KPI Guidance Tool

Electronics
Assessment NameKPI TitleCalculation & ScopeCertifications, Standards & ToolsBackground InformationDefinitions
ComputersConflict mineralsCalculate D1 as the total number of validated smelters, divided by the total number of smelters, then multiply by 100. Include all smelters identified as supplying some portion of the tin, tungsten, tantalum, or gold in your products.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
To be considered conflict-free, smelters must have a valid certification established or confirmed in the previous 12-month period as defined above.
Smelters may be validated through any internationally recognized body, such as the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI), Responsible Jewellery Council, ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group, or the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA).
Better Sourcing Program: The Better Sourcing Program (BSP) provides a technology-based communications solution to allow global organizations to source artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) ores through upstream due diligence, auditing and risk management. https://www.rcsglobal.com/bettersourcing/

ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group: The International Tin Association (ITA) has convened the Responsible Tin Supply Group (RTS) to enable organizations to source cassiterite (ore from which tin is derived) from responsible supply chain actors in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and surrounding countries while meeting due diligence guidance developed by the UN and OECD and required by national laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act. https://www.internationaltin.org/rts-group/

OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas: Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) has developed due diligence guidelines for organizations to implement when sourcing minerals from conflict regions, including but not limited to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. These guidelines have become normative in the industry and can be used to demonstrate due diligence under national and regional laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act in the U.S. and the European Commission draft proposal for supply chain due diligence for conflict minerals. http://www.oecd.org/daf/inv/mne/mining.htm

Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC) chain-of-custody certification: The Responsible Jewellery Council is a standard-setting and certification organization that has developed an ISEAL-accredited chain-of-custody certification program for use by the jewellery industry and manufacturers, which applies to gold and platinum group metals. https://www.responsiblejewellery.com/rjc-certification/

Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI): Formerly known as the Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative, the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI) is a joint effort between the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) and GeSI to establish supply chain transparency tools, resources and training to assist organizations in responsibly sourcing conflict-free minerals from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. Of note is their Responsible Minerals Assurance Process, which enables auditing and assessment of smelters for responsible ore sourcing and provides a centralized database for tracking smelter performance. http://www.responsiblemineralsinitiative.org/

THESIS Help Center Video: Conflict minerals KPI: Short video tutorial on the Conflict minerals KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017273

The London Bullion Market Association Good Delivery Lists: According to their website, the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA) produces "Good Delivery Lists for gold and silver bars; detailing the names of accredited refiners, their listing date and the marking details of their bars." http://www.lbma.org.uk/the-good-delivery-list

World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard: As part of their activities to support socially-responsible gold mining, the World Gold Council has developed the World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard to provide guidance to companies on responsible mining practices. https://www.gold.org/about-gold/gold-supply/responsible-gold/conflict-free-gold-standard
Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade: According to the website, "The Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade (PPA) is a joint initiative among governments, companies, and civil society to support supply chain solutions to conflict minerals challenges in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and the Great Lakes Region (GLR) of Central Africa." http://www.resolv.org/site-ppa/Conflict minerals: Conflict minerals are defined per "Section 1502(e)(4) of the [Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform] Act as (A) columbite-tantalite, also known as coltan (the metal ore from which tantalum is extracted); cassiterite (the metal ore from which tin is extracted); gold; wolframite (the metal ore from which tungsten is extracted); or their derivatives; or (B) any other mineral or its derivatives determined by the Secretary of State to be financing conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo or an adjoining country." (US Securities and Exchange Commission, 17 CFR Parts 240 and 249b, RIN: 3235-AK84, Conflict Minerals Final Rule)
ComputersEnergy savings in use phaseCalculate B1 as the total number of product units that were sold that had ENERGY STAR® certification, divided by the total number of product units sold in this category, then multiply by 100. Include only products certified to the version of the ENERGY STAR standard that was in force when the product was manufactured.
In markets not actively participating in the ENERGY STAR program (i.e., the United States and countries listed as ENERGY STAR International Partners), products may be counted toward this percentage if they meet the criteria in the appropriate ENERGY STAR standard, even if they are not ENERGY STAR-certified.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
ENERGY STAR® International Partners: The EPA enters into agreements with foreign governments to use and/or recognize the ENERGY STAR standards and mark to help unify voluntary energy-efficiency initiatives globally. https://www.energystar.gov/partner_resources/international_partners

ENERGY STAR® Qualified Products: According to their website, "The ENERGY STAR label was established to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and other pollutants caused by the inefficient use of energy and make it easy for consumers to identify and purchase energy-efficient products that offer savings on energy bills without sacrificing performance, features, and comfort." Standards are established by ENERGY STAR through a multi-stakeholder process and administered under the US EPA. https://www.energystar.gov/products
Energy Efficiency - Use Phase: Attributes can include using switching regulator technology in the chargers, implementing labeling programs to reduce the energy consumption during standby and idle conditions, and providing more information about the battery charger duty cycles to the consumers. ? N/A
ComputersF-GHG emission tracking and reportingCalculate percentage of components, by units procured for products in this category, which meet the criteria for this question as the number of suppliers that abate all F-GHGs in at least 50% of their facilities divided by the total number of suppliers responsible for all relevant components and multiply the result by 100. For example: if four suppliers provide all relevant components and one does nothing, one abates only PFCs, and the remaining 2 abate all gases in 40% and 70% of their facilities, respectively, the correct percentage is 25% because only one supplier meets both criteria.
Relevant components specifically refer to flat panel displays and semiconductor electronic components or devices whose manufacture is known to use and emit fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-GHGs), namely during etch and chamber clean processes.
Abate all F-GHG emissions means that the component supplier abates all of the following F-GHGs in at least half of their facilities that manufacture relevant components for this product category: perfluorocarbons (PFCs), trifluoromethane (CHF3 or HFCs), nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6).
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Protocol for Measuring Destruction or Removal Efficiency (DRE): The Protocol for Measuring Destruction or Removal Efficiency (DRE) of Fluorinated Greenhouse Gas Abatement Equipment in Electronics Manufacturing was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency as a standard approach to measure F-GHG emissions at the point of abatement in the electronics component manufacturing facility. https://www.epa.gov/f-gas-partnership-programs/epas-protocol-measuring-destruction-or-removal-efficiencyCenter for Corporate Climate Leadership: According to this website, "The EPA's Center for Corporate Climate Leadership seeks to highlight activities to reduce supply chain greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at the sector level." The first efforts to be highlighted within the electronics industry are the efforts by suppliers to reduce F-GHGs during manufacturing of flat panel display in the electronics sector. https://www.epa.gov/climateleadership

European Semiconductor Industry - PFC Emission Reduction: The European Semiconductor Industry Association (ESIA) has provided information regarding successful PFC emissions reduction programs in Europe, and steps the industry is taking beyond its voluntary 2010 reduction goals. https://www.eusemiconductors.eu/esia/public-policy/sustainability-esh/pfc-gases

GHG Protocol Calculation Tools - Semiconductors: The GHG Protocol calculation tool for the semiconductor industry provides guidance on how to assess and account for PFC emissions during semiconductor wafer production and processing. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

PFC Reduction/Climate Partnership for the Semiconductor Industry: The United States Environmental Protection Agency supports the voluntary efforts to reduce fluorinated greenhouse gas (F-GHG) emissions from semiconductor industry through the PFC Reduction/Climate Partnership for the Semiconductor Industry. https://www.epa.gov/ghgemissions/overview-greenhouse-gases#f-gases

World LCD Industry Cooperation Committee: The "principal mission of WLICC is to address efforts and share understanding on issues concerning environmental protection and resource recycling within the LCD industry." In 2010, the organization published results of their member's F-GHG reduction efforts. http://home.jeita.or.jp/device/committee/kankyou/pdf/20111110WLICG_e.pdf
Component supplier: A manufacturer of a component used in the final product. If the manufacturing facility partner is responsible for fabrication of these devices, they are the supplier of interest for this question.

Fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-GHGs): Fluorine-containing gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere. The F-GHG emissions of primary concern in electronics manufacturing are of perfluorocarbons (PFCs), trifluoromethane (CHF3 or HFCs), nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which are more potent than carbon dioxide.

Manufacturing facility partners: Manufacturing facility partners are defined as organizations responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these organizations are internal or external to the respondent's organization.
ComputersGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the procurement spend on component suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total procurement spend on all component suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party. Component suppliers means the group of suppliers that account for 80% of your total spend on components purchased for products in this category.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
ComputersGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, including product assembly and the manufacture of any components purchased directly by your organization for inclusion in products in this category, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total spend required to produce the products.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total spend required to produce the product. If the manufacturing facilities produce more than one category of product, only weight using the total spend required to produce the product specific to the product category in question.
Calculate B2 as the total spend on final products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total spend for final products produced, then multiply by 100.
For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardGreenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
ComputersHazardous substances - Alternatives assessmentHazardous substances are defined as chemicals that meet the criteria for classification as carcinogens, mutagens, reproductive toxicants, or are persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemicals for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57).GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

PRIO: PRIO is a web-based tool developed by the Swedish government to facilitate the assessment of environmental and health risks of chemicals. ? https://www.kemi.se/prioguiden/english/start

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Exposure Assessment Tools and Models: According to their website, "The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) has developed several exposure assessment methods, databases, and predictive models to help in evaluating what happens to chemicals when they are used and released to the environment and how workers, the general public, consumers and the aquatic ecosystems may be exposed to chemicals." https://www.epa.gov/ceam/tools-data-exposure-assessment
BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815

REACH: A Priority Chemical is defined as a chemical that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57).  Priority Chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis. http://www.reachonline.eu/REACH/EN/REACH_EN/article57.html

The Guide to Safer Chemicals: The Guide to Safer Chemicals provides guidance on how to design and implement a chemicals management program based on the Principles for Safer Chemicals. The Principles and Guide were developed by BizNGO, a collaboration of business and NGO leaders to create and adopt "safer chemicals and sustainable materials." https://www.bizngo.org/safer-chemicals/guide-to-safer-chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Existing Chemicals Program: According to their website, "EPA's existing chemical programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and characterization, and risk management for chemical substances in commercial use." The current chemicals management program is undergoing review and update, including how the agency identifies and prioritizes priority chemicals for review and assessment under TSCA. https://www.epa.gov/compliance/toxic-substances-control-act-tsca-compliance-monitoring#chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
Informed substitution: Informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles (Adapted from United States Environmental Protection Agency Design for Environment Program Alternative Assessment information).

Public disclosure: Manufacturer-based acts of making information available and readily accessible to the public through one or more forms of media (e.g., online, print, telephone). Print media includes product labels and also includes, but is not limited to, books, magazines, newspapers, and readily accessible journal articles. Online disclosure includes, but is not limited to, publicly accessible websites (desktop or mobile) as well as making information electronically available through reporting platforms or mobile apps.
ComputersHazardous substances - DisclosureCalculate B1 as the number of suppliers which have provided disclosure information, divided by the total number of suppliers, then multiply by 100. Include all company-owned or contract component manufacturers, as well as organizations contracted for direct material supply to company-owned or contract manufacturers. To be included in this percentage, a supplier must disclose intentionally-added materials listed in the declarable substance groups and declarable substances above the thresholds specified in IEC 62474.
Suppliers who only report substances whose declaration is already mandated by relevant regulations in the market(s) of sale (e.g., by RoHS Directive) should not be considered as having provided disclosure. If an organization has not adopted IEC 62474, suppliers who report declarable substances in line with the declarable substances list in IEC 62474 can count as having provided disclosure.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
International Electrotechnical Commission Standard 62474: If you are using this - this has been moved to the standards field. Please link that to your categories - this item will be going away. http://webstore.iec.ch/webstore/webstore.nsf/mysearchajax?Openform&key=62474&sorting=&start=1&onglet=1Dell, Inc. Materials Restricted for Use: "Materials Restricted for Use," published by Dell, Inc., is one example of an internal hazardous substances management list used within the electronics industry. https://www.dell.com/downloads/global/corporate/environ/restricted_materials_guid.pdf

GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

Panasonic Corporation Chemical Substances Management Rank Guidelines: "The Chemical Substances Management Rank Guide," published by the Industrial Devices Company Group, Panasonic Corporation, is one example of an internal hazardous substances management list used within the electronics industry. https://www.panasonic.com/global/corporate/management/procurement/green.html
N/A
ComputersMaterial disposition tracking - Product takeback programFinal disposition means the point at which 1) a product enters its next life cycle through reuse or refurbishment; 2) the components of a product are recaptured for reuse as part of a refurbishment program; or 3) the product or materials contained within the product reach landfilling, incineration or material recovery where they are returned to the commodity market.R2 Certified Recyclers: According to the R2:2013 Standard, "certifying to this Standard through an accredited third-party Certification Body, electronics recyclers can help prospective purchasers of their services (customers) make informed decisions and have increased confidence that used and end -of-life electronic equipment are managed in an environmentally responsible manner, protective of the health and safety of workers and the public, and that all data on all media devices is secure until destroyed." https://sustainableelectronics.org/r2-standard

WEEELABEX: WEEELABEX standards cover the collection, logistics, and treatment of electronic wastes in all ten categories of the European Union's Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive. http://www.weeelabex.org/#!standards/component_41229

e-Stewards: According to the e-Stewards Certification website, "The e-Stewards Certification Program provides a high level of confidence that a recycler consistently conforms to the e-Stewards Standard." http://www.e-stewards.org/certification-overview/
N/ACertified third-party e-waste vendors: "Vendors that demonstrate to an accredited, independent third-party auditor that they meet specific standards to safely recycle and manage electronics. These certification programs must be based on strong environmental standards which maximize reuse and recycling, minimize exposure to human health or the environment, ensure safe management of materials by downstream handlers, and require destruction of all data on used electronics. Two accredited certification standards are the Responsible Recycling Practices (R2) and the e-Stewards® standards."(Source: EPA, E-cycling certification definition)

Hazardous materials and components - Used electronics: The phrase "...hazardous materials and components..." indicates materials and components that are regulated or require special handling. This list may include components such as mercury lamps, rechargeable batteries, CRT displays, and circuit boards. (Source: US EPA e-Cycling Regulations and Standards)

Responsible final disposition: Takeback programs may achieve the goal of responsible final material disposition by doing one or more of the following:
1. Including contractual requirements regarding downstream partner responsibility, all the way to final material disposition;
2. Verifying responsible final disposition by tracking a sampling of materials to final disposition; and/or;
3. Contracting exclusively with certified third-party e-waste vendors to ensure responsible final disposition.

Takeback program operation: The phrase "... operate programs in regions or countries globally where required by law or regulation" means programs that are created in response to laws or regulations. This includes State-level or Province-level legislation in North America, and national levels in other regions, such as the European Union or Japan.
ComputersProduct takeback programThis question addresses takeback programs that an organization may fund, contract, or physically operate, in whole or in part, to enable consumers to return products for responsible end-of-life management. Include only products and materials for which an organization has the ability to decide or influence the handling, treatment, and disposal of returned devices, components, and materials. These calculations should be made at the program level rather than category level. The same percentage can be reported across multiple product categories if the products are collected and managed in the same program. Separate programs require separate percentage calculations. For example, if two separate programs are run to collect hardware and printer ink cartridges, percentages for each program should be calculated separately and reported in the appropriate product category.
Calculate B1, B2, B3, and B4 as the weight of products or materials recovered from products in each category, divided by the weight of total products recovered globally through both voluntary and mandatory programs, then multiply by 100. The sum of B1, B2, B3, and B4 must be less than or equal to 100%.
The weight for any given returned device can only be credited once. For example, a device whose weight is included in component reuse for a hard drive that was salvaged cannot also be included under the material recovery calculation, even if the rest of the materials from the device are sent for material recovery.
Material that is found or suspected to end in landfill or incineration through downstream auditing or the lack of a viable secondary market cannot be included in the material recovery percentage.
Components reused or refurbished means the percent of total volume representing parts that return to the market. Examples would be hard drives, motherboards, salvaged chips or other components removed for the secondary market.
Closed-loop system means that once material or components are recovered, they are returned to the materials supply chain for manufacturing new devices or products of the same value or greater value than the device that was recycled. For example, a closed loop system would be when printer ink cartridges are recycled and the recovered plastic is then used in new printer ink cartridges.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
R2 Certified Recyclers: According to the R2:2013 Standard, "certifying to this Standard through an accredited third-party Certification Body, electronics recyclers can help prospective purchasers of their services (customers) make informed decisions and have increased confidence that used and end -of-life electronic equipment are managed in an environmentally responsible manner, protective of the health and safety of workers and the public, and that all data on all media devices is secure until destroyed." https://sustainableelectronics.org/r2-standard

e-Stewards: According to the e-Stewards Certification website, "The e-Stewards Certification Program provides a high level of confidence that a recycler consistently conforms to the e-Stewards Standard." http://www.e-stewards.org/certification-overview/
N/AN/A
ComputersRestriction of hazardous substances - Brominated flame retardantsCalculate C1 as the number of products sold in this category that are BFR-free, divided by the total number of products sold in this category, then multiply by 100. Include only products that have no BFRs in their internal components such as printed wiring boards as well as their external housing or cabling as BFR-free products. Also include products where BFR content is solely related to recycled plastic content in housings or other external components, where the BFRs were not intentionally added to the components.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
N/ABizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815
Informed substitution: Informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles (Adapted from United States Environmental Protection Agency Design for Environment Program Alternative Assessment information).
ComputersSupply chain working conditions - Audit resultsCalculate B1 as the number of events resolved, divided by the total number of events recorded during both second- and third-party audits conducted in the previous year, then multiply by 100. Include all tier 1 company-owned or contract component manufacturing facilities, as well as all component manufacturing facilities that are directly contracted to supply custom parts or materials to company-owned or contract product assembly facilities that have had a second- or third-party audit conducted in the past year. For B1, answer 100% if zero non-conformance events have been recorded across all facilities. A non-conformance event indicates an audit finding that would trigger a corrective action plan. For audits performed under the Responsible Business Alliance Validated Auditing Program (VAP), this includes priority, major, and minor non-conformance events.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process: Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process (VAP) provides members the ability to audit manufacturing facilities within their supply chain and share audit results with other members to better leverage information on common upstream supplier facilities. Organizations that are not members of RBA but own facilities that are in the electronics supply chain may also participate in this effort. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/vap/

THESIS Help Center Video: Supply chain working conditions - Audit results KPI: Short video tutorial on the Supply chain working conditions - Audit results KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528319
Global Social Compliance Programme (GSCP) Reference Tools: The Global Social Compliance Program provides a publicly available suite of reference tools that describes existing best practices in social compliance. The reference tools can be used by companies to develop systems and initiatives. http://supply-chain.unglobalcompact.org/site/article/126

Responsible Battery Alliance (RBA) Supply Chain Accountability Tools: RBA supports multiple tools for members that enable self-assessment, third-party auditing, and online sustainability data management systems of this information. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/tools/

Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct: Companies can use the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct with their suppliers to improve the working conditions within facilities in their supply chain, the most recent version of which can be found on their website. The Code of Conduct was originally developed for use within the electronics industry, but has been revised to ensure relevance across most manufacturing sectors. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/code-of-conduct/

Responsible Business Alliance: The Responsible Business Alliance (RBA), formerly known as the Electronics Industry Citizenship Council (EICC), supports an industry Code of Conduct that provides a common approach to drive positive change on social, economic and environmental issues in manufacturing supply chains. RBA offers a suite of tools and resources to their members to aid in assessing and managing change in supply chains, as well as coordinating audit processes across different companies. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.
ComputersWorker health, safety, and labor rightsCalculate C1 as the number of facilities that have been audited by a third party in the last twelve months, divided by the total number of company-owned or contact facilities, then multiply by 100. Include all tier 1 company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities, and all component manufacturing facilities that are directly contracted to supply custom parts or materials to company-owned or contract product assembly facilities.
Facilities eligible for inclusion in the reported percentage are those that have either been deemed low risk through a verifiable assessment, or high-risk facilities audited by a third party. A verifiable assessment can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party, or a first-party systematic risk assessment against a code of conduct to determine risk based on conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The code of conduct must cover the following issues with requirements that meet or exceed those outlined in the in-force Responsible Business Alliance Code of Conduct: Child labor; Compensation; Discipline; Discrimination; Forced labor; Freedom of association and right to collective bargaining; Health and safety; Management systems for human resources; Working hours.
Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct: Companies can use the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct with their suppliers to improve the working conditions within facilities in their supply chain, the most recent version of which can be found on their website. The Code of Conduct was originally developed for use within the electronics industry, but has been revised to ensure relevance across most manufacturing sectors. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/code-of-conduct/

Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process: Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process (VAP) provides members the ability to audit manufacturing facilities within their supply chain and share audit results with other members to better leverage information on common upstream supplier facilities. Organizations that are not members of RBA but own facilities that are in the electronics supply chain may also participate in this effort. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/vap/

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

Ethical Trading Initiative Base Code of Labor Practices: This organization works in partnership to improve the working lives of poor and vulnerable people across the globe that make or grow consumer goods. ETI has a Base Code of Labor Practice and provides guidance and resources for implementing it. https://www.ethicaltrade.org/resources/eti-base-code

Global Social Compliance Programme (GSCP) Reference Tools: The Global Social Compliance Program provides a publicly available suite of reference tools that describes existing best practices in social compliance. The reference tools can be used by companies to develop systems and initiatives. http://supply-chain.unglobalcompact.org/site/article/126

Responsible Battery Alliance (RBA) Supply Chain Accountability Tools: RBA supports multiple tools for members that enable self-assessment, third-party auditing, and online sustainability data management systems of this information. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/tools/
First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
DisplaysConflict mineralsCalculate D1 as the total number of validated smelters, divided by the total number of smelters, then multiply by 100. Include all smelters identified as supplying some portion of the tin, tungsten, tantalum, or gold in your products.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
To be considered conflict-free, smelters must have a valid certification established or confirmed in the previous 12-month period as defined above.
Smelters may be validated through any internationally recognized body, such as the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI), Responsible Jewellery Council, ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group, or the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA).
Better Sourcing Program: The Better Sourcing Program (BSP) provides a technology-based communications solution to allow global organizations to source artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) ores through upstream due diligence, auditing and risk management. https://www.rcsglobal.com/bettersourcing/

ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group: The International Tin Association (ITA) has convened the Responsible Tin Supply Group (RTS) to enable organizations to source cassiterite (ore from which tin is derived) from responsible supply chain actors in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and surrounding countries while meeting due diligence guidance developed by the UN and OECD and required by national laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act. https://www.internationaltin.org/rts-group/

OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas: Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) has developed due diligence guidelines for organizations to implement when sourcing minerals from conflict regions, including but not limited to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. These guidelines have become normative in the industry and can be used to demonstrate due diligence under national and regional laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act in the U.S. and the European Commission draft proposal for supply chain due diligence for conflict minerals. http://www.oecd.org/daf/inv/mne/mining.htm

Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC) chain-of-custody certification: The Responsible Jewellery Council is a standard-setting and certification organization that has developed an ISEAL-accredited chain-of-custody certification program for use by the jewellery industry and manufacturers, which applies to gold and platinum group metals. https://www.responsiblejewellery.com/rjc-certification/

Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI): Formerly known as the Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative, the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI) is a joint effort between the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) and GeSI to establish supply chain transparency tools, resources and training to assist organizations in responsibly sourcing conflict-free minerals from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. Of note is their Responsible Minerals Assurance Process, which enables auditing and assessment of smelters for responsible ore sourcing and provides a centralized database for tracking smelter performance. http://www.responsiblemineralsinitiative.org/

THESIS Help Center Video: Conflict minerals KPI: Short video tutorial on the Conflict minerals KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017273

The London Bullion Market Association Good Delivery Lists: According to their website, the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA) produces "Good Delivery Lists for gold and silver bars; detailing the names of accredited refiners, their listing date and the marking details of their bars." http://www.lbma.org.uk/the-good-delivery-list

World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard: As part of their activities to support socially-responsible gold mining, the World Gold Council has developed the World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard to provide guidance to companies on responsible mining practices. https://www.gold.org/about-gold/gold-supply/responsible-gold/conflict-free-gold-standard
Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade: According to the website, "The Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade (PPA) is a joint initiative among governments, companies, and civil society to support supply chain solutions to conflict minerals challenges in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and the Great Lakes Region (GLR) of Central Africa." http://www.resolv.org/site-ppa/Conflict minerals: Conflict minerals are defined per "Section 1502(e)(4) of the [Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform] Act as (A) columbite-tantalite, also known as coltan (the metal ore from which tantalum is extracted); cassiterite (the metal ore from which tin is extracted); gold; wolframite (the metal ore from which tungsten is extracted); or their derivatives; or (B) any other mineral or its derivatives determined by the Secretary of State to be financing conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo or an adjoining country." (US Securities and Exchange Commission, 17 CFR Parts 240 and 249b, RIN: 3235-AK84, Conflict Minerals Final Rule)
DisplaysEnergy savings in use phaseCalculate B1 as the total number of product units that were sold that had ENERGY STAR® certification, divided by the total number of product units sold in this category, then multiply by 100. Include only products certified to the version of the ENERGY STAR standard that was in force when the product was manufactured.
In markets not actively participating in the ENERGY STAR program (i.e., the United States and countries listed as ENERGY STAR International Partners), products may be counted toward this percentage if they meet the criteria in the appropriate ENERGY STAR standard, even if they are not ENERGY STAR-certified.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
ENERGY STAR® International Partners: The EPA enters into agreements with foreign governments to use and/or recognize the ENERGY STAR standards and mark to help unify voluntary energy-efficiency initiatives globally. https://www.energystar.gov/partner_resources/international_partners

ENERGY STAR® Qualified Products: According to their website, "The ENERGY STAR label was established to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and other pollutants caused by the inefficient use of energy and make it easy for consumers to identify and purchase energy-efficient products that offer savings on energy bills without sacrificing performance, features, and comfort." Standards are established by ENERGY STAR through a multi-stakeholder process and administered under the US EPA. https://www.energystar.gov/products
Energy Efficiency - Use Phase: Attributes can include using switching regulator technology in the chargers, implementing labeling programs to reduce the energy consumption during standby and idle conditions, and providing more information about the battery charger duty cycles to the consumers. ? N/A
DisplaysF-GHG emission tracking and reportingCalculate percentage of components, by units procured for products in this category, which meet the criteria for this question as the number of suppliers that abate all F-GHGs in at least 50% of their facilities divided by the total number of suppliers responsible for all relevant components and multiply the result by 100. For example: if four suppliers provide all relevant components and one does nothing, one abates only PFCs, and the remaining 2 abate all gases in 40% and 70% of their facilities, respectively, the correct percentage is 25% because only one supplier meets both criteria.
Relevant components specifically refer to flat panel displays and semiconductor electronic components or devices whose manufacture is known to use and emit fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-GHGs), namely during etch and chamber clean processes.
Abate all F-GHG emissions means that the component supplier abates all of the following F-GHGs in at least half of their facilities that manufacture relevant components for this product category: perfluorocarbons (PFCs), trifluoromethane (CHF3 or HFCs), nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6).
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Protocol for Measuring Destruction or Removal Efficiency (DRE): The Protocol for Measuring Destruction or Removal Efficiency (DRE) of Fluorinated Greenhouse Gas Abatement Equipment in Electronics Manufacturing was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency as a standard approach to measure F-GHG emissions at the point of abatement in the electronics component manufacturing facility. https://www.epa.gov/f-gas-partnership-programs/epas-protocol-measuring-destruction-or-removal-efficiencyCenter for Corporate Climate Leadership: According to this website, "The EPA's Center for Corporate Climate Leadership seeks to highlight activities to reduce supply chain greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at the sector level." The first efforts to be highlighted within the electronics industry are the efforts by suppliers to reduce F-GHGs during manufacturing of flat panel display in the electronics sector. https://www.epa.gov/climateleadership

European Semiconductor Industry - PFC Emission Reduction: The European Semiconductor Industry Association (ESIA) has provided information regarding successful PFC emissions reduction programs in Europe, and steps the industry is taking beyond its voluntary 2010 reduction goals. https://www.eusemiconductors.eu/esia/public-policy/sustainability-esh/pfc-gases

GHG Protocol Calculation Tools - Semiconductors: The GHG Protocol calculation tool for the semiconductor industry provides guidance on how to assess and account for PFC emissions during semiconductor wafer production and processing. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

PFC Reduction/Climate Partnership for the Semiconductor Industry: The United States Environmental Protection Agency supports the voluntary efforts to reduce fluorinated greenhouse gas (F-GHG) emissions from semiconductor industry through the PFC Reduction/Climate Partnership for the Semiconductor Industry. https://www.epa.gov/ghgemissions/overview-greenhouse-gases#f-gases

World LCD Industry Cooperation Committee: The "principal mission of WLICC is to address efforts and share understanding on issues concerning environmental protection and resource recycling within the LCD industry." In 2010, the organization published results of their member's F-GHG reduction efforts. http://home.jeita.or.jp/device/committee/kankyou/pdf/20111110WLICG_e.pdf
Component supplier: A manufacturer of a component used in the final product. If the manufacturing facility partner is responsible for fabrication of these devices, they are the supplier of interest for this question.

Fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-GHGs): Fluorine-containing gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere. The F-GHG emissions of primary concern in electronics manufacturing are of perfluorocarbons (PFCs), trifluoromethane (CHF3 or HFCs), nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which are more potent than carbon dioxide.

Manufacturing facility partners: Manufacturing facility partners are defined as organizations responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these organizations are internal or external to the respondent's organization.
DisplaysGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the procurement spend on component suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total procurement spend on all component suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party. Component suppliers means the group of suppliers that account for 80% of your total spend on components purchased for products in this category.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
DisplaysGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, including product assembly and the manufacture of any components purchased directly by your organization for inclusion in products in this category, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total spend required to produce the products.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total spend required to produce the product. If the manufacturing facilities produce more than one category of product, only weight using the total spend required to produce the product specific to the product category in question.
Calculate B2 as the total spend on final products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total spend for final products produced, then multiply by 100.
For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardGreenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
DisplaysHazardous substances - Alternatives assessmentHazardous substances are defined as chemicals that meet the criteria for classification as carcinogens, mutagens, reproductive toxicants, or are persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemicals for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57).GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

PRIO: PRIO is a web-based tool developed by the Swedish government to facilitate the assessment of environmental and health risks of chemicals. ? https://www.kemi.se/prioguiden/english/start

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Exposure Assessment Tools and Models: According to their website, "The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) has developed several exposure assessment methods, databases, and predictive models to help in evaluating what happens to chemicals when they are used and released to the environment and how workers, the general public, consumers and the aquatic ecosystems may be exposed to chemicals." https://www.epa.gov/ceam/tools-data-exposure-assessment
BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815

REACH: A Priority Chemical is defined as a chemical that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57).  Priority Chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis. http://www.reachonline.eu/REACH/EN/REACH_EN/article57.html

The Guide to Safer Chemicals: The Guide to Safer Chemicals provides guidance on how to design and implement a chemicals management program based on the Principles for Safer Chemicals. The Principles and Guide were developed by BizNGO, a collaboration of business and NGO leaders to create and adopt "safer chemicals and sustainable materials." https://www.bizngo.org/safer-chemicals/guide-to-safer-chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Existing Chemicals Program: According to their website, "EPA's existing chemical programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and characterization, and risk management for chemical substances in commercial use." The current chemicals management program is undergoing review and update, including how the agency identifies and prioritizes priority chemicals for review and assessment under TSCA. https://www.epa.gov/compliance/toxic-substances-control-act-tsca-compliance-monitoring#chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
Informed substitution: Informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles (Adapted from United States Environmental Protection Agency Design for Environment Program Alternative Assessment information).

Public disclosure: Manufacturer-based acts of making information available and readily accessible to the public through one or more forms of media (e.g., online, print, telephone). Print media includes product labels and also includes, but is not limited to, books, magazines, newspapers, and readily accessible journal articles. Online disclosure includes, but is not limited to, publicly accessible websites (desktop or mobile) as well as making information electronically available through reporting platforms or mobile apps.
DisplaysHazardous substances - DisclosureCalculate B1 as the number of suppliers which have provided disclosure information, divided by the total number of suppliers, then multiply by 100. Include all company-owned or contract component manufacturers, as well as organizations contracted for direct material supply to company-owned or contract manufacturers. To be included in this percentage, a supplier must disclose intentionally-added materials listed in the declarable substance groups and declarable substances above the thresholds specified in IEC 62474.
Suppliers who only report substances whose declaration is already mandated by relevant regulations in the market(s) of sale (e.g., by RoHS Directive) should not be considered as having provided disclosure. If an organization has not adopted IEC 62474, suppliers who report declarable substances in line with the declarable substances list in IEC 62474 can count as having provided disclosure.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
International Electrotechnical Commission Standard 62474: If you are using this - this has been moved to the standards field. Please link that to your categories - this item will be going away. http://webstore.iec.ch/webstore/webstore.nsf/mysearchajax?Openform&key=62474&sorting=&start=1&onglet=1Dell, Inc. Materials Restricted for Use: "Materials Restricted for Use," published by Dell, Inc., is one example of an internal hazardous substances management list used within the electronics industry. https://www.dell.com/downloads/global/corporate/environ/restricted_materials_guid.pdf

GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

Panasonic Corporation Chemical Substances Management Rank Guidelines: "The Chemical Substances Management Rank Guide," published by the Industrial Devices Company Group, Panasonic Corporation, is one example of an internal hazardous substances management list used within the electronics industry. https://www.panasonic.com/global/corporate/management/procurement/green.html
N/A
DisplaysMaterial disposition tracking - Product takeback programFinal disposition means the point at which 1) a product enters its next life cycle through reuse or refurbishment; 2) the components of a product are recaptured for reuse as part of a refurbishment program; or 3) the product or materials contained within the product reach landfilling, incineration or material recovery where they are returned to the commodity market.R2 Certified Recyclers: According to the R2:2013 Standard, "certifying to this Standard through an accredited third-party Certification Body, electronics recyclers can help prospective purchasers of their services (customers) make informed decisions and have increased confidence that used and end -of-life electronic equipment are managed in an environmentally responsible manner, protective of the health and safety of workers and the public, and that all data on all media devices is secure until destroyed." https://sustainableelectronics.org/r2-standard

WEEELABEX: WEEELABEX standards cover the collection, logistics, and treatment of electronic wastes in all ten categories of the European Union's Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive. http://www.weeelabex.org/#!standards/component_41229

e-Stewards: According to the e-Stewards Certification website, "The e-Stewards Certification Program provides a high level of confidence that a recycler consistently conforms to the e-Stewards Standard." http://www.e-stewards.org/certification-overview/
N/ACertified third-party e-waste vendors: "Vendors that demonstrate to an accredited, independent third-party auditor that they meet specific standards to safely recycle and manage electronics. These certification programs must be based on strong environmental standards which maximize reuse and recycling, minimize exposure to human health or the environment, ensure safe management of materials by downstream handlers, and require destruction of all data on used electronics. Two accredited certification standards are the Responsible Recycling Practices (R2) and the e-Stewards® standards."(Source: EPA, E-cycling certification definition)

Hazardous materials and components - Used electronics: The phrase "...hazardous materials and components..." indicates materials and components that are regulated or require special handling. This list may include components such as mercury lamps, rechargeable batteries, CRT displays, and circuit boards. (Source: US EPA e-Cycling Regulations and Standards)

Responsible final disposition: Takeback programs may achieve the goal of responsible final material disposition by doing one or more of the following:
1. Including contractual requirements regarding downstream partner responsibility, all the way to final material disposition;
2. Verifying responsible final disposition by tracking a sampling of materials to final disposition; and/or;
3. Contracting exclusively with certified third-party e-waste vendors to ensure responsible final disposition.

