioguiden/english/start

Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Management KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Management KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528286

The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS): GHS provides specific human and environmental health criteria along with physical hazard criteria for chemicals in industry. These criteria are used for hazard communication and labeling of chemicals. https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/global.html

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Exposure Assessment Tools and Models: According to their website, "The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) has developed several exposure assessment methods, databases, and predictive models to help in evaluating what happens to chemicals when they are used and released to the environment and how workers, the general public, consumers and the aquatic ecosystems may be exposed to chemicals." https://www.epa.gov/ceam/tools-data-exposure-assessment

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Sustainable Futures: According to their website, "The goal of the Sustainable Futures Initiative (SF) is to make new chemicals safer, available faster, and at lower cost. It works by giving chemical developers the same risk-screening models that EPA uses to evaluate new chemicals before they enter the market."? https://www.epa.gov/sustainable-futures
BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

Greenlist Process: According to their website, "In 2001, SC Johnson developed the Greenlist Process to classify ingredients in order to minimize the human and environmental impacts of their products." The process is now available for license to other companies and organizations. https://www.scjohnson.com/en/our-purpose/sustainability-report/explaining-the-sc-johnson-greenlist-program-an-excerpt-from-our-2017-sustainability-report

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Existing Chemicals Program: According to their website, "EPA's existing chemical programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and characterization, and risk management for chemical substances in commercial use." The current chemicals management program is undergoing review and update, including how the agency identifies and prioritizes priority chemicals for review and assessment under TSCA. https://www.epa.gov/compliance/toxic-substances-control-act-tsca-compliance-monitoring#chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
Public disclosure: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Ice MeltPriority chemicals - SafetyFor this question, a priority chemical is one that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis.
Relevant criteria in the US EPA Safer Choice Program and Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals, listed below, may be used to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment.
Examples of frameworks that define exposure scenarios and/or margins of safety include the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety's Notes of Guidance for the Testing of Cosmetic Substances and Their Safety Evaluation (10th Revision), the American Cleaning Institute's Consumer Product Ingredient Safety Handbook (2nd Edition), the Human and Environmental Risk Assessment project (HERA), and REACH's Guidance on Information Requirements and Chemical Safety Assessment.
Aggregate exposure is the total exposure to a consumer for a single ingredient from multiple product types. Cumulative risk assessment is "an analysis, characterization, and possible quantification of the combined risks to health or the environment from multiple agents or stressors" (EPA, 2003).
American Cleaning Institute's Consumer Product Ingredient Safety: Exposure and Risk Screening Methods for Consumer Product Ingredients: The main purpose of this book is to present methodologies and specific consumer exposure information that can be used for screening-level risk assessments of environmental and human exposures to high production volume (HPV) chemicals through the manufacturing and use of consumer products, mainly laundry, cleaning, and personal care products. The book is produced by the American Cleaning Institute (ACI; formerly, the Soap and Detergent Association) in collaboration with its partners and member companies. https://www.aciscience.org/docs/Consumer_Product_Ingredient_Safety_v2.0.pdf

European Chemicals Agency Guidance on Information Requirements and Chemical Safety Assessment (ECHA): This guidance document describes the information requirements under REACH with regard to substance properties, exposure, use and risk management measures, in the context of the chemical safety assessment. https://echa.europa.eu/guidance-documents/guidance-on-information-requirements-and-chemical-safety-assessment

Human and Environmental Risk Assessment (HERA): A voluntary industry programme to carry out Human and Environmental Risk Assessments on ingredients of household cleaning products. http://www.heraproject.com/RiskAssessment.cfm

Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Safety KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Safety KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528300

The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS): GHS provides specific human and environmental health criteria along with physical hazard criteria for chemicals in industry. These criteria are used for hazard communication and labeling of chemicals. https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/global.html

The SCCS Notes of Guidance for the Testing of Cosmetic Substances and Their Safety Evaluation - 10th Revision: The SCCS Notes of Guidance for the Testing of Cosmetic Ingredients and Their Safety Evaluation is a document compiled by the members of the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety (SCCS). The document contains information on the different aspects of testing and safety evaluation of cosmetic substances in Europe, with an emphasis on cosmetic ingredients and finished products. It is designed to provide guidance to public authorities and to the cosmetic industry in order to improve harmonized compliance with the current cosmetic EU legislation. https://op.europa.eu/en/publication-detail/-/publication/1d5f1653-38ce-11e9-8d04-01aa75ed71a1/language-en/format-PDF/source-87840423
EPA - Framework for Cumulative Risk Assessment: This EPA document provides background information for cumulative risk assessment. The presented framework outlines important factors for addressing scientific issues of cumulative risk assessment and presents a foundation of key elements for the cumulative risk assessment process. https://www.epa.gov/risk/framework-cumulative-risk-assessment

REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57, Annex XIV: This annex of the European Community's Registration, Evaluation, Authorization, and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) regulations describes substances to be included in regulation in accordance with the procedure described in Article 58. http://www.reachonline.eu/REACH/EN/REACH_EN/article57.html

UL Assessing the Safety of Personal Care Products: Original research paper published by UL, entitled: "Assessing the Safety of Personal Care Products: Comparative Analysis of Health Risk Assessment Frameworks and Recommendations for Best Practices. UL conducted its research in order to facilitate a path forward for improved personal care product development. This research includes an assessment of views expressed by non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and activists, as well as views from safety, stewardship, and sustainability experts from the retail, brand, and chemical supplier communities. It explores various elements of a full safety assessment, including hazard characterization, exposure assessment, dose response, and risk characterization. https://msc.ul.com/en/resources/white-papers/personal-care-product-health-risk-assessment-study/
Cumulative risk assessment: An analysis of the combined risks to health or the environment from multiple agents or stressors.
Ice MeltProduct CertificationsCalculate B1-B3 as the sales of your product that underwent the specified certification, divided by the total sales of the product, them multiply by 100. The sum of B1-B3 may exceed 100% if product has more than one certification.Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

EPA Safer Choice Program: EPA developed the Safer Choice program in which companies can voluntarily participate by researching and reformulating their product to meet Safer Choice standards in order to earn the Safer Choice Label on their products. Safer Choice reviews the formulation of ingredients in terms of environmental and human health risk, and characteristics of concern within a functional class against the Master and Functional-Class Criteria documents. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

Environmental Working Group EWG VERIFIED™ Standard: The Environmental Working Group (EWG) is a non-profit, non-partisan organization dedicated to protecting human health and the environment. EWG produces research and educational guides on health hazards in food and personal care products. Companies work with EWG by disclosing ingredients not listed on labels and manufacturing processes that is then compared to EWG’s strict criteria standards and if they meet the criteria they receive the EWG verified mark. http://www.ewg.org/ewgverified/
N/AN/A
Ice MeltProduct stewardshipThis question addresses takeback programs that an organization may fund, contract, or physically operate, in whole or in part, to enable consumers to return products for responsible end-of-life management. Include only products and materials for which an organization has the ability to decide or influence the handling, treatment, and disposal of returned materials. These calculations should be made at the program level rather than category level. The same percentage can be reported across multiple product categories if the products are collected and managed in the same program within the organization. Separate programs require separate percentage calculations when reported in different product category questionnaires. If products under the same category are collected in separate programs, average the recycling performance of the two programs and report that value in D1.
Calculate D1 as the number of product units returned through the program(s) for recycling divided by the total number of product units sold, then multiply by 100. If this number exceeds 100, report it as 100.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Data for both the unit volume returned and unit volume sold should come from the same year, even though units may be returned in a different year than they were sold.
Examples of stewardship programs include extended producer responsibility programs and product takeback programs. Such programs should ensure that materials are recycled or disposed of in an environmentally sensitive manner.
THESIS Help Center Video: Product Stewardship KPI: Short video tutorial on the Product Stewardship KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750712N/AProduct stewardship: The set of activities by which those who participate in a product’s life cycle share responsibility for its total life cycle impacts.

Takeback program: A collection method whereby consumers return specific products or classes of products at the end of their useful lives for potential reuse and refurbishment, followed by material recovery and appropriate disposal.
Ice MeltSustainable packaging design and productionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

Recycle Now: Recycle Now is the national recycling effort in England. The website contains examples of recycling labels that may be used on packaging and how to interpret them. http://www.recyclenow.com/recycle/packaging-symbols-explained

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: The practice of minimizing material use and waste in production processes.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
Ice MeltWater use - Supply chainCalculate B1 as the total spend on ingredient suppliers that reported their annual water use, divided by total spend on all ingredient suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using spend data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Water use is defined as the total amount of withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells. Supplier water use reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
If suppliers completed the CDP Water Security Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report water use.
THESIS Help Center Video: Water use - Supply chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Water use - Supply chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/528558948CDP Water Information Request: The CDP Water Information Request provides questions that assess a company's water use, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. CDP can be contacted to respond to the Water Information Request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/
Public disclosure: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.