Takeback program operation: The phrase "... operate programs in regions or countries globally where required by law or regulation" means programs that are created in response to laws or regulations. This includes State-level or Province-level legislation in North America, and national levels in other regions, such as the European Union or Japan.
DisplaysProduct takeback programThis question addresses takeback programs that an organization may fund, contract, or physically operate, in whole or in part, to enable consumers to return products for responsible end-of-life management. Include only products and materials for which an organization has the ability to decide or influence the handling, treatment, and disposal of returned devices, components, and materials. These calculations should be made at the program level rather than category level. The same percentage can be reported across multiple product categories if the products are collected and managed in the same program. Separate programs require separate percentage calculations. For example, if two separate programs are run to collect hardware and printer ink cartridges, percentages for each program should be calculated separately and reported in the appropriate product category.
Calculate B1, B2, B3, and B4 as the weight of products or materials recovered from products in each category, divided by the weight of total products recovered globally through both voluntary and mandatory programs, then multiply by 100. The sum of B1, B2, B3, and B4 must be less than or equal to 100%.
The weight for any given returned device can only be credited once. For example, a device whose weight is included in component reuse for a hard drive that was salvaged cannot also be included under the material recovery calculation, even if the rest of the materials from the device are sent for material recovery.
Material that is found or suspected to end in landfill or incineration through downstream auditing or the lack of a viable secondary market cannot be included in the material recovery percentage.
Components reused or refurbished means the percent of total volume representing parts that return to the market. Examples would be hard drives, motherboards, salvaged chips or other components removed for the secondary market.
Closed-loop system means that once material or components are recovered, they are returned to the materials supply chain for manufacturing new devices or products of the same value or greater value than the device that was recycled. For example, a closed loop system would be when printer ink cartridges are recycled and the recovered plastic is then used in new printer ink cartridges.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
R2 Certified Recyclers: According to the R2:2013 Standard, "certifying to this Standard through an accredited third-party Certification Body, electronics recyclers can help prospective purchasers of their services (customers) make informed decisions and have increased confidence that used and end -of-life electronic equipment are managed in an environmentally responsible manner, protective of the health and safety of workers and the public, and that all data on all media devices is secure until destroyed." https://sustainableelectronics.org/r2-standard

e-Stewards: According to the e-Stewards Certification website, "The e-Stewards Certification Program provides a high level of confidence that a recycler consistently conforms to the e-Stewards Standard." http://www.e-stewards.org/certification-overview/
N/AN/A
DisplaysRestriction of hazardous substances - Brominated flame retardantsCalculate C1 as the number of products sold in this category that are BFR-free, divided by the total number of products sold in this category, then multiply by 100. Include only products that have no BFRs in their internal components such as printed wiring boards as well as their external housing or cabling as BFR-free products. Also include products where BFR content is solely related to recycled plastic content in housings or other external components, where the BFRs were not intentionally added to the components.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
N/ABizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815
Informed substitution: Informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles (Adapted from United States Environmental Protection Agency Design for Environment Program Alternative Assessment information).
DisplaysSupply chain working conditions - Audit resultsCalculate B1 as the number of events resolved, divided by the total number of events recorded during both second- and third-party audits conducted in the previous year, then multiply by 100. Include all tier 1 company-owned or contract component manufacturing facilities, as well as all component manufacturing facilities that are directly contracted to supply custom parts or materials to company-owned or contract product assembly facilities that have had a second- or third-party audit conducted in the past year. For B1, answer 100% if zero non-conformance events have been recorded across all facilities. A non-conformance event indicates an audit finding that would trigger a corrective action plan. For audits performed under the Responsible Business Alliance Validated Auditing Program (VAP), this includes priority, major, and minor non-conformance events.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process: Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process (VAP) provides members the ability to audit manufacturing facilities within their supply chain and share audit results with other members to better leverage information on common upstream supplier facilities. Organizations that are not members of RBA but own facilities that are in the electronics supply chain may also participate in this effort. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/vap/

THESIS Help Center Video: Supply chain working conditions - Audit results KPI: Short video tutorial on the Supply chain working conditions - Audit results KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528319
Global Social Compliance Programme (GSCP) Reference Tools: The Global Social Compliance Program provides a publicly available suite of reference tools that describes existing best practices in social compliance. The reference tools can be used by companies to develop systems and initiatives. http://supply-chain.unglobalcompact.org/site/article/126

Responsible Battery Alliance (RBA) Supply Chain Accountability Tools: RBA supports multiple tools for members that enable self-assessment, third-party auditing, and online sustainability data management systems of this information. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/tools/

Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct: Companies can use the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct with their suppliers to improve the working conditions within facilities in their supply chain, the most recent version of which can be found on their website. The Code of Conduct was originally developed for use within the electronics industry, but has been revised to ensure relevance across most manufacturing sectors. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/code-of-conduct/

Responsible Business Alliance: The Responsible Business Alliance (RBA), formerly known as the Electronics Industry Citizenship Council (EICC), supports an industry Code of Conduct that provides a common approach to drive positive change on social, economic and environmental issues in manufacturing supply chains. RBA offers a suite of tools and resources to their members to aid in assessing and managing change in supply chains, as well as coordinating audit processes across different companies. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.
DisplaysWorker health, safety, and labor rightsCalculate C1 as the number of facilities that have been audited by a third party in the last twelve months, divided by the total number of company-owned or contact facilities, then multiply by 100. Include all tier 1 company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities, and all component manufacturing facilities that are directly contracted to supply custom parts or materials to company-owned or contract product assembly facilities.
Facilities eligible for inclusion in the reported percentage are those that have either been deemed low risk through a verifiable assessment, or high-risk facilities audited by a third party. A verifiable assessment can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party, or a first-party systematic risk assessment against a code of conduct to determine risk based on conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The code of conduct must cover the following issues with requirements that meet or exceed those outlined in the in-force Responsible Business Alliance Code of Conduct: Child labor; Compensation; Discipline; Discrimination; Forced labor; Freedom of association and right to collective bargaining; Health and safety; Management systems for human resources; Working hours.
Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct: Companies can use the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct with their suppliers to improve the working conditions within facilities in their supply chain, the most recent version of which can be found on their website. The Code of Conduct was originally developed for use within the electronics industry, but has been revised to ensure relevance across most manufacturing sectors. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/code-of-conduct/

Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process: Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process (VAP) provides members the ability to audit manufacturing facilities within their supply chain and share audit results with other members to better leverage information on common upstream supplier facilities. Organizations that are not members of RBA but own facilities that are in the electronics supply chain may also participate in this effort. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/vap/

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

Ethical Trading Initiative Base Code of Labor Practices: This organization works in partnership to improve the working lives of poor and vulnerable people across the globe that make or grow consumer goods. ETI has a Base Code of Labor Practice and provides guidance and resources for implementing it. https://www.ethicaltrade.org/resources/eti-base-code

Global Social Compliance Programme (GSCP) Reference Tools: The Global Social Compliance Program provides a publicly available suite of reference tools that describes existing best practices in social compliance. The reference tools can be used by companies to develop systems and initiatives. http://supply-chain.unglobalcompact.org/site/article/126

Responsible Battery Alliance (RBA) Supply Chain Accountability Tools: RBA supports multiple tools for members that enable self-assessment, third-party auditing, and online sustainability data management systems of this information. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/tools/
First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
TelevisionsConflict mineralsCalculate D1 as the total number of validated smelters, divided by the total number of smelters, then multiply by 100. Include all smelters identified as supplying some portion of the tin, tungsten, tantalum, or gold in your products.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
To be considered conflict-free, smelters must have a valid certification established or confirmed in the previous 12-month period as defined above.
Smelters may be validated through any internationally recognized body, such as the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI), Responsible Jewellery Council, ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group, or the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA).
Better Sourcing Program: The Better Sourcing Program (BSP) provides a technology-based communications solution to allow global organizations to source artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) ores through upstream due diligence, auditing and risk management. https://www.rcsglobal.com/bettersourcing/

ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group: The International Tin Association (ITA) has convened the Responsible Tin Supply Group (RTS) to enable organizations to source cassiterite (ore from which tin is derived) from responsible supply chain actors in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and surrounding countries while meeting due diligence guidance developed by the UN and OECD and required by national laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act. https://www.internationaltin.org/rts-group/

OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas: Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) has developed due diligence guidelines for organizations to implement when sourcing minerals from conflict regions, including but not limited to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. These guidelines have become normative in the industry and can be used to demonstrate due diligence under national and regional laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act in the U.S. and the European Commission draft proposal for supply chain due diligence for conflict minerals. http://www.oecd.org/daf/inv/mne/mining.htm

Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC) chain-of-custody certification: The Responsible Jewellery Council is a standard-setting and certification organization that has developed an ISEAL-accredited chain-of-custody certification program for use by the jewellery industry and manufacturers, which applies to gold and platinum group metals. https://www.responsiblejewellery.com/rjc-certification/

Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI): Formerly known as the Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative, the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI) is a joint effort between the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) and GeSI to establish supply chain transparency tools, resources and training to assist organizations in responsibly sourcing conflict-free minerals from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. Of note is their Responsible Minerals Assurance Process, which enables auditing and assessment of smelters for responsible ore sourcing and provides a centralized database for tracking smelter performance. http://www.responsiblemineralsinitiative.org/

THESIS Help Center Video: Conflict minerals KPI: Short video tutorial on the Conflict minerals KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017273

The London Bullion Market Association Good Delivery Lists: According to their website, the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA) produces "Good Delivery Lists for gold and silver bars; detailing the names of accredited refiners, their listing date and the marking details of their bars." http://www.lbma.org.uk/the-good-delivery-list

World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard: As part of their activities to support socially-responsible gold mining, the World Gold Council has developed the World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard to provide guidance to companies on responsible mining practices. https://www.gold.org/about-gold/gold-supply/responsible-gold/conflict-free-gold-standard
Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade: According to the website, "The Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade (PPA) is a joint initiative among governments, companies, and civil society to support supply chain solutions to conflict minerals challenges in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and the Great Lakes Region (GLR) of Central Africa." http://www.resolv.org/site-ppa/Conflict minerals: Conflict minerals are defined per "Section 1502(e)(4) of the [Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform] Act as (A) columbite-tantalite, also known as coltan (the metal ore from which tantalum is extracted); cassiterite (the metal ore from which tin is extracted); gold; wolframite (the metal ore from which tungsten is extracted); or their derivatives; or (B) any other mineral or its derivatives determined by the Secretary of State to be financing conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo or an adjoining country." (US Securities and Exchange Commission, 17 CFR Parts 240 and 249b, RIN: 3235-AK84, Conflict Minerals Final Rule)
TelevisionsEnergy savings in use phaseCalculate B1 as the total number of product units that were sold that had ENERGY STAR® certification, divided by the total number of product units sold in this category, then multiply by 100. Include only products certified to the version of the ENERGY STAR standard that was in force when the product was manufactured.
In markets not actively participating in the ENERGY STAR program (i.e., the United States and countries listed as ENERGY STAR International Partners), products may be counted toward this percentage if they meet the criteria in the appropriate ENERGY STAR standard, even if they are not ENERGY STAR-certified.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
ENERGY STAR® International Partners: The EPA enters into agreements with foreign governments to use and/or recognize the ENERGY STAR standards and mark to help unify voluntary energy-efficiency initiatives globally. https://www.energystar.gov/partner_resources/international_partners

ENERGY STAR® Qualified Products: According to their website, "The ENERGY STAR label was established to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and other pollutants caused by the inefficient use of energy and make it easy for consumers to identify and purchase energy-efficient products that offer savings on energy bills without sacrificing performance, features, and comfort." Standards are established by ENERGY STAR through a multi-stakeholder process and administered under the US EPA. https://www.energystar.gov/products
Energy Efficiency - Use Phase: Attributes can include using switching regulator technology in the chargers, implementing labeling programs to reduce the energy consumption during standby and idle conditions, and providing more information about the battery charger duty cycles to the consumers. ? N/A
TelevisionsF-GHG emission tracking and reportingCalculate percentage of components, by units procured for products in this category, which meet the criteria for this question as the number of suppliers that abate all F-GHGs in at least 50% of their facilities divided by the total number of suppliers responsible for all relevant components and multiply the result by 100. For example: if four suppliers provide all relevant components and one does nothing, one abates only PFCs, and the remaining 2 abate all gases in 40% and 70% of their facilities, respectively, the correct percentage is 25% because only one supplier meets both criteria.
Relevant components specifically refer to flat panel displays and semiconductor electronic components or devices whose manufacture is known to use and emit fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-GHGs), namely during etch and chamber clean processes.
Abate all F-GHG emissions means that the component supplier abates all of the following F-GHGs in at least half of their facilities that manufacture relevant components for this product category: perfluorocarbons (PFCs), trifluoromethane (CHF3 or HFCs), nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6).
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Protocol for Measuring Destruction or Removal Efficiency (DRE): The Protocol for Measuring Destruction or Removal Efficiency (DRE) of Fluorinated Greenhouse Gas Abatement Equipment in Electronics Manufacturing was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency as a standard approach to measure F-GHG emissions at the point of abatement in the electronics component manufacturing facility. https://www.epa.gov/f-gas-partnership-programs/epas-protocol-measuring-destruction-or-removal-efficiencyCenter for Corporate Climate Leadership: According to this website, "The EPA's Center for Corporate Climate Leadership seeks to highlight activities to reduce supply chain greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at the sector level." The first efforts to be highlighted within the electronics industry are the efforts by suppliers to reduce F-GHGs during manufacturing of flat panel display in the electronics sector. https://www.epa.gov/climateleadership

European Semiconductor Industry - PFC Emission Reduction: The European Semiconductor Industry Association (ESIA) has provided information regarding successful PFC emissions reduction programs in Europe, and steps the industry is taking beyond its voluntary 2010 reduction goals. https://www.eusemiconductors.eu/esia/public-policy/sustainability-esh/pfc-gases

GHG Protocol Calculation Tools - Semiconductors: The GHG Protocol calculation tool for the semiconductor industry provides guidance on how to assess and account for PFC emissions during semiconductor wafer production and processing. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

PFC Reduction/Climate Partnership for the Semiconductor Industry: The United States Environmental Protection Agency supports the voluntary efforts to reduce fluorinated greenhouse gas (F-GHG) emissions from semiconductor industry through the PFC Reduction/Climate Partnership for the Semiconductor Industry. https://www.epa.gov/ghgemissions/overview-greenhouse-gases#f-gases

World LCD Industry Cooperation Committee: The "principal mission of WLICC is to address efforts and share understanding on issues concerning environmental protection and resource recycling within the LCD industry." In 2010, the organization published results of their member's F-GHG reduction efforts. http://home.jeita.or.jp/device/committee/kankyou/pdf/20111110WLICG_e.pdf
Component supplier: A manufacturer of a component used in the final product. If the manufacturing facility partner is responsible for fabrication of these devices, they are the supplier of interest for this question.

Fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-GHGs): Fluorine-containing gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere. The F-GHG emissions of primary concern in electronics manufacturing are of perfluorocarbons (PFCs), trifluoromethane (CHF3 or HFCs), nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which are more potent than carbon dioxide.

Manufacturing facility partners: Manufacturing facility partners are defined as organizations responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these organizations are internal or external to the respondent's organization.
TelevisionsGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the procurement spend on component suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total procurement spend on all component suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party. Component suppliers means the group of suppliers that account for 80% of your total spend on components purchased for products in this category.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
TelevisionsGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, including product assembly and the manufacture of any components purchased directly by your organization for inclusion in products in this category, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total spend required to produce the products.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total spend required to produce the product. If the manufacturing facilities produce more than one category of product, only weight using the total spend required to produce the product specific to the product category in question.
Calculate B2 as the total spend on final products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total spend for final products produced, then multiply by 100.
For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardGreenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
TelevisionsHazardous substances - Alternatives assessmentHazardous substances are defined as chemicals that meet the criteria for classification as carcinogens, mutagens, reproductive toxicants, or are persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemicals for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57).GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

PRIO: PRIO is a web-based tool developed by the Swedish government to facilitate the assessment of environmental and health risks of chemicals. ? https://www.kemi.se/prioguiden/english/start

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Exposure Assessment Tools and Models: According to their website, "The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) has developed several exposure assessment methods, databases, and predictive models to help in evaluating what happens to chemicals when they are used and released to the environment and how workers, the general public, consumers and the aquatic ecosystems may be exposed to chemicals." https://www.epa.gov/ceam/tools-data-exposure-assessment
BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815

REACH: A Priority Chemical is defined as a chemical that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57).  Priority Chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis. http://www.reachonline.eu/REACH/EN/REACH_EN/article57.html

The Guide to Safer Chemicals: The Guide to Safer Chemicals provides guidance on how to design and implement a chemicals management program based on the Principles for Safer Chemicals. The Principles and Guide were developed by BizNGO, a collaboration of business and NGO leaders to create and adopt "safer chemicals and sustainable materials." https://www.bizngo.org/safer-chemicals/guide-to-safer-chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Existing Chemicals Program: According to their website, "EPA's existing chemical programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and characterization, and risk management for chemical substances in commercial use." The current chemicals management program is undergoing review and update, including how the agency identifies and prioritizes priority chemicals for review and assessment under TSCA. https://www.epa.gov/compliance/toxic-substances-control-act-tsca-compliance-monitoring#chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
Informed substitution: Informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles (Adapted from United States Environmental Protection Agency Design for Environment Program Alternative Assessment information).

Public disclosure: Manufacturer-based acts of making information available and readily accessible to the public through one or more forms of media (e.g., online, print, telephone). Print media includes product labels and also includes, but is not limited to, books, magazines, newspapers, and readily accessible journal articles. Online disclosure includes, but is not limited to, publicly accessible websites (desktop or mobile) as well as making information electronically available through reporting platforms or mobile apps.
TelevisionsHazardous substances - DisclosureCalculate B1 as the number of suppliers which have provided disclosure information, divided by the total number of suppliers, then multiply by 100. Include all company-owned or contract component manufacturers, as well as organizations contracted for direct material supply to company-owned or contract manufacturers. To be included in this percentage, a supplier must disclose intentionally-added materials listed in the declarable substance groups and declarable substances above the thresholds specified in IEC 62474.
Suppliers who only report substances whose declaration is already mandated by relevant regulations in the market(s) of sale (e.g., by RoHS Directive) should not be considered as having provided disclosure. If an organization has not adopted IEC 62474, suppliers who report declarable substances in line with the declarable substances list in IEC 62474 can count as having provided disclosure.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
International Electrotechnical Commission Standard 62474: If you are using this - this has been moved to the standards field. Please link that to your categories - this item will be going away. http://webstore.iec.ch/webstore/webstore.nsf/mysearchajax?Openform&key=62474&sorting=&start=1&onglet=1Dell, Inc. Materials Restricted for Use: "Materials Restricted for Use," published by Dell, Inc., is one example of an internal hazardous substances management list used within the electronics industry. https://www.dell.com/downloads/global/corporate/environ/restricted_materials_guid.pdf

GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

Panasonic Corporation Chemical Substances Management Rank Guidelines: "The Chemical Substances Management Rank Guide," published by the Industrial Devices Company Group, Panasonic Corporation, is one example of an internal hazardous substances management list used within the electronics industry. https://www.panasonic.com/global/corporate/management/procurement/green.html
N/A
TelevisionsMaterial disposition tracking - Product takeback programFinal disposition means the point at which 1) a product enters its next life cycle through reuse or refurbishment; 2) the components of a product are recaptured for reuse as part of a refurbishment program; or 3) the product or materials contained within the product reach landfilling, incineration or material recovery where they are returned to the commodity market.R2 Certified Recyclers: According to the R2:2013 Standard, "certifying to this Standard through an accredited third-party Certification Body, electronics recyclers can help prospective purchasers of their services (customers) make informed decisions and have increased confidence that used and end -of-life electronic equipment are managed in an environmentally responsible manner, protective of the health and safety of workers and the public, and that all data on all media devices is secure until destroyed." https://sustainableelectronics.org/r2-standard

WEEELABEX: WEEELABEX standards cover the collection, logistics, and treatment of electronic wastes in all ten categories of the European Union's Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive. http://www.weeelabex.org/#!standards/component_41229

e-Stewards: According to the e-Stewards Certification website, "The e-Stewards Certification Program provides a high level of confidence that a recycler consistently conforms to the e-Stewards Standard." http://www.e-stewards.org/certification-overview/
N/ACertified third-party e-waste vendors: "Vendors that demonstrate to an accredited, independent third-party auditor that they meet specific standards to safely recycle and manage electronics. These certification programs must be based on strong environmental standards which maximize reuse and recycling, minimize exposure to human health or the environment, ensure safe management of materials by downstream handlers, and require destruction of all data on used electronics. Two accredited certification standards are the Responsible Recycling Practices (R2) and the e-Stewards® standards."(Source: EPA, E-cycling certification definition)

Hazardous materials and components - Used electronics: The phrase "...hazardous materials and components..." indicates materials and components that are regulated or require special handling. This list may include components such as mercury lamps, rechargeable batteries, CRT displays, and circuit boards. (Source: US EPA e-Cycling Regulations and Standards)

Responsible final disposition: Takeback programs may achieve the goal of responsible final material disposition by doing one or more of the following:
1. Including contractual requirements regarding downstream partner responsibility, all the way to final material disposition;
2. Verifying responsible final disposition by tracking a sampling of materials to final disposition; and/or;
3. Contracting exclusively with certified third-party e-waste vendors to ensure responsible final disposition.

Takeback program operation: The phrase "... operate programs in regions or countries globally where required by law or regulation" means programs that are created in response to laws or regulations. This includes State-level or Province-level legislation in North America, and national levels in other regions, such as the European Union or Japan.
TelevisionsProduct takeback programThis question addresses takeback programs that an organization may fund, contract, or physically operate, in whole or in part, to enable consumers to return products for responsible end-of-life management. Include only products and materials for which an organization has the ability to decide or influence the handling, treatment, and disposal of returned devices, components, and materials. These calculations should be made at the program level rather than category level. The same percentage can be reported across multiple product categories if the products are collected and managed in the same program. Separate programs require separate percentage calculations. For example, if two separate programs are run to collect hardware and printer ink cartridges, percentages for each program should be calculated separately and reported in the appropriate product category.
Calculate B1, B2, B3, and B4 as the weight of products or materials recovered from products in each category, divided by the weight of total products recovered globally through both voluntary and mandatory programs, then multiply by 100. The sum of B1, B2, B3, and B4 must be less than or equal to 100%.
The weight for any given returned device can only be credited once. For example, a device whose weight is included in component reuse for a hard drive that was salvaged cannot also be included under the material recovery calculation, even if the rest of the materials from the device are sent for material recovery.
Material that is found or suspected to end in landfill or incineration through downstream auditing or the lack of a viable secondary market cannot be included in the material recovery percentage.
Components reused or refurbished means the percent of total volume representing parts that return to the market. Examples would be hard drives, motherboards, salvaged chips or other components removed for the secondary market.
Closed-loop system means that once material or components are recovered, they are returned to the materials supply chain for manufacturing new devices or products of the same value or greater value than the device that was recycled. For example, a closed loop system would be when printer ink cartridges are recycled and the recovered plastic is then used in new printer ink cartridges.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
R2 Certified Recyclers: According to the R2:2013 Standard, "certifying to this Standard through an accredited third-party Certification Body, electronics recyclers can help prospective purchasers of their services (customers) make informed decisions and have increased confidence that used and end -of-life electronic equipment are managed in an environmentally responsible manner, protective of the health and safety of workers and the public, and that all data on all media devices is secure until destroyed." https://sustainableelectronics.org/r2-standard

e-Stewards: According to the e-Stewards Certification website, "The e-Stewards Certification Program provides a high level of confidence that a recycler consistently conforms to the e-Stewards Standard." http://www.e-stewards.org/certification-overview/
N/AN/A
TelevisionsRestriction of hazardous substances - Brominated flame retardantsCalculate C1 as the number of products sold in this category that are BFR-free, divided by the total number of products sold in this category, then multiply by 100. Include only products that have no BFRs in their internal components such as printed wiring boards as well as their external housing or cabling as BFR-free products. Also include products where BFR content is solely related to recycled plastic content in housings or other external components, where the BFRs were not intentionally added to the components.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
N/ABizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815
Informed substitution: Informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles (Adapted from United States Environmental Protection Agency Design for Environment Program Alternative Assessment information).
TelevisionsSupply chain working conditions - Audit resultsCalculate B1 as the number of events resolved, divided by the total number of events recorded during both second- and third-party audits conducted in the previous year, then multiply by 100. Include all tier 1 company-owned or contract component manufacturing facilities, as well as all component manufacturing facilities that are directly contracted to supply custom parts or materials to company-owned or contract product assembly facilities that have had a second- or third-party audit conducted in the past year. For B1, answer 100% if zero non-conformance events have been recorded across all facilities. A non-conformance event indicates an audit finding that would trigger a corrective action plan. For audits performed under the Responsible Business Alliance Validated Auditing Program (VAP), this includes priority, major, and minor non-conformance events.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process: Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process (VAP) provides members the ability to audit manufacturing facilities within their supply chain and share audit results with other members to better leverage information on common upstream supplier facilities. Organizations that are not members of RBA but own facilities that are in the electronics supply chain may also participate in this effort. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/vap/

THESIS Help Center Video: Supply chain working conditions - Audit results KPI: Short video tutorial on the Supply chain working conditions - Audit results KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528319
Global Social Compliance Programme (GSCP) Reference Tools: The Global Social Compliance Program provides a publicly available suite of reference tools that describes existing best practices in social compliance. The reference tools can be used by companies to develop systems and initiatives. http://supply-chain.unglobalcompact.org/site/article/126

Responsible Battery Alliance (RBA) Supply Chain Accountability Tools: RBA supports multiple tools for members that enable self-assessment, third-party auditing, and online sustainability data management systems of this information. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/tools/

Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct: Companies can use the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct with their suppliers to improve the working conditions within facilities in their supply chain, the most recent version of which can be found on their website. The Code of Conduct was originally developed for use within the electronics industry, but has been revised to ensure relevance across most manufacturing sectors. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/code-of-conduct/

Responsible Business Alliance: The Responsible Business Alliance (RBA), formerly known as the Electronics Industry Citizenship Council (EICC), supports an industry Code of Conduct that provides a common approach to drive positive change on social, economic and environmental issues in manufacturing supply chains. RBA offers a suite of tools and resources to their members to aid in assessing and managing change in supply chains, as well as coordinating audit processes across different companies. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.
TelevisionsWorker health, safety, and labor rightsCalculate C1 as the number of facilities that have been audited by a third party in the last twelve months, divided by the total number of company-owned or contact facilities, then multiply by 100. Include all tier 1 company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities, and all component manufacturing facilities that are directly contracted to supply custom parts or materials to company-owned or contract product assembly facilities.
Facilities eligible for inclusion in the reported percentage are those that have either been deemed low risk through a verifiable assessment, or high-risk facilities audited by a third party. A verifiable assessment can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party, or a first-party systematic risk assessment against a code of conduct to determine risk based on conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The code of conduct must cover the following issues with requirements that meet or exceed those outlined in the in-force Responsible Business Alliance Code of Conduct: Child labor; Compensation; Discipline; Discrimination; Forced labor; Freedom of association and right to collective bargaining; Health and safety; Management systems for human resources; Working hours.
Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct: Companies can use the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct with their suppliers to improve the working conditions within facilities in their supply chain, the most recent version of which can be found on their website. The Code of Conduct was originally developed for use within the electronics industry, but has been revised to ensure relevance across most manufacturing sectors. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/code-of-conduct/

Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process: Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process (VAP) provides members the ability to audit manufacturing facilities within their supply chain and share audit results with other members to better leverage information on common upstream supplier facilities. Organizations that are not members of RBA but own facilities that are in the electronics supply chain may also participate in this effort. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/vap/

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

Ethical Trading Initiative Base Code of Labor Practices: This organization works in partnership to improve the working lives of poor and vulnerable people across the globe that make or grow consumer goods. ETI has a Base Code of Labor Practice and provides guidance and resources for implementing it. https://www.ethicaltrade.org/resources/eti-base-code

Global Social Compliance Programme (GSCP) Reference Tools: The Global Social Compliance Program provides a publicly available suite of reference tools that describes existing best practices in social compliance. The reference tools can be used by companies to develop systems and initiatives. http://supply-chain.unglobalcompact.org/site/article/126

Responsible Battery Alliance (RBA) Supply Chain Accountability Tools: RBA supports multiple tools for members that enable self-assessment, third-party auditing, and online sustainability data management systems of this information. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/tools/
First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Automotive Audio and VideoConflict mineralsCalculate D1 as the total number of validated smelters, divided by the total number of smelters, then multiply by 100. Include all smelters identified as supplying some portion of the tin, tungsten, tantalum, or gold in your products.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
To be considered conflict-free, smelters must have a valid certification established or confirmed in the previous 12-month period as defined above.
Smelters may be validated through any internationally recognized body, such as the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI), Responsible Jewellery Council, ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group, or the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA).
ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group: The International Tin Association (ITA) has convened the Responsible Tin Supply Group (RTS) to enable organizations to source cassiterite (ore from which tin is derived) from responsible supply chain actors in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and surrounding countries while meeting due diligence guidance developed by the UN and OECD and required by national laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act. https://www.internationaltin.org/rts-group/

OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas: Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) has developed due diligence guidelines for organizations to implement when sourcing minerals from conflict regions, including but not limited to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. These guidelines have become normative in the industry and can be used to demonstrate due diligence under national and regional laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act in the U.S. and the European Commission draft proposal for supply chain due diligence for conflict minerals. http://www.oecd.org/daf/inv/mne/mining.htm

Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC) chain-of-custody certification: The Responsible Jewellery Council is a standard-setting and certification organization that has developed an ISEAL-accredited chain-of-custody certification program for use by the jewellery industry and manufacturers, which applies to gold and platinum group metals. https://www.responsiblejewellery.com/rjc-certification/

Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI): Formerly known as the Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative, the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI) is a joint effort between the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) and GeSI to establish supply chain transparency tools, resources and training to assist organizations in responsibly sourcing conflict-free minerals from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. Of note is their Responsible Minerals Assurance Process, which enables auditing and assessment of smelters for responsible ore sourcing and provides a centralized database for tracking smelter performance. http://www.responsiblemineralsinitiative.org/

THESIS Help Center Video: Conflict minerals KPI: Short video tutorial on the Conflict minerals KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017273

The London Bullion Market Association Good Delivery Lists: According to their website, the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA) produces "Good Delivery Lists for gold and silver bars; detailing the names of accredited refiners, their listing date and the marking details of their bars." http://www.lbma.org.uk/the-good-delivery-list

World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard: As part of their activities to support socially-responsible gold mining, the World Gold Council has developed the World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard to provide guidance to companies on responsible mining practices. https://www.gold.org/about-gold/gold-supply/responsible-gold/conflict-free-gold-standard
Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade: According to the website, "The Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade (PPA) is a joint initiative among governments, companies, and civil society to support supply chain solutions to conflict minerals challenges in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and the Great Lakes Region (GLR) of Central Africa." http://www.resolv.org/site-ppa/Conflict minerals: Conflict minerals are defined per "Section 1502(e)(4) of the [Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform] Act as (A) columbite-tantalite, also known as coltan (the metal ore from which tantalum is extracted); cassiterite (the metal ore from which tin is extracted); gold; wolframite (the metal ore from which tungsten is extracted); or their derivatives; or (B) any other mineral or its derivatives determined by the Secretary of State to be financing conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo or an adjoining country." (US Securities and Exchange Commission, 17 CFR Parts 240 and 249b, RIN: 3235-AK84, Conflict Minerals Final Rule)
Automotive Audio and VideoEnergy efficiency - Use phaseCalculate B1 as the total number of units that meet the criteria for this question, divided by the total number of units sold, then multiply by 100. Include all units that were shipped with power management or energy efficiency attributes enabled, regardless of whether required by law. Products that are certified to a current in-force version of ENERGY STAR® or an equivalent third-party certified energy efficiency standard count toward this question.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
ENERGY STAR® International Partners: The EPA enters into agreements with foreign governments to use and/or recognize the ENERGY STAR standards and mark to help unify voluntary energy-efficiency initiatives globally. https://www.energystar.gov/partner_resources/international_partners

ENERGY STAR® Qualified Products: According to their website, "The ENERGY STAR label was established to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and other pollutants caused by the inefficient use of energy and make it easy for consumers to identify and purchase energy-efficient products that offer savings on energy bills without sacrificing performance, features, and comfort." Standards are established by ENERGY STAR through a multi-stakeholder process and administered under the US EPA. https://www.energystar.gov/products
N/AEnergy efficiency attributes: Product design attributes such as low power motors or more efficient air circulation that increase the energy efficiency of a product above market average.

Power management features: Product design features that enable users to manage product energy use, such as variable heat or speed settings, or that automatically control energy use, such as auto-off after a set time.
Automotive Audio and VideoF-GHG emission tracking and reportingCalculate percentage of components, by units procured for products in this category, that meet the criteria for this question as the number of suppliers that abate all F-GHGs in at least 50% of their facilities divided by the total number of suppliers responsible for all relevant components and multiply the result by 100. For example: if four suppliers provide all relevant components and one does nothing, one abates only PFCs, and the remaining 2 abate all gases in 40% and 70% of their facilities, respectively, the correct percentage is 25% because only one supplier meets both criteria.
In the rare circumstance that a facility uses no F-GHGs in any process for any component in products included in this category, that facility may be counted as having 100% abatement.
Relevant components specifically refer to flat panel displays and semiconductor electronic components or devices whose manufacture is known to use and emit fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-GHGs), namely during etch and chamber clean processes.
Abate all F-GHG emissions means that the component supplier abates all of the following F-GHGs in at least half of their facilities that manufacture relevant components for this product category: perfluorocarbons (PFCs), trifluoromethane (CHF3 or HFCs), nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6).
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Protocol for Measuring Destruction or Removal Efficiency (DRE): The Protocol for Measuring Destruction or Removal Efficiency (DRE) of Fluorinated Greenhouse Gas Abatement Equipment in Electronics Manufacturing was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency as a standard approach to measure F-GHG emissions at the point of abatement in the electronics component manufacturing facility. https://www.epa.gov/f-gas-partnership-programs/epas-protocol-measuring-destruction-or-removal-efficiencyCenter for Corporate Climate Leadership: According to this website, "The EPA's Center for Corporate Climate Leadership seeks to highlight activities to reduce supply chain greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at the sector level." The first efforts to be highlighted within the electronics industry are the efforts by suppliers to reduce F-GHGs during manufacturing of flat panel display in the electronics sector. https://www.epa.gov/climateleadership

European Semiconductor Industry - PFC Emission Reduction: The European Semiconductor Industry Association (ESIA) has provided information regarding successful PFC emissions reduction programs in Europe, and steps the industry is taking beyond its voluntary 2010 reduction goals. https://www.eusemiconductors.eu/esia/public-policy/sustainability-esh/pfc-gases

GHG Protocol Calculation Tools - Semiconductors: The GHG Protocol calculation tool for the semiconductor industry provides guidance on how to assess and account for PFC emissions during semiconductor wafer production and processing. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

PFC Reduction/Climate Partnership for the Semiconductor Industry: The United States Environmental Protection Agency supports the voluntary efforts to reduce fluorinated greenhouse gas (F-GHG) emissions from semiconductor industry through the PFC Reduction/Climate Partnership for the Semiconductor Industry. https://www.epa.gov/ghgemissions/overview-greenhouse-gases#f-gases

World LCD Industry Cooperation Committee: The "principal mission of WLICC is to address efforts and share understanding on issues concerning environmental protection and resource recycling within the LCD industry." In 2010, the organization published results of their member's F-GHG reduction efforts. http://home.jeita.or.jp/device/committee/kankyou/pdf/20111110WLICG_e.pdf

World Semiconductor Council - Best Practice Guidance of PFC Emission Reduction: The World Semiconductor Council has developed a set of best known practices related to reducing fluorinated greenhouse gas emissions from equipment and manufacturing processes to support their members in efforts to meet their voluntary perfluoro-compound emission reduction targets. http://www.semiconductorcouncil.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/Best-Practice-Guidance-of-PFC-Emission-Reduction.pdf
Component supplier: A manufacturer of a component used in the final product. If the manufacturing facility partner is responsible for fabrication of these devices, they are the supplier of interest for this question.

Fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-GHGs): Fluorine-containing gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere. The F-GHG emissions of primary concern in electronics manufacturing are of perfluorocarbons (PFCs), trifluoromethane (CHF3 or HFCs), nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which are more potent than carbon dioxide.

Manufacturing facility partners: Manufacturing facility partners are defined as organizations responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these organizations are internal or external to the respondent's organization.
Automotive Audio and VideoGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the procurement spend on component suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total procurement spend on all component suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party. Component suppliers means the group of suppliers that account for 80% of your total spend on components purchased for products in this category.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Automotive Audio and VideoGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, including product assembly and the manufacture of any components purchased directly by your organization for inclusion in products in scope for this questionnaire, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total spend required to produce the products.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total spend required to produce the product. If the manufacturing facilities produce both in scope and out of scope products, only weight using the total spend required to produce the in scope products.
Calculate B2 as the total spend on final products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total spend for final products produced, then multiply by 100.
For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardCO2e: Carbon dioxide equivalent; a metric that expresses the impact of a greenhouse gas in terms of the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) that has the same global warming potential.

Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Automotive Audio and VideoHazardous substances - Alternatives assessmentHazardous substances are defined as chemicals that meet the criteria for classification as a carcinogens, mutagens, reproductive toxicants, or are persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemicals for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57).GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

PRIO: PRIO is a web-based tool developed by the Swedish government to facilitate the assessment of environmental and health risks of chemicals. ? https://www.kemi.se/prioguiden/english/start

Scivera Lens™ Rapid Screen: The Scivera Lens Rapid Screen tool provides access to chemical ingredient toxicological hazard and risk assessment profiles using a product's bill of materials or bill of substances.
https://www.scivera.com/rapidscreen/

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Exposure Assessment Tools and Models: According to their website, "The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) has developed several exposure assessment methods, databases, and predictive models to help in evaluating what happens to chemicals when they are used and released to the environment and how workers, the general public, consumers and the aquatic ecosystems may be exposed to chemicals." https://www.epa.gov/ceam/tools-data-exposure-assessment
BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

CCS Enhanced GreenSuite®: Enhanced GreenSuite® is a web-based chemical and product hazard and risk assessment tool developmed by Chemical Compliance Systems (CCS). https://www.chemply.com/greensuite

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815

REACH: A Priority Chemical is defined as a chemical that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57).  Priority Chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis. http://www.reachonline.eu/REACH/EN/REACH_EN/article57.html

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Existing Chemicals Program: According to their website, "EPA's existing chemical programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and characterization, and risk management for chemical substances in commercial use." The current chemicals management program is undergoing review and update, including how the agency identifies and prioritizes priority chemicals for review and assessment under TSCA. https://www.epa.gov/compliance/toxic-substances-control-act-tsca-compliance-monitoring#chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
Informed substitution: Informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles (Adapted from United States Environmental Protection Agency Design for Environment Program Alternative Assessment information).

Public disclosure: Manufacturer-based acts of making information available and readily accessible to the public through one or more forms of media (e.g., online, print, telephone). Print media includes product labels and also includes, but is not limited to, books, magazines, newspapers, and readily accessible journal articles. Online disclosure includes, but is not limited to, publicly accessible websites (desktop or mobile) as well as making information electronically available through reporting platforms or mobile apps.
Automotive Audio and VideoHazardous substances - DisclosureCalculate B1 as the number of suppliers which have provided disclosure information, divided by the total number of suppliers, then multiply by 100. Include all company-owned or contract component manufacturers, as well as organizations contracted for direct material supply to company-owned or contract manufacturers. To be included in this percentage, a supplier must disclose intentionally-added materials listed in the declarable substance groups and declarable substances above the thresholds specified in IEC 62474.
Suppliers who only report substances whose declaration is already mandated by relevant regulations in the market(s) of sale (e.g., by RoHS Directive) should not be considered as having provided disclosure. If an organization has not adopted IEC 62474, suppliers who report declarable substances in line with the declarable substances list in IEC 62474 can count as having provided disclosure.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
International Electrotechnical Commission Standard 62474: If you are using this - this has been moved to the standards field. Please link that to your categories - this item will be going away. http://webstore.iec.ch/webstore/webstore.nsf/mysearchajax?Openform&key=62474&sorting=&start=1&onglet=1Dell, Inc. Materials Restricted for Use: "Materials Restricted for Use," published by Dell, Inc., is one example of an internal hazardous substances management list used within the electronics industry. https://www.dell.com/downloads/global/corporate/environ/restricted_materials_guid.pdf

GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

Panasonic Corporation Chemical Substances Management Rank Guidelines: "The Chemical Substances Management Rank Guide," published by the Industrial Devices Company Group, Panasonic Corporation, is one example of an internal hazardous substances management list used within the electronics industry. https://www.panasonic.com/global/corporate/management/procurement/green.html
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.
Automotive Audio and VideoMaterial disposition tracking - Product takeback programFinal disposition means the point at which 1) a product enters its next life cycle through reuse or refurbishment; 2) the components of a product are recaptured for reuse as part of a refurbishment program; or 3) the product or materials contained within the product reach landfilling, incineration or material recovery where they are returned to the commodity market.R2 Certified Recyclers: According to the R2:2013 Standard, "certifying to this Standard through an accredited third-party Certification Body, electronics recyclers can help prospective purchasers of their services (customers) make informed decisions and have increased confidence that used and end -of-life electronic equipment are managed in an environmentally responsible manner, protective of the health and safety of workers and the public, and that all data on all media devices is secure until destroyed." https://sustainableelectronics.org/r2-standard

WEEELABEX: WEEELABEX standards cover the collection, logistics, and treatment of electronic wastes in all ten categories of the European Union's Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive. http://www.weeelabex.org/#!standards/component_41229

e-Stewards: According to the e-Stewards Certification website, "The e-Stewards Certification Program provides a high level of confidence that a recycler consistently conforms to the e-Stewards Standard." http://www.e-stewards.org/certification-overview/
N/ACertified third-party e-waste vendors: "Vendors that demonstrate to an accredited, independent third-party auditor that they meet specific standards to safely recycle and manage electronics. These certification programs must be based on strong environmental standards which maximize reuse and recycling, minimize exposure to human health or the environment, ensure safe management of materials by downstream handlers, and require destruction of all data on used electronics. Two accredited certification standards are the Responsible Recycling Practices (R2) and the e-Stewards® standards."(Source: EPA, E-cycling certification definition)

Responsible final disposition: Takeback programs may achieve the goal of responsible final material disposition by doing one or more of the following:
1. Including contractual requirements regarding downstream partner responsibility, all the way to final material disposition;
2. Verifying responsible final disposition by tracking a sampling of materials to final disposition; and/or;
3. Contracting exclusively with certified third-party e-waste vendors to ensure responsible final disposition.

Takeback program: A collection method whereby consumers return specific products or classes of products at the end of their useful lives for potential reuse and refurbishment, followed by material recovery and appropriate disposal.
Automotive Audio and VideoPackaging Raw Material SourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

ISO 18604: ISO 18604 (Packaging and the environment -- Material recycling) provides measurement standards for determining how recyclable a particular product is. https://www.iso.org/standard/55872.html

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Renewable material: “Material that is composed of biomass from a living source and that can be continually replenished. To be defined as renewable, virgin materials shall come from sources which are replenished at a rate equal to or greater than the rate of depletion.” (FTC Green Guides:2012)

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably-sourced material: Material for which it can be demonstrated through second- or third-party verification that the virgin raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities. Materials such as paper can be included in this definition if the source of the packaging content comes from sustainably-managed forests with no deforestation.
Automotive Audio and VideoProduct takeback programThis question addresses takeback programs that an organization may fund, contract, or physically operate, in whole or in part, to enable consumers to return products for responsible end-of-life management. Include only products and materials for which an organization has the ability to decide or influence the handling, treatment, and disposal of returned devices, components, and materials. If multiple questionnaires are received, the same percentage may be reported as long as the product types in question are collected and managed in the same program. Otherwise, the responses need to be for percentages appropriate to the different product types associated with each questionnaire.
Calculate B1, B2, B3, and B4 as the weight of products or materials recovered from products in each category, divided by the weight of total products recovered globally through both voluntary and mandatory programs, then multiply by 100. The sum of B1, B2, B3, and B4 must be less than or equal to 100%.
The weight for any given returned device can only be credited once. For example, a device whose weight is included in component reuse for a hard drive that was salvaged cannot also be included under the material recovery calculation, even if the rest of the materials from the device are sent for material recovery.
Material that is found or suspected to end in landfill or incineration through downstream auditing or the lack of a viable secondary market cannot be included in the material recovery percentage.
Components reused or refurbished means the percent of total volume representing parts that return to the market. Examples would be hard drives, motherboards, salvaged chips or other components removed for the secondary market.
Closed-loop system means that once material or components are recovered, they are returned to the materials supply chain for manufacturing new devices or products of the same value or greater value than the device that was recycled. For example, a closed loop system would be when printer ink cartridges are recycled and the recovered plastic is then used in new printer ink cartridges.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
R2 Certified Recyclers: According to the R2:2013 Standard, "certifying to this Standard through an accredited third-party Certification Body, electronics recyclers can help prospective purchasers of their services (customers) make informed decisions and have increased confidence that used and end -of-life electronic equipment are managed in an environmentally responsible manner, protective of the health and safety of workers and the public, and that all data on all media devices is secure until destroyed." https://sustainableelectronics.org/r2-standard

e-Stewards: According to the e-Stewards Certification website, "The e-Stewards Certification Program provides a high level of confidence that a recycler consistently conforms to the e-Stewards Standard." http://www.e-stewards.org/certification-overview/
HP Product Return and Recycling Program: One example of a manufacturer takeback program is run by HP, where LaserJet and ink cartridges are collected, recycled, and materials used to manufacture new cartridges. http://www8.hp.com/us/en/hp-information/environment/product-recycling.html?jumpid=re_r138_eco_product-recycling#.UkTzV39c57cTakeback program: A collection method whereby consumers return specific products or classes of products at the end of their useful lives for potential reuse and refurbishment, followed by material recovery and appropriate disposal.
Automotive Audio and VideoSupply chain working conditions - Audit resultsCalculate B1 as the number of events resolved, divided by the total number of events recorded during both second- and third-party audits conducted in the previous year, then multiply by 100. Include all tier 1 company-owned or contract component manufacturing facilities, as well as all component manufacturing facilities that are directly contracted to supply custom parts or materials to company-owned or contract product assembly facilities, that have had a second- or third-party audit to a widely-recognized code of conduct conducted in the past year. For B1, answer 100% if zero non-conformance events have been recorded across all facilities. A non-conformance event indicates an audit finding that would trigger a corrective action plan. For audits performed under the Responsible Business Alliance Validated Auditing Program (VAP), this includes priority, major, and minor non-conformance events.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process: Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process (VAP) provides members the ability to audit manufacturing facilities within their supply chain and share audit results with other members to better leverage information on common upstream supplier facilities. Organizations that are not members of RBA but own facilities that are in the electronics supply chain may also participate in this effort. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/vap/

THESIS Help Center Video: Supply chain working conditions - Audit results KPI: Short video tutorial on the Supply chain working conditions - Audit results KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528319
Global Social Compliance Programme (GSCP) Reference Tools: The Global Social Compliance Program provides a publicly available suite of reference tools that describes existing best practices in social compliance. The reference tools can be used by companies to develop systems and initiatives. http://supply-chain.unglobalcompact.org/site/article/126

Responsible Battery Alliance (RBA) Supply Chain Accountability Tools: RBA supports multiple tools for members that enable self-assessment, third-party auditing, and online sustainability data management systems of this information. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/tools/

Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct: Companies can use the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct with their suppliers to improve the working conditions within facilities in their supply chain, the most recent version of which can be found on their website. The Code of Conduct was originally developed for use within the electronics industry, but has been revised to ensure relevance across most manufacturing sectors. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/code-of-conduct/

Responsible Business Alliance: The Responsible Business Alliance (RBA), formerly known as the Electronics Industry Citizenship Council (EICC), supports an industry Code of Conduct that provides a common approach to drive positive change on social, economic and environmental issues in manufacturing supply chains. RBA offers a suite of tools and resources to their members to aid in assessing and managing change in supply chains, as well as coordinating audit processes across different companies. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.
Automotive Audio and VideoSustainable Packaging Design and ProductionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: Material efficiency is the ratio between the material input and the benefits derived. Resource conservation (source reduction) of material inputs and/or improving the functionality of the packaging can positively impact material efficiency. Process efficiency is the ratio between the time spent on production steps to the output. Opportunities to improve material and process efficiency include process improvement, product redesign, and technology changes to packaging equipment. It should be noted that continual source reduction has benefits, but there are trade-offs that must be assessed.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
Automotive Audio and VideoWorker health, safety, and labor rightsCalculate C1 as the number of facilities that have been audited by a third party in the last twelve months, divided by the total number of company-owned or contact facilities, then multiply by 100. Include all tier 1 company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities, and all component manufacturing facilities that are directly contracted to supply custom parts or materials to company-owned or contract product assembly facilities.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The code of conduct must cover the following issues with requirements that meet or exceed those in the current, in-force Responsible Business Alliance Code of Conduct, including: Child labor; compensation; discipline; discrimination; forced labor; freedom of association and right to collective bargaining; health and safety; management systems for human resources; working hours.
Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct: Companies can use the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct with their suppliers to improve the working conditions within facilities in their supply chain, the most recent version of which can be found on their website. The Code of Conduct was originally developed for use within the electronics industry, but has been revised to ensure relevance across most manufacturing sectors. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/code-of-conduct/

Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process: Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process (VAP) provides members the ability to audit manufacturing facilities within their supply chain and share audit results with other members to better leverage information on common upstream supplier facilities. Organizations that are not members of RBA but own facilities that are in the electronics supply chain may also participate in this effort. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/vap/

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
N/ACompany-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Automotive ElectronicsConflict mineralsCalculate D1 as the total number of validated smelters, divided by the total number of smelters, then multiply by 100. Include all smelters identified as supplying some portion of the tin, tungsten, tantalum, or gold in your products.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
To be considered conflict-free, smelters must have a valid certification established or confirmed in the previous 12-month period as defined above.
Smelters may be validated through any internationally recognized body, such as the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI), Responsible Jewellery Council, ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group, or the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA).
ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group: The International Tin Association (ITA) has convened the Responsible Tin Supply Group (RTS) to enable organizations to source cassiterite (ore from which tin is derived) from responsible supply chain actors in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and surrounding countries while meeting due diligence guidance developed by the UN and OECD and required by national laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act. https://www.internationaltin.org/rts-group/

OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas: Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) has developed due diligence guidelines for organizations to implement when sourcing minerals from conflict regions, including but not limited to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. These guidelines have become normative in the industry and can be used to demonstrate due diligence under national and regional laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act in the U.S. and the European Commission draft proposal for supply chain due diligence for conflict minerals. http://www.oecd.org/daf/inv/mne/mining.htm

Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC) chain-of-custody certification: The Responsible Jewellery Council is a standard-setting and certification organization that has developed an ISEAL-accredited chain-of-custody certification program for use by the jewellery industry and manufacturers, which applies to gold and platinum group metals. https://www.responsiblejewellery.com/rjc-certification/

Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI): Formerly known as the Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative, the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI) is a joint effort between the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) and GeSI to establish supply chain transparency tools, resources and training to assist organizations in responsibly sourcing conflict-free minerals from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. Of note is their Responsible Minerals Assurance Process, which enables auditing and assessment of smelters for responsible ore sourcing and provides a centralized database for tracking smelter performance. http://www.responsiblemineralsinitiative.org/

THESIS Help Center Video: Conflict minerals KPI: Short video tutorial on the Conflict minerals KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017273

The London Bullion Market Association Good Delivery Lists: According to their website, the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA) produces "Good Delivery Lists for gold and silver bars; detailing the names of accredited refiners, their listing date and the marking details of their bars." http://www.lbma.org.uk/the-good-delivery-list

World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard: As part of their activities to support socially-responsible gold mining, the World Gold Council has developed the World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard to provide guidance to companies on responsible mining practices. https://www.gold.org/about-gold/gold-supply/responsible-gold/conflict-free-gold-standard
Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade: According to the website, "The Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade (PPA) is a joint initiative among governments, companies, and civil society to support supply chain solutions to conflict minerals challenges in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and the Great Lakes Region (GLR) of Central Africa." http://www.resolv.org/site-ppa/Conflict minerals: Conflict minerals are defined per "Section 1502(e)(4) of the [Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform] Act as (A) columbite-tantalite, also known as coltan (the metal ore from which tantalum is extracted); cassiterite (the metal ore from which tin is extracted); gold; wolframite (the metal ore from which tungsten is extracted); or their derivatives; or (B) any other mineral or its derivatives determined by the Secretary of State to be financing conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo or an adjoining country." (US Securities and Exchange Commission, 17 CFR Parts 240 and 249b, RIN: 3235-AK84, Conflict Minerals Final Rule)
Automotive ElectronicsEnergy efficiency - Use phaseCalculate B1 as the total number of units that meet the criteria for this question, divided by the total number of units sold, then multiply by 100. Include all units that were shipped with power management or energy efficiency attributes enabled, regardless of whether required by law. Products that are certified to a current in-force version of ENERGY STAR® or an equivalent third-party certified energy efficiency standard count toward this question.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
ENERGY STAR® International Partners: The EPA enters into agreements with foreign governments to use and/or recognize the ENERGY STAR standards and mark to help unify voluntary energy-efficiency initiatives globally. https://www.energystar.gov/partner_resources/international_partners

ENERGY STAR® Qualified Products: According to their website, "The ENERGY STAR label was established to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and other pollutants caused by the inefficient use of energy and make it easy for consumers to identify and purchase energy-efficient products that offer savings on energy bills without sacrificing performance, features, and comfort." Standards are established by ENERGY STAR through a multi-stakeholder process and administered under the US EPA. https://www.energystar.gov/products
N/AEnergy efficiency attributes: Product design attributes such as low power motors or more efficient air circulation that increase the energy efficiency of a product above market average.

Power management features: Product design features that enable users to manage product energy use, such as variable heat or speed settings, or that automatically control energy use, such as auto-off after a set time.
Automotive ElectronicsF-GHG emission tracking and reportingCalculate percentage of components, by units procured for products in this category, that meet the criteria for this question as the number of suppliers that abate all F-GHGs in at least 50% of their facilities divided by the total number of suppliers responsible for all relevant components and multiply the result by 100. For example: if four suppliers provide all relevant components and one does nothing, one abates only PFCs, and the remaining 2 abate all gases in 40% and 70% of their facilities, respectively, the correct percentage is 25% because only one supplier meets both criteria.
In the rare circumstance that a facility uses no F-GHGs in any process for any component in products included in this category, that facility may be counted as having 100% abatement.
Relevant components specifically refer to flat panel displays and semiconductor electronic components or devices whose manufacture is known to use and emit fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-GHGs), namely during etch and chamber clean processes.
Abate all F-GHG emissions means that the component supplier abates all of the following F-GHGs in at least half of their facilities that manufacture relevant components for this product category: perfluorocarbons (PFCs), trifluoromethane (CHF3 or HFCs), nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6).
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Protocol for Measuring Destruction or Removal Efficiency (DRE): The Protocol for Measuring Destruction or Removal Efficiency (DRE) of Fluorinated Greenhouse Gas Abatement Equipment in Electronics Manufacturing was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency as a standard approach to measure F-GHG emissions at the point of abatement in the electronics component manufacturing facility. https://www.epa.gov/f-gas-partnership-programs/epas-protocol-measuring-destruction-or-removal-efficiencyCenter for Corporate Climate Leadership: According to this website, "The EPA's Center for Corporate Climate Leadership seeks to highlight activities to reduce supply chain greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at the sector level." The first efforts to be highlighted within the electronics industry are the efforts by suppliers to reduce F-GHGs during manufacturing of flat panel display in the electronics sector. https://www.epa.gov/climateleadership

European Semiconductor Industry - PFC Emission Reduction: The European Semiconductor Industry Association (ESIA) has provided information regarding successful PFC emissions reduction programs in Europe, and steps the industry is taking beyond its voluntary 2010 reduction goals. https://www.eusemiconductors.eu/esia/public-policy/sustainability-esh/pfc-gases

GHG Protocol Calculation Tools - Semiconductors: The GHG Protocol calculation tool for the semiconductor industry provides guidance on how to assess and account for PFC emissions during semiconductor wafer production and processing. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

PFC Reduction/Climate Partnership for the Semiconductor Industry: The United States Environmental Protection Agency supports the voluntary efforts to reduce fluorinated greenhouse gas (F-GHG) emissions from semiconductor industry through the PFC Reduction/Climate Partnership for the Semiconductor Industry. https://www.epa.gov/ghgemissions/overview-greenhouse-gases#f-gases

World LCD Industry Cooperation Committee: The "principal mission of WLICC is to address efforts and share understanding on issues concerning environmental protection and resource recycling within the LCD industry." In 2010, the organization published results of their member's F-GHG reduction efforts. http://home.jeita.or.jp/device/committee/kankyou/pdf/20111110WLICG_e.pdf

World Semiconductor Council - Best Practice Guidance of PFC Emission Reduction: The World Semiconductor Council has developed a set of best known practices related to reducing fluorinated greenhouse gas emissions from equipment and manufacturing processes to support their members in efforts to meet their voluntary perfluoro-compound emission reduction targets. http://www.semiconductorcouncil.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/Best-Practice-Guidance-of-PFC-Emission-Reduction.pdf
Component supplier: A manufacturer of a component used in the final product. If the manufacturing facility partner is responsible for fabrication of these devices, they are the supplier of interest for this question.

Fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-GHGs): Fluorine-containing gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere. The F-GHG emissions of primary concern in electronics manufacturing are of perfluorocarbons (PFCs), trifluoromethane (CHF3 or HFCs), nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which are more potent than carbon dioxide.

Manufacturing facility partners: Manufacturing facility partners are defined as organizations responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these organizations are internal or external to the respondent's organization.
Automotive ElectronicsGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the procurement spend on component suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total procurement spend on all component suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party. Component suppliers means the group of suppliers that account for 80% of your total spend on components purchased for products in this category.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Automotive ElectronicsGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, including product assembly and the manufacture of any components purchased directly by your organization for inclusion in products in scope for this questionnaire, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total spend required to produce the products.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total spend required to produce the product. If the manufacturing facilities produce both in scope and out of scope products, only weight using the total spend required to produce the in scope products.
Calculate B2 as the total spend on final products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total spend for final products produced, then multiply by 100.
For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardCO2e: Carbon dioxide equivalent; a metric that expresses the impact of a greenhouse gas in terms of the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) that has the same global warming potential.

Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Automotive ElectronicsHazardous substances - Alternatives assessmentHazardous substances are defined as chemicals that meet the criteria for classification as a carcinogens, mutagens, reproductive toxicants, or are persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemicals for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57).GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

PRIO: PRIO is a web-based tool developed by the Swedish government to facilitate the assessment of environmental and health risks of chemicals. ? https://www.kemi.se/prioguiden/english/start

Scivera Lens™ Rapid Screen: The Scivera Lens Rapid Screen tool provides access to chemical ingredient toxicological hazard and risk assessment profiles using a product's bill of materials or bill of substances.
https://www.scivera.com/rapidscreen/

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Exposure Assessment Tools and Models: According to their website, "The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) has developed several exposure assessment methods, databases, and predictive models to help in evaluating what happens to chemicals when they are used and released to the environment and how workers, the general public, consumers and the aquatic ecosystems may be exposed to chemicals." https://www.epa.gov/ceam/tools-data-exposure-assessment
BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

CCS Enhanced GreenSuite®: Enhanced GreenSuite® is a web-based chemical and product hazard and risk assessment tool developmed by Chemical Compliance Systems (CCS). https://www.chemply.com/greensuite

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815

REACH: A Priority Chemical is defined as a chemical that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57).  Priority Chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis. http://www.reachonline.eu/REACH/EN/REACH_EN/article57.html

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Existing Chemicals Program: According to their website, "EPA's existing chemical programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and characterization, and risk management for chemical substances in commercial use." The current chemicals management program is undergoing review and update, including how the agency identifies and prioritizes priority chemicals for review and assessment under TSCA. https://www.epa.gov/compliance/toxic-substances-control-act-tsca-compliance-monitoring#chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
Informed substitution: Informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles (Adapted from United States Environmental Protection Agency Design for Environment Program Alternative Assessment information).

Public disclosure: Manufacturer-based acts of making information available and readily accessible to the public through one or more forms of media (e.g., online, print, telephone). Print media includes product labels and also includes, but is not limited to, books, magazines, newspapers, and readily accessible journal articles. Online disclosure includes, but is not limited to, publicly accessible websites (desktop or mobile) as well as making information electronically available through reporting platforms or mobile apps.
Automotive ElectronicsHazardous substances - DisclosureCalculate B1 as the number of suppliers which have provided disclosure information, divided by the total number of suppliers, then multiply by 100. Include all company-owned or contract component manufacturers, as well as organizations contracted for direct material supply to company-owned or contract manufacturers. To be included in this percentage, a supplier must disclose intentionally-added materials listed in the declarable substance groups and declarable substances above the thresholds specified in IEC 62474.
Suppliers who only report substances whose declaration is already mandated by relevant regulations in the market(s) of sale (e.g., by RoHS Directive) should not be considered as having provided disclosure. If an organization has not adopted IEC 62474, suppliers who report declarable substances in line with the declarable substances list in IEC 62474 can count as having provided disclosure.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
International Electrotechnical Commission Standard 62474: If you are using this - this has been moved to the standards field. Please link that to your categories - this item will be going away. http://webstore.iec.ch/webstore/webstore.nsf/mysearchajax?Openform&key=62474&sorting=&start=1&onglet=1Dell, Inc. Materials Restricted for Use: "Materials Restricted for Use," published by Dell, Inc., is one example of an internal hazardous substances management list used within the electronics industry. https://www.dell.com/downloads/global/corporate/environ/restricted_materials_guid.pdf

GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

Panasonic Corporation Chemical Substances Management Rank Guidelines: "The Chemical Substances Management Rank Guide," published by the Industrial Devices Company Group, Panasonic Corporation, is one example of an internal hazardous substances management list used within the electronics industry. https://www.panasonic.com/global/corporate/management/procurement/green.html
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.
Automotive ElectronicsMaterial disposition tracking - Product takeback programFinal disposition means the point at which 1) a product enters its next life cycle through reuse or refurbishment; 2) the components of a product are recaptured for reuse as part of a refurbishment program; or 3) the product or materials contained within the product reach landfilling, incineration or material recovery where they are returned to the commodity market.R2 Certified Recyclers: According to the R2:2013 Standard, "certifying to this Standard through an accredited third-party Certification Body, electronics recyclers can help prospective purchasers of their services (customers) make informed decisions and have increased confidence that used and end -of-life electronic equipment are managed in an environmentally responsible manner, protective of the health and safety of workers and the public, and that all data on all media devices is secure until destroyed." https://sustainableelectronics.org/r2-standard

WEEELABEX: WEEELABEX standards cover the collection, logistics, and treatment of electronic wastes in all ten categories of the European Union's Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive. http://www.weeelabex.org/#!standards/component_41229

e-Stewards: According to the e-Stewards Certification website, "The e-Stewards Certification Program provides a high level of confidence that a recycler consistently conforms to the e-Stewards Standard." http://www.e-stewards.org/certification-overview/
N/ACertified third-party e-waste vendors: "Vendors that demonstrate to an accredited, independent third-party auditor that they meet specific standards to safely recycle and manage electronics. These certification programs must be based on strong environmental standards which maximize reuse and recycling, minimize exposure to human health or the environment, ensure safe management of materials by downstream handlers, and require destruction of all data on used electronics. Two accredited certification standards are the Responsible Recycling Practices (R2) and the e-Stewards® standards."(Source: EPA, E-cycling certification definition)

Responsible final disposition: Takeback programs may achieve the goal of responsible final material disposition by doing one or more of the following:
1. Including contractual requirements regarding downstream partner responsibility, all the way to final material disposition;
2. Verifying responsible final disposition by tracking a sampling of materials to final disposition; and/or;
3. Contracting exclusively with certified third-party e-waste vendors to ensure responsible final disposition.

Takeback program: A collection method whereby consumers return specific products or classes of products at the end of their useful lives for potential reuse and refurbishment, followed by material recovery and appropriate disposal.
Automotive ElectronicsPackaging Raw Material SourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

ISO 18604: ISO 18604 (Packaging and the environment -- Material recycling) provides measurement standards for determining how recyclable a particular product is. https://www.iso.org/standard/55872.html

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Renewable material: “Material that is composed of biomass from a living source and that can be continually replenished. To be defined as renewable, virgin materials shall come from sources which are replenished at a rate equal to or greater than the rate of depletion.” (FTC Green Guides:2012)

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably-sourced material: Material for which it can be demonstrated through second- or third-party verification that the virgin raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities. Materials such as paper can be included in this definition if the source of the packaging content comes from sustainably-managed forests with no deforestation.
Automotive ElectronicsProduct takeback programThis question addresses takeback programs that an organization may fund, contract, or physically operate, in whole or in part, to enable consumers to return products for responsible end-of-life management. Include only products and materials for which an organization has the ability to decide or influence the handling, treatment, and disposal of returned devices, components, and materials. If multiple questionnaires are received, the same percentage may be reported as long as the product types in question are collected and managed in the same program. Otherwise, the responses need to be for percentages appropriate to the different product types associated with each questionnaire.
Calculate B1, B2, B3, and B4 as the weight of products or materials recovered from products in each category, divided by the weight of total products recovered globally through both voluntary and mandatory programs, then multiply by 100. The sum of B1, B2, B3, and B4 must be less than or equal to 100%.
The weight for any given returned device can only be credited once. For example, a device whose weight is included in component reuse for a hard drive that was salvaged cannot also be included under the material recovery calculation, even if the rest of the materials from the device are sent for material recovery.
Material that is found or suspected to end in landfill or incineration through downstream auditing or the lack of a viable secondary market cannot be included in the material recovery percentage.
Components reused or refurbished means the percent of total volume representing parts that return to the market. Examples would be hard drives, motherboards, salvaged chips or other components removed for the secondary market.
Closed-loop system means that once material or components are recovered, they are returned to the materials supply chain for manufacturing new devices or products of the same value or greater value than the device that was recycled. For example, a closed loop system would be when printer ink cartridges are recycled and the recovered plastic is then used in new printer ink cartridges.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
R2 Certified Recyclers: According to the R2:2013 Standard, "certifying to this Standard through an accredited third-party Certification Body, electronics recyclers can help prospective purchasers of their services (customers) make informed decisions and have increased confidence that used and end -of-life electronic equipment are managed in an environmentally responsible manner, protective of the health and safety of workers and the public, and that all data on all media devices is secure until destroyed." https://sustainableelectronics.org/r2-standard

e-Stewards: According to the e-Stewards Certification website, "The e-Stewards Certification Program provides a high level of confidence that a recycler consistently conforms to the e-Stewards Standard." http://www.e-stewards.org/certification-overview/
HP Product Return and Recycling Program: One example of a manufacturer takeback program is run by HP, where LaserJet and ink cartridges are collected, recycled, and materials used to manufacture new cartridges. http://www8.hp.com/us/en/hp-information/environment/product-recycling.html?jumpid=re_r138_eco_product-recycling#.UkTzV39c57cTakeback program: A collection method whereby consumers return specific products or classes of products at the end of their useful lives for potential reuse and refurbishment, followed by material recovery and appropriate disposal.
Automotive ElectronicsSupply chain working conditions - Audit resultsCalculate B1 as the number of events resolved, divided by the total number of events recorded during both second- and third-party audits conducted in the previous year, then multiply by 100. Include all tier 1 company-owned or contract component manufacturing facilities, as well as all component manufacturing facilities that are directly contracted to supply custom parts or materials to company-owned or contract product assembly facilities, that have had a second- or third-party audit to a widely-recognized code of conduct conducted in the past year. For B1, answer 100% if zero non-conformance events have been recorded across all facilities. A non-conformance event indicates an audit finding that would trigger a corrective action plan. For audits performed under the Responsible Business Alliance Validated Auditing Program (VAP), this includes priority, major, and minor non-conformance events.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process: Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process (VAP) provides members the ability to audit manufacturing facilities within their supply chain and share audit results with other members to better leverage information on common upstream supplier facilities. Organizations that are not members of RBA but own facilities that are in the electronics supply chain may also participate in this effort. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/vap/

THESIS Help Center Video: Supply chain working conditions - Audit results KPI: Short video tutorial on the Supply chain working conditions - Audit results KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528319
Global Social Compliance Programme (GSCP) Reference Tools: The Global Social Compliance Program provides a publicly available suite of reference tools that describes existing best practices in social compliance. The reference tools can be used by companies to develop systems and initiatives. http://supply-chain.unglobalcompact.org/site/article/126

Responsible Battery Alliance (RBA) Supply Chain Accountability Tools: RBA supports multiple tools for members that enable self-assessment, third-party auditing, and online sustainability data management systems of this information. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/tools/

Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct: Companies can use the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct with their suppliers to improve the working conditions within facilities in their supply chain, the most recent version of which can be found on their website. The Code of Conduct was originally developed for use within the electronics industry, but has been revised to ensure relevance across most manufacturing sectors. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/code-of-conduct/

Responsible Business Alliance: The Responsible Business Alliance (RBA), formerly known as the Electronics Industry Citizenship Council (EICC), supports an industry Code of Conduct that provides a common approach to drive positive change on social, economic and environmental issues in manufacturing supply chains. RBA offers a suite of tools and resources to their members to aid in assessing and managing change in supply chains, as well as coordinating audit processes across different companies. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.
Automotive ElectronicsSustainable Packaging Design and ProductionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: Material efficiency is the ratio between the material input and the benefits derived. Resource conservation (source reduction) of material inputs and/or improving the functionality of the packaging can positively impact material efficiency. Process efficiency is the ratio between the time spent on production steps to the output. Opportunities to improve material and process efficiency include process improvement, product redesign, and technology changes to packaging equipment. It should be noted that continual source reduction has benefits, but there are trade-offs that must be assessed.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
Automotive ElectronicsWorker health, safety, and labor rightsCalculate C1 as the number of facilities that have been audited by a third party in the last twelve months, divided by the total number of company-owned or contact facilities, then multiply by 100. Include all tier 1 company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities, and all component manufacturing facilities that are directly contracted to supply custom parts or materials to company-owned or contract product assembly facilities.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The code of conduct must cover the following issues with requirements that meet or exceed those in the current, in-force Responsible Business Alliance Code of Conduct, including: Child labor; compensation; discipline; discrimination; forced labor; freedom of association and right to collective bargaining; health and safety; management systems for human resources; working hours.
Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct: Companies can use the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct with their suppliers to improve the working conditions within facilities in their supply chain, the most recent version of which can be found on their website. The Code of Conduct was originally developed for use within the electronics industry, but has been revised to ensure relevance across most manufacturing sectors. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/code-of-conduct/

Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process: Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process (VAP) provides members the ability to audit manufacturing facilities within their supply chain and share audit results with other members to better leverage information on common upstream supplier facilities. Organizations that are not members of RBA but own facilities that are in the electronics supply chain may also participate in this effort. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/vap/

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
N/ACompany-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Computer Drives and StorageConflict mineralsCalculate D1 as the total number of validated smelters, divided by the total number of smelters, then multiply by 100. Include all smelters identified as supplying some portion of the tin, tungsten, tantalum, or gold in your products.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
To be considered conflict-free, smelters must have a valid certification established or confirmed in the previous 12-month period as defined above.
Smelters may be validated through any internationally recognized body, such as the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI), Responsible Jewellery Council, ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group, or the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA).
ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group: The International Tin Association (ITA) has convened the Responsible Tin Supply Group (RTS) to enable organizations to source cassiterite (ore from which tin is derived) from responsible supply chain actors in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and surrounding countries while meeting due diligence guidance developed by the UN and OECD and required by national laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act. https://www.internationaltin.org/rts-group/

OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas: Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) has developed due diligence guidelines for organizations to implement when sourcing minerals from conflict regions, including but not limited to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. These guidelines have become normative in the industry and can be used to demonstrate due diligence under national and regional laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act in the U.S. and the European Commission draft proposal for supply chain due diligence for conflict minerals. http://www.oecd.org/daf/inv/mne/mining.htm

Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC) chain-of-custody certification: The Responsible Jewellery Council is a standard-setting and certification organization that has developed an ISEAL-accredited chain-of-custody certification program for use by the jewellery industry and manufacturers, which applies to gold and platinum group metals. https://www.responsiblejewellery.com/rjc-certification/

Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI): Formerly known as the Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative, the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI) is a joint effort between the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) and GeSI to establish supply chain transparency tools, resources and training to assist organizations in responsibly sourcing conflict-free minerals from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. Of note is their Responsible Minerals Assurance Process, which enables auditing and assessment of smelters for responsible ore sourcing and provides a centralized database for tracking smelter performance. http://www.responsiblemineralsinitiative.org/

THESIS Help Center Video: Conflict minerals KPI: Short video tutorial on the Conflict minerals KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017273

The London Bullion Market Association Good Delivery Lists: According to their website, the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA) produces "Good Delivery Lists for gold and silver bars; detailing the names of accredited refiners, their listing date and the marking details of their bars." http://www.lbma.org.uk/the-good-delivery-list

World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard: As part of their activities to support socially-responsible gold mining, the World Gold Council has developed the World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard to provide guidance to companies on responsible mining practices. https://www.gold.org/about-gold/gold-supply/responsible-gold/conflict-free-gold-standard
Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade: According to the website, "The Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade (PPA) is a joint initiative among governments, companies, and civil society to support supply chain solutions to conflict minerals challenges in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and the Great Lakes Region (GLR) of Central Africa." http://www.resolv.org/site-ppa/Conflict minerals: Conflict minerals are defined per "Section 1502(e)(4) of the [Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform] Act as (A) columbite-tantalite, also known as coltan (the metal ore from which tantalum is extracted); cassiterite (the metal ore from which tin is extracted); gold; wolframite (the metal ore from which tungsten is extracted); or their derivatives; or (B) any other mineral or its derivatives determined by the Secretary of State to be financing conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo or an adjoining country." (US Securities and Exchange Commission, 17 CFR Parts 240 and 249b, RIN: 3235-AK84, Conflict Minerals Final Rule)
Computer Drives and StorageEnergy efficiency - Use phaseCalculate B1 as the total number of units that meet the criteria for this question, divided by the total number of units sold, then multiply by 100. Include all units that were shipped with power management or energy efficiency attributes enabled, regardless of whether required by law. Products that are certified to a current in-force version of ENERGY STAR® or an equivalent third-party certified energy efficiency standard count toward this question.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
ENERGY STAR® International Partners: The EPA enters into agreements with foreign governments to use and/or recognize the ENERGY STAR standards and mark to help unify voluntary energy-efficiency initiatives globally. https://www.energystar.gov/partner_resources/international_partners

ENERGY STAR® Qualified Products: According to their website, "The ENERGY STAR label was established to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and other pollutants caused by the inefficient use of energy and make it easy for consumers to identify and purchase energy-efficient products that offer savings on energy bills without sacrificing performance, features, and comfort." Standards are established by ENERGY STAR through a multi-stakeholder process and administered under the US EPA. https://www.energystar.gov/products
N/AEnergy efficiency attributes: Product design attributes such as low power motors or more efficient air circulation that increase the energy efficiency of a product above market average.

Power management features: Product design features that enable users to manage product energy use, such as variable heat or speed settings, or that automatically control energy use, such as auto-off after a set time.
Computer Drives and StorageF-GHG emission tracking and reportingCalculate percentage of components, by units procured for products in this category, that meet the criteria for this question as the number of suppliers that abate all F-GHGs in at least 50% of their facilities divided by the total number of suppliers responsible for all relevant components and multiply the result by 100. For example: if four suppliers provide all relevant components and one does nothing, one abates only PFCs, and the remaining 2 abate all gases in 40% and 70% of their facilities, respectively, the correct percentage is 25% because only one supplier meets both criteria.
In the rare circumstance that a facility uses no F-GHGs in any process for any component in products included in this category, that facility may be counted as having 100% abatement.
Relevant components specifically refer to flat panel displays and semiconductor electronic components or devices whose manufacture is known to use and emit fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-GHGs), namely during etch and chamber clean processes.
Abate all F-GHG emissions means that the component supplier abates all of the following F-GHGs in at least half of their facilities that manufacture relevant components for this product category: perfluorocarbons (PFCs), trifluoromethane (CHF3 or HFCs), nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6).
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Protocol for Measuring Destruction or Removal Efficiency (DRE): The Protocol for Measuring Destruction or Removal Efficiency (DRE) of Fluorinated Greenhouse Gas Abatement Equipment in Electronics Manufacturing was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency as a standard approach to measure F-GHG emissions at the point of abatement in the electronics component manufacturing facility. https://www.epa.gov/f-gas-partnership-programs/epas-protocol-measuring-destruction-or-removal-efficiencyCenter for Corporate Climate Leadership: According to this website, "The EPA's Center for Corporate Climate Leadership seeks to highlight activities to reduce supply chain greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at the sector level." The first efforts to be highlighted within the electronics industry are the efforts by suppliers to reduce F-GHGs during manufacturing of flat panel display in the electronics sector. https://www.epa.gov/climateleadership

European Semiconductor Industry - PFC Emission Reduction: The European Semiconductor Industry Association (ESIA) has provided information regarding successful PFC emissions reduction programs in Europe, and steps the industry is taking beyond its voluntary 2010 reduction goals. https://www.eusemiconductors.eu/esia/public-policy/sustainability-esh/pfc-gases

GHG Protocol Calculation Tools - Semiconductors: The GHG Protocol calculation tool for the semiconductor industry provides guidance on how to assess and account for PFC emissions during semiconductor wafer production and processing. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

PFC Reduction/Climate Partnership for the Semiconductor Industry: The United States Environmental Protection Agency supports the voluntary efforts to reduce fluorinated greenhouse gas (F-GHG) emissions from semiconductor industry through the PFC Reduction/Climate Partnership for the Semiconductor Industry. https://www.epa.gov/ghgemissions/overview-greenhouse-gases#f-gases

World LCD Industry Cooperation Committee: The "principal mission of WLICC is to address efforts and share understanding on issues concerning environmental protection and resource recycling within the LCD industry." In 2010, the organization published results of their member's F-GHG reduction efforts. http://home.jeita.or.jp/device/committee/kankyou/pdf/20111110WLICG_e.pdf

World Semiconductor Council - Best Practice Guidance of PFC Emission Reduction: The World Semiconductor Council has developed a set of best known practices related to reducing fluorinated greenhouse gas emissions from equipment and manufacturing processes to support their members in efforts to meet their voluntary perfluoro-compound emission reduction targets. http://www.semiconductorcouncil.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/Best-Practice-Guidance-of-PFC-Emission-Reduction.pdf
Component supplier: A manufacturer of a component used in the final product. If the manufacturing facility partner is responsible for fabrication of these devices, they are the supplier of interest for this question.

Fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-GHGs): Fluorine-containing gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere. The F-GHG emissions of primary concern in electronics manufacturing are of perfluorocarbons (PFCs), trifluoromethane (CHF3 or HFCs), nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which are more potent than carbon dioxide.

Manufacturing facility partners: Manufacturing facility partners are defined as organizations responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these organizations are internal or external to the respondent's organization.
Computer Drives and StorageGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the procurement spend on component suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total procurement spend on all component suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party. Component suppliers means the group of suppliers that account for 80% of your total spend on components purchased for products in this category.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Computer Drives and StorageGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, including product assembly and the manufacture of any components purchased directly by your organization for inclusion in products in scope for this questionnaire, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total spend required to produce the products.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total spend required to produce the product. If the manufacturing facilities produce both in scope and out of scope products, only weight using the total spend required to produce the in scope products.
Calculate B2 as the total spend on final products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total spend for final products produced, then multiply by 100.
For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardCO2e: Carbon dioxide equivalent; a metric that expresses the impact of a greenhouse gas in terms of the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) that has the same global warming potential.

Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Computer Drives and StorageHazardous substances - Alternatives assessmentHazardous substances are defined as chemicals that meet the criteria for classification as a carcinogens, mutagens, reproductive toxicants, or are persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemicals for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57).GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

PRIO: PRIO is a web-based tool developed by the Swedish government to facilitate the assessment of environmental and health risks of chemicals. ? https://www.kemi.se/prioguiden/english/start

Scivera Lens™ Rapid Screen: The Scivera Lens Rapid Screen tool provides access to chemical ingredient toxicological hazard and risk assessment profiles using a product's bill of materials or bill of substances.
https://www.scivera.com/rapidscreen/

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Exposure Assessment Tools and Models: According to their website, "The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) has developed several exposure assessment methods, databases, and predictive models to help in evaluating what happens to chemicals when they are used and released to the environment and how workers, the general public, consumers and the aquatic ecosystems may be exposed to chemicals." https://www.epa.gov/ceam/tools-data-exposure-assessment
BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

CCS Enhanced GreenSuite®: Enhanced GreenSuite® is a web-based chemical and product hazard and risk assessment tool developmed by Chemical Compliance Systems (CCS). https://www.chemply.com/greensuite

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815

REACH: A Priority Chemical is defined as a chemical that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57).  Priority Chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis. http://www.reachonline.eu/REACH/EN/REACH_EN/article57.html

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Existing Chemicals Program: According to their website, "EPA's existing chemical programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and characterization, and risk management for chemical substances in commercial use." The current chemicals management program is undergoing review and update, including how the agency identifies and prioritizes priority chemicals for review and assessment under TSCA. https://www.epa.gov/compliance/toxic-substances-control-act-tsca-compliance-monitoring#chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
Informed substitution: Informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles (Adapted from United States Environmental Protection Agency Design for Environment Program Alternative Assessment information).

Public disclosure: Manufacturer-based acts of making information available and readily accessible to the public through one or more forms of media (e.g., online, print, telephone). Print media includes product labels and also includes, but is not limited to, books, magazines, newspapers, and readily accessible journal articles. Online disclosure includes, but is not limited to, publicly accessible websites (desktop or mobile) as well as making information electronically available through reporting platforms or mobile apps.
Computer Drives and StorageHazardous substances - DisclosureCalculate B1 as the number of suppliers which have provided disclosure information, divided by the total number of suppliers, then multiply by 100. Include all company-owned or contract component manufacturers, as well as organizations contracted for direct material supply to company-owned or contract manufacturers. To be included in this percentage, a supplier must disclose intentionally-added materials listed in the declarable substance groups and declarable substances above the thresholds specified in IEC 62474.
Suppliers who only report substances whose declaration is already mandated by relevant regulations in the market(s) of sale (e.g., by RoHS Directive) should not be considered as having provided disclosure. If an organization has not adopted IEC 62474, suppliers who report declarable substances in line with the declarable substances list in IEC 62474 can count as having provided disclosure.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
International Electrotechnical Commission Standard 62474: If you are using this - this has been moved to the standards field. Please link that to your categories - this item will be going away. http://webstore.iec.ch/webstore/webstore.nsf/mysearchajax?Openform&key=62474&sorting=&start=1&onglet=1Dell, Inc. Materials Restricted for Use: "Materials Restricted for Use," published by Dell, Inc., is one example of an internal hazardous substances management list used within the electronics industry. https://www.dell.com/downloads/global/corporate/environ/restricted_materials_guid.pdf

GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

Panasonic Corporation Chemical Substances Management Rank Guidelines: "The Chemical Substances Management Rank Guide," published by the Industrial Devices Company Group, Panasonic Corporation, is one example of an internal hazardous substances management list used within the electronics industry. https://www.panasonic.com/global/corporate/management/procurement/green.html
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.
Computer Drives and StorageMaterial disposition tracking - Product takeback programFinal disposition means the point at which 1) a product enters its next life cycle through reuse or refurbishment; 2) the components of a product are recaptured for reuse as part of a refurbishment program; or 3) the product or materials contained within the product reach landfilling, incineration or material recovery where they are returned to the commodity market.R2 Certified Recyclers: According to the R2:2013 Standard, "certifying to this Standard through an accredited third-party Certification Body, electronics recyclers can help prospective purchasers of their services (customers) make informed decisions and have increased confidence that used and end -of-life electronic equipment are managed in an environmentally responsible manner, protective of the health and safety of workers and the public, and that all data on all media devices is secure until destroyed." https://sustainableelectronics.org/r2-standard

WEEELABEX: WEEELABEX standards cover the collection, logistics, and treatment of electronic wastes in all ten categories of the European Union's Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive. http://www.weeelabex.org/#!standards/component_41229

e-Stewards: According to the e-Stewards Certification website, "The e-Stewards Certification Program provides a high level of confidence that a recycler consistently conforms to the e-Stewards Standard." http://www.e-stewards.org/certification-overview/
N/ACertified third-party e-waste vendors: "Vendors that demonstrate to an accredited, independent third-party auditor that they meet specific standards to safely recycle and manage electronics. These certification programs must be based on strong environmental standards which maximize reuse and recycling, minimize exposure to human health or the environment, ensure safe management of materials by downstream handlers, and require destruction of all data on used electronics. Two accredited certification standards are the Responsible Recycling Practices (R2) and the e-Stewards® standards."(Source: EPA, E-cycling certification definition)

Responsible final disposition: Takeback programs may achieve the goal of responsible final material disposition by doing one or more of the following:
1. Including contractual requirements regarding downstream partner responsibility, all the way to final material disposition;
2. Verifying responsible final disposition by tracking a sampling of materials to final disposition; and/or;
3. Contracting exclusively with certified third-party e-waste vendors to ensure responsible final disposition.

Takeback program: A collection method whereby consumers return specific products or classes of products at the end of their useful lives for potential reuse and refurbishment, followed by material recovery and appropriate disposal.
Computer Drives and StoragePackaging Raw Material SourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

ISO 18604: ISO 18604 (Packaging and the environment -- Material recycling) provides measurement standards for determining how recyclable a particular product is. https://www.iso.org/standard/55872.html

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Renewable material: “Material that is composed of biomass from a living source and that can be continually replenished. To be defined as renewable, virgin materials shall come from sources which are replenished at a rate equal to or greater than the rate of depletion.” (FTC Green Guides:2012)

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably-sourced material: Material for which it can be demonstrated through second- or third-party verification that the virgin raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities. Materials such as paper can be included in this definition if the source of the packaging content comes from sustainably-managed forests with no deforestation.
Computer Drives and StorageProduct takeback programThis question addresses takeback programs that an organization may fund, contract, or physically operate, in whole or in part, to enable consumers to return products for responsible end-of-life management. Include only products and materials for which an organization has the ability to decide or influence the handling, treatment, and disposal of returned devices, components, and materials. If multiple questionnaires are received, the same percentage may be reported as long as the product types in question are collected and managed in the same program. Otherwise, the responses need to be for percentages appropriate to the different product types associated with each questionnaire.
Calculate B1, B2, B3, and B4 as the weight of products or materials recovered from products in each category, divided by the weight of total products recovered globally through both voluntary and mandatory programs, then multiply by 100. The sum of B1, B2, B3, and B4 must be less than or equal to 100%.
The weight for any given returned device can only be credited once. For example, a device whose weight is included in component reuse for a hard drive that was salvaged cannot also be included under the material recovery calculation, even if the rest of the materials from the device are sent for material recovery.
Material that is found or suspected to end in landfill or incineration through downstream auditing or the lack of a viable secondary market cannot be included in the material recovery percentage.
Components reused or refurbished means the percent of total volume representing parts that return to the market. Examples would be hard drives, motherboards, salvaged chips or other components removed for the secondary market.
Closed-loop system means that once material or components are recovered, they are returned to the materials supply chain for manufacturing new devices or products of the same value or greater value than the device that was recycled. For example, a closed loop system would be when printer ink cartridges are recycled and the recovered plastic is then used in new printer ink cartridges.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
R2 Certified Recyclers: According to the R2:2013 Standard, "certifying to this Standard through an accredited third-party Certification Body, electronics recyclers can help prospective purchasers of their services (customers) make informed decisions and have increased confidence that used and end -of-life electronic equipment are managed in an environmentally responsible manner, protective of the health and safety of workers and the public, and that all data on all media devices is secure until destroyed." https://sustainableelectronics.org/r2-standard

e-Stewards: According to the e-Stewards Certification website, "The e-Stewards Certification Program provides a high level of confidence that a recycler consistently conforms to the e-Stewards Standard." http://www.e-stewards.org/certification-overview/
HP Product Return and Recycling Program: One example of a manufacturer takeback program is run by HP, where LaserJet and ink cartridges are collected, recycled, and materials used to manufacture new cartridges. http://www8.hp.com/us/en/hp-information/environment/product-recycling.html?jumpid=re_r138_eco_product-recycling#.UkTzV39c57cTakeback program: A collection method whereby consumers return specific products or classes of products at the end of their useful lives for potential reuse and refurbishment, followed by material recovery and appropriate disposal.
Computer Drives and StorageSupply chain working conditions - Audit resultsCalculate B1 as the number of events resolved, divided by the total number of events recorded during both second- and third-party audits conducted in the previous year, then multiply by 100. Include all tier 1 company-owned or contract component manufacturing facilities, as well as all component manufacturing facilities that are directly contracted to supply custom parts or materials to company-owned or contract product assembly facilities, that have had a second- or third-party audit to a widely-recognized code of conduct conducted in the past year. For B1, answer 100% if zero non-conformance events have been recorded across all facilities. A non-conformance event indicates an audit finding that would trigger a corrective action plan. For audits performed under the Responsible Business Alliance Validated Auditing Program (VAP), this includes priority, major, and minor non-conformance events.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process: Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process (VAP) provides members the ability to audit manufacturing facilities within their supply chain and share audit results with other members to better leverage information on common upstream supplier facilities. Organizations that are not members of RBA but own facilities that are in the electronics supply chain may also participate in this effort. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/vap/

THESIS Help Center Video: Supply chain working conditions - Audit results KPI: Short video tutorial on the Supply chain working conditions - Audit results KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528319
Global Social Compliance Programme (GSCP) Reference Tools: The Global Social Compliance Program provides a publicly available suite of reference tools that describes existing best practices in social compliance. The reference tools can be used by companies to develop systems and initiatives. http://supply-chain.unglobalcompact.org/site/article/126

Responsible Battery Alliance (RBA) Supply Chain Accountability Tools: RBA supports multiple tools for members that enable self-assessment, third-party auditing, and online sustainability data management systems of this information. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/tools/

Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct: Companies can use the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct with their suppliers to improve the working conditions within facilities in their supply chain, the most recent version of which can be found on their website. The Code of Conduct was originally developed for use within the electronics industry, but has been revised to ensure relevance across most manufacturing sectors. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/code-of-conduct/

Responsible Business Alliance: The Responsible Business Alliance (RBA), formerly known as the Electronics Industry Citizenship Council (EICC), supports an industry Code of Conduct that provides a common approach to drive positive change on social, economic and environmental issues in manufacturing supply chains. RBA offers a suite of tools and resources to their members to aid in assessing and managing change in supply chains, as well as coordinating audit processes across different companies. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.
Computer Drives and StorageSustainable Packaging Design and ProductionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: Material efficiency is the ratio between the material input and the benefits derived. Resource conservation (source reduction) of material inputs and/or improving the functionality of the packaging can positively impact material efficiency. Process efficiency is the ratio between the time spent on production steps to the output. Opportunities to improve material and process efficiency include process improvement, product redesign, and technology changes to packaging equipment. It should be noted that continual source reduction has benefits, but there are trade-offs that must be assessed.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
Computer Drives and StorageWorker health, safety, and labor rightsCalculate C1 as the number of facilities that have been audited by a third party in the last twelve months, divided by the total number of company-owned or contact facilities, then multiply by 100. Include all tier 1 company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities, and all component manufacturing facilities that are directly contracted to supply custom parts or materials to company-owned or contract product assembly facilities.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The code of conduct must cover the following issues with requirements that meet or exceed those in the current, in-force Responsible Business Alliance Code of Conduct, including: Child labor; compensation; discipline; discrimination; forced labor; freedom of association and right to collective bargaining; health and safety; management systems for human resources; working hours.
Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct: Companies can use the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct with their suppliers to improve the working conditions within facilities in their supply chain, the most recent version of which can be found on their website. The Code of Conduct was originally developed for use within the electronics industry, but has been revised to ensure relevance across most manufacturing sectors. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/code-of-conduct/

Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process: Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process (VAP) provides members the ability to audit manufacturing facilities within their supply chain and share audit results with other members to better leverage information on common upstream supplier facilities. Organizations that are not members of RBA but own facilities that are in the electronics supply chain may also participate in this effort. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/vap/

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
N/ACompany-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Electronics Chargers and AdaptersConflict mineralsCalculate D1 as the total number of validated smelters, divided by the total number of smelters, then multiply by 100. Include all smelters identified as supplying some portion of the tin, tungsten, tantalum, or gold in your products.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
To be considered conflict-free, smelters must have a valid certification established or confirmed in the previous 12-month period as defined above.
Smelters may be validated through any internationally recognized body, such as the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI), Responsible Jewellery Council, ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group, or the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA).
ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group: The International Tin Association (ITA) has convened the Responsible Tin Supply Group (RTS) to enable organizations to source cassiterite (ore from which tin is derived) from responsible supply chain actors in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and surrounding countries while meeting due diligence guidance developed by the UN and OECD and required by national laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act. https://www.internationaltin.org/rts-group/

OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas: Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) has developed due diligence guidelines for organizations to implement when sourcing minerals from conflict regions, including but not limited to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. These guidelines have become normative in the industry and can be used to demonstrate due diligence under national and regional laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act in the U.S. and the European Commission draft proposal for supply chain due diligence for conflict minerals. http://www.oecd.org/daf/inv/mne/mining.htm

Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC) chain-of-custody certification: The Responsible Jewellery Council is a standard-setting and certification organization that has developed an ISEAL-accredited chain-of-custody certification program for use by the jewellery industry and manufacturers, which applies to gold and platinum group metals. https://www.responsiblejewellery.com/rjc-certification/

Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI): Formerly known as the Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative, the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI) is a joint effort between the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) and GeSI to establish supply chain transparency tools, resources and training to assist organizations in responsibly sourcing conflict-free minerals from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. Of note is their Responsible Minerals Assurance Process, which enables auditing and assessment of smelters for responsible ore sourcing and provides a centralized database for tracking smelter performance. http://www.responsiblemineralsinitiative.org/

THESIS Help Center Video: Conflict minerals KPI: Short video tutorial on the Conflict minerals KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017273

The London Bullion Market Association Good Delivery Lists: According to their website, the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA) produces "Good Delivery Lists for gold and silver bars; detailing the names of accredited refiners, their listing date and the marking details of their bars." http://www.lbma.org.uk/the-good-delivery-list

World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard: As part of their activities to support socially-responsible gold mining, the World Gold Council has developed the World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard to provide guidance to companies on responsible mining practices. https://www.gold.org/about-gold/gold-supply/responsible-gold/conflict-free-gold-standard
Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade: According to the website, "The Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade (PPA) is a joint initiative among governments, companies, and civil society to support supply chain solutions to conflict minerals challenges in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and the Great Lakes Region (GLR) of Central Africa." http://www.resolv.org/site-ppa/Conflict minerals: Conflict minerals are defined per "Section 1502(e)(4) of the [Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform] Act as (A) columbite-tantalite, also known as coltan (the metal ore from which tantalum is extracted); cassiterite (the metal ore from which tin is extracted); gold; wolframite (the metal ore from which tungsten is extracted); or their derivatives; or (B) any other mineral or its derivatives determined by the Secretary of State to be financing conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo or an adjoining country." (US Securities and Exchange Commission, 17 CFR Parts 240 and 249b, RIN: 3235-AK84, Conflict Minerals Final Rule)
Electronics Chargers and AdaptersEnergy efficiency - Use phaseCalculate B1 as the total number of units that meet the criteria for this question, divided by the total number of units sold, then multiply by 100. Include all units that were shipped with power management or energy efficiency attributes enabled, regardless of whether required by law. Products that are certified to a current in-force version of ENERGY STAR® or an equivalent third-party certified energy efficiency standard count toward this question.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
ENERGY STAR® International Partners: The EPA enters into agreements with foreign governments to use and/or recognize the ENERGY STAR standards and mark to help unify voluntary energy-efficiency initiatives globally. https://www.energystar.gov/partner_resources/international_partners

ENERGY STAR® Qualified Products: According to their website, "The ENERGY STAR label was established to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and other pollutants caused by the inefficient use of energy and make it easy for consumers to identify and purchase energy-efficient products that offer savings on energy bills without sacrificing performance, features, and comfort." Standards are established by ENERGY STAR through a multi-stakeholder process and administered under the US EPA. https://www.energystar.gov/products
N/AEnergy efficiency attributes: Product design attributes such as low power motors or more efficient air circulation that increase the energy efficiency of a product above market average.

Power management features: Product design features that enable users to manage product energy use, such as variable heat or speed settings, or that automatically control energy use, such as auto-off after a set time.
Electronics Chargers and AdaptersF-GHG emission tracking and reportingCalculate percentage of components, by units procured for products in this category, that meet the criteria for this question as the number of suppliers that abate all F-GHGs in at least 50% of their facilities divided by the total number of suppliers responsible for all relevant components and multiply the result by 100. For example: if four suppliers provide all relevant components and one does nothing, one abates only PFCs, and the remaining 2 abate all gases in 40% and 70% of their facilities, respectively, the correct percentage is 25% because only one supplier meets both criteria.
In the rare circumstance that a facility uses no F-GHGs in any process for any component in products included in this category, that facility may be counted as having 100% abatement.
Relevant components specifically refer to flat panel displays and semiconductor electronic components or devices whose manufacture is known to use and emit fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-GHGs), namely during etch and chamber clean processes.
Abate all F-GHG emissions means that the component supplier abates all of the following F-GHGs in at least half of their facilities that manufacture relevant components for this product category: perfluorocarbons (PFCs), trifluoromethane (CHF3 or HFCs), nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6).
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Protocol for Measuring Destruction or Removal Efficiency (DRE): The Protocol for Measuring Destruction or Removal Efficiency (DRE) of Fluorinated Greenhouse Gas Abatement Equipment in Electronics Manufacturing was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency as a standard approach to measure F-GHG emissions at the point of abatement in the electronics component manufacturing facility. https://www.epa.gov/f-gas-partnership-programs/epas-protocol-measuring-destruction-or-removal-efficiencyCenter for Corporate Climate Leadership: According to this website, "The EPA's Center for Corporate Climate Leadership seeks to highlight activities to reduce supply chain greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at the sector level." The first efforts to be highlighted within the electronics industry are the efforts by suppliers to reduce F-GHGs during manufacturing of flat panel display in the electronics sector. https://www.epa.gov/climateleadership

European Semiconductor Industry - PFC Emission Reduction: The European Semiconductor Industry Association (ESIA) has provided information regarding successful PFC emissions reduction programs in Europe, and steps the industry is taking beyond its voluntary 2010 reduction goals. https://www.eusemiconductors.eu/esia/public-policy/sustainability-esh/pfc-gases

GHG Protocol Calculation Tools - Semiconductors: The GHG Protocol calculation tool for the semiconductor industry provides guidance on how to assess and account for PFC emissions during semiconductor wafer production and processing. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

PFC Reduction/Climate Partnership for the Semiconductor Industry: The United States Environmental Protection Agency supports the voluntary efforts to reduce fluorinated greenhouse gas (F-GHG) emissions from semiconductor industry through the PFC Reduction/Climate Partnership for the Semiconductor Industry. https://www.epa.gov/ghgemissions/overview-greenhouse-gases#f-gases

World LCD Industry Cooperation Committee: The "principal mission of WLICC is to address efforts and share understanding on issues concerning environmental protection and resource recycling within the LCD industry." In 2010, the organization published results of their member's F-GHG reduction efforts. http://home.jeita.or.jp/device/committee/kankyou/pdf/20111110WLICG_e.pdf

World Semiconductor Council - Best Practice Guidance of PFC Emission Reduction: The World Semiconductor Council has developed a set of best known practices related to reducing fluorinated greenhouse gas emissions from equipment and manufacturing processes to support their members in efforts to meet their voluntary perfluoro-compound emission reduction targets. http://www.semiconductorcouncil.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/Best-Practice-Guidance-of-PFC-Emission-Reduction.pdf
Component supplier: A manufacturer of a component used in the final product. If the manufacturing facility partner is responsible for fabrication of these devices, they are the supplier of interest for this question.

Fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-GHGs): Fluorine-containing gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere. The F-GHG emissions of primary concern in electronics manufacturing are of perfluorocarbons (PFCs), trifluoromethane (CHF3 or HFCs), nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which are more potent than carbon dioxide.

Manufacturing facility partners: Manufacturing facility partners are defined as organizations responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these organizations are internal or external to the respondent's organization.
Electronics Chargers and AdaptersGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the procurement spend on component suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total procurement spend on all component suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party. Component suppliers means the group of suppliers that account for 80% of your total spend on components purchased for products in this category.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Electronics Chargers and AdaptersGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, including product assembly and the manufacture of any components purchased directly by your organization for inclusion in products in scope for this questionnaire, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total spend required to produce the products.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total spend required to produce the product. If the manufacturing facilities produce both in scope and out of scope products, only weight using the total spend required to produce the in scope products.
Calculate B2 as the total spend on final products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total spend for final products produced, then multiply by 100.
For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardCO2e: Carbon dioxide equivalent; a metric that expresses the impact of a greenhouse gas in terms of the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) that has the same global warming potential.

Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Electronics Chargers and AdaptersHazardous substances - Alternatives assessmentHazardous substances are defined as chemicals that meet the criteria for classification as a carcinogens, mutagens, reproductive toxicants, or are persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemicals for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57).GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

PRIO: PRIO is a web-based tool developed by the Swedish government to facilitate the assessment of environmental and health risks of chemicals. ? https://www.kemi.se/prioguiden/english/start

Scivera Lens™ Rapid Screen: The Scivera Lens Rapid Screen tool provides access to chemical ingredient toxicological hazard and risk assessment profiles using a product's bill of materials or bill of substances.
https://www.scivera.com/rapidscreen/

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Exposure Assessment Tools and Models: According to their website, "The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) has developed several exposure assessment methods, databases, and predictive models to help in evaluating what happens to chemicals when they are used and released to the environment and how workers, the general public, consumers and the aquatic ecosystems may be exposed to chemicals." https://www.epa.gov/ceam/tools-data-exposure-assessment
BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

CCS Enhanced GreenSuite®: Enhanced GreenSuite® is a web-based chemical and product hazard and risk assessment tool developmed by Chemical Compliance Systems (CCS). https://www.chemply.com/greensuite

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815

REACH: A Priority Chemical is defined as a chemical that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57).  Priority Chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis. http://www.reachonline.eu/REACH/EN/REACH_EN/article57.html

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Existing Chemicals Program: According to their website, "EPA's existing chemical programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and characterization, and risk management for chemical substances in commercial use." The current chemicals management program is undergoing review and update, including how the agency identifies and prioritizes priority chemicals for review and assessment under TSCA. https://www.epa.gov/compliance/toxic-substances-control-act-tsca-compliance-monitoring#chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
Informed substitution: Informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles (Adapted from United States Environmental Protection Agency Design for Environment Program Alternative Assessment information).

Public disclosure: Manufacturer-based acts of making information available and readily accessible to the public through one or more forms of media (e.g., online, print, telephone). Print media includes product labels and also includes, but is not limited to, books, magazines, newspapers, and readily accessible journal articles. Online disclosure includes, but is not limited to, publicly accessible websites (desktop or mobile) as well as making information electronically available through reporting platforms or mobile apps.
Electronics Chargers and AdaptersHazardous substances - DisclosureCalculate B1 as the number of suppliers which have provided disclosure information, divided by the total number of suppliers, then multiply by 100. Include all company-owned or contract component manufacturers, as well as organizations contracted for direct material supply to company-owned or contract manufacturers. To be included in this percentage, a supplier must disclose intentionally-added materials listed in the declarable substance groups and declarable substances above the thresholds specified in IEC 62474.
Suppliers who only report substances whose declaration is already mandated by relevant regulations in the market(s) of sale (e.g., by RoHS Directive) should not be considered as having provided disclosure. If an organization has not adopted IEC 62474, suppliers who report declarable substances in line with the declarable substances list in IEC 62474 can count as having provided disclosure.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
International Electrotechnical Commission Standard 62474: If you are using this - this has been moved to the standards field. Please link that to your categories - this item will be going away. http://webstore.iec.ch/webstore/webstore.nsf/mysearchajax?Openform&key=62474&sorting=&start=1&onglet=1Dell, Inc. Materials Restricted for Use: "Materials Restricted for Use," published by Dell, Inc., is one example of an internal hazardous substances management list used within the electronics industry. https://www.dell.com/downloads/global/corporate/environ/restricted_materials_guid.pdf

GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

Panasonic Corporation Chemical Substances Management Rank Guidelines: "The Chemical Substances Management Rank Guide," published by the Industrial Devices Company Group, Panasonic Corporation, is one example of an internal hazardous substances management list used within the electronics industry. https://www.panasonic.com/global/corporate/management/procurement/green.html
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.
Electronics Chargers and AdaptersMaterial disposition tracking - Product takeback programFinal disposition means the point at which 1) a product enters its next life cycle through reuse or refurbishment; 2) the components of a product are recaptured for reuse as part of a refurbishment program; or 3) the product or materials contained within the product reach landfilling, incineration or material recovery where they are returned to the commodity market.R2 Certified Recyclers: According to the R2:2013 Standard, "certifying to this Standard through an accredited third-party Certification Body, electronics recyclers can help prospective purchasers of their services (customers) make informed decisions and have increased confidence that used and end -of-life electronic equipment are managed in an environmentally responsible manner, protective of the health and safety of workers and the public, and that all data on all media devices is secure until destroyed." https://sustainableelectronics.org/r2-standard

WEEELABEX: WEEELABEX standards cover the collection, logistics, and treatment of electronic wastes in all ten categories of the European Union's Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive. http://www.weeelabex.org/#!standards/component_41229

e-Stewards: According to the e-Stewards Certification website, "The e-Stewards Certification Program provides a high level of confidence that a recycler consistently conforms to the e-Stewards Standard." http://www.e-stewards.org/certification-overview/
N/ACertified third-party e-waste vendors: "Vendors that demonstrate to an accredited, independent third-party auditor that they meet specific standards to safely recycle and manage electronics. These certification programs must be based on strong environmental standards which maximize reuse and recycling, minimize exposure to human health or the environment, ensure safe management of materials by downstream handlers, and require destruction of all data on used electronics. Two accredited certification standards are the Responsible Recycling Practices (R2) and the e-Stewards® standards."(Source: EPA, E-cycling certification definition)

Responsible final disposition: Takeback programs may achieve the goal of responsible final material disposition by doing one or more of the following:
1. Including contractual requirements regarding downstream partner responsibility, all the way to final material disposition;
2. Verifying responsible final disposition by tracking a sampling of materials to final disposition; and/or;
3. Contracting exclusively with certified third-party e-waste vendors to ensure responsible final disposition.