Water use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.
Ice MeltWorker Health and Safety - ManufacturingThis question aligns with the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Injury and Illness rate. This rate can be normalized for global applicability.
Calculate B1 according to OSHA's injury and illness rate by multiplying the number of recordable injuries and illnesses by 200,000. Divide this number by the total employee hours worked to produce your final product. For laundry detergents, in order to convert the AISE accident rate derived from the occupational health and safety indicator #3 found in the AISE Charter, multiply that number by 2 to calculate the requested number. If multiple facilities manufacture the final product, the injury and illness rate will need to be adjusted using a weighted average based on each facility's percentage of total production. Include all employees at a facility that participate in the production of the final product. This includes both full-time and contracted employees.
Calculate B2 as the revenue from your final product for which you were able to obtain data, divided by the total revenue from your final product, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS General Guidance document provides guidance to calculate the weighted average. See Background Information for access to this document.
The Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool is an online calculator that will compute your injury and illness rate. The OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses provides forms and information for computing your facility injury and illness rate.
Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool: This tool calculates the injury and illness incidence rate for employers. https://data.bls.gov/iirc/

OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses: This webpage contains information on how to record workplace injuries and illnesses and provides the worksheets needed to correctly do so. https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/forms

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520108472
How to Compute a Firm's Incidence Rate for Safety Management: This website from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics provides in-depth guidance on computing injury and illness numbers. https://www.bls.gov/iif/osheval.htm

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

TSC General Guidance for Key Performance Indicators: The General Guidance Document for Key Performance Indicators (KPI) provides essential guidance to complement the specific guidance provided for each KPI. TSC recommends reading this document before you begin your first questionnaire and revisiting it as often as necessary for clarification and additional information. https://www.sustainabilityconsortium.org/tsc-downloads/general-guidance-document/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Ice MeltWorker health and safety - Supply chainTo be included in B1-B5, risk assessments, training programs, safety plans, performance monitoring systems, and audits must be verifiable and address health and safety issues such as worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. The assessments and audits must be conducted by second or third parties. The risk assessment must be conducted once per year while the audit must have been conducted at least once every three years, both using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles such as International Labour Organization Occupational Safety and Health Conventions (e.g., No. 155). The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions, which can inform your responses. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for examples of initiatives that meet these requirements.
Calculate B1 as the mass of your raw material supply that came from operations that have performed a risk assessment to identify high risk areas for health and safety, divided by the total mass of your raw material supply, then multiply by 100.
To determine if an operation is high risk for health and safety, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic review assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. It must be conducted at least once per year. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your raw material supply that came from operations that train workers on health and safety procedures, divided by the total mass of your raw material supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B2, the training on health and safety procedures must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and must be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for workers on health and safety procedures and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional worker training may be required to perform job duties. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your raw material supply that came from operations that implement a verifiable worker health and safety plan, divided by the total mass of your raw material supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B3, a worker health and safety plan must be verifiable and must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and be prominently displayed in the workplace where employees normally report. The plan should include best practices specific to ergonomics; repetitive motions; chemical and particulate exposure; appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE); and proper use of tools, machinery, and the handling of animals (if applicable). On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B4 as the mass of your raw material supply that came from operations that have a worker health and safety performance monitoring system in place, divided by the total mass of your raw material supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B4, a worker health and safety performance monitoring system should include metrics on issues including, but not limited to, incidence of worker injuries and prevalence of diseases. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B5 as the mass of your raw material supply that came from operations that were audited in the last three years on worker health and safety issues, divided by the total mass of your raw material supply, then multiply by 100. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
To be included in B5, the audits must be verifiable and address preventive measures, freely provided personal protective equipment, identification of worker health and safety hazards and effects on the exposed people, statistics and reasons behind injuries, design of work area, processes, installations, machinery/work equipment, operating processes and work organization, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Standards on Occupational Health and Safety.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification List: The risk classification of countries is based on the Worldwide Governance Indicators. These determine the level of risks related to Governance in sourcing countries. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

GlobalG.A.P. Risk Assessment on Social Practice (GRASP): GRASP is an add-on module for GLOBALG.A.P. developed to assess social practices on the farm, addressing specific aspects of workers’ health, safety and welfare, and labor rights. https://www.globalgap.org/uk_en/for-producers/globalg.a.p.-add-on/grasp/

Rainforest Alliance Sustainable Agriculture Standard: Rainforest Alliance has two certifications: farm and chain of custody. The standard encompasses all three pillars of sustainability—social, economic, and environmental. RA is currently developing a new certification program, following their 2018 merger with UTZ. Since 2018 RA has also become the sole owner and operator of the 2017 SAN Standard. https://www.rainforest-alliance.org/business/solutions/certification/agriculture/

Recommended Practices for Safety and Health Programs: Defines and enforces standards for the safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women. OHSA also provides training, outreach education, and assistance. The OSHA tools can be used for self-evaluations, to compare elements and actions of different health and safety standards, to track implemented actions, identify remaining weaknesses, and strategies for continued improvement. https://www.osha.gov/shpguidelines/explore-tools.html

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit: Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit is an auditing system that aligns with Ethical Trading Initiative's Base Code as well International Labour Organization Conventions. It has been developed to provide a public auditing methodology and format for companies to use to assess compliance. https://www.sedex.com/our-services/smeta-audit/

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528345
IS0 26000 Social Responsibility: ISO 2600 is not a certification tool, but it offers guidance about social responsibility to all sorts of organizations regardless of their activity, size or location. https://www.iso.org/iso-26000-social-responsibility.html

Social Accountability International Guidance Document for Social Accountability 8000: According to Social Accountability International, "this guidance document provides various tools and information for users of the Social Accountability 8000 standard, including definitions, background information, and examples." https://sa-intl.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/SA8000-2014-Guidance-Document.pdf

United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9
Corrective actions: Prompt actions taken to eliminate the causes of a problem, thus preventing their recurrence.

First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Risk assessment: A systematic process to evaluate the potential risks associated with consumer exposure to individual ingredient hazards or final formulations when used in products under conditions of instructed use or foreseeable misuse.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Shoe Cleaning and PolishingAnimal testing - Alternative approachesThe scope of this question includes testing that is performed by your organization or a contracted organization.
Toxicity endpoints include those that are used to perform a hazard assessment that may be required for by regulatory agencies or authorities. An overview of applicable toxicity endpoints and animal alternatives along with their validation status can be found at "AltTox.org - Toxicity Endpoints & Tests" in the Background Information section of this KPI.
Major research initiatives are government, university, or privately based programs that are dedicated to the replacement, reduction, and refinement of animal testing by advancing non-animal alternative testing methods through effective development, validation, use, and/or communication. Examples of major research initiatives include, but are not limited to, JaCVAM, ECVAM, ICCVAM, CAAT, and ZEBET.
N/AAltTox.org: According to their website, "AltTox.org is a website dedicated to advancing non-animal methods of toxicity testing, both to better protect the health of humans, animals, and the environment and to reduce the numbers and suffering of animals used in current toxicology assessments." http://www.alttox.org/spotlight/055.html

Doerenkamp-Zbinden Foundation (DZF): According to their website, "The Doerenkamp-Zbinden Foundation has continued to actively support a number of projects in the field of alternatives to animal testing in biomedical sciences." http://www.doerenkamp.ch/en/default.html?id=11

European Union Reference Laboratory for Alternatives to Animal Testing (EURL ECVAM): EURL ECVAM is dedicated to the advancement of animal testing alternatives by promoting non-animal alternatives through scientific research, validation, and independent evaluation. ECVAM’s ultimate goal is enhanced safety at multiple life cycle stages with decreased reliance on animal testing. https://ec.europa.eu/jrc/en/eurl/ecvam

Japanese Center for Validation of Alternative Methods (JaCVAM): JaCVAM is an institute that is dedicated to the promotion of the reduction, refinement, and replacement of animal testing used to justify chemical safety in Japan. This mission is achieved in part through international collaboration. https://www.jacvam.jp/en/index.html

Japanese Society for Alternatives to Animal Experiments: This site contains a link to The Center of Alternatives Methods for Safety Evaluation of Cosmetics. http://www.asas.or.jp/jsaae/eng/outline/index.html

National Center for Evaluation and Documentation of Alternative Methods to Animal Experiments at the Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (ZEBET): According to the BfR website, the ZEBET "Unit supports the development and use of alternative methods to animal experiments." https://www.bfr.bund.de/en/unit__centre_for_documentation_and_evaluation_of_alternative_methods_to_animal_experiments__zebet_-53868.html

National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research: According to their website, "The National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs) is a leader in the discovery and application of new technologies and approaches to minimize the use of animals for research purposes and improve their welfare (the 3Rs). Primarily funded by the government, charitable and private donations, NC3R funds research, supports training and development, and stimulates changes in regulations and practice." https://www.nc3rs.org.uk/

The Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM): ICCVAM is an interagency committee composed of representatives from 15 U.S. federal regulatory and research agencies that require, use, generate, or disseminate toxicological and safety testing information used to determine the safety or potential adverse health effects of chemicals and products to which workers and consumers may be exposed. https://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/whatwestudy/niceatm/iccvam/index.html
N/A
Shoe Cleaning and PolishingDesign for the environment - FormulationThis question does not address packaging materials.
For formulated goods, minimization of negative impacts to humans and the environment can be achieved through actions such as prioritization and continual reduction, elimination, or restriction of hazardous substances.
Examples of tools, standards, and certifications that can be used to minimize negative impacts include, but are not limited to, those below.
You may select response A if you do not produce products for end consumers.
Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

EPA Safer Choice Program: EPA developed the Safer Choice program in which companies can voluntarily participate by researching and reformulating their product to meet Safer Choice standards in order to earn the Safer Choice Label on their products. Safer Choice reviews the formulation of ingredients in terms of environmental and human health risk, and characteristics of concern within a functional class against the Master and Functional-Class Criteria documents. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

OECD Guideline for the Testing of Chemicals, Ready Biodegradability: Test Number 301 of the OECD Guidelines for the Testing of Chemicals (Section 3) outlines six methods for the screening of ready biodegradability. "The methods are: the DOC Die-Away, the CO2 Evolution (Modified Sturm Test), the MITI (I) (Ministry of International Trade and Industry, Japan), the Closed Bottle, the Modified OECD Screening and the Manometric Respirometry." http://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/environment/test-no-301-ready-biodegradability_9789264070349-en
Autodesk - Design for Sustainability: Autodesk® Sustainability Workshop provides resources, tools and online learning opportunities to teach the principles of sustainable design. https://academy.autodesk.com/sustainable-design

BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

Guidelines for Formulating and Designing Green Products: Earth Friendly Products provides a technical overview of the factors to consider when formulating and designing sustainable products. Key aspects of design include life cycle assessment of products, minimization of resource consumption, synergy of ingredients, and effective package design. http://ecos.com/assets/uploads/2013/10/EFP-Guidelines-for-Product-Development-and-Designedited2016.pdf

The Guide to Safer Chemicals: The Guide to Safer Chemicals provides guidance on how to design and implement a chemicals management program based on the Principles for Safer Chemicals. The Principles and Guide were developed by BizNGO, a collaboration of business and NGO leaders to create and adopt "safer chemicals and sustainable materials." https://www.bizngo.org/safer-chemicals/guide-to-safer-chemicals
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Public disclosure: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Shoe Cleaning and PolishingGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the total spend on ingredients from suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total spend on all ingredients from suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers responded to the most recent CDP Climate Change questionnaire you may refer to each supplier's CDP Climate Change responses to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.