Takeback program: A collection method whereby consumers return specific products or classes of products at the end of their useful lives for potential reuse and refurbishment, followed by material recovery and appropriate disposal.
Electronics Chargers and AdaptersPackaging Raw Material SourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

ISO 18604: ISO 18604 (Packaging and the environment -- Material recycling) provides measurement standards for determining how recyclable a particular product is. https://www.iso.org/standard/55872.html

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Renewable material: “Material that is composed of biomass from a living source and that can be continually replenished. To be defined as renewable, virgin materials shall come from sources which are replenished at a rate equal to or greater than the rate of depletion.” (FTC Green Guides:2012)

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably-sourced material: Material for which it can be demonstrated through second- or third-party verification that the virgin raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities. Materials such as paper can be included in this definition if the source of the packaging content comes from sustainably-managed forests with no deforestation.
Electronics Chargers and AdaptersProduct takeback programThis question addresses takeback programs that an organization may fund, contract, or physically operate, in whole or in part, to enable consumers to return products for responsible end-of-life management. Include only products and materials for which an organization has the ability to decide or influence the handling, treatment, and disposal of returned devices, components, and materials. If multiple questionnaires are received, the same percentage may be reported as long as the product types in question are collected and managed in the same program. Otherwise, the responses need to be for percentages appropriate to the different product types associated with each questionnaire.
Calculate B1, B2, B3, and B4 as the weight of products or materials recovered from products in each category, divided by the weight of total products recovered globally through both voluntary and mandatory programs, then multiply by 100. The sum of B1, B2, B3, and B4 must be less than or equal to 100%.
The weight for any given returned device can only be credited once. For example, a device whose weight is included in component reuse for a hard drive that was salvaged cannot also be included under the material recovery calculation, even if the rest of the materials from the device are sent for material recovery.
Material that is found or suspected to end in landfill or incineration through downstream auditing or the lack of a viable secondary market cannot be included in the material recovery percentage.
Components reused or refurbished means the percent of total volume representing parts that return to the market. Examples would be hard drives, motherboards, salvaged chips or other components removed for the secondary market.
Closed-loop system means that once material or components are recovered, they are returned to the materials supply chain for manufacturing new devices or products of the same value or greater value than the device that was recycled. For example, a closed loop system would be when printer ink cartridges are recycled and the recovered plastic is then used in new printer ink cartridges.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
R2 Certified Recyclers: According to the R2:2013 Standard, "certifying to this Standard through an accredited third-party Certification Body, electronics recyclers can help prospective purchasers of their services (customers) make informed decisions and have increased confidence that used and end -of-life electronic equipment are managed in an environmentally responsible manner, protective of the health and safety of workers and the public, and that all data on all media devices is secure until destroyed." https://sustainableelectronics.org/r2-standard

e-Stewards: According to the e-Stewards Certification website, "The e-Stewards Certification Program provides a high level of confidence that a recycler consistently conforms to the e-Stewards Standard." http://www.e-stewards.org/certification-overview/
HP Product Return and Recycling Program: One example of a manufacturer takeback program is run by HP, where LaserJet and ink cartridges are collected, recycled, and materials used to manufacture new cartridges. http://www8.hp.com/us/en/hp-information/environment/product-recycling.html?jumpid=re_r138_eco_product-recycling#.UkTzV39c57cTakeback program: A collection method whereby consumers return specific products or classes of products at the end of their useful lives for potential reuse and refurbishment, followed by material recovery and appropriate disposal.
Electronics Chargers and AdaptersSupply chain working conditions - Audit resultsCalculate B1 as the number of events resolved, divided by the total number of events recorded during both second- and third-party audits conducted in the previous year, then multiply by 100. Include all tier 1 company-owned or contract component manufacturing facilities, as well as all component manufacturing facilities that are directly contracted to supply custom parts or materials to company-owned or contract product assembly facilities, that have had a second- or third-party audit to a widely-recognized code of conduct conducted in the past year. For B1, answer 100% if zero non-conformance events have been recorded across all facilities. A non-conformance event indicates an audit finding that would trigger a corrective action plan. For audits performed under the Responsible Business Alliance Validated Auditing Program (VAP), this includes priority, major, and minor non-conformance events.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process: Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process (VAP) provides members the ability to audit manufacturing facilities within their supply chain and share audit results with other members to better leverage information on common upstream supplier facilities. Organizations that are not members of RBA but own facilities that are in the electronics supply chain may also participate in this effort. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/vap/

THESIS Help Center Video: Supply chain working conditions - Audit results KPI: Short video tutorial on the Supply chain working conditions - Audit results KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528319
Global Social Compliance Programme (GSCP) Reference Tools: The Global Social Compliance Program provides a publicly available suite of reference tools that describes existing best practices in social compliance. The reference tools can be used by companies to develop systems and initiatives. http://supply-chain.unglobalcompact.org/site/article/126

Responsible Battery Alliance (RBA) Supply Chain Accountability Tools: RBA supports multiple tools for members that enable self-assessment, third-party auditing, and online sustainability data management systems of this information. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/tools/

Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct: Companies can use the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct with their suppliers to improve the working conditions within facilities in their supply chain, the most recent version of which can be found on their website. The Code of Conduct was originally developed for use within the electronics industry, but has been revised to ensure relevance across most manufacturing sectors. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/code-of-conduct/

Responsible Business Alliance: The Responsible Business Alliance (RBA), formerly known as the Electronics Industry Citizenship Council (EICC), supports an industry Code of Conduct that provides a common approach to drive positive change on social, economic and environmental issues in manufacturing supply chains. RBA offers a suite of tools and resources to their members to aid in assessing and managing change in supply chains, as well as coordinating audit processes across different companies. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.
Electronics Chargers and AdaptersSustainable Packaging Design and ProductionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: Material efficiency is the ratio between the material input and the benefits derived. Resource conservation (source reduction) of material inputs and/or improving the functionality of the packaging can positively impact material efficiency. Process efficiency is the ratio between the time spent on production steps to the output. Opportunities to improve material and process efficiency include process improvement, product redesign, and technology changes to packaging equipment. It should be noted that continual source reduction has benefits, but there are trade-offs that must be assessed.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
Electronics Chargers and AdaptersWorker health, safety, and labor rightsCalculate C1 as the number of facilities that have been audited by a third party in the last twelve months, divided by the total number of company-owned or contact facilities, then multiply by 100. Include all tier 1 company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities, and all component manufacturing facilities that are directly contracted to supply custom parts or materials to company-owned or contract product assembly facilities.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The code of conduct must cover the following issues with requirements that meet or exceed those in the current, in-force Responsible Business Alliance Code of Conduct, including: Child labor; compensation; discipline; discrimination; forced labor; freedom of association and right to collective bargaining; health and safety; management systems for human resources; working hours.
Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct: Companies can use the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct with their suppliers to improve the working conditions within facilities in their supply chain, the most recent version of which can be found on their website. The Code of Conduct was originally developed for use within the electronics industry, but has been revised to ensure relevance across most manufacturing sectors. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/code-of-conduct/

Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process: Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process (VAP) provides members the ability to audit manufacturing facilities within their supply chain and share audit results with other members to better leverage information on common upstream supplier facilities. Organizations that are not members of RBA but own facilities that are in the electronics supply chain may also participate in this effort. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/vap/

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
N/ACompany-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Other Office Electronics and AppliancesConflict mineralsCalculate D1 as the total number of validated smelters, divided by the total number of smelters, then multiply by 100. Include all smelters identified as supplying some portion of the tin, tungsten, tantalum, or gold in your products.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
To be considered conflict-free, smelters must have a valid certification established or confirmed in the previous 12-month period as defined above.
Smelters may be validated through any internationally recognized body, such as the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI), Responsible Jewellery Council, ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group, or the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA).
ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group: The International Tin Association (ITA) has convened the Responsible Tin Supply Group (RTS) to enable organizations to source cassiterite (ore from which tin is derived) from responsible supply chain actors in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and surrounding countries while meeting due diligence guidance developed by the UN and OECD and required by national laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act. https://www.internationaltin.org/rts-group/

OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas: Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) has developed due diligence guidelines for organizations to implement when sourcing minerals from conflict regions, including but not limited to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. These guidelines have become normative in the industry and can be used to demonstrate due diligence under national and regional laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act in the U.S. and the European Commission draft proposal for supply chain due diligence for conflict minerals. http://www.oecd.org/daf/inv/mne/mining.htm

Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC) chain-of-custody certification: The Responsible Jewellery Council is a standard-setting and certification organization that has developed an ISEAL-accredited chain-of-custody certification program for use by the jewellery industry and manufacturers, which applies to gold and platinum group metals. https://www.responsiblejewellery.com/rjc-certification/

Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI): Formerly known as the Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative, the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI) is a joint effort between the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) and GeSI to establish supply chain transparency tools, resources and training to assist organizations in responsibly sourcing conflict-free minerals from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. Of note is their Responsible Minerals Assurance Process, which enables auditing and assessment of smelters for responsible ore sourcing and provides a centralized database for tracking smelter performance. http://www.responsiblemineralsinitiative.org/

THESIS Help Center Video: Conflict minerals KPI: Short video tutorial on the Conflict minerals KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017273

The London Bullion Market Association Good Delivery Lists: According to their website, the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA) produces "Good Delivery Lists for gold and silver bars; detailing the names of accredited refiners, their listing date and the marking details of their bars." http://www.lbma.org.uk/the-good-delivery-list

World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard: As part of their activities to support socially-responsible gold mining, the World Gold Council has developed the World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard to provide guidance to companies on responsible mining practices. https://www.gold.org/about-gold/gold-supply/responsible-gold/conflict-free-gold-standard
Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade: According to the website, "The Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade (PPA) is a joint initiative among governments, companies, and civil society to support supply chain solutions to conflict minerals challenges in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and the Great Lakes Region (GLR) of Central Africa." http://www.resolv.org/site-ppa/Conflict minerals: Conflict minerals are defined per "Section 1502(e)(4) of the [Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform] Act as (A) columbite-tantalite, also known as coltan (the metal ore from which tantalum is extracted); cassiterite (the metal ore from which tin is extracted); gold; wolframite (the metal ore from which tungsten is extracted); or their derivatives; or (B) any other mineral or its derivatives determined by the Secretary of State to be financing conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo or an adjoining country." (US Securities and Exchange Commission, 17 CFR Parts 240 and 249b, RIN: 3235-AK84, Conflict Minerals Final Rule)
Other Office Electronics and AppliancesEnergy efficiency - Use phaseCalculate B1 as the total number of units that meet the criteria for this question, divided by the total number of units sold, then multiply by 100. Include all units that were shipped with power management or energy efficiency attributes enabled, regardless of whether required by law. Products that are certified to a current in-force version of ENERGY STAR® or an equivalent third-party certified energy efficiency standard count toward this question.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
ENERGY STAR® International Partners: The EPA enters into agreements with foreign governments to use and/or recognize the ENERGY STAR standards and mark to help unify voluntary energy-efficiency initiatives globally. https://www.energystar.gov/partner_resources/international_partners

ENERGY STAR® Qualified Products: According to their website, "The ENERGY STAR label was established to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and other pollutants caused by the inefficient use of energy and make it easy for consumers to identify and purchase energy-efficient products that offer savings on energy bills without sacrificing performance, features, and comfort." Standards are established by ENERGY STAR through a multi-stakeholder process and administered under the US EPA. https://www.energystar.gov/products
N/AEnergy efficiency attributes: Product design attributes such as low power motors or more efficient air circulation that increase the energy efficiency of a product above market average.

Power management features: Product design features that enable users to manage product energy use, such as variable heat or speed settings, or that automatically control energy use, such as auto-off after a set time.
Other Office Electronics and AppliancesF-GHG emission tracking and reportingCalculate percentage of components, by units procured for products in this category, that meet the criteria for this question as the number of suppliers that abate all F-GHGs in at least 50% of their facilities divided by the total number of suppliers responsible for all relevant components and multiply the result by 100. For example: if four suppliers provide all relevant components and one does nothing, one abates only PFCs, and the remaining 2 abate all gases in 40% and 70% of their facilities, respectively, the correct percentage is 25% because only one supplier meets both criteria.
In the rare circumstance that a facility uses no F-GHGs in any process for any component in products included in this category, that facility may be counted as having 100% abatement.
Relevant components specifically refer to flat panel displays and semiconductor electronic components or devices whose manufacture is known to use and emit fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-GHGs), namely during etch and chamber clean processes.
Abate all F-GHG emissions means that the component supplier abates all of the following F-GHGs in at least half of their facilities that manufacture relevant components for this product category: perfluorocarbons (PFCs), trifluoromethane (CHF3 or HFCs), nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6).
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Protocol for Measuring Destruction or Removal Efficiency (DRE): The Protocol for Measuring Destruction or Removal Efficiency (DRE) of Fluorinated Greenhouse Gas Abatement Equipment in Electronics Manufacturing was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency as a standard approach to measure F-GHG emissions at the point of abatement in the electronics component manufacturing facility. https://www.epa.gov/f-gas-partnership-programs/epas-protocol-measuring-destruction-or-removal-efficiencyCenter for Corporate Climate Leadership: According to this website, "The EPA's Center for Corporate Climate Leadership seeks to highlight activities to reduce supply chain greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at the sector level." The first efforts to be highlighted within the electronics industry are the efforts by suppliers to reduce F-GHGs during manufacturing of flat panel display in the electronics sector. https://www.epa.gov/climateleadership

European Semiconductor Industry - PFC Emission Reduction: The European Semiconductor Industry Association (ESIA) has provided information regarding successful PFC emissions reduction programs in Europe, and steps the industry is taking beyond its voluntary 2010 reduction goals. https://www.eusemiconductors.eu/esia/public-policy/sustainability-esh/pfc-gases

GHG Protocol Calculation Tools - Semiconductors: The GHG Protocol calculation tool for the semiconductor industry provides guidance on how to assess and account for PFC emissions during semiconductor wafer production and processing. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

PFC Reduction/Climate Partnership for the Semiconductor Industry: The United States Environmental Protection Agency supports the voluntary efforts to reduce fluorinated greenhouse gas (F-GHG) emissions from semiconductor industry through the PFC Reduction/Climate Partnership for the Semiconductor Industry. https://www.epa.gov/ghgemissions/overview-greenhouse-gases#f-gases

World LCD Industry Cooperation Committee: The "principal mission of WLICC is to address efforts and share understanding on issues concerning environmental protection and resource recycling within the LCD industry." In 2010, the organization published results of their member's F-GHG reduction efforts. http://home.jeita.or.jp/device/committee/kankyou/pdf/20111110WLICG_e.pdf

World Semiconductor Council - Best Practice Guidance of PFC Emission Reduction: The World Semiconductor Council has developed a set of best known practices related to reducing fluorinated greenhouse gas emissions from equipment and manufacturing processes to support their members in efforts to meet their voluntary perfluoro-compound emission reduction targets. http://www.semiconductorcouncil.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/Best-Practice-Guidance-of-PFC-Emission-Reduction.pdf
Component supplier: A manufacturer of a component used in the final product. If the manufacturing facility partner is responsible for fabrication of these devices, they are the supplier of interest for this question.

Fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-GHGs): Fluorine-containing gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere. The F-GHG emissions of primary concern in electronics manufacturing are of perfluorocarbons (PFCs), trifluoromethane (CHF3 or HFCs), nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which are more potent than carbon dioxide.

Manufacturing facility partners: Manufacturing facility partners are defined as organizations responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these organizations are internal or external to the respondent's organization.
Other Office Electronics and AppliancesGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the procurement spend on component suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total procurement spend on all component suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party. Component suppliers means the group of suppliers that account for 80% of your total spend on components purchased for products in this category.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Other Office Electronics and AppliancesGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, including product assembly and the manufacture of any components purchased directly by your organization for inclusion in products in scope for this questionnaire, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total spend required to produce the products.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total spend required to produce the product. If the manufacturing facilities produce both in scope and out of scope products, only weight using the total spend required to produce the in scope products.
Calculate B2 as the total spend on final products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total spend for final products produced, then multiply by 100.
For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardCO2e: Carbon dioxide equivalent; a metric that expresses the impact of a greenhouse gas in terms of the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) that has the same global warming potential.

Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Other Office Electronics and AppliancesHazardous substances - Alternatives assessmentHazardous substances are defined as chemicals that meet the criteria for classification as a carcinogens, mutagens, reproductive toxicants, or are persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemicals for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57).GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

PRIO: PRIO is a web-based tool developed by the Swedish government to facilitate the assessment of environmental and health risks of chemicals. ? https://www.kemi.se/prioguiden/english/start

Scivera Lens™ Rapid Screen: The Scivera Lens Rapid Screen tool provides access to chemical ingredient toxicological hazard and risk assessment profiles using a product's bill of materials or bill of substances.
https://www.scivera.com/rapidscreen/

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Exposure Assessment Tools and Models: According to their website, "The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) has developed several exposure assessment methods, databases, and predictive models to help in evaluating what happens to chemicals when they are used and released to the environment and how workers, the general public, consumers and the aquatic ecosystems may be exposed to chemicals." https://www.epa.gov/ceam/tools-data-exposure-assessment
BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

CCS Enhanced GreenSuite®: Enhanced GreenSuite® is a web-based chemical and product hazard and risk assessment tool developmed by Chemical Compliance Systems (CCS). https://www.chemply.com/greensuite

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815

REACH: A Priority Chemical is defined as a chemical that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57).  Priority Chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis. http://www.reachonline.eu/REACH/EN/REACH_EN/article57.html

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Existing Chemicals Program: According to their website, "EPA's existing chemical programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and characterization, and risk management for chemical substances in commercial use." The current chemicals management program is undergoing review and update, including how the agency identifies and prioritizes priority chemicals for review and assessment under TSCA. https://www.epa.gov/compliance/toxic-substances-control-act-tsca-compliance-monitoring#chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
Informed substitution: Informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles (Adapted from United States Environmental Protection Agency Design for Environment Program Alternative Assessment information).

Public disclosure: Manufacturer-based acts of making information available and readily accessible to the public through one or more forms of media (e.g., online, print, telephone). Print media includes product labels and also includes, but is not limited to, books, magazines, newspapers, and readily accessible journal articles. Online disclosure includes, but is not limited to, publicly accessible websites (desktop or mobile) as well as making information electronically available through reporting platforms or mobile apps.
Other Office Electronics and AppliancesHazardous substances - DisclosureCalculate B1 as the number of suppliers which have provided disclosure information, divided by the total number of suppliers, then multiply by 100. Include all company-owned or contract component manufacturers, as well as organizations contracted for direct material supply to company-owned or contract manufacturers. To be included in this percentage, a supplier must disclose intentionally-added materials listed in the declarable substance groups and declarable substances above the thresholds specified in IEC 62474.
Suppliers who only report substances whose declaration is already mandated by relevant regulations in the market(s) of sale (e.g., by RoHS Directive) should not be considered as having provided disclosure. If an organization has not adopted IEC 62474, suppliers who report declarable substances in line with the declarable substances list in IEC 62474 can count as having provided disclosure.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
International Electrotechnical Commission Standard 62474: If you are using this - this has been moved to the standards field. Please link that to your categories - this item will be going away. http://webstore.iec.ch/webstore/webstore.nsf/mysearchajax?Openform&key=62474&sorting=&start=1&onglet=1Dell, Inc. Materials Restricted for Use: "Materials Restricted for Use," published by Dell, Inc., is one example of an internal hazardous substances management list used within the electronics industry. https://www.dell.com/downloads/global/corporate/environ/restricted_materials_guid.pdf

GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

Panasonic Corporation Chemical Substances Management Rank Guidelines: "The Chemical Substances Management Rank Guide," published by the Industrial Devices Company Group, Panasonic Corporation, is one example of an internal hazardous substances management list used within the electronics industry. https://www.panasonic.com/global/corporate/management/procurement/green.html
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.
Other Office Electronics and AppliancesMaterial disposition tracking - Product takeback programFinal disposition means the point at which 1) a product enters its next life cycle through reuse or refurbishment; 2) the components of a product are recaptured for reuse as part of a refurbishment program; or 3) the product or materials contained within the product reach landfilling, incineration or material recovery where they are returned to the commodity market.R2 Certified Recyclers: According to the R2:2013 Standard, "certifying to this Standard through an accredited third-party Certification Body, electronics recyclers can help prospective purchasers of their services (customers) make informed decisions and have increased confidence that used and end -of-life electronic equipment are managed in an environmentally responsible manner, protective of the health and safety of workers and the public, and that all data on all media devices is secure until destroyed." https://sustainableelectronics.org/r2-standard

WEEELABEX: WEEELABEX standards cover the collection, logistics, and treatment of electronic wastes in all ten categories of the European Union's Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive. http://www.weeelabex.org/#!standards/component_41229

e-Stewards: According to the e-Stewards Certification website, "The e-Stewards Certification Program provides a high level of confidence that a recycler consistently conforms to the e-Stewards Standard." http://www.e-stewards.org/certification-overview/
N/ACertified third-party e-waste vendors: "Vendors that demonstrate to an accredited, independent third-party auditor that they meet specific standards to safely recycle and manage electronics. These certification programs must be based on strong environmental standards which maximize reuse and recycling, minimize exposure to human health or the environment, ensure safe management of materials by downstream handlers, and require destruction of all data on used electronics. Two accredited certification standards are the Responsible Recycling Practices (R2) and the e-Stewards® standards."(Source: EPA, E-cycling certification definition)

Responsible final disposition: Takeback programs may achieve the goal of responsible final material disposition by doing one or more of the following:
1. Including contractual requirements regarding downstream partner responsibility, all the way to final material disposition;
2. Verifying responsible final disposition by tracking a sampling of materials to final disposition; and/or;
3. Contracting exclusively with certified third-party e-waste vendors to ensure responsible final disposition.

Takeback program: A collection method whereby consumers return specific products or classes of products at the end of their useful lives for potential reuse and refurbishment, followed by material recovery and appropriate disposal.
Other Office Electronics and AppliancesPackaging Raw Material SourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

ISO 18604: ISO 18604 (Packaging and the environment -- Material recycling) provides measurement standards for determining how recyclable a particular product is. https://www.iso.org/standard/55872.html

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Renewable material: “Material that is composed of biomass from a living source and that can be continually replenished. To be defined as renewable, virgin materials shall come from sources which are replenished at a rate equal to or greater than the rate of depletion.” (FTC Green Guides:2012)

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably-sourced material: Material for which it can be demonstrated through second- or third-party verification that the virgin raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities. Materials such as paper can be included in this definition if the source of the packaging content comes from sustainably-managed forests with no deforestation.
Other Office Electronics and AppliancesProduct takeback programThis question addresses takeback programs that an organization may fund, contract, or physically operate, in whole or in part, to enable consumers to return products for responsible end-of-life management. Include only products and materials for which an organization has the ability to decide or influence the handling, treatment, and disposal of returned devices, components, and materials. If multiple questionnaires are received, the same percentage may be reported as long as the product types in question are collected and managed in the same program. Otherwise, the responses need to be for percentages appropriate to the different product types associated with each questionnaire.
Calculate B1, B2, B3, and B4 as the weight of products or materials recovered from products in each category, divided by the weight of total products recovered globally through both voluntary and mandatory programs, then multiply by 100. The sum of B1, B2, B3, and B4 must be less than or equal to 100%.
The weight for any given returned device can only be credited once. For example, a device whose weight is included in component reuse for a hard drive that was salvaged cannot also be included under the material recovery calculation, even if the rest of the materials from the device are sent for material recovery.
Material that is found or suspected to end in landfill or incineration through downstream auditing or the lack of a viable secondary market cannot be included in the material recovery percentage.
Components reused or refurbished means the percent of total volume representing parts that return to the market. Examples would be hard drives, motherboards, salvaged chips or other components removed for the secondary market.
Closed-loop system means that once material or components are recovered, they are returned to the materials supply chain for manufacturing new devices or products of the same value or greater value than the device that was recycled. For example, a closed loop system would be when printer ink cartridges are recycled and the recovered plastic is then used in new printer ink cartridges.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
R2 Certified Recyclers: According to the R2:2013 Standard, "certifying to this Standard through an accredited third-party Certification Body, electronics recyclers can help prospective purchasers of their services (customers) make informed decisions and have increased confidence that used and end -of-life electronic equipment are managed in an environmentally responsible manner, protective of the health and safety of workers and the public, and that all data on all media devices is secure until destroyed." https://sustainableelectronics.org/r2-standard

e-Stewards: According to the e-Stewards Certification website, "The e-Stewards Certification Program provides a high level of confidence that a recycler consistently conforms to the e-Stewards Standard." http://www.e-stewards.org/certification-overview/
HP Product Return and Recycling Program: One example of a manufacturer takeback program is run by HP, where LaserJet and ink cartridges are collected, recycled, and materials used to manufacture new cartridges. http://www8.hp.com/us/en/hp-information/environment/product-recycling.html?jumpid=re_r138_eco_product-recycling#.UkTzV39c57cTakeback program: A collection method whereby consumers return specific products or classes of products at the end of their useful lives for potential reuse and refurbishment, followed by material recovery and appropriate disposal.
Other Office Electronics and AppliancesSupply chain working conditions - Audit resultsCalculate B1 as the number of events resolved, divided by the total number of events recorded during both second- and third-party audits conducted in the previous year, then multiply by 100. Include all tier 1 company-owned or contract component manufacturing facilities, as well as all component manufacturing facilities that are directly contracted to supply custom parts or materials to company-owned or contract product assembly facilities, that have had a second- or third-party audit to a widely-recognized code of conduct conducted in the past year. For B1, answer 100% if zero non-conformance events have been recorded across all facilities. A non-conformance event indicates an audit finding that would trigger a corrective action plan. For audits performed under the Responsible Business Alliance Validated Auditing Program (VAP), this includes priority, major, and minor non-conformance events.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process: Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process (VAP) provides members the ability to audit manufacturing facilities within their supply chain and share audit results with other members to better leverage information on common upstream supplier facilities. Organizations that are not members of RBA but own facilities that are in the electronics supply chain may also participate in this effort. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/vap/

THESIS Help Center Video: Supply chain working conditions - Audit results KPI: Short video tutorial on the Supply chain working conditions - Audit results KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528319
Global Social Compliance Programme (GSCP) Reference Tools: The Global Social Compliance Program provides a publicly available suite of reference tools that describes existing best practices in social compliance. The reference tools can be used by companies to develop systems and initiatives. http://supply-chain.unglobalcompact.org/site/article/126

Responsible Battery Alliance (RBA) Supply Chain Accountability Tools: RBA supports multiple tools for members that enable self-assessment, third-party auditing, and online sustainability data management systems of this information. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/tools/

Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct: Companies can use the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct with their suppliers to improve the working conditions within facilities in their supply chain, the most recent version of which can be found on their website. The Code of Conduct was originally developed for use within the electronics industry, but has been revised to ensure relevance across most manufacturing sectors. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/code-of-conduct/

Responsible Business Alliance: The Responsible Business Alliance (RBA), formerly known as the Electronics Industry Citizenship Council (EICC), supports an industry Code of Conduct that provides a common approach to drive positive change on social, economic and environmental issues in manufacturing supply chains. RBA offers a suite of tools and resources to their members to aid in assessing and managing change in supply chains, as well as coordinating audit processes across different companies. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.
Other Office Electronics and AppliancesSustainable Packaging Design and ProductionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: Material efficiency is the ratio between the material input and the benefits derived. Resource conservation (source reduction) of material inputs and/or improving the functionality of the packaging can positively impact material efficiency. Process efficiency is the ratio between the time spent on production steps to the output. Opportunities to improve material and process efficiency include process improvement, product redesign, and technology changes to packaging equipment. It should be noted that continual source reduction has benefits, but there are trade-offs that must be assessed.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
Other Office Electronics and AppliancesWorker health, safety, and labor rightsCalculate C1 as the number of facilities that have been audited by a third party in the last twelve months, divided by the total number of company-owned or contact facilities, then multiply by 100. Include all tier 1 company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities, and all component manufacturing facilities that are directly contracted to supply custom parts or materials to company-owned or contract product assembly facilities.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The code of conduct must cover the following issues with requirements that meet or exceed those in the current, in-force Responsible Business Alliance Code of Conduct, including: Child labor; compensation; discipline; discrimination; forced labor; freedom of association and right to collective bargaining; health and safety; management systems for human resources; working hours.
Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct: Companies can use the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct with their suppliers to improve the working conditions within facilities in their supply chain, the most recent version of which can be found on their website. The Code of Conduct was originally developed for use within the electronics industry, but has been revised to ensure relevance across most manufacturing sectors. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/code-of-conduct/

Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process: Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process (VAP) provides members the ability to audit manufacturing facilities within their supply chain and share audit results with other members to better leverage information on common upstream supplier facilities. Organizations that are not members of RBA but own facilities that are in the electronics supply chain may also participate in this effort. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/vap/

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
N/ACompany-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Power Strips and CablesConflict mineralsCalculate D1 as the total number of validated smelters, divided by the total number of smelters, then multiply by 100. Include all smelters identified as supplying some portion of the tin, tungsten, tantalum, or gold in your products.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
To be considered conflict-free, smelters must have a valid certification established or confirmed in the previous 12-month period as defined above.
Smelters may be validated through any internationally recognized body, such as the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI), Responsible Jewellery Council, ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group, or the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA).
ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group: The International Tin Association (ITA) has convened the Responsible Tin Supply Group (RTS) to enable organizations to source cassiterite (ore from which tin is derived) from responsible supply chain actors in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and surrounding countries while meeting due diligence guidance developed by the UN and OECD and required by national laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act. https://www.internationaltin.org/rts-group/

OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas: Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) has developed due diligence guidelines for organizations to implement when sourcing minerals from conflict regions, including but not limited to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. These guidelines have become normative in the industry and can be used to demonstrate due diligence under national and regional laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act in the U.S. and the European Commission draft proposal for supply chain due diligence for conflict minerals. http://www.oecd.org/daf/inv/mne/mining.htm

Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC) chain-of-custody certification: The Responsible Jewellery Council is a standard-setting and certification organization that has developed an ISEAL-accredited chain-of-custody certification program for use by the jewellery industry and manufacturers, which applies to gold and platinum group metals. https://www.responsiblejewellery.com/rjc-certification/

Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI): Formerly known as the Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative, the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI) is a joint effort between the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) and GeSI to establish supply chain transparency tools, resources and training to assist organizations in responsibly sourcing conflict-free minerals from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. Of note is their Responsible Minerals Assurance Process, which enables auditing and assessment of smelters for responsible ore sourcing and provides a centralized database for tracking smelter performance. http://www.responsiblemineralsinitiative.org/

THESIS Help Center Video: Conflict minerals KPI: Short video tutorial on the Conflict minerals KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017273

The London Bullion Market Association Good Delivery Lists: According to their website, the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA) produces "Good Delivery Lists for gold and silver bars; detailing the names of accredited refiners, their listing date and the marking details of their bars." http://www.lbma.org.uk/the-good-delivery-list

World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard: As part of their activities to support socially-responsible gold mining, the World Gold Council has developed the World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard to provide guidance to companies on responsible mining practices. https://www.gold.org/about-gold/gold-supply/responsible-gold/conflict-free-gold-standard
Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade: According to the website, "The Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade (PPA) is a joint initiative among governments, companies, and civil society to support supply chain solutions to conflict minerals challenges in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and the Great Lakes Region (GLR) of Central Africa." http://www.resolv.org/site-ppa/Conflict minerals: Conflict minerals are defined per "Section 1502(e)(4) of the [Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform] Act as (A) columbite-tantalite, also known as coltan (the metal ore from which tantalum is extracted); cassiterite (the metal ore from which tin is extracted); gold; wolframite (the metal ore from which tungsten is extracted); or their derivatives; or (B) any other mineral or its derivatives determined by the Secretary of State to be financing conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo or an adjoining country." (US Securities and Exchange Commission, 17 CFR Parts 240 and 249b, RIN: 3235-AK84, Conflict Minerals Final Rule)
Power Strips and CablesEnergy efficiency - Use phaseCalculate B1 as the total number of units that meet the criteria for this question, divided by the total number of units sold, then multiply by 100. Include all units that were shipped with power management or energy efficiency attributes enabled, regardless of whether required by law. Products that are certified to a current in-force version of ENERGY STAR® or an equivalent third-party certified energy efficiency standard count toward this question.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
ENERGY STAR® International Partners: The EPA enters into agreements with foreign governments to use and/or recognize the ENERGY STAR standards and mark to help unify voluntary energy-efficiency initiatives globally. https://www.energystar.gov/partner_resources/international_partners

ENERGY STAR® Qualified Products: According to their website, "The ENERGY STAR label was established to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and other pollutants caused by the inefficient use of energy and make it easy for consumers to identify and purchase energy-efficient products that offer savings on energy bills without sacrificing performance, features, and comfort." Standards are established by ENERGY STAR through a multi-stakeholder process and administered under the US EPA. https://www.energystar.gov/products
N/AEnergy efficiency attributes: Product design attributes such as low power motors or more efficient air circulation that increase the energy efficiency of a product above market average.

Power management features: Product design features that enable users to manage product energy use, such as variable heat or speed settings, or that automatically control energy use, such as auto-off after a set time.
Power Strips and CablesF-GHG emission tracking and reportingCalculate percentage of components, by units procured for products in this category, that meet the criteria for this question as the number of suppliers that abate all F-GHGs in at least 50% of their facilities divided by the total number of suppliers responsible for all relevant components and multiply the result by 100. For example: if four suppliers provide all relevant components and one does nothing, one abates only PFCs, and the remaining 2 abate all gases in 40% and 70% of their facilities, respectively, the correct percentage is 25% because only one supplier meets both criteria.
In the rare circumstance that a facility uses no F-GHGs in any process for any component in products included in this category, that facility may be counted as having 100% abatement.
Relevant components specifically refer to flat panel displays and semiconductor electronic components or devices whose manufacture is known to use and emit fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-GHGs), namely during etch and chamber clean processes.
Abate all F-GHG emissions means that the component supplier abates all of the following F-GHGs in at least half of their facilities that manufacture relevant components for this product category: perfluorocarbons (PFCs), trifluoromethane (CHF3 or HFCs), nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6).
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Protocol for Measuring Destruction or Removal Efficiency (DRE): The Protocol for Measuring Destruction or Removal Efficiency (DRE) of Fluorinated Greenhouse Gas Abatement Equipment in Electronics Manufacturing was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency as a standard approach to measure F-GHG emissions at the point of abatement in the electronics component manufacturing facility. https://www.epa.gov/f-gas-partnership-programs/epas-protocol-measuring-destruction-or-removal-efficiencyCenter for Corporate Climate Leadership: According to this website, "The EPA's Center for Corporate Climate Leadership seeks to highlight activities to reduce supply chain greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at the sector level." The first efforts to be highlighted within the electronics industry are the efforts by suppliers to reduce F-GHGs during manufacturing of flat panel display in the electronics sector. https://www.epa.gov/climateleadership

European Semiconductor Industry - PFC Emission Reduction: The European Semiconductor Industry Association (ESIA) has provided information regarding successful PFC emissions reduction programs in Europe, and steps the industry is taking beyond its voluntary 2010 reduction goals. https://www.eusemiconductors.eu/esia/public-policy/sustainability-esh/pfc-gases

GHG Protocol Calculation Tools - Semiconductors: The GHG Protocol calculation tool for the semiconductor industry provides guidance on how to assess and account for PFC emissions during semiconductor wafer production and processing. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

PFC Reduction/Climate Partnership for the Semiconductor Industry: The United States Environmental Protection Agency supports the voluntary efforts to reduce fluorinated greenhouse gas (F-GHG) emissions from semiconductor industry through the PFC Reduction/Climate Partnership for the Semiconductor Industry. https://www.epa.gov/ghgemissions/overview-greenhouse-gases#f-gases

World LCD Industry Cooperation Committee: The "principal mission of WLICC is to address efforts and share understanding on issues concerning environmental protection and resource recycling within the LCD industry." In 2010, the organization published results of their member's F-GHG reduction efforts. http://home.jeita.or.jp/device/committee/kankyou/pdf/20111110WLICG_e.pdf

World Semiconductor Council - Best Practice Guidance of PFC Emission Reduction: The World Semiconductor Council has developed a set of best known practices related to reducing fluorinated greenhouse gas emissions from equipment and manufacturing processes to support their members in efforts to meet their voluntary perfluoro-compound emission reduction targets. http://www.semiconductorcouncil.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/Best-Practice-Guidance-of-PFC-Emission-Reduction.pdf
Component supplier: A manufacturer of a component used in the final product. If the manufacturing facility partner is responsible for fabrication of these devices, they are the supplier of interest for this question.

Fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-GHGs): Fluorine-containing gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere. The F-GHG emissions of primary concern in electronics manufacturing are of perfluorocarbons (PFCs), trifluoromethane (CHF3 or HFCs), nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which are more potent than carbon dioxide.

Manufacturing facility partners: Manufacturing facility partners are defined as organizations responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these organizations are internal or external to the respondent's organization.
Power Strips and CablesGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the procurement spend on component suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total procurement spend on all component suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party. Component suppliers means the group of suppliers that account for 80% of your total spend on components purchased for products in this category.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Power Strips and CablesGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, including product assembly and the manufacture of any components purchased directly by your organization for inclusion in products in scope for this questionnaire, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total spend required to produce the products.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total spend required to produce the product. If the manufacturing facilities produce both in scope and out of scope products, only weight using the total spend required to produce the in scope products.
Calculate B2 as the total spend on final products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total spend for final products produced, then multiply by 100.
For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardCO2e: Carbon dioxide equivalent; a metric that expresses the impact of a greenhouse gas in terms of the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) that has the same global warming potential.

Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Power Strips and CablesHazardous substances - Alternatives assessmentHazardous substances are defined as chemicals that meet the criteria for classification as a carcinogens, mutagens, reproductive toxicants, or are persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemicals for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57).GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

PRIO: PRIO is a web-based tool developed by the Swedish government to facilitate the assessment of environmental and health risks of chemicals. ? https://www.kemi.se/prioguiden/english/start

Scivera Lens™ Rapid Screen: The Scivera Lens Rapid Screen tool provides access to chemical ingredient toxicological hazard and risk assessment profiles using a product's bill of materials or bill of substances.
https://www.scivera.com/rapidscreen/

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Exposure Assessment Tools and Models: According to their website, "The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) has developed several exposure assessment methods, databases, and predictive models to help in evaluating what happens to chemicals when they are used and released to the environment and how workers, the general public, consumers and the aquatic ecosystems may be exposed to chemicals." https://www.epa.gov/ceam/tools-data-exposure-assessment
BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

CCS Enhanced GreenSuite®: Enhanced GreenSuite® is a web-based chemical and product hazard and risk assessment tool developmed by Chemical Compliance Systems (CCS). https://www.chemply.com/greensuite

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815

REACH: A Priority Chemical is defined as a chemical that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57).  Priority Chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis. http://www.reachonline.eu/REACH/EN/REACH_EN/article57.html

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Existing Chemicals Program: According to their website, "EPA's existing chemical programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and characterization, and risk management for chemical substances in commercial use." The current chemicals management program is undergoing review and update, including how the agency identifies and prioritizes priority chemicals for review and assessment under TSCA. https://www.epa.gov/compliance/toxic-substances-control-act-tsca-compliance-monitoring#chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
Informed substitution: Informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles (Adapted from United States Environmental Protection Agency Design for Environment Program Alternative Assessment information).

Public disclosure: Manufacturer-based acts of making information available and readily accessible to the public through one or more forms of media (e.g., online, print, telephone). Print media includes product labels and also includes, but is not limited to, books, magazines, newspapers, and readily accessible journal articles. Online disclosure includes, but is not limited to, publicly accessible websites (desktop or mobile) as well as making information electronically available through reporting platforms or mobile apps.
Power Strips and CablesHazardous substances - DisclosureCalculate B1 as the number of suppliers which have provided disclosure information, divided by the total number of suppliers, then multiply by 100. Include all company-owned or contract component manufacturers, as well as organizations contracted for direct material supply to company-owned or contract manufacturers. To be included in this percentage, a supplier must disclose intentionally-added materials listed in the declarable substance groups and declarable substances above the thresholds specified in IEC 62474.
Suppliers who only report substances whose declaration is already mandated by relevant regulations in the market(s) of sale (e.g., by RoHS Directive) should not be considered as having provided disclosure. If an organization has not adopted IEC 62474, suppliers who report declarable substances in line with the declarable substances list in IEC 62474 can count as having provided disclosure.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
International Electrotechnical Commission Standard 62474: If you are using this - this has been moved to the standards field. Please link that to your categories - this item will be going away. http://webstore.iec.ch/webstore/webstore.nsf/mysearchajax?Openform&key=62474&sorting=&start=1&onglet=1Dell, Inc. Materials Restricted for Use: "Materials Restricted for Use," published by Dell, Inc., is one example of an internal hazardous substances management list used within the electronics industry. https://www.dell.com/downloads/global/corporate/environ/restricted_materials_guid.pdf

GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

Panasonic Corporation Chemical Substances Management Rank Guidelines: "The Chemical Substances Management Rank Guide," published by the Industrial Devices Company Group, Panasonic Corporation, is one example of an internal hazardous substances management list used within the electronics industry. https://www.panasonic.com/global/corporate/management/procurement/green.html
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.
Power Strips and CablesMaterial disposition tracking - Product takeback programFinal disposition means the point at which 1) a product enters its next life cycle through reuse or refurbishment; 2) the components of a product are recaptured for reuse as part of a refurbishment program; or 3) the product or materials contained within the product reach landfilling, incineration or material recovery where they are returned to the commodity market.R2 Certified Recyclers: According to the R2:2013 Standard, "certifying to this Standard through an accredited third-party Certification Body, electronics recyclers can help prospective purchasers of their services (customers) make informed decisions and have increased confidence that used and end -of-life electronic equipment are managed in an environmentally responsible manner, protective of the health and safety of workers and the public, and that all data on all media devices is secure until destroyed." https://sustainableelectronics.org/r2-standard

WEEELABEX: WEEELABEX standards cover the collection, logistics, and treatment of electronic wastes in all ten categories of the European Union's Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive. http://www.weeelabex.org/#!standards/component_41229

e-Stewards: According to the e-Stewards Certification website, "The e-Stewards Certification Program provides a high level of confidence that a recycler consistently conforms to the e-Stewards Standard." http://www.e-stewards.org/certification-overview/
N/ACertified third-party e-waste vendors: "Vendors that demonstrate to an accredited, independent third-party auditor that they meet specific standards to safely recycle and manage electronics. These certification programs must be based on strong environmental standards which maximize reuse and recycling, minimize exposure to human health or the environment, ensure safe management of materials by downstream handlers, and require destruction of all data on used electronics. Two accredited certification standards are the Responsible Recycling Practices (R2) and the e-Stewards® standards."(Source: EPA, E-cycling certification definition)

Responsible final disposition: Takeback programs may achieve the goal of responsible final material disposition by doing one or more of the following:
1. Including contractual requirements regarding downstream partner responsibility, all the way to final material disposition;
2. Verifying responsible final disposition by tracking a sampling of materials to final disposition; and/or;
3. Contracting exclusively with certified third-party e-waste vendors to ensure responsible final disposition.

Takeback program: A collection method whereby consumers return specific products or classes of products at the end of their useful lives for potential reuse and refurbishment, followed by material recovery and appropriate disposal.
Power Strips and CablesPackaging Raw Material SourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

ISO 18604: ISO 18604 (Packaging and the environment -- Material recycling) provides measurement standards for determining how recyclable a particular product is. https://www.iso.org/standard/55872.html

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Renewable material: “Material that is composed of biomass from a living source and that can be continually replenished. To be defined as renewable, virgin materials shall come from sources which are replenished at a rate equal to or greater than the rate of depletion.” (FTC Green Guides:2012)

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably-sourced material: Material for which it can be demonstrated through second- or third-party verification that the virgin raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities. Materials such as paper can be included in this definition if the source of the packaging content comes from sustainably-managed forests with no deforestation.
Power Strips and CablesProduct takeback programThis question addresses takeback programs that an organization may fund, contract, or physically operate, in whole or in part, to enable consumers to return products for responsible end-of-life management. Include only products and materials for which an organization has the ability to decide or influence the handling, treatment, and disposal of returned devices, components, and materials. If multiple questionnaires are received, the same percentage may be reported as long as the product types in question are collected and managed in the same program. Otherwise, the responses need to be for percentages appropriate to the different product types associated with each questionnaire.
Calculate B1, B2, B3, and B4 as the weight of products or materials recovered from products in each category, divided by the weight of total products recovered globally through both voluntary and mandatory programs, then multiply by 100. The sum of B1, B2, B3, and B4 must be less than or equal to 100%.
The weight for any given returned device can only be credited once. For example, a device whose weight is included in component reuse for a hard drive that was salvaged cannot also be included under the material recovery calculation, even if the rest of the materials from the device are sent for material recovery.
Material that is found or suspected to end in landfill or incineration through downstream auditing or the lack of a viable secondary market cannot be included in the material recovery percentage.
Components reused or refurbished means the percent of total volume representing parts that return to the market. Examples would be hard drives, motherboards, salvaged chips or other components removed for the secondary market.
Closed-loop system means that once material or components are recovered, they are returned to the materials supply chain for manufacturing new devices or products of the same value or greater value than the device that was recycled. For example, a closed loop system would be when printer ink cartridges are recycled and the recovered plastic is then used in new printer ink cartridges.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
R2 Certified Recyclers: According to the R2:2013 Standard, "certifying to this Standard through an accredited third-party Certification Body, electronics recyclers can help prospective purchasers of their services (customers) make informed decisions and have increased confidence that used and end -of-life electronic equipment are managed in an environmentally responsible manner, protective of the health and safety of workers and the public, and that all data on all media devices is secure until destroyed." https://sustainableelectronics.org/r2-standard

e-Stewards: According to the e-Stewards Certification website, "The e-Stewards Certification Program provides a high level of confidence that a recycler consistently conforms to the e-Stewards Standard." http://www.e-stewards.org/certification-overview/
HP Product Return and Recycling Program: One example of a manufacturer takeback program is run by HP, where LaserJet and ink cartridges are collected, recycled, and materials used to manufacture new cartridges. http://www8.hp.com/us/en/hp-information/environment/product-recycling.html?jumpid=re_r138_eco_product-recycling#.UkTzV39c57cTakeback program: A collection method whereby consumers return specific products or classes of products at the end of their useful lives for potential reuse and refurbishment, followed by material recovery and appropriate disposal.
Power Strips and CablesSupply chain working conditions - Audit resultsCalculate B1 as the number of events resolved, divided by the total number of events recorded during both second- and third-party audits conducted in the previous year, then multiply by 100. Include all tier 1 company-owned or contract component manufacturing facilities, as well as all component manufacturing facilities that are directly contracted to supply custom parts or materials to company-owned or contract product assembly facilities, that have had a second- or third-party audit to a widely-recognized code of conduct conducted in the past year. For B1, answer 100% if zero non-conformance events have been recorded across all facilities. A non-conformance event indicates an audit finding that would trigger a corrective action plan. For audits performed under the Responsible Business Alliance Validated Auditing Program (VAP), this includes priority, major, and minor non-conformance events.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process: Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process (VAP) provides members the ability to audit manufacturing facilities within their supply chain and share audit results with other members to better leverage information on common upstream supplier facilities. Organizations that are not members of RBA but own facilities that are in the electronics supply chain may also participate in this effort. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/vap/

THESIS Help Center Video: Supply chain working conditions - Audit results KPI: Short video tutorial on the Supply chain working conditions - Audit results KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528319
Global Social Compliance Programme (GSCP) Reference Tools: The Global Social Compliance Program provides a publicly available suite of reference tools that describes existing best practices in social compliance. The reference tools can be used by companies to develop systems and initiatives. http://supply-chain.unglobalcompact.org/site/article/126

Responsible Battery Alliance (RBA) Supply Chain Accountability Tools: RBA supports multiple tools for members that enable self-assessment, third-party auditing, and online sustainability data management systems of this information. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/tools/

Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct: Companies can use the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct with their suppliers to improve the working conditions within facilities in their supply chain, the most recent version of which can be found on their website. The Code of Conduct was originally developed for use within the electronics industry, but has been revised to ensure relevance across most manufacturing sectors. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/code-of-conduct/

Responsible Business Alliance: The Responsible Business Alliance (RBA), formerly known as the Electronics Industry Citizenship Council (EICC), supports an industry Code of Conduct that provides a common approach to drive positive change on social, economic and environmental issues in manufacturing supply chains. RBA offers a suite of tools and resources to their members to aid in assessing and managing change in supply chains, as well as coordinating audit processes across different companies. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.
Power Strips and CablesSustainable Packaging Design and ProductionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: Material efficiency is the ratio between the material input and the benefits derived. Resource conservation (source reduction) of material inputs and/or improving the functionality of the packaging can positively impact material efficiency. Process efficiency is the ratio between the time spent on production steps to the output. Opportunities to improve material and process efficiency include process improvement, product redesign, and technology changes to packaging equipment. It should be noted that continual source reduction has benefits, but there are trade-offs that must be assessed.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
Power Strips and CablesWorker health, safety, and labor rightsCalculate C1 as the number of facilities that have been audited by a third party in the last twelve months, divided by the total number of company-owned or contact facilities, then multiply by 100. Include all tier 1 company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities, and all component manufacturing facilities that are directly contracted to supply custom parts or materials to company-owned or contract product assembly facilities.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The code of conduct must cover the following issues with requirements that meet or exceed those in the current, in-force Responsible Business Alliance Code of Conduct, including: Child labor; compensation; discipline; discrimination; forced labor; freedom of association and right to collective bargaining; health and safety; management systems for human resources; working hours.
Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct: Companies can use the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct with their suppliers to improve the working conditions within facilities in their supply chain, the most recent version of which can be found on their website. The Code of Conduct was originally developed for use within the electronics industry, but has been revised to ensure relevance across most manufacturing sectors. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/code-of-conduct/

Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process: Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process (VAP) provides members the ability to audit manufacturing facilities within their supply chain and share audit results with other members to better leverage information on common upstream supplier facilities. Organizations that are not members of RBA but own facilities that are in the electronics supply chain may also participate in this effort. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/vap/

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
N/ACompany-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Wearable ElectronicsConflict mineralsCalculate D1 as the total number of validated smelters, divided by the total number of smelters, then multiply by 100. Include all smelters identified as supplying some portion of the tin, tungsten, tantalum, or gold in your products.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
To be considered conflict-free, smelters must have a valid certification established or confirmed in the previous 12-month period as defined above.
Smelters may be validated through any internationally recognized body, such as the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI), Responsible Jewellery Council, ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group, or the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA).
ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group: The International Tin Association (ITA) has convened the Responsible Tin Supply Group (RTS) to enable organizations to source cassiterite (ore from which tin is derived) from responsible supply chain actors in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and surrounding countries while meeting due diligence guidance developed by the UN and OECD and required by national laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act. https://www.internationaltin.org/rts-group/

OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas: Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) has developed due diligence guidelines for organizations to implement when sourcing minerals from conflict regions, including but not limited to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. These guidelines have become normative in the industry and can be used to demonstrate due diligence under national and regional laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act in the U.S. and the European Commission draft proposal for supply chain due diligence for conflict minerals. http://www.oecd.org/daf/inv/mne/mining.htm

Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC) chain-of-custody certification: The Responsible Jewellery Council is a standard-setting and certification organization that has developed an ISEAL-accredited chain-of-custody certification program for use by the jewellery industry and manufacturers, which applies to gold and platinum group metals. https://www.responsiblejewellery.com/rjc-certification/

Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI): Formerly known as the Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative, the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI) is a joint effort between the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) and GeSI to establish supply chain transparency tools, resources and training to assist organizations in responsibly sourcing conflict-free minerals from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. Of note is their Responsible Minerals Assurance Process, which enables auditing and assessment of smelters for responsible ore sourcing and provides a centralized database for tracking smelter performance. http://www.responsiblemineralsinitiative.org/

THESIS Help Center Video: Conflict minerals KPI: Short video tutorial on the Conflict minerals KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017273

The London Bullion Market Association Good Delivery Lists: According to their website, the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA) produces "Good Delivery Lists for gold and silver bars; detailing the names of accredited refiners, their listing date and the marking details of their bars." http://www.lbma.org.uk/the-good-delivery-list

World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard: As part of their activities to support socially-responsible gold mining, the World Gold Council has developed the World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard to provide guidance to companies on responsible mining practices. https://www.gold.org/about-gold/gold-supply/responsible-gold/conflict-free-gold-standard
Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade: According to the website, "The Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade (PPA) is a joint initiative among governments, companies, and civil society to support supply chain solutions to conflict minerals challenges in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and the Great Lakes Region (GLR) of Central Africa." http://www.resolv.org/site-ppa/Conflict minerals: Conflict minerals are defined per "Section 1502(e)(4) of the [Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform] Act as (A) columbite-tantalite, also known as coltan (the metal ore from which tantalum is extracted); cassiterite (the metal ore from which tin is extracted); gold; wolframite (the metal ore from which tungsten is extracted); or their derivatives; or (B) any other mineral or its derivatives determined by the Secretary of State to be financing conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo or an adjoining country." (US Securities and Exchange Commission, 17 CFR Parts 240 and 249b, RIN: 3235-AK84, Conflict Minerals Final Rule)
Wearable ElectronicsEnergy efficiency - Use phaseCalculate B1 as the total number of units that meet the criteria for this question, divided by the total number of units sold, then multiply by 100. Include all units that were shipped with power management or energy efficiency attributes enabled, regardless of whether required by law. Products that are certified to a current in-force version of ENERGY STAR® or an equivalent third-party certified energy efficiency standard count toward this question.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
ENERGY STAR® International Partners: The EPA enters into agreements with foreign governments to use and/or recognize the ENERGY STAR standards and mark to help unify voluntary energy-efficiency initiatives globally. https://www.energystar.gov/partner_resources/international_partners

ENERGY STAR® Qualified Products: According to their website, "The ENERGY STAR label was established to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and other pollutants caused by the inefficient use of energy and make it easy for consumers to identify and purchase energy-efficient products that offer savings on energy bills without sacrificing performance, features, and comfort." Standards are established by ENERGY STAR through a multi-stakeholder process and administered under the US EPA. https://www.energystar.gov/products
N/AEnergy efficiency attributes: Product design attributes such as low power motors or more efficient air circulation that increase the energy efficiency of a product above market average.

Power management features: Product design features that enable users to manage product energy use, such as variable heat or speed settings, or that automatically control energy use, such as auto-off after a set time.
Wearable ElectronicsF-GHG emission tracking and reportingCalculate percentage of components, by units procured for products in this category, that meet the criteria for this question as the number of suppliers that abate all F-GHGs in at least 50% of their facilities divided by the total number of suppliers responsible for all relevant components and multiply the result by 100. For example: if four suppliers provide all relevant components and one does nothing, one abates only PFCs, and the remaining 2 abate all gases in 40% and 70% of their facilities, respectively, the correct percentage is 25% because only one supplier meets both criteria.
In the rare circumstance that a facility uses no F-GHGs in any process for any component in products included in this category, that facility may be counted as having 100% abatement.
Relevant components specifically refer to flat panel displays and semiconductor electronic components or devices whose manufacture is known to use and emit fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-GHGs), namely during etch and chamber clean processes.
Abate all F-GHG emissions means that the component supplier abates all of the following F-GHGs in at least half of their facilities that manufacture relevant components for this product category: perfluorocarbons (PFCs), trifluoromethane (CHF3 or HFCs), nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6).
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Protocol for Measuring Destruction or Removal Efficiency (DRE): The Protocol for Measuring Destruction or Removal Efficiency (DRE) of Fluorinated Greenhouse Gas Abatement Equipment in Electronics Manufacturing was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency as a standard approach to measure F-GHG emissions at the point of abatement in the electronics component manufacturing facility. https://www.epa.gov/f-gas-partnership-programs/epas-protocol-measuring-destruction-or-removal-efficiencyCenter for Corporate Climate Leadership: According to this website, "The EPA's Center for Corporate Climate Leadership seeks to highlight activities to reduce supply chain greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at the sector level." The first efforts to be highlighted within the electronics industry are the efforts by suppliers to reduce F-GHGs during manufacturing of flat panel display in the electronics sector. https://www.epa.gov/climateleadership

European Semiconductor Industry - PFC Emission Reduction: The European Semiconductor Industry Association (ESIA) has provided information regarding successful PFC emissions reduction programs in Europe, and steps the industry is taking beyond its voluntary 2010 reduction goals. https://www.eusemiconductors.eu/esia/public-policy/sustainability-esh/pfc-gases

GHG Protocol Calculation Tools - Semiconductors: The GHG Protocol calculation tool for the semiconductor industry provides guidance on how to assess and account for PFC emissions during semiconductor wafer production and processing. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

PFC Reduction/Climate Partnership for the Semiconductor Industry: The United States Environmental Protection Agency supports the voluntary efforts to reduce fluorinated greenhouse gas (F-GHG) emissions from semiconductor industry through the PFC Reduction/Climate Partnership for the Semiconductor Industry. https://www.epa.gov/ghgemissions/overview-greenhouse-gases#f-gases

World LCD Industry Cooperation Committee: The "principal mission of WLICC is to address efforts and share understanding on issues concerning environmental protection and resource recycling within the LCD industry." In 2010, the organization published results of their member's F-GHG reduction efforts. http://home.jeita.or.jp/device/committee/kankyou/pdf/20111110WLICG_e.pdf

World Semiconductor Council - Best Practice Guidance of PFC Emission Reduction: The World Semiconductor Council has developed a set of best known practices related to reducing fluorinated greenhouse gas emissions from equipment and manufacturing processes to support their members in efforts to meet their voluntary perfluoro-compound emission reduction targets. http://www.semiconductorcouncil.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/Best-Practice-Guidance-of-PFC-Emission-Reduction.pdf
Component supplier: A manufacturer of a component used in the final product. If the manufacturing facility partner is responsible for fabrication of these devices, they are the supplier of interest for this question.

Fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-GHGs): Fluorine-containing gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere. The F-GHG emissions of primary concern in electronics manufacturing are of perfluorocarbons (PFCs), trifluoromethane (CHF3 or HFCs), nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which are more potent than carbon dioxide.

Manufacturing facility partners: Manufacturing facility partners are defined as organizations responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these organizations are internal or external to the respondent's organization.
Wearable ElectronicsGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the procurement spend on component suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total procurement spend on all component suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party. Component suppliers means the group of suppliers that account for 80% of your total spend on components purchased for products in this category.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Wearable ElectronicsGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, including product assembly and the manufacture of any components purchased directly by your organization for inclusion in products in scope for this questionnaire, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total spend required to produce the products.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total spend required to produce the product. If the manufacturing facilities produce both in scope and out of scope products, only weight using the total spend required to produce the in scope products.
Calculate B2 as the total spend on final products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total spend for final products produced, then multiply by 100.
For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardCO2e: Carbon dioxide equivalent; a metric that expresses the impact of a greenhouse gas in terms of the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) that has the same global warming potential.

Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Wearable ElectronicsHazardous substances - Alternatives assessmentHazardous substances are defined as chemicals that meet the criteria for classification as a carcinogens, mutagens, reproductive toxicants, or are persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemicals for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57).GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

PRIO: PRIO is a web-based tool developed by the Swedish government to facilitate the assessment of environmental and health risks of chemicals. ? https://www.kemi.se/prioguiden/english/start

Scivera Lens™ Rapid Screen: The Scivera Lens Rapid Screen tool provides access to chemical ingredient toxicological hazard and risk assessment profiles using a product's bill of materials or bill of substances.
https://www.scivera.com/rapidscreen/

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Exposure Assessment Tools and Models: According to their website, "The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) has developed several exposure assessment methods, databases, and predictive models to help in evaluating what happens to chemicals when they are used and released to the environment and how workers, the general public, consumers and the aquatic ecosystems may be exposed to chemicals." https://www.epa.gov/ceam/tools-data-exposure-assessment
BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

CCS Enhanced GreenSuite®: Enhanced GreenSuite® is a web-based chemical and product hazard and risk assessment tool developmed by Chemical Compliance Systems (CCS). https://www.chemply.com/greensuite

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815

REACH: A Priority Chemical is defined as a chemical that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57).  Priority Chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis. http://www.reachonline.eu/REACH/EN/REACH_EN/article57.html

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Existing Chemicals Program: According to their website, "EPA's existing chemical programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and characterization, and risk management for chemical substances in commercial use." The current chemicals management program is undergoing review and update, including how the agency identifies and prioritizes priority chemicals for review and assessment under TSCA. https://www.epa.gov/compliance/toxic-substances-control-act-tsca-compliance-monitoring#chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
Informed substitution: Informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles (Adapted from United States Environmental Protection Agency Design for Environment Program Alternative Assessment information).

Public disclosure: Manufacturer-based acts of making information available and readily accessible to the public through one or more forms of media (e.g., online, print, telephone). Print media includes product labels and also includes, but is not limited to, books, magazines, newspapers, and readily accessible journal articles. Online disclosure includes, but is not limited to, publicly accessible websites (desktop or mobile) as well as making information electronically available through reporting platforms or mobile apps.
Wearable ElectronicsHazardous substances - DisclosureCalculate B1 as the number of suppliers which have provided disclosure information, divided by the total number of suppliers, then multiply by 100. Include all company-owned or contract component manufacturers, as well as organizations contracted for direct material supply to company-owned or contract manufacturers. To be included in this percentage, a supplier must disclose intentionally-added materials listed in the declarable substance groups and declarable substances above the thresholds specified in IEC 62474.
Suppliers who only report substances whose declaration is already mandated by relevant regulations in the market(s) of sale (e.g., by RoHS Directive) should not be considered as having provided disclosure. If an organization has not adopted IEC 62474, suppliers who report declarable substances in line with the declarable substances list in IEC 62474 can count as having provided disclosure.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
International Electrotechnical Commission Standard 62474: If you are using this - this has been moved to the standards field. Please link that to your categories - this item will be going away. http://webstore.iec.ch/webstore/webstore.nsf/mysearchajax?Openform&key=62474&sorting=&start=1&onglet=1Dell, Inc. Materials Restricted for Use: "Materials Restricted for Use," published by Dell, Inc., is one example of an internal hazardous substances management list used within the electronics industry. https://www.dell.com/downloads/global/corporate/environ/restricted_materials_guid.pdf

GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

Panasonic Corporation Chemical Substances Management Rank Guidelines: "The Chemical Substances Management Rank Guide," published by the Industrial Devices Company Group, Panasonic Corporation, is one example of an internal hazardous substances management list used within the electronics industry. https://www.panasonic.com/global/corporate/management/procurement/green.html
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.
Wearable ElectronicsMaterial disposition tracking - Product takeback programFinal disposition means the point at which 1) a product enters its next life cycle through reuse or refurbishment; 2) the components of a product are recaptured for reuse as part of a refurbishment program; or 3) the product or materials contained within the product reach landfilling, incineration or material recovery where they are returned to the commodity market.R2 Certified Recyclers: According to the R2:2013 Standard, "certifying to this Standard through an accredited third-party Certification Body, electronics recyclers can help prospective purchasers of their services (customers) make informed decisions and have increased confidence that used and end -of-life electronic equipment are managed in an environmentally responsible manner, protective of the health and safety of workers and the public, and that all data on all media devices is secure until destroyed." https://sustainableelectronics.org/r2-standard

WEEELABEX: WEEELABEX standards cover the collection, logistics, and treatment of electronic wastes in all ten categories of the European Union's Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive. http://www.weeelabex.org/#!standards/component_41229

e-Stewards: According to the e-Stewards Certification website, "The e-Stewards Certification Program provides a high level of confidence that a recycler consistently conforms to the e-Stewards Standard." http://www.e-stewards.org/certification-overview/
N/ACertified third-party e-waste vendors: "Vendors that demonstrate to an accredited, independent third-party auditor that they meet specific standards to safely recycle and manage electronics. These certification programs must be based on strong environmental standards which maximize reuse and recycling, minimize exposure to human health or the environment, ensure safe management of materials by downstream handlers, and require destruction of all data on used electronics. Two accredited certification standards are the Responsible Recycling Practices (R2) and the e-Stewards® standards."(Source: EPA, E-cycling certification definition)

Responsible final disposition: Takeback programs may achieve the goal of responsible final material disposition by doing one or more of the following:
1. Including contractual requirements regarding downstream partner responsibility, all the way to final material disposition;
2. Verifying responsible final disposition by tracking a sampling of materials to final disposition; and/or;
3. Contracting exclusively with certified third-party e-waste vendors to ensure responsible final disposition.

Takeback program: A collection method whereby consumers return specific products or classes of products at the end of their useful lives for potential reuse and refurbishment, followed by material recovery and appropriate disposal.
Wearable ElectronicsPackaging Raw Material SourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

ISO 18604: ISO 18604 (Packaging and the environment -- Material recycling) provides measurement standards for determining how recyclable a particular product is. https://www.iso.org/standard/55872.html

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Renewable material: “Material that is composed of biomass from a living source and that can be continually replenished. To be defined as renewable, virgin materials shall come from sources which are replenished at a rate equal to or greater than the rate of depletion.” (FTC Green Guides:2012)

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably-sourced material: Material for which it can be demonstrated through second- or third-party verification that the virgin raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities. Materials such as paper can be included in this definition if the source of the packaging content comes from sustainably-managed forests with no deforestation.
Wearable ElectronicsProduct takeback programThis question addresses takeback programs that an organization may fund, contract, or physically operate, in whole or in part, to enable consumers to return products for responsible end-of-life management. Include only products and materials for which an organization has the ability to decide or influence the handling, treatment, and disposal of returned devices, components, and materials. If multiple questionnaires are received, the same percentage may be reported as long as the product types in question are collected and managed in the same program. Otherwise, the responses need to be for percentages appropriate to the different product types associated with each questionnaire.
Calculate B1, B2, B3, and B4 as the weight of products or materials recovered from products in each category, divided by the weight of total products recovered globally through both voluntary and mandatory programs, then multiply by 100. The sum of B1, B2, B3, and B4 must be less than or equal to 100%.
The weight for any given returned device can only be credited once. For example, a device whose weight is included in component reuse for a hard drive that was salvaged cannot also be included under the material recovery calculation, even if the rest of the materials from the device are sent for material recovery.
Material that is found or suspected to end in landfill or incineration through downstream auditing or the lack of a viable secondary market cannot be included in the material recovery percentage.
Components reused or refurbished means the percent of total volume representing parts that return to the market. Examples would be hard drives, motherboards, salvaged chips or other components removed for the secondary market.
Closed-loop system means that once material or components are recovered, they are returned to the materials supply chain for manufacturing new devices or products of the same value or greater value than the device that was recycled. For example, a closed loop system would be when printer ink cartridges are recycled and the recovered plastic is then used in new printer ink cartridges.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
R2 Certified Recyclers: According to the R2:2013 Standard, "certifying to this Standard through an accredited third-party Certification Body, electronics recyclers can help prospective purchasers of their services (customers) make informed decisions and have increased confidence that used and end -of-life electronic equipment are managed in an environmentally responsible manner, protective of the health and safety of workers and the public, and that all data on all media devices is secure until destroyed." https://sustainableelectronics.org/r2-standard

e-Stewards: According to the e-Stewards Certification website, "The e-Stewards Certification Program provides a high level of confidence that a recycler consistently conforms to the e-Stewards Standard." http://www.e-stewards.org/certification-overview/
HP Product Return and Recycling Program: One example of a manufacturer takeback program is run by HP, where LaserJet and ink cartridges are collected, recycled, and materials used to manufacture new cartridges. http://www8.hp.com/us/en/hp-information/environment/product-recycling.html?jumpid=re_r138_eco_product-recycling#.UkTzV39c57cTakeback program: A collection method whereby consumers return specific products or classes of products at the end of their useful lives for potential reuse and refurbishment, followed by material recovery and appropriate disposal.
Wearable ElectronicsSupply chain working conditions - Audit resultsCalculate B1 as the number of events resolved, divided by the total number of events recorded during both second- and third-party audits conducted in the previous year, then multiply by 100. Include all tier 1 company-owned or contract component manufacturing facilities, as well as all component manufacturing facilities that are directly contracted to supply custom parts or materials to company-owned or contract product assembly facilities, that have had a second- or third-party audit to a widely-recognized code of conduct conducted in the past year. For B1, answer 100% if zero non-conformance events have been recorded across all facilities. A non-conformance event indicates an audit finding that would trigger a corrective action plan. For audits performed under the Responsible Business Alliance Validated Auditing Program (VAP), this includes priority, major, and minor non-conformance events.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process: Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process (VAP) provides members the ability to audit manufacturing facilities within their supply chain and share audit results with other members to better leverage information on common upstream supplier facilities. Organizations that are not members of RBA but own facilities that are in the electronics supply chain may also participate in this effort. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/vap/

THESIS Help Center Video: Supply chain working conditions - Audit results KPI: Short video tutorial on the Supply chain working conditions - Audit results KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528319
Global Social Compliance Programme (GSCP) Reference Tools: The Global Social Compliance Program provides a publicly available suite of reference tools that describes existing best practices in social compliance. The reference tools can be used by companies to develop systems and initiatives. http://supply-chain.unglobalcompact.org/site/article/126

Responsible Battery Alliance (RBA) Supply Chain Accountability Tools: RBA supports multiple tools for members that enable self-assessment, third-party auditing, and online sustainability data management systems of this information. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/tools/

Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct: Companies can use the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct with their suppliers to improve the working conditions within facilities in their supply chain, the most recent version of which can be found on their website. The Code of Conduct was originally developed for use within the electronics industry, but has been revised to ensure relevance across most manufacturing sectors. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/code-of-conduct/

Responsible Business Alliance: The Responsible Business Alliance (RBA), formerly known as the Electronics Industry Citizenship Council (EICC), supports an industry Code of Conduct that provides a common approach to drive positive change on social, economic and environmental issues in manufacturing supply chains. RBA offers a suite of tools and resources to their members to aid in assessing and managing change in supply chains, as well as coordinating audit processes across different companies. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.
Wearable ElectronicsSustainable Packaging Design and ProductionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: Material efficiency is the ratio between the material input and the benefits derived. Resource conservation (source reduction) of material inputs and/or improving the functionality of the packaging can positively impact material efficiency. Process efficiency is the ratio between the time spent on production steps to the output. Opportunities to improve material and process efficiency include process improvement, product redesign, and technology changes to packaging equipment. It should be noted that continual source reduction has benefits, but there are trade-offs that must be assessed.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
Wearable ElectronicsWorker health, safety, and labor rightsCalculate C1 as the number of facilities that have been audited by a third party in the last twelve months, divided by the total number of company-owned or contact facilities, then multiply by 100. Include all tier 1 company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities, and all component manufacturing facilities that are directly contracted to supply custom parts or materials to company-owned or contract product assembly facilities.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The code of conduct must cover the following issues with requirements that meet or exceed those in the current, in-force Responsible Business Alliance Code of Conduct, including: Child labor; compensation; discipline; discrimination; forced labor; freedom of association and right to collective bargaining; health and safety; management systems for human resources; working hours.
Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct: Companies can use the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct with their suppliers to improve the working conditions within facilities in their supply chain, the most recent version of which can be found on their website. The Code of Conduct was originally developed for use within the electronics industry, but has been revised to ensure relevance across most manufacturing sectors. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/code-of-conduct/

Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process: Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process (VAP) provides members the ability to audit manufacturing facilities within their supply chain and share audit results with other members to better leverage information on common upstream supplier facilities. Organizations that are not members of RBA but own facilities that are in the electronics supply chain may also participate in this effort. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/vap/

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
N/ACompany-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Audio and Video Peripherals and AccessoriesConflict mineralsCalculate D1 as the total number of validated smelters, divided by the total number of smelters, then multiply by 100. Include all smelters identified as supplying some portion of the tin, tungsten, tantalum, or gold in your products.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
To be considered conflict-free, smelters must have a valid certification established or confirmed in the previous 12-month period as defined above.
Smelters may be validated through any internationally recognized body, such as the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI), Responsible Jewellery Council, ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group, or the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA).
Better Sourcing Program: The Better Sourcing Program (BSP) provides a technology-based communications solution to allow global organizations to source artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) ores through upstream due diligence, auditing and risk management. https://www.rcsglobal.com/bettersourcing/

ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group: The International Tin Association (ITA) has convened the Responsible Tin Supply Group (RTS) to enable organizations to source cassiterite (ore from which tin is derived) from responsible supply chain actors in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and surrounding countries while meeting due diligence guidance developed by the UN and OECD and required by national laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act. https://www.internationaltin.org/rts-group/

OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas: Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) has developed due diligence guidelines for organizations to implement when sourcing minerals from conflict regions, including but not limited to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. These guidelines have become normative in the industry and can be used to demonstrate due diligence under national and regional laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act in the U.S. and the European Commission draft proposal for supply chain due diligence for conflict minerals. http://www.oecd.org/daf/inv/mne/mining.htm

Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC) chain-of-custody certification: The Responsible Jewellery Council is a standard-setting and certification organization that has developed an ISEAL-accredited chain-of-custody certification program for use by the jewellery industry and manufacturers, which applies to gold and platinum group metals. https://www.responsiblejewellery.com/rjc-certification/

Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI): Formerly known as the Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative, the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI) is a joint effort between the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) and GeSI to establish supply chain transparency tools, resources and training to assist organizations in responsibly sourcing conflict-free minerals from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. Of note is their Responsible Minerals Assurance Process, which enables auditing and assessment of smelters for responsible ore sourcing and provides a centralized database for tracking smelter performance. http://www.responsiblemineralsinitiative.org/

THESIS Help Center Video: Conflict minerals KPI: Short video tutorial on the Conflict minerals KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017273

The London Bullion Market Association Good Delivery Lists: According to their website, the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA) produces "Good Delivery Lists for gold and silver bars; detailing the names of accredited refiners, their listing date and the marking details of their bars." http://www.lbma.org.uk/the-good-delivery-list

World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard: As part of their activities to support socially-responsible gold mining, the World Gold Council has developed the World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard to provide guidance to companies on responsible mining practices. https://www.gold.org/about-gold/gold-supply/responsible-gold/conflict-free-gold-standard
Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade: According to the website, "The Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade (PPA) is a joint initiative among governments, companies, and civil society to support supply chain solutions to conflict minerals challenges in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and the Great Lakes Region (GLR) of Central Africa." http://www.resolv.org/site-ppa/Conflict minerals: Conflict minerals are defined per "Section 1502(e)(4) of the [Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform] Act as (A) columbite-tantalite, also known as coltan (the metal ore from which tantalum is extracted); cassiterite (the metal ore from which tin is extracted); gold; wolframite (the metal ore from which tungsten is extracted); or their derivatives; or (B) any other mineral or its derivatives determined by the Secretary of State to be financing conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo or an adjoining country." (US Securities and Exchange Commission, 17 CFR Parts 240 and 249b, RIN: 3235-AK84, Conflict Minerals Final Rule)
Audio and Video Peripherals and AccessoriesEnergy efficiency - Use phaseCalculate B1 as the total number of units that meet the criteria for this question, divided by the total number of units sold, then multiply by 100. Include all units that were shipped with power management or energy efficiency attributes enabled, regardless of whether required by law. Products that are certified to a current in-force version of ENERGY STAR® or an equivalent third-party certified energy efficiency standard count toward this question.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
ENERGY STAR® International Partners: The EPA enters into agreements with foreign governments to use and/or recognize the ENERGY STAR standards and mark to help unify voluntary energy-efficiency initiatives globally. https://www.energystar.gov/partner_resources/international_partners

ENERGY STAR® Qualified Set-top Boxes : ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Set-top Boxes include benchmarks for product performance levels as well as incentives to enable "Deep Sleep Mode" for these products. The requirements became effective on September 1, 2011. https://www.energystar.gov/products/electronics/set_top_boxes_cable_boxes/partners

ENERGY STAR® Qualified Small Network Equipment (SNE): ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Small Network Equipment Version 1.0 include benchmarks for low-traffic rate efficiency as well as incentives to enable "Energy Efficiency Ethernet and External Network Proxy" functionality. The requirements became effective on September 3, 2013. https://www.energystar.gov/products/specs/sites/products/files/SNE%20V1_0%20Final%20Program%20Requirements.pdf
ENERGY STAR® International Partners: The EPA enters into agreements with foreign governments to use and/or recognize the ENERGY STAR standards and mark to help unify voluntary energy-efficiency initiatives globally. https://www.energystar.gov/partner_resources/international_partners

ENERGY STAR® Qualified Products: According to their website, "The ENERGY STAR label was established to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and other pollutants caused by the inefficient use of energy and make it easy for consumers to identify and purchase energy-efficient products that offer savings on energy bills without sacrificing performance, features, and comfort." Standards are established by ENERGY STAR through a multi-stakeholder process and administered under the US EPA. https://www.energystar.gov/products

Energy Efficiency - Use Phase: Attributes can include using switching regulator technology in the chargers, implementing labeling programs to reduce the energy consumption during standby and idle conditions, and providing more information about the battery charger duty cycles to the consumers. ?
Energy efficiency attributes: Product design attributes such as low power motors or more efficient air circulation that increase the energy efficiency of a product above market average.

Power management features: Product design features that enable users to manage product energy use, such as variable heat or speed settings, or that automatically control energy use, such as auto-off after a set time.
Audio and Video Peripherals and AccessoriesF-GHG emission tracking and reportingCalculate percentage of components, by units procured for products in this category, which meet the criteria for this question as the number of suppliers that abate all F-GHGs in at least 50% of their facilities divided by the total number of suppliers responsible for all relevant components and multiply the result by 100. For example: if four suppliers provide all relevant components and one does nothing, one abates only PFCs, and the remaining 2 abate all gases in 40% and 70% of their facilities, respectively, the correct percentage is 25% because only one supplier meets both criteria.
Relevant components specifically refer to flat panel displays and semiconductor electronic components or devices whose manufacture is known to use and emit fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-GHGs), namely during etch and chamber clean processes.
Abate all F-GHG emissions means that the component supplier abates all of the following F-GHGs in at least half of their facilities that manufacture relevant components for this product category: perfluorocarbons (PFCs), trifluoromethane (CHF3 or HFCs), nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6).
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Protocol for Measuring Destruction or Removal Efficiency (DRE): The Protocol for Measuring Destruction or Removal Efficiency (DRE) of Fluorinated Greenhouse Gas Abatement Equipment in Electronics Manufacturing was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency as a standard approach to measure F-GHG emissions at the point of abatement in the electronics component manufacturing facility. https://www.epa.gov/f-gas-partnership-programs/epas-protocol-measuring-destruction-or-removal-efficiencyCenter for Corporate Climate Leadership: According to this website, "The EPA's Center for Corporate Climate Leadership seeks to highlight activities to reduce supply chain greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at the sector level." The first efforts to be highlighted within the electronics industry are the efforts by suppliers to reduce F-GHGs during manufacturing of flat panel display in the electronics sector. https://www.epa.gov/climateleadership

European Semiconductor Industry - PFC Emission Reduction: The European Semiconductor Industry Association (ESIA) has provided information regarding successful PFC emissions reduction programs in Europe, and steps the industry is taking beyond its voluntary 2010 reduction goals. https://www.eusemiconductors.eu/esia/public-policy/sustainability-esh/pfc-gases

GHG Protocol Calculation Tools - Semiconductors: The GHG Protocol calculation tool for the semiconductor industry provides guidance on how to assess and account for PFC emissions during semiconductor wafer production and processing. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

PFC Reduction/Climate Partnership for the Semiconductor Industry: The United States Environmental Protection Agency supports the voluntary efforts to reduce fluorinated greenhouse gas (F-GHG) emissions from semiconductor industry through the PFC Reduction/Climate Partnership for the Semiconductor Industry. https://www.epa.gov/ghgemissions/overview-greenhouse-gases#f-gases
Component supplier: A manufacturer of a component used in the final product. If the manufacturing facility partner is responsible for fabrication of these devices, they are the supplier of interest for this question.

Fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-GHGs): Fluorine-containing gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere. The F-GHG emissions of primary concern in electronics manufacturing are of perfluorocarbons (PFCs), trifluoromethane (CHF3 or HFCs), nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which are more potent than carbon dioxide.

Manufacturing facility partners: Manufacturing facility partners are defined as organizations responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these organizations are internal or external to the respondent's organization.
Audio and Video Peripherals and AccessoriesGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the procurement spend on component suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total procurement spend on all component suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party. Component suppliers means the group of suppliers that account for 80% of your total spend on components purchased for products in this category.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Audio and Video Peripherals and AccessoriesGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, including product assembly and the manufacture of any components purchased directly by your organization for inclusion in products in this category, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total spend required to produce the products.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total spend required to produce the product. If the manufacturing facilities produce more than one category of product, only weight using the total spend required to produce the product specific to the product category in question.
Calculate B2 as the total spend on final products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total spend for final products produced, then multiply by 100.
For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardGreenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Audio and Video Peripherals and AccessoriesHazardous substances - Alternatives assessmentHazardous substances are defined as chemicals that meet the criteria for classification as carcinogens, mutagens, reproductive toxicants, or are persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemicals for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57).GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

PRIO: PRIO is a web-based tool developed by the Swedish government to facilitate the assessment of environmental and health risks of chemicals. ? https://www.kemi.se/prioguiden/english/start

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Exposure Assessment Tools and Models: According to their website, "The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) has developed several exposure assessment methods, databases, and predictive models to help in evaluating what happens to chemicals when they are used and released to the environment and how workers, the general public, consumers and the aquatic ecosystems may be exposed to chemicals." https://www.epa.gov/ceam/tools-data-exposure-assessment
BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815

REACH: A Priority Chemical is defined as a chemical that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57).  Priority Chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis. http://www.reachonline.eu/REACH/EN/REACH_EN/article57.html

The Guide to Safer Chemicals: The Guide to Safer Chemicals provides guidance on how to design and implement a chemicals management program based on the Principles for Safer Chemicals. The Principles and Guide were developed by BizNGO, a collaboration of business and NGO leaders to create and adopt "safer chemicals and sustainable materials." https://www.bizngo.org/safer-chemicals/guide-to-safer-chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Existing Chemicals Program: According to their website, "EPA's existing chemical programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and characterization, and risk management for chemical substances in commercial use." The current chemicals management program is undergoing review and update, including how the agency identifies and prioritizes priority chemicals for review and assessment under TSCA. https://www.epa.gov/compliance/toxic-substances-control-act-tsca-compliance-monitoring#chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
Informed substitution: Informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles (Adapted from United States Environmental Protection Agency Design for Environment Program Alternative Assessment information).

Public disclosure: Manufacturer-based acts of making information available and readily accessible to the public through one or more forms of media (e.g., online, print, telephone). Print media includes product labels and also includes, but is not limited to, books, magazines, newspapers, and readily accessible journal articles. Online disclosure includes, but is not limited to, publicly accessible websites (desktop or mobile) as well as making information electronically available through reporting platforms or mobile apps.
Audio and Video Peripherals and AccessoriesHazardous substances - DisclosureCalculate B1 as the number of suppliers which have provided disclosure information, divided by the total number of suppliers, then multiply by 100. Include all company-owned or contract component manufacturers, as well as organizations contracted for direct material supply to company-owned or contract manufacturers. To be included in this percentage, a supplier must disclose intentionally-added materials listed in the declarable substance groups and declarable substances above the thresholds specified in IEC 62474.
Suppliers who only report substances whose declaration is already mandated by relevant regulations in the market(s) of sale (e.g., by RoHS Directive) should not be considered as having provided disclosure. If an organization has not adopted IEC 62474, suppliers who report declarable substances in line with the declarable substances list in IEC 62474 can count as having provided disclosure.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
International Electrotechnical Commission Standard 62474: If you are using this - this has been moved to the standards field. Please link that to your categories - this item will be going away. http://webstore.iec.ch/webstore/webstore.nsf/mysearchajax?Openform&key=62474&sorting=&start=1&onglet=1Dell, Inc. Materials Restricted for Use: "Materials Restricted for Use," published by Dell, Inc., is one example of an internal hazardous substances management list used within the electronics industry. https://www.dell.com/downloads/global/corporate/environ/restricted_materials_guid.pdf

GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

Panasonic Corporation Chemical Substances Management Rank Guidelines: "The Chemical Substances Management Rank Guide," published by the Industrial Devices Company Group, Panasonic Corporation, is one example of an internal hazardous substances management list used within the electronics industry. https://www.panasonic.com/global/corporate/management/procurement/green.html
N/A
Audio and Video Peripherals and AccessoriesMaterial disposition tracking - Product takeback programFinal disposition means the point at which 1) a product enters its next life cycle through reuse or refurbishment; 2) the components of a product are recaptured for reuse as part of a refurbishment program; or 3) the product or materials contained within the product reach landfilling, incineration or material recovery where they are returned to the commodity market.R2 Certified Recyclers: According to the R2:2013 Standard, "certifying to this Standard through an accredited third-party Certification Body, electronics recyclers can help prospective purchasers of their services (customers) make informed decisions and have increased confidence that used and end -of-life electronic equipment are managed in an environmentally responsible manner, protective of the health and safety of workers and the public, and that all data on all media devices is secure until destroyed." https://sustainableelectronics.org/r2-standard

WEEELABEX: WEEELABEX standards cover the collection, logistics, and treatment of electronic wastes in all ten categories of the European Union's Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive. http://www.weeelabex.org/#!standards/component_41229

e-Stewards: According to the e-Stewards Certification website, "The e-Stewards Certification Program provides a high level of confidence that a recycler consistently conforms to the e-Stewards Standard." http://www.e-stewards.org/certification-overview/
N/ACertified third-party e-waste vendors: "Vendors that demonstrate to an accredited, independent third-party auditor that they meet specific standards to safely recycle and manage electronics. These certification programs must be based on strong environmental standards which maximize reuse and recycling, minimize exposure to human health or the environment, ensure safe management of materials by downstream handlers, and require destruction of all data on used electronics. Two accredited certification standards are the Responsible Recycling Practices (R2) and the e-Stewards® standards."(Source: EPA, E-cycling certification definition)

Hazardous materials and components - Used electronics: The phrase "...hazardous materials and components..." indicates materials and components that are regulated or require special handling. This list may include components such as mercury lamps, rechargeable batteries, CRT displays, and circuit boards. (Source: US EPA e-Cycling Regulations and Standards)

Responsible final disposition: Takeback programs may achieve the goal of responsible final material disposition by doing one or more of the following:
1. Including contractual requirements regarding downstream partner responsibility, all the way to final material disposition;
2. Verifying responsible final disposition by tracking a sampling of materials to final disposition; and/or;
3. Contracting exclusively with certified third-party e-waste vendors to ensure responsible final disposition.

Takeback program operation: The phrase "... operate programs in regions or countries globally where required by law or regulation" means programs that are created in response to laws or regulations. This includes State-level or Province-level legislation in North America, and national levels in other regions, such as the European Union or Japan.
Audio and Video Peripherals and AccessoriesPackaging Raw Material SourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

ISO 18604: ISO 18604 (Packaging and the environment -- Material recycling) provides measurement standards for determining how recyclable a particular product is. https://www.iso.org/standard/55872.html

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Pre-consumer recycled material: “Material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Renewable material: “Material that is composed of biomass from a living source and that can be continually replenished. To be defined as renewable, virgin materials shall come from sources which are replenished at a rate equal to or greater than the rate of depletion.” (FTC Green Guides:2012)

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably-sourced material: Material for which it can be demonstrated through second- or third-party verification that the virgin raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities. Materials such as paper can be included in this definition if the source of the packaging content comes from sustainably-managed forests with no deforestation.
Audio and Video Peripherals and AccessoriesProduct takeback programThis question addresses takeback programs that an organization may fund, contract, or physically operate, in whole or in part, to enable consumers to return products for responsible end-of-life management. Include only products and materials for which an organization has the ability to decide or influence the handling, treatment, and disposal of returned devices, components, and materials. These calculations should be made at the program level rather than category level. The same percentage can be reported across multiple product categories if the products are collected and managed in the same program. Separate programs require separate percentage calculations. For example, if two separate programs are run to collect hardware and printer ink cartridges, percentages for each program should be calculated separately and reported in the appropriate product category.
Calculate B1, B2, B3, and B4 as the weight of products or materials recovered from products in each category, divided by the weight of total products recovered globally through both voluntary and mandatory programs, then multiply by 100. The sum of B1, B2, B3, and B4 must be less than or equal to 100%.
The weight for any given returned device can only be credited once. For example, a device whose weight is included in component reuse for a hard drive that was salvaged cannot also be included under the material recovery calculation, even if the rest of the materials from the device are sent for material recovery.
Material that is found or suspected to end in landfill or incineration through downstream auditing or the lack of a viable secondary market cannot be included in the material recovery percentage.
Components reused or refurbished means the percent of total volume representing parts that return to the market. Examples would be hard drives, motherboards, salvaged chips or other components removed for the secondary market.
Closed-loop system means that once material or components are recovered, they are returned to the materials supply chain for manufacturing new devices or products of the same value or greater value than the device that was recycled. For example, a closed loop system would be when printer ink cartridges are recycled and the recovered plastic is then used in new printer ink cartridges.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
R2 Certified Recyclers: According to the R2:2013 Standard, "certifying to this Standard through an accredited third-party Certification Body, electronics recyclers can help prospective purchasers of their services (customers) make informed decisions and have increased confidence that used and end -of-life electronic equipment are managed in an environmentally responsible manner, protective of the health and safety of workers and the public, and that all data on all media devices is secure until destroyed." https://sustainableelectronics.org/r2-standard

e-Stewards: According to the e-Stewards Certification website, "The e-Stewards Certification Program provides a high level of confidence that a recycler consistently conforms to the e-Stewards Standard." http://www.e-stewards.org/certification-overview/
N/AN/A
Audio and Video Peripherals and AccessoriesSupply chain working conditions - Audit resultsCalculate B1 as the number of events resolved, divided by the total number of events recorded during both second- and third-party audits conducted in the previous year, then multiply by 100. Include all tier 1 company-owned or contract component manufacturing facilities, as well as all component manufacturing facilities that are directly contracted to supply custom parts or materials to company-owned or contract product assembly facilities that have had a second- or third-party audit conducted in the past year. For B1, answer 100% if zero non-conformance events have been recorded across all facilities. A non-conformance event indicates an audit finding that would trigger a corrective action plan. For audits performed under the Responsible Business Alliance Validated Auditing Program (VAP), this includes priority, major, and minor non-conformance events.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process: Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process (VAP) provides members the ability to audit manufacturing facilities within their supply chain and share audit results with other members to better leverage information on common upstream supplier facilities. Organizations that are not members of RBA but own facilities that are in the electronics supply chain may also participate in this effort. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/vap/

THESIS Help Center Video: Supply chain working conditions - Audit results KPI: Short video tutorial on the Supply chain working conditions - Audit results KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528319
Global Social Compliance Programme (GSCP) Reference Tools: The Global Social Compliance Program provides a publicly available suite of reference tools that describes existing best practices in social compliance. The reference tools can be used by companies to develop systems and initiatives. http://supply-chain.unglobalcompact.org/site/article/126

Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct: Companies can use the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct with their suppliers to improve the working conditions within facilities in their supply chain, the most recent version of which can be found on their website. The Code of Conduct was originally developed for use within the electronics industry, but has been revised to ensure relevance across most manufacturing sectors. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/code-of-conduct/

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.
Audio and Video Peripherals and AccessoriesSustainable Packaging Design and ProductionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: Material efficiency is the ratio between the material input and the benefits derived. Resource conservation (source reduction) of material inputs and/or improving the functionality of the packaging can positively impact material efficiency. Process efficiency is the ratio between the time spent on production steps to the output. Opportunities to improve material and process efficiency include process improvement, product redesign, and technology changes to packaging equipment. It should be noted that continual source reduction has benefits, but there are trade-offs that must be assessed.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
Audio and Video Peripherals and AccessoriesWorker health, safety, and labor rightsCalculate C1 as the number of facilities that have been audited by a third party in the last twelve months, divided by the total number of company-owned or contact facilities, then multiply by 100. Include all tier 1 company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities, and all component manufacturing facilities that are directly contracted to supply custom parts or materials to company-owned or contract product assembly facilities.
Facilities eligible for inclusion in the reported percentage are those that have either been deemed low risk through a verifiable assessment, or high-risk facilities audited by a third party. A verifiable assessment can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party, or a first-party systematic risk assessment against a code of conduct to determine risk based on conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The code of conduct must cover the following issues with requirements that meet or exceed those outlined in the in-force Responsible Business Alliance Code of Conduct: Child labor; Compensation; Discipline; Discrimination; Forced labor; Freedom of association and right to collective bargaining; Health and safety; Management systems for human resources; Working hours.
Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct: Companies can use the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct with their suppliers to improve the working conditions within facilities in their supply chain, the most recent version of which can be found on their website. The Code of Conduct was originally developed for use within the electronics industry, but has been revised to ensure relevance across most manufacturing sectors. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/code-of-conduct/

Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process: Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process (VAP) provides members the ability to audit manufacturing facilities within their supply chain and share audit results with other members to better leverage information on common upstream supplier facilities. Organizations that are not members of RBA but own facilities that are in the electronics supply chain may also participate in this effort. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/vap/

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

Ethical Trading Initiative Base Code of Labor Practices: This organization works in partnership to improve the working lives of poor and vulnerable people across the globe that make or grow consumer goods. ETI has a Base Code of Labor Practice and provides guidance and resources for implementing it. https://www.ethicaltrade.org/resources/eti-base-code

Global Social Compliance Programme (GSCP) Reference Tools: The Global Social Compliance Program provides a publicly available suite of reference tools that describes existing best practices in social compliance. The reference tools can be used by companies to develop systems and initiatives. http://supply-chain.unglobalcompact.org/site/article/126
First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
CamerasConflict mineralsCalculate D1 as the total number of validated smelters, divided by the total number of smelters, then multiply by 100. Include all smelters identified as supplying some portion of the tin, tungsten, tantalum, or gold in your products.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
To be considered conflict-free, smelters must have a valid certification established or confirmed in the previous 12-month period as defined above.
Smelters may be validated through any internationally recognized body, such as the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI), Responsible Jewellery Council, ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group, or the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA).
Better Sourcing Program: The Better Sourcing Program (BSP) provides a technology-based communications solution to allow global organizations to source artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) ores through upstream due diligence, auditing and risk management. https://www.rcsglobal.com/bettersourcing/

ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group: The International Tin Association (ITA) has convened the Responsible Tin Supply Group (RTS) to enable organizations to source cassiterite (ore from which tin is derived) from responsible supply chain actors in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and surrounding countries while meeting due diligence guidance developed by the UN and OECD and required by national laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act. https://www.internationaltin.org/rts-group/

OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas: Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) has developed due diligence guidelines for organizations to implement when sourcing minerals from conflict regions, including but not limited to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. These guidelines have become normative in the industry and can be used to demonstrate due diligence under national and regional laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act in the U.S. and the European Commission draft proposal for supply chain due diligence for conflict minerals. http://www.oecd.org/daf/inv/mne/mining.htm

Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC) chain-of-custody certification: The Responsible Jewellery Council is a standard-setting and certification organization that has developed an ISEAL-accredited chain-of-custody certification program for use by the jewellery industry and manufacturers, which applies to gold and platinum group metals. https://www.responsiblejewellery.com/rjc-certification/

Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI): Formerly known as the Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative, the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI) is a joint effort between the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) and GeSI to establish supply chain transparency tools, resources and training to assist organizations in responsibly sourcing conflict-free minerals from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. Of note is their Responsible Minerals Assurance Process, which enables auditing and assessment of smelters for responsible ore sourcing and provides a centralized database for tracking smelter performance. http://www.responsiblemineralsinitiative.org/

THESIS Help Center Video: Conflict minerals KPI: Short video tutorial on the Conflict minerals KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017273

The London Bullion Market Association Good Delivery Lists: According to their website, the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA) produces "Good Delivery Lists for gold and silver bars; detailing the names of accredited refiners, their listing date and the marking details of their bars." http://www.lbma.org.uk/the-good-delivery-list

World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard: As part of their activities to support socially-responsible gold mining, the World Gold Council has developed the World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard to provide guidance to companies on responsible mining practices. https://www.gold.org/about-gold/gold-supply/responsible-gold/conflict-free-gold-standard
Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade: According to the website, "The Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade (PPA) is a joint initiative among governments, companies, and civil society to support supply chain solutions to conflict minerals challenges in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and the Great Lakes Region (GLR) of Central Africa." http://www.resolv.org/site-ppa/Conflict minerals: Conflict minerals are defined per "Section 1502(e)(4) of the [Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform] Act as (A) columbite-tantalite, also known as coltan (the metal ore from which tantalum is extracted); cassiterite (the metal ore from which tin is extracted); gold; wolframite (the metal ore from which tungsten is extracted); or their derivatives; or (B) any other mineral or its derivatives determined by the Secretary of State to be financing conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo or an adjoining country." (US Securities and Exchange Commission, 17 CFR Parts 240 and 249b, RIN: 3235-AK84, Conflict Minerals Final Rule)
CamerasEnergy efficiency - Use phaseCalculate B1 as the total number of units that meet the criteria for this question, divided by the total number of units sold, then multiply by 100. Include all units that were shipped with power management or energy efficiency attributes enabled, regardless of whether required by law. Products that are certified to a current in-force version of ENERGY STAR® or an equivalent third-party certified energy efficiency standard count toward this question.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
ENERGY STAR® International Partners: The EPA enters into agreements with foreign governments to use and/or recognize the ENERGY STAR standards and mark to help unify voluntary energy-efficiency initiatives globally. https://www.energystar.gov/partner_resources/international_partners

ENERGY STAR® Qualified Set-top Boxes : ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Set-top Boxes include benchmarks for product performance levels as well as incentives to enable "Deep Sleep Mode" for these products. The requirements became effective on September 1, 2011. https://www.energystar.gov/products/electronics/set_top_boxes_cable_boxes/partners

ENERGY STAR® Qualified Small Network Equipment (SNE): ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Small Network Equipment Version 1.0 include benchmarks for low-traffic rate efficiency as well as incentives to enable "Energy Efficiency Ethernet and External Network Proxy" functionality. The requirements became effective on September 3, 2013. https://www.energystar.gov/products/specs/sites/products/files/SNE%20V1_0%20Final%20Program%20Requirements.pdf
ENERGY STAR® International Partners: The EPA enters into agreements with foreign governments to use and/or recognize the ENERGY STAR standards and mark to help unify voluntary energy-efficiency initiatives globally. https://www.energystar.gov/partner_resources/international_partners

ENERGY STAR® Qualified Products: According to their website, "The ENERGY STAR label was established to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and other pollutants caused by the inefficient use of energy and make it easy for consumers to identify and purchase energy-efficient products that offer savings on energy bills without sacrificing performance, features, and comfort." Standards are established by ENERGY STAR through a multi-stakeholder process and administered under the US EPA. https://www.energystar.gov/products

Energy Efficiency - Use Phase: Attributes can include using switching regulator technology in the chargers, implementing labeling programs to reduce the energy consumption during standby and idle conditions, and providing more information about the battery charger duty cycles to the consumers. ?
Energy efficiency attributes: Product design attributes such as low power motors or more efficient air circulation that increase the energy efficiency of a product above market average.

Power management features: Product design features that enable users to manage product energy use, such as variable heat or speed settings, or that automatically control energy use, such as auto-off after a set time.
CamerasF-GHG emission tracking and reportingCalculate percentage of components, by units procured for products in this category, which meet the criteria for this question as the number of suppliers that abate all F-GHGs in at least 50% of their facilities divided by the total number of suppliers responsible for all relevant components and multiply the result by 100. For example: if four suppliers provide all relevant components and one does nothing, one abates only PFCs, and the remaining 2 abate all gases in 40% and 70% of their facilities, respectively, the correct percentage is 25% because only one supplier meets both criteria.
Relevant components specifically refer to flat panel displays and semiconductor electronic components or devices whose manufacture is known to use and emit fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-GHGs), namely during etch and chamber clean processes.
Abate all F-GHG emissions means that the component supplier abates all of the following F-GHGs in at least half of their facilities that manufacture relevant components for this product category: perfluorocarbons (PFCs), trifluoromethane (CHF3 or HFCs), nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6).
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Protocol for Measuring Destruction or Removal Efficiency (DRE): The Protocol for Measuring Destruction or Removal Efficiency (DRE) of Fluorinated Greenhouse Gas Abatement Equipment in Electronics Manufacturing was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency as a standard approach to measure F-GHG emissions at the point of abatement in the electronics component manufacturing facility. https://www.epa.gov/f-gas-partnership-programs/epas-protocol-measuring-destruction-or-removal-efficiencyCenter for Corporate Climate Leadership: According to this website, "The EPA's Center for Corporate Climate Leadership seeks to highlight activities to reduce supply chain greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at the sector level." The first efforts to be highlighted within the electronics industry are the efforts by suppliers to reduce F-GHGs during manufacturing of flat panel display in the electronics sector. https://www.epa.gov/climateleadership

European Semiconductor Industry - PFC Emission Reduction: The European Semiconductor Industry Association (ESIA) has provided information regarding successful PFC emissions reduction programs in Europe, and steps the industry is taking beyond its voluntary 2010 reduction goals. https://www.eusemiconductors.eu/esia/public-policy/sustainability-esh/pfc-gases

GHG Protocol Calculation Tools - Semiconductors: The GHG Protocol calculation tool for the semiconductor industry provides guidance on how to assess and account for PFC emissions during semiconductor wafer production and processing. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

PFC Reduction/Climate Partnership for the Semiconductor Industry: The United States Environmental Protection Agency supports the voluntary efforts to reduce fluorinated greenhouse gas (F-GHG) emissions from semiconductor industry through the PFC Reduction/Climate Partnership for the Semiconductor Industry. https://www.epa.gov/ghgemissions/overview-greenhouse-gases#f-gases
Component supplier: A manufacturer of a component used in the final product. If the manufacturing facility partner is responsible for fabrication of these devices, they are the supplier of interest for this question.

Fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-GHGs): Fluorine-containing gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere. The F-GHG emissions of primary concern in electronics manufacturing are of perfluorocarbons (PFCs), trifluoromethane (CHF3 or HFCs), nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which are more potent than carbon dioxide.

Manufacturing facility partners: Manufacturing facility partners are defined as organizations responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these organizations are internal or external to the respondent's organization.
CamerasGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the procurement spend on component suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total procurement spend on all component suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party. Component suppliers means the group of suppliers that account for 80% of your total spend on components purchased for products in this category.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
CamerasGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, including product assembly and the manufacture of any components purchased directly by your organization for inclusion in products in this category, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total spend required to produce the products.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total spend required to produce the product. If the manufacturing facilities produce more than one category of product, only weight using the total spend required to produce the product specific to the product category in question.
Calculate B2 as the total spend on final products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total spend for final products produced, then multiply by 100.
For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardGreenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
CamerasHazardous substances - Alternatives assessmentHazardous substances are defined as chemicals that meet the criteria for classification as carcinogens, mutagens, reproductive toxicants, or are persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemicals for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57).GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

PRIO: PRIO is a web-based tool developed by the Swedish government to facilitate the assessment of environmental and health risks of chemicals. ? https://www.kemi.se/prioguiden/english/start

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Exposure Assessment Tools and Models: According to their website, "The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) has developed several exposure assessment methods, databases, and predictive models to help in evaluating what happens to chemicals when they are used and released to the environment and how workers, the general public, consumers and the aquatic ecosystems may be exposed to chemicals." https://www.epa.gov/ceam/tools-data-exposure-assessment
BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815

REACH: A Priority Chemical is defined as a chemical that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57).  Priority Chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis. http://www.reachonline.eu/REACH/EN/REACH_EN/article57.html

The Guide to Safer Chemicals: The Guide to Safer Chemicals provides guidance on how to design and implement a chemicals management program based on the Principles for Safer Chemicals. The Principles and Guide were developed by BizNGO, a collaboration of business and NGO leaders to create and adopt "safer chemicals and sustainable materials." https://www.bizngo.org/safer-chemicals/guide-to-safer-chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Existing Chemicals Program: According to their website, "EPA's existing chemical programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and characterization, and risk management for chemical substances in commercial use." The current chemicals management program is undergoing review and update, including how the agency identifies and prioritizes priority chemicals for review and assessment under TSCA. https://www.epa.gov/compliance/toxic-substances-control-act-tsca-compliance-monitoring#chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
Informed substitution: Informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles (Adapted from United States Environmental Protection Agency Design for Environment Program Alternative Assessment information).

Public disclosure: Manufacturer-based acts of making information available and readily accessible to the public through one or more forms of media (e.g., online, print, telephone). Print media includes product labels and also includes, but is not limited to, books, magazines, newspapers, and readily accessible journal articles. Online disclosure includes, but is not limited to, publicly accessible websites (desktop or mobile) as well as making information electronically available through reporting platforms or mobile apps.
CamerasHazardous substances - DisclosureCalculate B1 as the number of suppliers which have provided disclosure information, divided by the total number of suppliers, then multiply by 100. Include all company-owned or contract component manufacturers, as well as organizations contracted for direct material supply to company-owned or contract manufacturers. To be included in this percentage, a supplier must disclose intentionally-added materials listed in the declarable substance groups and declarable substances above the thresholds specified in IEC 62474.
Suppliers who only report substances whose declaration is already mandated by relevant regulations in the market(s) of sale (e.g., by RoHS Directive) should not be considered as having provided disclosure. If an organization has not adopted IEC 62474, suppliers who report declarable substances in line with the declarable substances list in IEC 62474 can count as having provided disclosure.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
International Electrotechnical Commission Standard 62474: If you are using this - this has been moved to the standards field. Please link that to your categories - this item will be going away. http://webstore.iec.ch/webstore/webstore.nsf/mysearchajax?Openform&key=62474&sorting=&start=1&onglet=1Dell, Inc. Materials Restricted for Use: "Materials Restricted for Use," published by Dell, Inc., is one example of an internal hazardous substances management list used within the electronics industry. https://www.dell.com/downloads/global/corporate/environ/restricted_materials_guid.pdf

GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

Panasonic Corporation Chemical Substances Management Rank Guidelines: "The Chemical Substances Management Rank Guide," published by the Industrial Devices Company Group, Panasonic Corporation, is one example of an internal hazardous substances management list used within the electronics industry. https://www.panasonic.com/global/corporate/management/procurement/green.html
N/A
CamerasMaterial disposition tracking - Product takeback programFinal disposition means the point at which 1) a product enters its next life cycle through reuse or refurbishment; 2) the components of a product are recaptured for reuse as part of a refurbishment program; or 3) the product or materials contained within the product reach landfilling, incineration or material recovery where they are returned to the commodity market.R2 Certified Recyclers: According to the R2:2013 Standard, "certifying to this Standard through an accredited third-party Certification Body, electronics recyclers can help prospective purchasers of their services (customers) make informed decisions and have increased confidence that used and end -of-life electronic equipment are managed in an environmentally responsible manner, protective of the health and safety of workers and the public, and that all data on all media devices is secure until destroyed." https://sustainableelectronics.org/r2-standard

WEEELABEX: WEEELABEX standards cover the collection, logistics, and treatment of electronic wastes in all ten categories of the European Union's Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive. http://www.weeelabex.org/#!standards/component_41229

e-Stewards: According to the e-Stewards Certification website, "The e-Stewards Certification Program provides a high level of confidence that a recycler consistently conforms to the e-Stewards Standard." http://www.e-stewards.org/certification-overview/
N/ACertified third-party e-waste vendors: "Vendors that demonstrate to an accredited, independent third-party auditor that they meet specific standards to safely recycle and manage electronics. These certification programs must be based on strong environmental standards which maximize reuse and recycling, minimize exposure to human health or the environment, ensure safe management of materials by downstream handlers, and require destruction of all data on used electronics. Two accredited certification standards are the Responsible Recycling Practices (R2) and the e-Stewards® standards."(Source: EPA, E-cycling certification definition)

Hazardous materials and components - Used electronics: The phrase "...hazardous materials and components..." indicates materials and components that are regulated or require special handling. This list may include components such as mercury lamps, rechargeable batteries, CRT displays, and circuit boards. (Source: US EPA e-Cycling Regulations and Standards)

Responsible final disposition: Takeback programs may achieve the goal of responsible final material disposition by doing one or more of the following:
1. Including contractual requirements regarding downstream partner responsibility, all the way to final material disposition;
2. Verifying responsible final disposition by tracking a sampling of materials to final disposition; and/or;
3. Contracting exclusively with certified third-party e-waste vendors to ensure responsible final disposition.