Public disclosure: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Shoe Cleaning and PolishingIngredient transparency - Business to consumerCalculate B1 as the revenue generated from your products for which you disclose ingredient identity online or via telephone, divided by the total revenue from all of your products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B2 as the revenue generated from your products for which you have on-label disclosure of ingredient identity, divided by the total revenue from all of your products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B3 as the revenue generated from your products for which you have disclosed information about the functionality of the ingredients (online, via telephone, or on-label), divided by the total revenue from all of your products, then multiply by 100.
Online disclosure includes either websites or mobile applications referenced on the product label. Telephone disclosure includes providing a toll-free phone number on a product label for consumers to call to obtain ingredient information. On-label disclosure includes ingredient information printed directly on your product’s packaging. Ingredient functionality disclosure includes a statement of the purpose of the ingredient used in your product either online, via telephone, or on-label.
Best-in-class practices for ingredient disclosure outlined by the nationally recognized standards listed below include listing ingredients by INCI, CAS, IUPAC, CSPA Ingredient Dictionary, or common chemical name in descending order of concentration. Where needed to ensure the protection of confidential business information, chemical function or chemical class labels may be used. Fragrance components may reference a list or subset list of the ingredients authored by the International Fragrance Association (IFRA) or another list that represents the fragrance materials used in the product.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
American Cleaning Institute (ACI) Ingredient Central: ?In collaboration with the Household & Commercial Products Association (HCPA) and the Canadian Consumer Specialty Products Association (CCSPA), the American Cleaning Institute (ACI) has developed an ingredient communication initiative that provides consumers with ingredient information for four main product categories: air care, automotive care, cleaning, and polishes and floor maintenance products. https://www.cleaninginstitute.org/ingredient_central/

EPA Safer Choice Program: EPA developed the Safer Choice program in which companies can voluntarily participate by researching and reformulating their product to meet Safer Choice standards in order to earn the Safer Choice Label on their products. Safer Choice reviews the formulation of ingredients in terms of environmental and human health risk, and characteristics of concern within a functional class against the Master and Functional-Class Criteria documents. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

The Household & Commercial Products Association (HCPA) Dictionary: The Household & Commercial Products Association (HCPA) Dictionary is the only source for definitions of the chemicals used specifically in household and automotive care consumer products. Companies engaged in ingredient communication can use the HCPA Dictionary to assure maximum transparency for consumers who want to know what ingredients are in the products they buy and use. Consumers can access information on product ingredients through the free HCPA Consumer Product Ingredients Dictionary Guides, which cross-reference HCPA Names with trade names, CAS numbers, and other technical names. Through referencing these Guides, consumers can better understand the ingredients lists on company web sites. https://www.thehcpa.org/resources/ingredient-dictionary/
N/AN/A
Shoe Cleaning and PolishingPackaging raw material sourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

ISO 18604: ISO 18604 (Packaging and the environment -- Material recycling) provides measurement standards for determining how recyclable a particular product is. https://www.iso.org/standard/55872.html

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)
Shoe Cleaning and PolishingPalm Oil, Palm Kernel Oil, and Derivative Ingredient SourcingYour palm oil supply includes all palm oil, palm kernel oil, and their chemically-derived ingredients purchased or produced for inclusion in your final products. "Chemically-derived ingredients" refers to any material that originated from a chemical reaction that included palm oil or palm kernel oil as a raw material.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your certified palm oil ingredient supply for your products that was purchased through RSPO book and claim (e.g., GreenPalm), divided by the total mass of your palm oil ingredient supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your certified palm oil ingredient supply for your products that was purchased through RSPO mass balance, divided by the total mass of your palm oil ingredient supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your certified palm oil ingredient supply for your products that was purchased through RSPO segregated, divided by the total mass of your palm oil ingredient supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the mass of your certified palm oil ingredient supply for your products that was purchased through RSPO identity preserved, divided by the total mass of your palm oil ingredient supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Consumer Goods Forum Palm Oil Roadmap (CGF - Palm Oil 2021): The Consumer Good Forum (CGF) Palm Oil Roadmap is a guide for companies implementing their own policies and practices for sourcing palm oil more sustainably and achieving deforestation reduction goals. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/20150810-Sustainable-Plam-Oil-Sourcing-Guidelines-Final-Version-1.pdf

GreenPalm - Certified Sustainable Palm Oil: The GreenPalm trading program allows companies to support RSPO growers and suppliers by allowing them to purchase book and claim certificates of RSPO to offset their use of palm and palm kernel oil. http://greenpalm.org/

RSPO - Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil - Certification: The RSPO certification is a seal of approval ensuring that the palm oil is traceable through the supply chain by certifying each facility that processes or uses it. RSPO was founded on and supports principles for palm oil production including transparency, regulatory compliance, financial viability, natural resource conservation, and continuous improvement. http://www.rspo.org/about

RSPO supply chain models Book and Claim, Mass Balance, Segregated, and Identity Preserved: The palm oil and palm oil-derived ingredients may go through many production and logistical stages between plantations and the end product. Any individual batch of palm oil and palm oil-derived ingredients can be traded through one of four supply chain models that are approved by RSPO - Book and Claim, Mass Balance, Segregated, and Identity Preserved. https://rspo.org/certification/supply-chains
Palm Oil Innovation Group Charter (2019): The Palm Oil Innovation Group (POIG) Charter supports the group's goals to support innovation and improvements in palm oil plantation management, create value for those using the practices outlined, and be a platform for communication for plantation managers and governments. http://poig.org/the-poig-charter/

Walmart Sustainability Hub Forest Conservation (Walmart 2021): This website offers resources and guidance to support supplier engagement for deforestation-risk commodities (i.e. beef, cocoa, palm oil, and soy) in the jurisdictional approach to encourage forest conservation in places at highest risk of deforestation. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/forest-conservation
Chemically-derived ingredients: Any material that originated from a chemical reaction that included palm oil or palm kernel oil as a raw material. Examples of ingredients that may be derived from palm oil or palm kernel oil include, but are not limited to: surfactants such as sodium lauryl sulfate, sodium laureth sulfate, and sodium dodecyl sulphate; emulsifiers such as glyceryl stearate, steareth-20, and cetyl alcohol, as well as emollients such as palmitic acid.
Shoe Cleaning and PolishingPriority chemicals - Disclosure For this question, a priority chemical is one that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis. For (C) and (D), “chemicals present” refers to those chemicals which would be reasonably anticipated or suspected to be present in procured materials whether intentionally added or not. This includes reactive byproducts, residual monomers, and contaminants.
Relevant criteria in US EPA Safer Choice Program and Global Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals, listed below, may be used to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment.
Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Disclosure KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Disclosure KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750684

The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS): GHS provides specific human and environmental health criteria along with physical hazard criteria for chemicals in industry. These criteria are used for hazard communication and labeling of chemicals. https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/global.html
N/AN/A
Shoe Cleaning and PolishingPriority chemicals - ManagementFor this question, a priority chemical is one that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis.
Relevant criteria in the US EPA Safer Choice Program and Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals, listed below, may be used to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment.
For B, informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles.
For C, goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound. Public disclosure of goals and progress must have occurred within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Examples of tools and protocols for screening chemicals and assessing alternatives include green chemistry, alternatives analysis, restricted substances lists, and other tools that are listed in the Background Information.
GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

GreenSuite: GreenSuite is an environmental sustainability tool that can be customized to specific users' needs. Environmental issues throughout the supply chain are covered by this web based solution. http://greensuite360.com/index.html

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815

PRIO: PRIO is a web-based tool developed by the Swedish government to facilitate the assessment of environmental and health risks of chemicals. ? https://www.kemi.se/prioguiden/english/start

Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Management KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Management KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528286

The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS): GHS provides specific human and environmental health criteria along with physical hazard criteria for chemicals in industry. These criteria are used for hazard communication and labeling of chemicals. https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/global.html

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Exposure Assessment Tools and Models: According to their website, "The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) has developed several exposure assessment methods, databases, and predictive models to help in evaluating what happens to chemicals when they are used and released to the environment and how workers, the general public, consumers and the aquatic ecosystems may be exposed to chemicals." https://www.epa.gov/ceam/tools-data-exposure-assessment

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Sustainable Futures: According to their website, "The goal of the Sustainable Futures Initiative (SF) is to make new chemicals safer, available faster, and at lower cost. It works by giving chemical developers the same risk-screening models that EPA uses to evaluate new chemicals before they enter the market."? https://www.epa.gov/sustainable-futures
BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

Greenlist Process: According to their website, "In 2001, SC Johnson developed the Greenlist Process to classify ingredients in order to minimize the human and environmental impacts of their products." The process is now available for license to other companies and organizations. https://www.scjohnson.com/en/our-purpose/sustainability-report/explaining-the-sc-johnson-greenlist-program-an-excerpt-from-our-2017-sustainability-report

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Existing Chemicals Program: According to their website, "EPA's existing chemical programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and characterization, and risk management for chemical substances in commercial use." The current chemicals management program is undergoing review and update, including how the agency identifies and prioritizes priority chemicals for review and assessment under TSCA. https://www.epa.gov/compliance/toxic-substances-control-act-tsca-compliance-monitoring#chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
Public disclosure: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Shoe Cleaning and PolishingPriority chemicals - SafetyFor this question, a priority chemical is one that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis.
Relevant criteria in the US EPA Safer Choice Program and Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals, listed below, may be used to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment.
Examples of frameworks that define exposure scenarios and/or margins of safety include the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety's Notes of Guidance for the Testing of Cosmetic Substances and Their Safety Evaluation (10th Revision), the American Cleaning Institute's Consumer Product Ingredient Safety Handbook (2nd Edition), the Human and Environmental Risk Assessment project (HERA), and REACH's Guidance on Information Requirements and Chemical Safety Assessment.
Aggregate exposure is the total exposure to a consumer for a single ingredient from multiple product types. Cumulative risk assessment is "an analysis, characterization, and possible quantification of the combined risks to health or the environment from multiple agents or stressors" (EPA, 2003).
American Cleaning Institute's Consumer Product Ingredient Safety: Exposure and Risk Screening Methods for Consumer Product Ingredients: The main purpose of this book is to present methodologies and specific consumer exposure information that can be used for screening-level risk assessments of environmental and human exposures to high production volume (HPV) chemicals through the manufacturing and use of consumer products, mainly laundry, cleaning, and personal care products. The book is produced by the American Cleaning Institute (ACI; formerly, the Soap and Detergent Association) in collaboration with its partners and member companies. https://www.aciscience.org/docs/Consumer_Product_Ingredient_Safety_v2.0.pdf

European Chemicals Agency Guidance on Information Requirements and Chemical Safety Assessment (ECHA): This guidance document describes the information requirements under REACH with regard to substance properties, exposure, use and risk management measures, in the context of the chemical safety assessment. https://echa.europa.eu/guidance-documents/guidance-on-information-requirements-and-chemical-safety-assessment

Human and Environmental Risk Assessment (HERA): A voluntary industry programme to carry out Human and Environmental Risk Assessments on ingredients of household cleaning products. http://www.heraproject.com/RiskAssessment.cfm

Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Safety KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Safety KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528300

The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS): GHS provides specific human and environmental health criteria along with physical hazard criteria for chemicals in industry. These criteria are used for hazard communication and labeling of chemicals. https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/global.html

The SCCS Notes of Guidance for the Testing of Cosmetic Substances and Their Safety Evaluation - 10th Revision: The SCCS Notes of Guidance for the Testing of Cosmetic Ingredients and Their Safety Evaluation is a document compiled by the members of the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety (SCCS). The document contains information on the different aspects of testing and safety evaluation of cosmetic substances in Europe, with an emphasis on cosmetic ingredients and finished products. It is designed to provide guidance to public authorities and to the cosmetic industry in order to improve harmonized compliance with the current cosmetic EU legislation. https://op.europa.eu/en/publication-detail/-/publication/1d5f1653-38ce-11e9-8d04-01aa75ed71a1/language-en/format-PDF/source-87840423
EPA - Framework for Cumulative Risk Assessment: This EPA document provides background information for cumulative risk assessment. The presented framework outlines important factors for addressing scientific issues of cumulative risk assessment and presents a foundation of key elements for the cumulative risk assessment process. https://www.epa.gov/risk/framework-cumulative-risk-assessment

REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57, Annex XIV: This annex of the European Community's Registration, Evaluation, Authorization, and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) regulations describes substances to be included in regulation in accordance with the procedure described in Article 58. http://www.reachonline.eu/REACH/EN/REACH_EN/article57.html

UL Assessing the Safety of Personal Care Products: Original research paper published by UL, entitled: "Assessing the Safety of Personal Care Products: Comparative Analysis of Health Risk Assessment Frameworks and Recommendations for Best Practices. UL conducted its research in order to facilitate a path forward for improved personal care product development. This research includes an assessment of views expressed by non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and activists, as well as views from safety, stewardship, and sustainability experts from the retail, brand, and chemical supplier communities. It explores various elements of a full safety assessment, including hazard characterization, exposure assessment, dose response, and risk characterization. https://msc.ul.com/en/resources/white-papers/personal-care-product-health-risk-assessment-study/
Cumulative risk assessment: An analysis of the combined risks to health or the environment from multiple agents or stressors.
Shoe Cleaning and PolishingProduct CertificationsCalculate B1-B3 as the sales of your product that underwent the specified certification, divided by the total sales of the product, them multiply by 100. The sum of B1-B3 may exceed 100% if product has more than one certification.Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

EPA Safer Choice Program: EPA developed the Safer Choice program in which companies can voluntarily participate by researching and reformulating their product to meet Safer Choice standards in order to earn the Safer Choice Label on their products. Safer Choice reviews the formulation of ingredients in terms of environmental and human health risk, and characteristics of concern within a functional class against the Master and Functional-Class Criteria documents. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

Environmental Working Group EWG VERIFIED™ Standard: The Environmental Working Group (EWG) is a non-profit, non-partisan organization dedicated to protecting human health and the environment. EWG produces research and educational guides on health hazards in food and personal care products. Companies work with EWG by disclosing ingredients not listed on labels and manufacturing processes that is then compared to EWG’s strict criteria standards and if they meet the criteria they receive the EWG verified mark. http://www.ewg.org/ewgverified/
N/AN/A
Shoe Cleaning and PolishingProduct stewardshipThis question addresses takeback programs that an organization may fund, contract, or physically operate, in whole or in part, to enable consumers to return products for responsible end-of-life management. Include only products and materials for which an organization has the ability to decide or influence the handling, treatment, and disposal of returned materials. These calculations should be made at the program level rather than category level. The same percentage can be reported across multiple product categories if the products are collected and managed in the same program within the organization. Separate programs require separate percentage calculations when reported in different product category questionnaires. If products under the same category are collected in separate programs, average the recycling performance of the two programs and report that value in D1.
Calculate D1 as the number of product units returned through the program(s) for recycling divided by the total number of product units sold, then multiply by 100. If this number exceeds 100, report it as 100.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Data for both the unit volume returned and unit volume sold should come from the same year, even though units may be returned in a different year than they were sold.
Examples of stewardship programs include extended producer responsibility programs and product takeback programs. Such programs should ensure that materials are recycled or disposed of in an environmentally sensitive manner.
THESIS Help Center Video: Product Stewardship KPI: Short video tutorial on the Product Stewardship KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750712N/AProduct stewardship: The set of activities by which those who participate in a product’s life cycle share responsibility for its total life cycle impacts.

Takeback program: A collection method whereby consumers return specific products or classes of products at the end of their useful lives for potential reuse and refurbishment, followed by material recovery and appropriate disposal.
Shoe Cleaning and PolishingSustainable packaging design and productionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

Recycle Now: Recycle Now is the national recycling effort in England. The website contains examples of recycling labels that may be used on packaging and how to interpret them. http://www.recyclenow.com/recycle/packaging-symbols-explained

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: The practice of minimizing material use and waste in production processes.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
Shoe Cleaning and PolishingWater use - Supply chainCalculate B1 as the total spend on ingredient suppliers that reported their annual water use, divided by total spend on all ingredient suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using spend data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Water use is defined as the total amount of withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells. Supplier water use reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
If suppliers completed the CDP Water Security Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report water use.
THESIS Help Center Video: Water use - Supply chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Water use - Supply chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/528558948CDP Water Information Request: The CDP Water Information Request provides questions that assess a company's water use, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. CDP can be contacted to respond to the Water Information Request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/
Public disclosure: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.

Water use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.
Shoe Cleaning and PolishingWorker Health and Safety - ManufacturingThis question aligns with the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Injury and Illness rate. This rate can be normalized for global applicability.
Calculate B1 according to OSHA's injury and illness rate by multiplying the number of recordable injuries and illnesses by 200,000. Divide this number by the total employee hours worked to produce your final product. For laundry detergents, in order to convert the AISE accident rate derived from the occupational health and safety indicator #3 found in the AISE Charter, multiply that number by 2 to calculate the requested number. If multiple facilities manufacture the final product, the injury and illness rate will need to be adjusted using a weighted average based on each facility's percentage of total production. Include all employees at a facility that participate in the production of the final product. This includes both full-time and contracted employees.
Calculate B2 as the revenue from your final product for which you were able to obtain data, divided by the total revenue from your final product, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS General Guidance document provides guidance to calculate the weighted average. See Background Information for access to this document.
The Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool is an online calculator that will compute your injury and illness rate. The OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses provides forms and information for computing your facility injury and illness rate.
Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool: This tool calculates the injury and illness incidence rate for employers. https://data.bls.gov/iirc/

OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses: This webpage contains information on how to record workplace injuries and illnesses and provides the worksheets needed to correctly do so. https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/forms

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520108472
How to Compute a Firm's Incidence Rate for Safety Management: This website from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics provides in-depth guidance on computing injury and illness numbers. https://www.bls.gov/iif/osheval.htm

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

TSC General Guidance for Key Performance Indicators: The General Guidance Document for Key Performance Indicators (KPI) provides essential guidance to complement the specific guidance provided for each KPI. TSC recommends reading this document before you begin your first questionnaire and revisiting it as often as necessary for clarification and additional information. https://www.sustainabilityconsortium.org/tsc-downloads/general-guidance-document/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Shoe Cleaning and PolishingWorker health and safety - Supply chainTo be included in B1-B5, risk assessments, training programs, safety plans, performance monitoring systems, and audits must be verifiable and address health and safety issues such as worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. The assessments and audits must be conducted by second or third parties. The risk assessment must be conducted once per year while the audit must have been conducted at least once every three years, both using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles such as International Labour Organization Occupational Safety and Health Conventions (e.g., No. 155). The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions, which can inform your responses. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for examples of initiatives that meet these requirements.
Calculate B1 as the mass of your raw material supply that came from operations that have performed a risk assessment to identify high risk areas for health and safety, divided by the total mass of your raw material supply, then multiply by 100.
To determine if an operation is high risk for health and safety, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic review assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. It must be conducted at least once per year. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your raw material supply that came from operations that train workers on health and safety procedures, divided by the total mass of your raw material supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B2, the training on health and safety procedures must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and must be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for workers on health and safety procedures and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional worker training may be required to perform job duties. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your raw material supply that came from operations that implement a verifiable worker health and safety plan, divided by the total mass of your raw material supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B3, a worker health and safety plan must be verifiable and must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and be prominently displayed in the workplace where employees normally report. The plan should include best practices specific to ergonomics; repetitive motions; chemical and particulate exposure; appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE); and proper use of tools, machinery, and the handling of animals (if applicable). On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B4 as the mass of your raw material supply that came from operations that have a worker health and safety performance monitoring system in place, divided by the total mass of your raw material supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B4, a worker health and safety performance monitoring system should include metrics on issues including, but not limited to, incidence of worker injuries and prevalence of diseases. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B5 as the mass of your raw material supply that came from operations that were audited in the last three years on worker health and safety issues, divided by the total mass of your raw material supply, then multiply by 100. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
To be included in B5, the audits must be verifiable and address preventive measures, freely provided personal protective equipment, identification of worker health and safety hazards and effects on the exposed people, statistics and reasons behind injuries, design of work area, processes, installations, machinery/work equipment, operating processes and work organization, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Standards on Occupational Health and Safety.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification List: The risk classification of countries is based on the Worldwide Governance Indicators. These determine the level of risks related to Governance in sourcing countries. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

GlobalG.A.P. Risk Assessment on Social Practice (GRASP): GRASP is an add-on module for GLOBALG.A.P. developed to assess social practices on the farm, addressing specific aspects of workers’ health, safety and welfare, and labor rights. https://www.globalgap.org/uk_en/for-producers/globalg.a.p.-add-on/grasp/

Rainforest Alliance Sustainable Agriculture Standard: Rainforest Alliance has two certifications: farm and chain of custody. The standard encompasses all three pillars of sustainability—social, economic, and environmental. RA is currently developing a new certification program, following their 2018 merger with UTZ. Since 2018 RA has also become the sole owner and operator of the 2017 SAN Standard. https://www.rainforest-alliance.org/business/solutions/certification/agriculture/

Recommended Practices for Safety and Health Programs: Defines and enforces standards for the safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women. OHSA also provides training, outreach education, and assistance. The OSHA tools can be used for self-evaluations, to compare elements and actions of different health and safety standards, to track implemented actions, identify remaining weaknesses, and strategies for continued improvement. https://www.osha.gov/shpguidelines/explore-tools.html

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit: Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit is an auditing system that aligns with Ethical Trading Initiative's Base Code as well International Labour Organization Conventions. It has been developed to provide a public auditing methodology and format for companies to use to assess compliance. https://www.sedex.com/our-services/smeta-audit/

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528345
IS0 26000 Social Responsibility: ISO 2600 is not a certification tool, but it offers guidance about social responsibility to all sorts of organizations regardless of their activity, size or location. https://www.iso.org/iso-26000-social-responsibility.html

Social Accountability International Guidance Document for Social Accountability 8000: According to Social Accountability International, "this guidance document provides various tools and information for users of the Social Accountability 8000 standard, including definitions, background information, and examples." https://sa-intl.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/SA8000-2014-Guidance-Document.pdf

United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9
Corrective actions: Prompt actions taken to eliminate the causes of a problem, thus preventing their recurrence.

First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Risk assessment: A systematic process to evaluate the potential risks associated with consumer exposure to individual ingredient hazards or final formulations when used in products under conditions of instructed use or foreseeable misuse.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Dishwashing ProductsChemical footprintThe stewardship list is comprised of the following lists which describe the conditions under which the identified chemicals can or cannot be used. If a chemical on a stewardship list is listed with a qualifying statement on production, exposure, or threshold, the statement should be considered for this KPI.
• CA EPA Prop 65 - Reproductive and Developmental Toxicants, Carcinogens
• EPA Toxics Release Inventory PBTs
• EU REACH - Annex XVII CMRs (Appendices 1 - 6)
• IARC - Groups 1, 2A, 2B
These published lists have been referenced in public retailer chemical policies.
Where a chemical is accompanied by a specific route of exposure on these published lists and the exposure route is relevant to the product during consumer use or foreseeable misuse, then the chemical is relevant to this KPI.
For B, the program may be internal to an organization but must measure the chemical footprint as defined by the Chemical Footprint Project (CFP).
For C, the external program must measure the chemical footprint of the organization and must be multi-stakeholder (include representatives from government and/or NGO as well as industry) with transparent methodology and include actors from across the supply chain (raw material suppliers, manufacturers, and retailers).
This KPI set was developed by The Sustainability Consortium to be aligned with the Beauty and Personal Care Product Sustainability Rating System. TSC is a multi-stakeholder organization comprised of leading brands, manufacturers, retailers, and non-profit organizations that represent broad perspectives on sustainability. To build a KPI set that can be deployed across the beauty and personal care industry, TSC acknowledges that members have diverse points of view. As such, the attributes, activities, KPIs, and scoring used in this KPI set represent a composite perspective of the current market and are not necessarily the views, policies, or program of any single member of TSC.
N/AClean Production Action - Chemical Footprint Project: The Chemical Footprint Project (CFP), an initiative of Clean Production Action (CPA), has developed a tool to track and benchmark corporate activities to include safer chemicals in consumer products. The CFP survey also covers chemical selection at the manufacturing and supply chain phases and tracks progress according to four major elements: Management Strategy, Chemical Inventory, Footprint Measurement, and Public disclosure and Verification. https://www.chemicalfootprint.org/Chemical footprint: Defined by the Chemical Footprint Project™ as the total mass of chemicals sold by a company, used in its manufacturing operations and by its suppliers, and contained in packaging that meet any of the following criteria:
• Carcinogenic, mutagenic, or toxic to reproduction (CMR);
• Persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic substance (PBT);
• Any other chemical for which there is scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment that give rise to an equivalent level of concern (for example, an endocrine disruptor or neurotoxicant); or
• A chemical whose breakdown products result in a [chemical] that meets any of the above criteria.
The Chemical Footprint Project™ provides other specific guidance that can be used to identify chemicals that meet these criteria.

Public disclosure - Home and Personal Care: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Dishwashing ProductsFormulation - Chemical selectionFor this KPI, “category” is defined by the Performance Assessment name and description.
Intentionally added ingredients in final formulations are in scope for this KPI.
For this KPI, the threshold for intentionally added chemicals on the stewardship list is 100 ppm. Intentionally added chemicals on the stewardship list below this threshold are not to be considered.
For C, chemicals on the stewardship list are those chemicals on any of the four authoritative and scientific lists referenced below. Even when a list specifies a particular route of exposure, C measures the presence of chemicals on the stewardship list regardless of the route of exposure.
Calculate C as the number of products that you sell in this product category that contain any intentionally added formulation ingredients that are on the stewardship list, divided by the total number of products that your organization sells in this product category, then multiply by 100.
For D, chemicals on the stewardship list are those chemicals on any of the six authoritative and scientific lists referenced below. When a list specifies a particular route of exposure, D measures the presence of chemicals on the stewardship list when that route of route of exposure is relevant to consumers under conditions of instructed use or foreseeable misuse. Foreseeable misuse is limited to consumer misuse during a product’s intended application and does not include exposure from intentional misuse (e.g., ingestion of rinse-off skin products).
Calculate D as the number of products that you sell in this product category that contain any intentionally added formulation ingredients that are on the stewardship list where exposure is relevant, divided by the total number of products that your organization sells in this product category, then multiply by 100.
For D, examples of authoritative or scientific hazard classifications where a route of exposure has been specified include: 1. Ethyl alcohol in alcoholic beverages 2. Titanium dioxide (airborne, unbound particles of respirable size) 3. Silica, crystalline (airborne particles of respirable size) 4. Carbon black (airborne, unbound particles of respirable size)
Example-1: Titanium dioxide
For C, ALL products containing titanium dioxide are to be included in the numerator of the calculation.
For D, for products containing titanium dioxide (unbound particles of respirable size), ONLY those products that can become airborne during instructed consumer use or foreseeable misuse are to be included in the numerator of the calculation.
Example-2: Ethyl alcohol
For C, ALL products containing ethyl alcohol are to be included in the numerator of the calculation. For D, for products containing ethyl alcohol, ONLY those products that are ingested under conditions of instructed use or foreseeable misuse are to be included in the numerator of the calculation.
For product categories without intentionally added formulation ingredients that are on the stewardship list with or without a specified route of exposure, enter zero for C.
For product categories without intentionally added formulation ingredients that are on the stewardship list, enter zero for C and D.
The stewardship list is comprised of the following lists which describe the conditions under which the identified chemicals can or cannot be used. If a chemical on a stewardship list is listed with a qualifying statement on production, exposure, or threshold, the statement should be considered for this KPI.
• CA EPA Prop 65 - Reproductive and Developmental Toxicants, Carcinogens
• EPA Toxics Release Inventory PBTs
• EU REACH - Annex XVII CMRs (Appendices 1 - 6)
• IARC - Groups 1, 2A, 2B
These published lists have been referenced in public retailer chemical policies.
This KPI set was developed by The Sustainability Consortium to be aligned with the Beauty and Personal Care Product Sustainability Rating System. TSC is a multi-stakeholder organization comprised of leading brands, manufacturers, retailers, and non-profit organizations that represent broad perspectives on sustainability. To build a KPI set that can be deployed across the beauty and personal care industry, TSC acknowledges that members have diverse points of view. As such, the attributes, activities, KPIs, and scoring used in this KPI set represent a composite perspective of the current market and are not necessarily the views, policies, or program of any single member of TSC.
EPA - Safer Choice: The EPA Safer Choice program (previously Design for the Environment) provides a voluntary standard for product designers who wish to choose ingredients based on established criteria. In this program, all ingredients are reviewed and must meet strict criteria for various impacts (e.g., human health and the environment, carcinogenicity, reproductive/developmental toxicity). Products meeting the standard are able to carry the Safer Choice label. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS): GHS provides specific human and environmental health criteria along with physical hazard criteria for chemicals in industry. These criteria are used for hazard communication and labeling of chemicals. https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/global.html
N/AContaminants: Naturally occurring impurities present in procured raw materials that are unintentionally incorporated into final formulations where they provide no function.

Incidental chemicals: Chemicals in raw materials present as a result of processing or for stabilization such as catalysts, solvents, residual monomers, reactive by-products, and raw material preservatives.

Intentionally added chemical: A chemical that provides a function to the final formulation during consumer use or is present as a result of formulating a product for safe use by consumers (e.g., pH balancing by acids or bases).

Unintentionally added ingredient: An ingredient that provides no function in a final formulation and is not present as a result of formulating a product for safe use by consumers (e.g., pH balancing by acids or bases). Unintentionally added ingredients include chemical contaminants (naturally occurring impurities present in procured raw materials that are unintentionally incorporated into final formulations where they provide no function) and incidental chemicals (chemicals in raw materials present as a result of processing or for stabilization such as catalysts, solvents, residual monomers, reactive by-products, and raw material preservatives).
Dishwashing ProductsFragrance safety - IFRA StandardsFor (C), fragrances used in products must meet at the time of production with the prohibitions, restrictions, and specifications set forth by the most recent International Fragrance Association (IFRA) Standards.
For (D), restrictions that further limit potential sensitizers and allergens include those which prohibit or restrict ingredients to levels below those set forth by the most recent IFRA Standards.
International Fragrance Association (IFRA) Standards: According to this website, "The IFRA Standards form the basis for the globally accepted and recognized risk management system for the safe use of fragrance ingredients and are part of the IFRA Code of Practice. This self-regulating body of industry partners developed a set of risk-based assessments and are institutionalized by an independent Expert Panel." http://www.ifraorg.org/en-us/standards#.UikMpzasiSoIFRA Code of Practice: The International Fragrance Association (IFRA) code of practice for compliance of fragrances and products with fragrances with relevant legislation, national and/or international. https://ifrafragrance.org/safe-use/code-of-practice-newSensitizer: A chemical that induces a specific immune cell memory response by repeated allergen exposure which later results in an elicitation of an allergic immune system response in sensitized individuals that may be exposed to the sensitizer, typically at lower levels than during induction.
Dishwashing ProductsGreenhouse gas - Supply chainScope 1, 2, and 3 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B as the spend on ingredient suppliers for household cleaning products sold that reported scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions, divided by total spend on all ingredient suppliers for household cleaning products sold, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
If suppliers responded to the most recent CDP Climate Change questionnaire you may refer to each supplier's CDP Climate Change responses to determine if they report emissions.
For C, public disclosure must have occurred within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Resources that can be used to establish and track greenhouse gas reduction goals include, but are not limited to, the Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard and GRI Performance Indicators.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools
The Global Reporting Initiative: The Global Reporting Initiative provides guidance globally on sustainable reporting standards. https://www.globalreporting.org/how-to-use-the-gri-standards/resource-center/Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.

Public disclosure - Home and Personal Care: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Dishwashing ProductsIngredient disclosure - Business to consumerThe scope of this question includes intentionally added ingredients.
Calculate B1 as the number of units sold for which you disclose ingredient identity online or via telephone, divided by the total number of units sold, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B2 as the number of units sold for which you disclose ingredient identity on-label divided by the total number of units sold, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B3 as the number of units sold for which you have disclosed information (online, via telephone, or on-label) about the functionality of the ingredients, divided by the total number of units sold, then multiply by 100.
For B1 - B3, when products have been bundled for sale under one SKU number or UPC code, the numerator should reflect the total number of product units sold, however bundled.
For B1 Online disclosure includes disclosure via websites, SmartLabel(TM), QR code at shelf, mobile apps, or similar measures. Telephone disclosure must be provided by a toll-free phone number on a product label for consumers to call to obtain ingredient information. Ingredients must be listed using a specific naming convention (e.g., CAS, IUPAC, HCPA Ingredient Dictionary, or common chemical name).
Where needed to ensure the protection of confidential business information, chemical function or chemical class labels may be used. Fragrances can reference a list or subset list of the ingredients authored by the International Fragrance Association (IFRA) or a "palette list" that represents the fragrance materials used in the product.
Ingredient functionality disclosure includes a statement of the function, or purpose, of the ingredient used in your product. The function is to be determined by the manufacturer and can be disclosed either online, via telephone, or on-label.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
American Cleaning Institute (ACI) Ingredient Central: ?In collaboration with the Household & Commercial Products Association (HCPA) and the Canadian Consumer Specialty Products Association (CCSPA), the American Cleaning Institute (ACI) has developed an ingredient communication initiative that provides consumers with ingredient information for four main product categories: air care, automotive care, cleaning, and polishes and floor maintenance products. https://www.cleaninginstitute.org/ingredient_central/

EPA Safer Choice Program: EPA developed the Safer Choice program in which companies can voluntarily participate by researching and reformulating their product to meet Safer Choice standards in order to earn the Safer Choice Label on their products. Safer Choice reviews the formulation of ingredients in terms of environmental and human health risk, and characteristics of concern within a functional class against the Master and Functional-Class Criteria documents. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
N/AN/A
Dishwashing ProductsIngredient disclosure to manufacturersBoth intentionally and unintentionally added ingredients in final formulations are in scope for this KPI.
For D and E, chemicals that are reasonably expected to be present include intentionally and unintentionally added ingredients present above trace quantities where the manufacturer knows or should reasonably know of such ingredients, impurities, or contaminants, unless they are withheld as confidential business information (adapted from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation).
For D, the limit of detection is 100 ppm. Chemicals that are reasonably expected to be present at levels lower than 100 ppm are not included.
For E, chemicals that are reasonably expected to be present at detectable levels are included.
The stewardship list is comprised of the following lists which describe the conditions under which the identified chemicals can or cannot be used. If a chemical on a stewardship list is listed with a qualifying statement on production, exposure, or threshold, the statement should be considered for this KPI.
• CA EPA Prop 65 - Reproductive and Developmental Toxicants, Carcinogens
• EPA Toxics Release Inventory PBTs
• EU REACH - Annex XVII CMRs (Appendices 1 - 6)
• IARC - Groups 1, 2A, 2B
These published lists have been referenced in public retailer chemical policies.
Where a chemical is accompanied by a specific route of exposure on these published lists and the exposure route is relevant to the product during consumer use or foreseeable misuse, then the chemical is relevant to this KPI.
This KPI set was developed by The Sustainability Consortium to be aligned with the Beauty and Personal Care Product Sustainability Rating System. TSC is a multi-stakeholder organization comprised of leading brands, manufacturers, retailers, and non-profit organizations that represent broad perspectives on sustainability. To build a KPI set that can be deployed across the beauty and personal care industry, TSC acknowledges that members have diverse points of view. As such, the attributes, activities, KPIs, and scoring used in this KPI set represent a composite perspective of the current market and are not necessarily the views, policies, or program of any single member of TSC.
The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS): GHS provides specific human and environmental health criteria along with physical hazard criteria for chemicals in industry. These criteria are used for hazard communication and labeling of chemicals. https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/global.htmlN/AIntentionally added ingredient: A chemical that provides a function to the final formulation during consumer use or is present as a result of formulating a product for safe use by consumers (e.g., pH balancing by acids or bases).

Limit of detection: Defined by the IUPAC Compendium of Chemical Terminology, 2nd ed. (the "Gold Book") as: "[the concentration, or the quantity, derived from the smallest measure that can be detected with reasonable certainty for a given analytical procedure.]"

Unintentionally added ingredient: An ingredient that provides no function in a final formulation and is not present as a result of formulating a product for safe use by consumers (e.g., pH balancing by acids or bases). Unintentionally added ingredients include chemical contaminants (naturally occurring impurities present in procured raw materials that are unintentionally incorporated into final formulations where they provide no function) and incidental chemicals (chemicals in raw materials present as a result of processing or for stabilization such as catalysts, solvents, residual monomers, reactive by-products, and raw material preservatives).
Dishwashing ProductsPackaging - Design, policy, and goalsFor this KPI, resources that can be used to establish goals and track progress on weight or volume optimization of packaging include, but are not limited to, assessment of packaging against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\) or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\). Life cycle impact assessment can be used to establish goals and track progress on environmental impact reduction.
For E, methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment or assessment against ISO Standard 14040.
For B, an assessment of material efficiency and weight or volume optimization must have been made.
For D, goals must have been established based on these assessments.
EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

ISO 14040: ISO 14040 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Principles and Framework" document for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/37456.html

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging - Design, policy, and goals KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging - Design, policy, and goals KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520106433
N/AEnvironmental impact: Any change to the environment, whether adverse or beneficial, wholly or partially resulting from an organization's activities, products or services. (ISO definition)

Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency - Home and Personal Care: The practice of minimizing material use and waste in production processes.

Public disclosure - Home and Personal Care: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)
Dishwashing ProductsPackaging - Recycle LabelingCalculate C1 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

Recycle Now: Recycle Now is the national recycling effort in England. The website contains examples of recycling labels that may be used on packaging and how to interpret them. http://www.recyclenow.com/recycle/packaging-symbols-explained

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging
Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.
Dishwashing ProductsPackaging - Sustainable SourcingFor this KPI, “category” is defined by the Performance Assessment name and description.
The total point value earned for C - G equals the total percentage of PCR, PIR, and sustainably sourced renewable content across all materials multiplied by 0.8. This value is calculated by:
% wood/paper composition × (% PCR or PIR content + % sustainably sourced renewable content)
+ % plastic composition × (% PCR content + % PIR content + % sustainably sourced renewable content)
+ % glass composition × (% PCR content + % PIR content) + % metal composition × (% PCR content + % PIR content)
+ % other materials composition × (% PCR content + % PIR content + % sustainably sourced renewable content)
For example, if the total percentage of PCR, PIR, or sustainably sourced renewable content across all materials is 25%, then the points earned for D - H would be 25% × 0.8 points available = 0.2 points earned.
Product sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer, is to be considered. For products that are shipped directly to an end consumer, include the transportation-related packaging.
Perform the calculations for this KPI in two steps:
Step 1. Enter the percentage composition, by mass, for each component type in this product category’s sales packaging:
• C1: Wood or paper
• D1: Plastic
• E1: Glass
• F1: Metal
• G1: Other materials
Step 2. Enter the percentage by mass for each material type in this product category’s sales packaging that is PCR, PIR, or sustainably sourced renewable content. For this step, be sure to enter the percentage of content based on each respective component type. Do not enter percentages based on the total mass of this product's category’s sales packaging.
• C2: Post-consumer or post-industrial recycled content
• D2, E2, F2, G2: Post-consumer recycled content
• D3, E3, F3, G3: Post-industrial recycled content
• C3, D4, G4: Sustainably sourced renewable content
For this KPI, post-consumer recycled content is defined by ISO 14021 or the Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0 and post-industrial (pre-consumer) recycled content is defined by ISO 14021. Sustainably sourced renewable content is defined by the Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0. Sustainable sourcing may be demonstrated by second or third party verification that the raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities.
Calculate C1, D1, E1, F1, and G1, as the mass of packaging composition for each component type in this product category’s sales packaging, divided by the total mass of this product category’s sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
For G1, "other materials" include, but are not limited to, textile packaging.
Calculate D2, E2, F2, and G2 as the mass of post-consumer recycled content for each component type in this product category’s sales packaging, divided by the total mass of each respective component type in this product category’s sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
For C2, sum the mass of post-consumer recycled and post-industrial recycled wood or paper content in this product category’s sales packaging and divide this value by the total mass of wood or paper in this product category’s sales packaging.
Calculate D3, E3, F3, and G3 as the mass of post-industrial recycled content for each component type in this product category’s sales packaging, divided by the total mass of each respective component type in this product category’s sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3, D4, and G4 as the mass of sustainably sourced renewable content for each component type in this product category’s sales packaging, divided by the total mass of each respective component type in this product category’s sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

ISO 14021: ISO 14021 (Environmental labels and declarations -- Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling)) provides measurement standards for determining how recyclable a particular product is. https://www.iso.org/standard/66652.html

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/
N/APost-consumer recycled (PCR) content: Materials obtained from a product that has been disposed of after its intended consumer use.

Post-industrial recycled (PIR) content: Materials obtained from a manufacturing process that has been disposed of after its intended use.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably sourced renewable content: Materials obtained from living biomass that is continually replenished at a rate equal to, or greater than, the rate of depletion.
Dishwashing ProductsPalm Oil, Palm Kernel Oil, and Derivative Ingredient SourcingYour palm oil supply includes all palm oil, palm kernel oil, and their chemically-derived ingredients purchased or produced for inclusion in your final products. "Chemically-derived ingredients" refers to any material that originated from a chemical reaction that included palm oil or palm kernel oil as a raw material.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your certified palm oil ingredient supply for your products that was purchased through RSPO book and claim (e.g., GreenPalm), divided by the total mass of your palm oil ingredient supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your certified palm oil ingredient supply for your products that was purchased through RSPO mass balance, divided by the total mass of your palm oil ingredient supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your certified palm oil ingredient supply for your products that was purchased through RSPO segregated, divided by the total mass of your palm oil ingredient supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the mass of your certified palm oil ingredient supply for your products that was purchased through RSPO identity preserved, divided by the total mass of your palm oil ingredient supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Consumer Goods Forum Palm Oil Roadmap (CGF - Palm Oil 2021): The Consumer Good Forum (CGF) Palm Oil Roadmap is a guide for companies implementing their own policies and practices for sourcing palm oil more sustainably and achieving deforestation reduction goals. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/20150810-Sustainable-Plam-Oil-Sourcing-Guidelines-Final-Version-1.pdf

GreenPalm - Certified Sustainable Palm Oil: The GreenPalm trading program allows companies to support RSPO growers and suppliers by allowing them to purchase book and claim certificates of RSPO to offset their use of palm and palm kernel oil. http://greenpalm.org/

RSPO - Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil - Certification: The RSPO certification is a seal of approval ensuring that the palm oil is traceable through the supply chain by certifying each facility that processes or uses it. RSPO was founded on and supports principles for palm oil production including transparency, regulatory compliance, financial viability, natural resource conservation, and continuous improvement. http://www.rspo.org/about

RSPO supply chain models Book and Claim, Mass Balance, Segregated, and Identity Preserved: The palm oil and palm oil-derived ingredients may go through many production and logistical stages between plantations and the end product. Any individual batch of palm oil and palm oil-derived ingredients can be traded through one of four supply chain models that are approved by RSPO - Book and Claim, Mass Balance, Segregated, and Identity Preserved. https://rspo.org/certification/supply-chains
Palm Oil Innovation Group Charter (2019): The Palm Oil Innovation Group (POIG) Charter supports the group's goals to support innovation and improvements in palm oil plantation management, create value for those using the practices outlined, and be a platform for communication for plantation managers and governments. http://poig.org/the-poig-charter/

Walmart Sustainability Hub Forest Conservation (Walmart 2021): This website offers resources and guidance to support supplier engagement for deforestation-risk commodities (i.e. beef, cocoa, palm oil, and soy) in the jurisdictional approach to encourage forest conservation in places at highest risk of deforestation. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/forest-conservation
Chemically-derived ingredients: Any material that originated from a chemical reaction that included palm oil or palm kernel oil as a raw material. Examples of ingredients that may be derived from palm oil or palm kernel oil include, but are not limited to: surfactants such as sodium lauryl sulfate, sodium laureth sulfate, and sodium dodecyl sulphate; emulsifiers such as glyceryl stearate, steareth-20, and cetyl alcohol, as well as emollients such as palmitic acid.
Dishwashing ProductsProduct CertificationsCalculate B1-B3 as the sales of your product that underwent the specified certification, divided by the total sales of the product, them multiply by 100. The sum of B1-B3 may exceed 100% if product has more than one certification.Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

EPA Safer Choice Program: EPA developed the Safer Choice program in which companies can voluntarily participate by researching and reformulating their product to meet Safer Choice standards in order to earn the Safer Choice Label on their products. Safer Choice reviews the formulation of ingredients in terms of environmental and human health risk, and characteristics of concern within a functional class against the Master and Functional-Class Criteria documents. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

Environmental Working Group EWG VERIFIED™ Standard: The Environmental Working Group (EWG) is a non-profit, non-partisan organization dedicated to protecting human health and the environment. EWG produces research and educational guides on health hazards in food and personal care products. Companies work with EWG by disclosing ingredients not listed on labels and manufacturing processes that is then compared to EWG’s strict criteria standards and if they meet the criteria they receive the EWG verified mark. http://www.ewg.org/ewgverified/
N/AN/A
Dishwashing ProductsRisk assessment and product safetyFinal formulations, not packaging materials, are in scope for this KPI.
For B, ingredient risk assessments must consider the aggregate exposure to individual ingredients from all products that are sold by a manufacturer and arrive at an acceptable margin of safety. These risk assessments should take into account exposure to vulnerable populations such as children under the age of three, the elderly, pregnant and breast-feeding women, and people with compromised immune systems (as described in the EU Cosmetic Products Regulation (EC) No 1223/2009).
Product level risk assessments must be performed for all products that are sold by a manufacturer and must account for interactions between individual ingredients in final formulations to justify safe use by consumers.
Resources for performing risk assessment, formulating products for adequate microbiological protection, and post market safety surveillance include, but are not limited to, those listed in the Background Information for this KPI.
American Cleaning Institute Exposure and Risk Screening Methods: The American Cleaning Institute released their exposure and risk screening document as a guide for brand manufacturers selling cleaning products with relevant human and environmental exposures. https://www.aciscience.org/docs/Consumer_Product_Ingredient_Safety_v2.0.pdf

Australian Industrial Chemicals Introduction Scheme (AICIS): The Australian Industrial Chemicals Introduction Scheme (AICIS)protects the Australian public by assessing chemical risks and sharing information for their safe industrial use. https://www.industrialchemicals.gov.au/

European Chemicals Agency Guidance on Information Requirements and Chemical Safety Assessment (ECHA): This guidance document describes the information requirements under REACH with regard to substance properties, exposure, use and risk management measures, in the context of the chemical safety assessment. https://echa.europa.eu/guidance-documents/guidance-on-information-requirements-and-chemical-safety-assessment

Human and Environmental Risk Assessment (HERA) Initiative: The Human and Environmental Risk Assessment (HERA) project is a voluntary initiative launched by A.I.S.E. and Cefic. This initiative provides a common risk assessment framework for the household cleaning products industry and works towards greater transparency of risk assessment information. http://www.heraproject.com/RiskAssessment.cfm

International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS): The International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS) consolidates science-based peer-reviewed data on chemicals that are used globally into a single database. IPCS’s goal is to aid in the proper and sound management of these chemicals. http://www.inchem.org/
Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR): The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) is part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and is focused on protecting communities from human health impacts associated with exposure to both natural and man-made substances. https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/

Australian Industrial Chemicals Introduction Scheme (AICIS): The Australian Industrial Chemicals Introduction Scheme (AICIS)protects the Australian public by assessing chemical risks and sharing information for their safe industrial use. https://www.industrialchemicals.gov.au/

National Toxicology Program (NTP): The National Toxicology Program (NTP) is an interagency program affiliated across the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services that works to enhance the science of toxicology, its testing methodology, and sharing of information across government entities and scientific communities. NTP also focuses on making this information publicly available. https://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/index.cfm

USA-EPA Human Health Risk Assessment Program: The EPA Human Health Risk Assessment Program (HHRA) studies the human health effects of chemical exposure and their specific impact on biological and physical processes. Their health assessments describe the potential risk to the public. Resources to perform risk assessments are publicly available on their website. https://www.epa.gov/risk/human-health-risk-assessment
Post market surveillance: The practice of monitoring the safety of products after they have been released on the market.

Risk assessment - Home and Personal Care: A systematic process to evaluate the potential risks associated with consumer exposure to individual ingredient hazards or final formulations when used in products under conditions of instructed use or foreseeable misuse.
Dishwashing ProductsWater use - Formulation raw material suppliersCalculate B as the total spend on ingredient suppliers for your household cleaning products sold that reported their annual water use, divided by the total spend on all ingredient suppliers for your household cleaning products sold, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the completion date of this questionnaire.
Supplier water use reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
If suppliers completed CDP's Water Security Questionnaire you may refer to their answers to determine if they report water use.
CDP Water Information Request: The CDP Water Information Request provides questions that assess a company's water use, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. CDP can be contacted to respond to the Water Information Request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/
N/APublic disclosure - Home and Personal Care: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.

Water use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.
Dishwashing ProductsWorker Health and Safety - ManufacturingThis question aligns with the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Injury and Illness rate. This rate can be normalized for global applicability.
Calculate B1 according to OSHA's injury and illness rate by multiplying the number of recordable injuries and illnesses by 200,000. Divide this number by the total employee hours worked to produce your final product. In order to convert the AISE accident rate, derived from the occupational health and safety indicator #3 found in the AISE Charter, multiply that number by 2x to calculate the requested number. If multiple facilities manufacture the final product, the injury and illness rate will need to be adjusted using a weighted average based on each facility's percentage of total production. Include all employees at a facility that participate in the production of the final product. This includes both full-time and contracted employees.
Calculate B2 as the revenue from your final product for which you were able to obtain data, divided by the total revenue from your final product, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS General Guidance document provides guidance to calculate the weighted average. See Background Information for access to this document.
The Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool is an online calculator that will compute your injury and illness rate. The OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses provides forms and information for computing your facility injury and illness rate.
Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool: This tool calculates the injury and illness incidence rate for employers. https://data.bls.gov/iirc/

OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses: This webpage contains information on how to record workplace injuries and illnesses and provides the worksheets needed to correctly do so. https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/forms
How to Compute a Firm's Incidence Rate for Safety Management: This website from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics provides in-depth guidance on computing injury and illness numbers. https://www.bls.gov/iif/osheval.htm

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

TSC General Guidance for Key Performance Indicators: The General Guidance Document for Key Performance Indicators (KPI) provides essential guidance to complement the specific guidance provided for each KPI. TSC recommends reading this document before you begin your first questionnaire and revisiting it as often as necessary for clarification and additional information. https://www.sustainabilityconsortium.org/tsc-downloads/general-guidance-document/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Dishwashing ProductsWorker health and safety - Supply chainTo be included in B1-B5, risk assessments, training programs, safety plans, performance monitoring systems, and audits must be verifiable and address health and safety issues such as worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. The assessments and audits must be conducted by second or third parties. The risk assessment must be conducted once per year while the audit must have been conducted at least once every three years, both using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles such as International Labour Organization Occupational Safety and Health Conventions (e.g., No. 155). The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions, which can inform your responses. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for examples of initiatives that meet these requirements.
Calculate B1 as the mass of your raw material supply that came from operations that have performed a risk assessment to identify high risk areas for health and safety, divided by the total mass of your raw material supply, then multiply by 100.
To determine if an operation is high risk for health and safety, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic review assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. It must be conducted at least once per year. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your raw material supply that came from operations that train workers on health and safety procedures, divided by the total mass of your raw material supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B2, the training on health and safety procedures must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and must be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for workers on health and safety procedures and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional worker training may be required to perform job duties. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your raw material supply that came from operations that implement a verifiable worker health and safety plan, divided by the total mass of your raw material supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B3, a worker health and safety plan must be verifiable and must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and be prominently displayed in the workplace where employees normally report. The plan should include best practices specific to ergonomics; repetitive motions; chemical and particulate exposure; appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE); and proper use of tools, machinery, and the handling of animals (if applicable). On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B4 as the mass of your raw material supply that came from operations that have a worker health and safety performance monitoring system in place, divided by the total mass of your raw material supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B4, a worker health and safety performance monitoring system should include metrics on issues including, but not limited to, incidence of worker injuries and prevalence of diseases. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B5 as the mass of your raw material supply that came from operations that were audited in the last three years on worker health and safety issues, divided by the total mass of your raw material supply, then multiply by 100. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
To be included in B5, the audits must be verifiable and address preventive measures, freely provided personal protective equipment, identification of worker health and safety hazards and effects on the exposed people, statistics and reasons behind injuries, design of work area, processes, installations, machinery/work equipment, operating processes and work organization, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Standards on Occupational Health and Safety.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528345
IS0 26000 Social Responsibility: ISO 2600 is not a certification tool, but it offers guidance about social responsibility to all sorts of organizations regardless of their activity, size or location. https://www.iso.org/iso-26000-social-responsibility.html

United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9
Corrective actions: Prompt actions taken to eliminate the causes of a problem, thus preventing their recurrence.

First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Risk assessment: A systematic process to evaluate the potential risks associated with consumer exposure to individual ingredient hazards or final formulations when used in products under conditions of instructed use or foreseeable misuse.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Household Cleaning ProductsChemical footprintThe stewardship list is comprised of the following lists which describe the conditions under which the identified chemicals can or cannot be used. If a chemical on a stewardship list is listed with a qualifying statement on production, exposure, or threshold, the statement should be considered for this KPI.
• CA EPA Prop 65 - Reproductive and Developmental Toxicants, Carcinogens
• EPA Toxics Release Inventory PBTs
• EU REACH - Annex XVII CMRs (Appendices 1 - 6)
• IARC - Groups 1, 2A, 2B
These published lists have been referenced in public retailer chemical policies.
Where a chemical is accompanied by a specific route of exposure on these published lists and the exposure route is relevant to the product during consumer use or foreseeable misuse, then the chemical is relevant to this KPI.
For B, the program may be internal to an organization but must measure the chemical footprint as defined by the Chemical Footprint Project (CFP).
For C, the external program must measure the chemical footprint of the organization and must be multi-stakeholder (include representatives from government and/or NGO as well as industry) with transparent methodology and include actors from across the supply chain (raw material suppliers, manufacturers, and retailers).
This KPI set was developed by The Sustainability Consortium to be aligned with the Beauty and Personal Care Product Sustainability Rating System. TSC is a multi-stakeholder organization comprised of leading brands, manufacturers, retailers, and non-profit organizations that represent broad perspectives on sustainability. To build a KPI set that can be deployed across the beauty and personal care industry, TSC acknowledges that members have diverse points of view. As such, the attributes, activities, KPIs, and scoring used in this KPI set represent a composite perspective of the current market and are not necessarily the views, policies, or program of any single member of TSC.
N/AClean Production Action - Chemical Footprint Project: The Chemical Footprint Project (CFP), an initiative of Clean Production Action (CPA), has developed a tool to track and benchmark corporate activities to include safer chemicals in consumer products. The CFP survey also covers chemical selection at the manufacturing and supply chain phases and tracks progress according to four major elements: Management Strategy, Chemical Inventory, Footprint Measurement, and Public disclosure and Verification. https://www.chemicalfootprint.org/Chemical footprint: Defined by the Chemical Footprint Project™ as the total mass of chemicals sold by a company, used in its manufacturing operations and by its suppliers, and contained in packaging that meet any of the following criteria:
• Carcinogenic, mutagenic, or toxic to reproduction (CMR);
• Persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic substance (PBT);
• Any other chemical for which there is scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment that give rise to an equivalent level of concern (for example, an endocrine disruptor or neurotoxicant); or
• A chemical whose breakdown products result in a [chemical] that meets any of the above criteria.
The Chemical Footprint Project™ provides other specific guidance that can be used to identify chemicals that meet these criteria.

Public disclosure - Home and Personal Care: Voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Household Cleaning ProductsFormulation - Chemical selectionFor this KPI, “category” is defined by the Performance Assessment name and description.
Intentionally added ingredients in final formulations are in scope for this KPI.
For this KPI, the threshold for intentionally added chemicals on the stewardship list is 100 ppm. Intentionally added chemicals on the stewardship list below this threshold are not to be cons