Takeback program operation: The phrase "... operate programs in regions or countries globally where required by law or regulation" means programs that are created in response to laws or regulations. This includes State-level or Province-level legislation in North America, and national levels in other regions, such as the European Union or Japan.
CamerasPackaging Raw Material SourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

ISO 18604: ISO 18604 (Packaging and the environment -- Material recycling) provides measurement standards for determining how recyclable a particular product is. https://www.iso.org/standard/55872.html

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Pre-consumer recycled material: “Material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Renewable material: “Material that is composed of biomass from a living source and that can be continually replenished. To be defined as renewable, virgin materials shall come from sources which are replenished at a rate equal to or greater than the rate of depletion.” (FTC Green Guides:2012)

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably-sourced material: Material for which it can be demonstrated through second- or third-party verification that the virgin raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities. Materials such as paper can be included in this definition if the source of the packaging content comes from sustainably-managed forests with no deforestation.
CamerasProduct takeback programThis question addresses takeback programs that an organization may fund, contract, or physically operate, in whole or in part, to enable consumers to return products for responsible end-of-life management. Include only products and materials for which an organization has the ability to decide or influence the handling, treatment, and disposal of returned devices, components, and materials. These calculations should be made at the program level rather than category level. The same percentage can be reported across multiple product categories if the products are collected and managed in the same program. Separate programs require separate percentage calculations. For example, if two separate programs are run to collect hardware and printer ink cartridges, percentages for each program should be calculated separately and reported in the appropriate product category.
Calculate B1, B2, B3, and B4 as the weight of products or materials recovered from products in each category, divided by the weight of total products recovered globally through both voluntary and mandatory programs, then multiply by 100. The sum of B1, B2, B3, and B4 must be less than or equal to 100%.
The weight for any given returned device can only be credited once. For example, a device whose weight is included in component reuse for a hard drive that was salvaged cannot also be included under the material recovery calculation, even if the rest of the materials from the device are sent for material recovery.
Material that is found or suspected to end in landfill or incineration through downstream auditing or the lack of a viable secondary market cannot be included in the material recovery percentage.
Components reused or refurbished means the percent of total volume representing parts that return to the market. Examples would be hard drives, motherboards, salvaged chips or other components removed for the secondary market.
Closed-loop system means that once material or components are recovered, they are returned to the materials supply chain for manufacturing new devices or products of the same value or greater value than the device that was recycled. For example, a closed loop system would be when printer ink cartridges are recycled and the recovered plastic is then used in new printer ink cartridges.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
R2 Certified Recyclers: According to the R2:2013 Standard, "certifying to this Standard through an accredited third-party Certification Body, electronics recyclers can help prospective purchasers of their services (customers) make informed decisions and have increased confidence that used and end -of-life electronic equipment are managed in an environmentally responsible manner, protective of the health and safety of workers and the public, and that all data on all media devices is secure until destroyed." https://sustainableelectronics.org/r2-standard

e-Stewards: According to the e-Stewards Certification website, "The e-Stewards Certification Program provides a high level of confidence that a recycler consistently conforms to the e-Stewards Standard." http://www.e-stewards.org/certification-overview/
N/AN/A
CamerasSupply chain working conditions - Audit resultsCalculate B1 as the number of events resolved, divided by the total number of events recorded during both second- and third-party audits conducted in the previous year, then multiply by 100. Include all tier 1 company-owned or contract component manufacturing facilities, as well as all component manufacturing facilities that are directly contracted to supply custom parts or materials to company-owned or contract product assembly facilities that have had a second- or third-party audit conducted in the past year. For B1, answer 100% if zero non-conformance events have been recorded across all facilities. A non-conformance event indicates an audit finding that would trigger a corrective action plan. For audits performed under the Responsible Business Alliance Validated Auditing Program (VAP), this includes priority, major, and minor non-conformance events.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process: Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process (VAP) provides members the ability to audit manufacturing facilities within their supply chain and share audit results with other members to better leverage information on common upstream supplier facilities. Organizations that are not members of RBA but own facilities that are in the electronics supply chain may also participate in this effort. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/vap/

THESIS Help Center Video: Supply chain working conditions - Audit results KPI: Short video tutorial on the Supply chain working conditions - Audit results KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528319
Global Social Compliance Programme (GSCP) Reference Tools: The Global Social Compliance Program provides a publicly available suite of reference tools that describes existing best practices in social compliance. The reference tools can be used by companies to develop systems and initiatives. http://supply-chain.unglobalcompact.org/site/article/126

Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct: Companies can use the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct with their suppliers to improve the working conditions within facilities in their supply chain, the most recent version of which can be found on their website. The Code of Conduct was originally developed for use within the electronics industry, but has been revised to ensure relevance across most manufacturing sectors. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/code-of-conduct/

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.
CamerasSustainable Packaging Design and ProductionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: Material efficiency is the ratio between the material input and the benefits derived. Resource conservation (source reduction) of material inputs and/or improving the functionality of the packaging can positively impact material efficiency. Process efficiency is the ratio between the time spent on production steps to the output. Opportunities to improve material and process efficiency include process improvement, product redesign, and technology changes to packaging equipment. It should be noted that continual source reduction has benefits, but there are trade-offs that must be assessed.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
CamerasWorker health, safety, and labor rightsCalculate C1 as the number of facilities that have been audited by a third party in the last twelve months, divided by the total number of company-owned or contact facilities, then multiply by 100. Include all tier 1 company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities, and all component manufacturing facilities that are directly contracted to supply custom parts or materials to company-owned or contract product assembly facilities.
Facilities eligible for inclusion in the reported percentage are those that have either been deemed low risk through a verifiable assessment, or high-risk facilities audited by a third party. A verifiable assessment can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party, or a first-party systematic risk assessment against a code of conduct to determine risk based on conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The code of conduct must cover the following issues with requirements that meet or exceed those outlined in the in-force Responsible Business Alliance Code of Conduct: Child labor; Compensation; Discipline; Discrimination; Forced labor; Freedom of association and right to collective bargaining; Health and safety; Management systems for human resources; Working hours.
Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct: Companies can use the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct with their suppliers to improve the working conditions within facilities in their supply chain, the most recent version of which can be found on their website. The Code of Conduct was originally developed for use within the electronics industry, but has been revised to ensure relevance across most manufacturing sectors. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/code-of-conduct/

Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process: Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process (VAP) provides members the ability to audit manufacturing facilities within their supply chain and share audit results with other members to better leverage information on common upstream supplier facilities. Organizations that are not members of RBA but own facilities that are in the electronics supply chain may also participate in this effort. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/vap/

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

Ethical Trading Initiative Base Code of Labor Practices: This organization works in partnership to improve the working lives of poor and vulnerable people across the globe that make or grow consumer goods. ETI has a Base Code of Labor Practice and provides guidance and resources for implementing it. https://www.ethicaltrade.org/resources/eti-base-code

Global Social Compliance Programme (GSCP) Reference Tools: The Global Social Compliance Program provides a publicly available suite of reference tools that describes existing best practices in social compliance. The reference tools can be used by companies to develop systems and initiatives. http://supply-chain.unglobalcompact.org/site/article/126
First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Computer and Gaming Peripherals and AccessoriesConflict mineralsCalculate D1 as the total number of validated smelters, divided by the total number of smelters, then multiply by 100. Include all smelters identified as supplying some portion of the tin, tungsten, tantalum, or gold in your products.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
To be considered conflict-free, smelters must have a valid certification established or confirmed in the previous 12-month period as defined above.
Smelters may be validated through any internationally recognized body, such as the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI), Responsible Jewellery Council, ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group, or the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA).
Better Sourcing Program: The Better Sourcing Program (BSP) provides a technology-based communications solution to allow global organizations to source artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) ores through upstream due diligence, auditing and risk management. https://www.rcsglobal.com/bettersourcing/

ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group: The International Tin Association (ITA) has convened the Responsible Tin Supply Group (RTS) to enable organizations to source cassiterite (ore from which tin is derived) from responsible supply chain actors in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and surrounding countries while meeting due diligence guidance developed by the UN and OECD and required by national laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act. https://www.internationaltin.org/rts-group/

OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas: Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) has developed due diligence guidelines for organizations to implement when sourcing minerals from conflict regions, including but not limited to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. These guidelines have become normative in the industry and can be used to demonstrate due diligence under national and regional laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act in the U.S. and the European Commission draft proposal for supply chain due diligence for conflict minerals. http://www.oecd.org/daf/inv/mne/mining.htm

Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC) chain-of-custody certification: The Responsible Jewellery Council is a standard-setting and certification organization that has developed an ISEAL-accredited chain-of-custody certification program for use by the jewellery industry and manufacturers, which applies to gold and platinum group metals. https://www.responsiblejewellery.com/rjc-certification/

Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI): Formerly known as the Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative, the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI) is a joint effort between the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) and GeSI to establish supply chain transparency tools, resources and training to assist organizations in responsibly sourcing conflict-free minerals from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. Of note is their Responsible Minerals Assurance Process, which enables auditing and assessment of smelters for responsible ore sourcing and provides a centralized database for tracking smelter performance. http://www.responsiblemineralsinitiative.org/

THESIS Help Center Video: Conflict minerals KPI: Short video tutorial on the Conflict minerals KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017273

The London Bullion Market Association Good Delivery Lists: According to their website, the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA) produces "Good Delivery Lists for gold and silver bars; detailing the names of accredited refiners, their listing date and the marking details of their bars." http://www.lbma.org.uk/the-good-delivery-list

World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard: As part of their activities to support socially-responsible gold mining, the World Gold Council has developed the World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard to provide guidance to companies on responsible mining practices. https://www.gold.org/about-gold/gold-supply/responsible-gold/conflict-free-gold-standard
Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade: According to the website, "The Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade (PPA) is a joint initiative among governments, companies, and civil society to support supply chain solutions to conflict minerals challenges in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and the Great Lakes Region (GLR) of Central Africa." http://www.resolv.org/site-ppa/Conflict minerals: Conflict minerals are defined per "Section 1502(e)(4) of the [Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform] Act as (A) columbite-tantalite, also known as coltan (the metal ore from which tantalum is extracted); cassiterite (the metal ore from which tin is extracted); gold; wolframite (the metal ore from which tungsten is extracted); or their derivatives; or (B) any other mineral or its derivatives determined by the Secretary of State to be financing conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo or an adjoining country." (US Securities and Exchange Commission, 17 CFR Parts 240 and 249b, RIN: 3235-AK84, Conflict Minerals Final Rule)
Computer and Gaming Peripherals and AccessoriesEnergy efficiency - Use phaseCalculate B1 as the total number of units that meet the criteria for this question, divided by the total number of units sold, then multiply by 100. Include all units that were shipped with power management or energy efficiency attributes enabled, regardless of whether required by law. Products that are certified to a current in-force version of ENERGY STAR® or an equivalent third-party certified energy efficiency standard count toward this question.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
ENERGY STAR® International Partners: The EPA enters into agreements with foreign governments to use and/or recognize the ENERGY STAR standards and mark to help unify voluntary energy-efficiency initiatives globally. https://www.energystar.gov/partner_resources/international_partners

ENERGY STAR® Qualified Set-top Boxes : ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Set-top Boxes include benchmarks for product performance levels as well as incentives to enable "Deep Sleep Mode" for these products. The requirements became effective on September 1, 2011. https://www.energystar.gov/products/electronics/set_top_boxes_cable_boxes/partners

ENERGY STAR® Qualified Small Network Equipment (SNE): ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Small Network Equipment Version 1.0 include benchmarks for low-traffic rate efficiency as well as incentives to enable "Energy Efficiency Ethernet and External Network Proxy" functionality. The requirements became effective on September 3, 2013. https://www.energystar.gov/products/specs/sites/products/files/SNE%20V1_0%20Final%20Program%20Requirements.pdf
ENERGY STAR® International Partners: The EPA enters into agreements with foreign governments to use and/or recognize the ENERGY STAR standards and mark to help unify voluntary energy-efficiency initiatives globally. https://www.energystar.gov/partner_resources/international_partners

ENERGY STAR® Qualified Products: According to their website, "The ENERGY STAR label was established to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and other pollutants caused by the inefficient use of energy and make it easy for consumers to identify and purchase energy-efficient products that offer savings on energy bills without sacrificing performance, features, and comfort." Standards are established by ENERGY STAR through a multi-stakeholder process and administered under the US EPA. https://www.energystar.gov/products

Energy Efficiency - Use Phase: Attributes can include using switching regulator technology in the chargers, implementing labeling programs to reduce the energy consumption during standby and idle conditions, and providing more information about the battery charger duty cycles to the consumers. ?
Energy efficiency attributes: Product design attributes such as low power motors or more efficient air circulation that increase the energy efficiency of a product above market average.

Power management features: Product design features that enable users to manage product energy use, such as variable heat or speed settings, or that automatically control energy use, such as auto-off after a set time.
Computer and Gaming Peripherals and AccessoriesF-GHG emission tracking and reportingCalculate percentage of components, by units procured for products in this category, which meet the criteria for this question as the number of suppliers that abate all F-GHGs in at least 50% of their facilities divided by the total number of suppliers responsible for all relevant components and multiply the result by 100. For example: if four suppliers provide all relevant components and one does nothing, one abates only PFCs, and the remaining 2 abate all gases in 40% and 70% of their facilities, respectively, the correct percentage is 25% because only one supplier meets both criteria.
Relevant components specifically refer to flat panel displays and semiconductor electronic components or devices whose manufacture is known to use and emit fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-GHGs), namely during etch and chamber clean processes.
Abate all F-GHG emissions means that the component supplier abates all of the following F-GHGs in at least half of their facilities that manufacture relevant components for this product category: perfluorocarbons (PFCs), trifluoromethane (CHF3 or HFCs), nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6).
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Protocol for Measuring Destruction or Removal Efficiency (DRE): The Protocol for Measuring Destruction or Removal Efficiency (DRE) of Fluorinated Greenhouse Gas Abatement Equipment in Electronics Manufacturing was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency as a standard approach to measure F-GHG emissions at the point of abatement in the electronics component manufacturing facility. https://www.epa.gov/f-gas-partnership-programs/epas-protocol-measuring-destruction-or-removal-efficiencyCenter for Corporate Climate Leadership: According to this website, "The EPA's Center for Corporate Climate Leadership seeks to highlight activities to reduce supply chain greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at the sector level." The first efforts to be highlighted within the electronics industry are the efforts by suppliers to reduce F-GHGs during manufacturing of flat panel display in the electronics sector. https://www.epa.gov/climateleadership

European Semiconductor Industry - PFC Emission Reduction: The European Semiconductor Industry Association (ESIA) has provided information regarding successful PFC emissions reduction programs in Europe, and steps the industry is taking beyond its voluntary 2010 reduction goals. https://www.eusemiconductors.eu/esia/public-policy/sustainability-esh/pfc-gases

GHG Protocol Calculation Tools - Semiconductors: The GHG Protocol calculation tool for the semiconductor industry provides guidance on how to assess and account for PFC emissions during semiconductor wafer production and processing. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

PFC Reduction/Climate Partnership for the Semiconductor Industry: The United States Environmental Protection Agency supports the voluntary efforts to reduce fluorinated greenhouse gas (F-GHG) emissions from semiconductor industry through the PFC Reduction/Climate Partnership for the Semiconductor Industry. https://www.epa.gov/ghgemissions/overview-greenhouse-gases#f-gases
Component supplier: A manufacturer of a component used in the final product. If the manufacturing facility partner is responsible for fabrication of these devices, they are the supplier of interest for this question.

Fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-GHGs): Fluorine-containing gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere. The F-GHG emissions of primary concern in electronics manufacturing are of perfluorocarbons (PFCs), trifluoromethane (CHF3 or HFCs), nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which are more potent than carbon dioxide.

Manufacturing facility partners: Manufacturing facility partners are defined as organizations responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these organizations are internal or external to the respondent's organization.
Computer and Gaming Peripherals and AccessoriesGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the procurement spend on component suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total procurement spend on all component suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party. Component suppliers means the group of suppliers that account for 80% of your total spend on components purchased for products in this category.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Computer and Gaming Peripherals and AccessoriesGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, including product assembly and the manufacture of any components purchased directly by your organization for inclusion in products in this category, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total spend required to produce the products.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total spend required to produce the product. If the manufacturing facilities produce more than one category of product, only weight using the total spend required to produce the product specific to the product category in question.
Calculate B2 as the total spend on final products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total spend for final products produced, then multiply by 100.
For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardGreenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Computer and Gaming Peripherals and AccessoriesHazardous substances - Alternatives assessmentHazardous substances are defined as chemicals that meet the criteria for classification as carcinogens, mutagens, reproductive toxicants, or are persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemicals for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57).GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

PRIO: PRIO is a web-based tool developed by the Swedish government to facilitate the assessment of environmental and health risks of chemicals. ? https://www.kemi.se/prioguiden/english/start

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Exposure Assessment Tools and Models: According to their website, "The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) has developed several exposure assessment methods, databases, and predictive models to help in evaluating what happens to chemicals when they are used and released to the environment and how workers, the general public, consumers and the aquatic ecosystems may be exposed to chemicals." https://www.epa.gov/ceam/tools-data-exposure-assessment
BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815

REACH: A Priority Chemical is defined as a chemical that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57).  Priority Chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis. http://www.reachonline.eu/REACH/EN/REACH_EN/article57.html

The Guide to Safer Chemicals: The Guide to Safer Chemicals provides guidance on how to design and implement a chemicals management program based on the Principles for Safer Chemicals. The Principles and Guide were developed by BizNGO, a collaboration of business and NGO leaders to create and adopt "safer chemicals and sustainable materials." https://www.bizngo.org/safer-chemicals/guide-to-safer-chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Existing Chemicals Program: According to their website, "EPA's existing chemical programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and characterization, and risk management for chemical substances in commercial use." The current chemicals management program is undergoing review and update, including how the agency identifies and prioritizes priority chemicals for review and assessment under TSCA. https://www.epa.gov/compliance/toxic-substances-control-act-tsca-compliance-monitoring#chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
Informed substitution: Informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles (Adapted from United States Environmental Protection Agency Design for Environment Program Alternative Assessment information).

Public disclosure: Manufacturer-based acts of making information available and readily accessible to the public through one or more forms of media (e.g., online, print, telephone). Print media includes product labels and also includes, but is not limited to, books, magazines, newspapers, and readily accessible journal articles. Online disclosure includes, but is not limited to, publicly accessible websites (desktop or mobile) as well as making information electronically available through reporting platforms or mobile apps.
Computer and Gaming Peripherals and AccessoriesHazardous substances - DisclosureCalculate B1 as the number of suppliers which have provided disclosure information, divided by the total number of suppliers, then multiply by 100. Include all company-owned or contract component manufacturers, as well as organizations contracted for direct material supply to company-owned or contract manufacturers. To be included in this percentage, a supplier must disclose intentionally-added materials listed in the declarable substance groups and declarable substances above the thresholds specified in IEC 62474.
Suppliers who only report substances whose declaration is already mandated by relevant regulations in the market(s) of sale (e.g., by RoHS Directive) should not be considered as having provided disclosure. If an organization has not adopted IEC 62474, suppliers who report declarable substances in line with the declarable substances list in IEC 62474 can count as having provided disclosure.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
International Electrotechnical Commission Standard 62474: If you are using this - this has been moved to the standards field. Please link that to your categories - this item will be going away. http://webstore.iec.ch/webstore/webstore.nsf/mysearchajax?Openform&key=62474&sorting=&start=1&onglet=1Dell, Inc. Materials Restricted for Use: "Materials Restricted for Use," published by Dell, Inc., is one example of an internal hazardous substances management list used within the electronics industry. https://www.dell.com/downloads/global/corporate/environ/restricted_materials_guid.pdf

GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

Panasonic Corporation Chemical Substances Management Rank Guidelines: "The Chemical Substances Management Rank Guide," published by the Industrial Devices Company Group, Panasonic Corporation, is one example of an internal hazardous substances management list used within the electronics industry. https://www.panasonic.com/global/corporate/management/procurement/green.html
N/A
Computer and Gaming Peripherals and AccessoriesMaterial disposition tracking - Product takeback programFinal disposition means the point at which 1) a product enters its next life cycle through reuse or refurbishment; 2) the components of a product are recaptured for reuse as part of a refurbishment program; or 3) the product or materials contained within the product reach landfilling, incineration or material recovery where they are returned to the commodity market.R2 Certified Recyclers: According to the R2:2013 Standard, "certifying to this Standard through an accredited third-party Certification Body, electronics recyclers can help prospective purchasers of their services (customers) make informed decisions and have increased confidence that used and end -of-life electronic equipment are managed in an environmentally responsible manner, protective of the health and safety of workers and the public, and that all data on all media devices is secure until destroyed." https://sustainableelectronics.org/r2-standard

WEEELABEX: WEEELABEX standards cover the collection, logistics, and treatment of electronic wastes in all ten categories of the European Union's Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive. http://www.weeelabex.org/#!standards/component_41229

e-Stewards: According to the e-Stewards Certification website, "The e-Stewards Certification Program provides a high level of confidence that a recycler consistently conforms to the e-Stewards Standard." http://www.e-stewards.org/certification-overview/
N/ACertified third-party e-waste vendors: "Vendors that demonstrate to an accredited, independent third-party auditor that they meet specific standards to safely recycle and manage electronics. These certification programs must be based on strong environmental standards which maximize reuse and recycling, minimize exposure to human health or the environment, ensure safe management of materials by downstream handlers, and require destruction of all data on used electronics. Two accredited certification standards are the Responsible Recycling Practices (R2) and the e-Stewards® standards."(Source: EPA, E-cycling certification definition)

Hazardous materials and components - Used electronics: The phrase "...hazardous materials and components..." indicates materials and components that are regulated or require special handling. This list may include components such as mercury lamps, rechargeable batteries, CRT displays, and circuit boards. (Source: US EPA e-Cycling Regulations and Standards)

Responsible final disposition: Takeback programs may achieve the goal of responsible final material disposition by doing one or more of the following:
1. Including contractual requirements regarding downstream partner responsibility, all the way to final material disposition;
2. Verifying responsible final disposition by tracking a sampling of materials to final disposition; and/or;
3. Contracting exclusively with certified third-party e-waste vendors to ensure responsible final disposition.

Takeback program operation: The phrase "... operate programs in regions or countries globally where required by law or regulation" means programs that are created in response to laws or regulations. This includes State-level or Province-level legislation in North America, and national levels in other regions, such as the European Union or Japan.
Computer and Gaming Peripherals and AccessoriesPackaging Raw Material SourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

ISO 18604: ISO 18604 (Packaging and the environment -- Material recycling) provides measurement standards for determining how recyclable a particular product is. https://www.iso.org/standard/55872.html

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Pre-consumer recycled material: “Material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Renewable material: “Material that is composed of biomass from a living source and that can be continually replenished. To be defined as renewable, virgin materials shall come from sources which are replenished at a rate equal to or greater than the rate of depletion.” (FTC Green Guides:2012)

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably-sourced material: Material for which it can be demonstrated through second- or third-party verification that the virgin raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities. Materials such as paper can be included in this definition if the source of the packaging content comes from sustainably-managed forests with no deforestation.
Computer and Gaming Peripherals and AccessoriesProduct takeback programThis question addresses takeback programs that an organization may fund, contract, or physically operate, in whole or in part, to enable consumers to return products for responsible end-of-life management. Include only products and materials for which an organization has the ability to decide or influence the handling, treatment, and disposal of returned devices, components, and materials. These calculations should be made at the program level rather than category level. The same percentage can be reported across multiple product categories if the products are collected and managed in the same program. Separate programs require separate percentage calculations. For example, if two separate programs are run to collect hardware and printer ink cartridges, percentages for each program should be calculated separately and reported in the appropriate product category.
Calculate B1, B2, B3, and B4 as the weight of products or materials recovered from products in each category, divided by the weight of total products recovered globally through both voluntary and mandatory programs, then multiply by 100. The sum of B1, B2, B3, and B4 must be less than or equal to 100%.
The weight for any given returned device can only be credited once. For example, a device whose weight is included in component reuse for a hard drive that was salvaged cannot also be included under the material recovery calculation, even if the rest of the materials from the device are sent for material recovery.
Material that is found or suspected to end in landfill or incineration through downstream auditing or the lack of a viable secondary market cannot be included in the material recovery percentage.
Components reused or refurbished means the percent of total volume representing parts that return to the market. Examples would be hard drives, motherboards, salvaged chips or other components removed for the secondary market.
Closed-loop system means that once material or components are recovered, they are returned to the materials supply chain for manufacturing new devices or products of the same value or greater value than the device that was recycled. For example, a closed loop system would be when printer ink cartridges are recycled and the recovered plastic is then used in new printer ink cartridges.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
R2 Certified Recyclers: According to the R2:2013 Standard, "certifying to this Standard through an accredited third-party Certification Body, electronics recyclers can help prospective purchasers of their services (customers) make informed decisions and have increased confidence that used and end -of-life electronic equipment are managed in an environmentally responsible manner, protective of the health and safety of workers and the public, and that all data on all media devices is secure until destroyed." https://sustainableelectronics.org/r2-standard

e-Stewards: According to the e-Stewards Certification website, "The e-Stewards Certification Program provides a high level of confidence that a recycler consistently conforms to the e-Stewards Standard." http://www.e-stewards.org/certification-overview/
N/AN/A
Computer and Gaming Peripherals and AccessoriesSupply chain working conditions - Audit resultsCalculate B1 as the number of events resolved, divided by the total number of events recorded during both second- and third-party audits conducted in the previous year, then multiply by 100. Include all tier 1 company-owned or contract component manufacturing facilities, as well as all component manufacturing facilities that are directly contracted to supply custom parts or materials to company-owned or contract product assembly facilities that have had a second- or third-party audit conducted in the past year. For B1, answer 100% if zero non-conformance events have been recorded across all facilities. A non-conformance event indicates an audit finding that would trigger a corrective action plan. For audits performed under the Responsible Business Alliance Validated Auditing Program (VAP), this includes priority, major, and minor non-conformance events.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process: Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process (VAP) provides members the ability to audit manufacturing facilities within their supply chain and share audit results with other members to better leverage information on common upstream supplier facilities. Organizations that are not members of RBA but own facilities that are in the electronics supply chain may also participate in this effort. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/vap/

THESIS Help Center Video: Supply chain working conditions - Audit results KPI: Short video tutorial on the Supply chain working conditions - Audit results KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528319
Global Social Compliance Programme (GSCP) Reference Tools: The Global Social Compliance Program provides a publicly available suite of reference tools that describes existing best practices in social compliance. The reference tools can be used by companies to develop systems and initiatives. http://supply-chain.unglobalcompact.org/site/article/126

Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct: Companies can use the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct with their suppliers to improve the working conditions within facilities in their supply chain, the most recent version of which can be found on their website. The Code of Conduct was originally developed for use within the electronics industry, but has been revised to ensure relevance across most manufacturing sectors. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/code-of-conduct/

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.
Computer and Gaming Peripherals and AccessoriesSustainable Packaging Design and ProductionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: Material efficiency is the ratio between the material input and the benefits derived. Resource conservation (source reduction) of material inputs and/or improving the functionality of the packaging can positively impact material efficiency. Process efficiency is the ratio between the time spent on production steps to the output. Opportunities to improve material and process efficiency include process improvement, product redesign, and technology changes to packaging equipment. It should be noted that continual source reduction has benefits, but there are trade-offs that must be assessed.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
Computer and Gaming Peripherals and AccessoriesWorker health, safety, and labor rightsCalculate C1 as the number of facilities that have been audited by a third party in the last twelve months, divided by the total number of company-owned or contact facilities, then multiply by 100. Include all tier 1 company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities, and all component manufacturing facilities that are directly contracted to supply custom parts or materials to company-owned or contract product assembly facilities.
Facilities eligible for inclusion in the reported percentage are those that have either been deemed low risk through a verifiable assessment, or high-risk facilities audited by a third party. A verifiable assessment can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party, or a first-party systematic risk assessment against a code of conduct to determine risk based on conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The code of conduct must cover the following issues with requirements that meet or exceed those outlined in the in-force Responsible Business Alliance Code of Conduct: Child labor; Compensation; Discipline; Discrimination; Forced labor; Freedom of association and right to collective bargaining; Health and safety; Management systems for human resources; Working hours.
Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct: Companies can use the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct with their suppliers to improve the working conditions within facilities in their supply chain, the most recent version of which can be found on their website. The Code of Conduct was originally developed for use within the electronics industry, but has been revised to ensure relevance across most manufacturing sectors. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/code-of-conduct/

Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process: Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process (VAP) provides members the ability to audit manufacturing facilities within their supply chain and share audit results with other members to better leverage information on common upstream supplier facilities. Organizations that are not members of RBA but own facilities that are in the electronics supply chain may also participate in this effort. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/vap/

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

Ethical Trading Initiative Base Code of Labor Practices: This organization works in partnership to improve the working lives of poor and vulnerable people across the globe that make or grow consumer goods. ETI has a Base Code of Labor Practice and provides guidance and resources for implementing it. https://www.ethicaltrade.org/resources/eti-base-code

Global Social Compliance Programme (GSCP) Reference Tools: The Global Social Compliance Program provides a publicly available suite of reference tools that describes existing best practices in social compliance. The reference tools can be used by companies to develop systems and initiatives. http://supply-chain.unglobalcompact.org/site/article/126
First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Entertainment ElectronicsConflict mineralsCalculate D1 as the total number of validated smelters, divided by the total number of smelters, then multiply by 100. Include all smelters identified as supplying some portion of the tin, tungsten, tantalum, or gold in your products.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
To be considered conflict-free, smelters must have a valid certification established or confirmed in the previous 12-month period as defined above.
Smelters may be validated through any internationally recognized body, such as the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI), Responsible Jewellery Council, ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group, or the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA).
Better Sourcing Program: The Better Sourcing Program (BSP) provides a technology-based communications solution to allow global organizations to source artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) ores through upstream due diligence, auditing and risk management. https://www.rcsglobal.com/bettersourcing/

ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group: The International Tin Association (ITA) has convened the Responsible Tin Supply Group (RTS) to enable organizations to source cassiterite (ore from which tin is derived) from responsible supply chain actors in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and surrounding countries while meeting due diligence guidance developed by the UN and OECD and required by national laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act. https://www.internationaltin.org/rts-group/

OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas: Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) has developed due diligence guidelines for organizations to implement when sourcing minerals from conflict regions, including but not limited to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. These guidelines have become normative in the industry and can be used to demonstrate due diligence under national and regional laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act in the U.S. and the European Commission draft proposal for supply chain due diligence for conflict minerals. http://www.oecd.org/daf/inv/mne/mining.htm

Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC) chain-of-custody certification: The Responsible Jewellery Council is a standard-setting and certification organization that has developed an ISEAL-accredited chain-of-custody certification program for use by the jewellery industry and manufacturers, which applies to gold and platinum group metals. https://www.responsiblejewellery.com/rjc-certification/

Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI): Formerly known as the Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative, the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI) is a joint effort between the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) and GeSI to establish supply chain transparency tools, resources and training to assist organizations in responsibly sourcing conflict-free minerals from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. Of note is their Responsible Minerals Assurance Process, which enables auditing and assessment of smelters for responsible ore sourcing and provides a centralized database for tracking smelter performance. http://www.responsiblemineralsinitiative.org/

THESIS Help Center Video: Conflict minerals KPI: Short video tutorial on the Conflict minerals KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017273

The London Bullion Market Association Good Delivery Lists: According to their website, the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA) produces "Good Delivery Lists for gold and silver bars; detailing the names of accredited refiners, their listing date and the marking details of their bars." http://www.lbma.org.uk/the-good-delivery-list

World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard: As part of their activities to support socially-responsible gold mining, the World Gold Council has developed the World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard to provide guidance to companies on responsible mining practices. https://www.gold.org/about-gold/gold-supply/responsible-gold/conflict-free-gold-standard
Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade: According to the website, "The Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade (PPA) is a joint initiative among governments, companies, and civil society to support supply chain solutions to conflict minerals challenges in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and the Great Lakes Region (GLR) of Central Africa." http://www.resolv.org/site-ppa/Conflict minerals: Conflict minerals are defined per "Section 1502(e)(4) of the [Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform] Act as (A) columbite-tantalite, also known as coltan (the metal ore from which tantalum is extracted); cassiterite (the metal ore from which tin is extracted); gold; wolframite (the metal ore from which tungsten is extracted); or their derivatives; or (B) any other mineral or its derivatives determined by the Secretary of State to be financing conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo or an adjoining country." (US Securities and Exchange Commission, 17 CFR Parts 240 and 249b, RIN: 3235-AK84, Conflict Minerals Final Rule)
Entertainment ElectronicsEnergy efficiency - Use phaseCalculate B1 as the total number of units that meet the criteria for this question, divided by the total number of units sold, then multiply by 100. Include all units that were shipped with power management or energy efficiency attributes enabled, regardless of whether required by law. Products that are certified to a current in-force version of ENERGY STAR® or an equivalent third-party certified energy efficiency standard count toward this question.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
ENERGY STAR® International Partners: The EPA enters into agreements with foreign governments to use and/or recognize the ENERGY STAR standards and mark to help unify voluntary energy-efficiency initiatives globally. https://www.energystar.gov/partner_resources/international_partners

ENERGY STAR® Qualified Set-top Boxes : ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Set-top Boxes include benchmarks for product performance levels as well as incentives to enable "Deep Sleep Mode" for these products. The requirements became effective on September 1, 2011. https://www.energystar.gov/products/electronics/set_top_boxes_cable_boxes/partners

ENERGY STAR® Qualified Small Network Equipment (SNE): ENERGY STAR Program Requirements for Small Network Equipment Version 1.0 include benchmarks for low-traffic rate efficiency as well as incentives to enable "Energy Efficiency Ethernet and External Network Proxy" functionality. The requirements became effective on September 3, 2013. https://www.energystar.gov/products/specs/sites/products/files/SNE%20V1_0%20Final%20Program%20Requirements.pdf
ENERGY STAR® International Partners: The EPA enters into agreements with foreign governments to use and/or recognize the ENERGY STAR standards and mark to help unify voluntary energy-efficiency initiatives globally. https://www.energystar.gov/partner_resources/international_partners

ENERGY STAR® Qualified Products: According to their website, "The ENERGY STAR label was established to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and other pollutants caused by the inefficient use of energy and make it easy for consumers to identify and purchase energy-efficient products that offer savings on energy bills without sacrificing performance, features, and comfort." Standards are established by ENERGY STAR through a multi-stakeholder process and administered under the US EPA. https://www.energystar.gov/products

Energy Efficiency - Use Phase: Attributes can include using switching regulator technology in the chargers, implementing labeling programs to reduce the energy consumption during standby and idle conditions, and providing more information about the battery charger duty cycles to the consumers. ?
Energy efficiency attributes: Product design attributes such as low power motors or more efficient air circulation that increase the energy efficiency of a product above market average.

Power management features: Product design features that enable users to manage product energy use, such as variable heat or speed settings, or that automatically control energy use, such as auto-off after a set time.
Entertainment ElectronicsF-GHG emission tracking and reportingCalculate percentage of components, by units procured for products in this category, which meet the criteria for this question as the number of suppliers that abate all F-GHGs in at least 50% of their facilities divided by the total number of suppliers responsible for all relevant components and multiply the result by 100. For example: if four suppliers provide all relevant components and one does nothing, one abates only PFCs, and the remaining 2 abate all gases in 40% and 70% of their facilities, respectively, the correct percentage is 25% because only one supplier meets both criteria.
Relevant components specifically refer to flat panel displays and semiconductor electronic components or devices whose manufacture is known to use and emit fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-GHGs), namely during etch and chamber clean processes.
Abate all F-GHG emissions means that the component supplier abates all of the following F-GHGs in at least half of their facilities that manufacture relevant components for this product category: perfluorocarbons (PFCs), trifluoromethane (CHF3 or HFCs), nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6).
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Protocol for Measuring Destruction or Removal Efficiency (DRE): The Protocol for Measuring Destruction or Removal Efficiency (DRE) of Fluorinated Greenhouse Gas Abatement Equipment in Electronics Manufacturing was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency as a standard approach to measure F-GHG emissions at the point of abatement in the electronics component manufacturing facility. https://www.epa.gov/f-gas-partnership-programs/epas-protocol-measuring-destruction-or-removal-efficiencyCenter for Corporate Climate Leadership: According to this website, "The EPA's Center for Corporate Climate Leadership seeks to highlight activities to reduce supply chain greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at the sector level." The first efforts to be highlighted within the electronics industry are the efforts by suppliers to reduce F-GHGs during manufacturing of flat panel display in the electronics sector. https://www.epa.gov/climateleadership

European Semiconductor Industry - PFC Emission Reduction: The European Semiconductor Industry Association (ESIA) has provided information regarding successful PFC emissions reduction programs in Europe, and steps the industry is taking beyond its voluntary 2010 reduction goals. https://www.eusemiconductors.eu/esia/public-policy/sustainability-esh/pfc-gases

GHG Protocol Calculation Tools - Semiconductors: The GHG Protocol calculation tool for the semiconductor industry provides guidance on how to assess and account for PFC emissions during semiconductor wafer production and processing. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

PFC Reduction/Climate Partnership for the Semiconductor Industry: The United States Environmental Protection Agency supports the voluntary efforts to reduce fluorinated greenhouse gas (F-GHG) emissions from semiconductor industry through the PFC Reduction/Climate Partnership for the Semiconductor Industry. https://www.epa.gov/ghgemissions/overview-greenhouse-gases#f-gases
Component supplier: A manufacturer of a component used in the final product. If the manufacturing facility partner is responsible for fabrication of these devices, they are the supplier of interest for this question.

Fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-GHGs): Fluorine-containing gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere. The F-GHG emissions of primary concern in electronics manufacturing are of perfluorocarbons (PFCs), trifluoromethane (CHF3 or HFCs), nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which are more potent than carbon dioxide.

Manufacturing facility partners: Manufacturing facility partners are defined as organizations responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these organizations are internal or external to the respondent's organization.
Entertainment ElectronicsGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the procurement spend on component suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total procurement spend on all component suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party. Component suppliers means the group of suppliers that account for 80% of your total spend on components purchased for products in this category.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Entertainment ElectronicsGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, including product assembly and the manufacture of any components purchased directly by your organization for inclusion in products in this category, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total spend required to produce the products.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total spend required to produce the product. If the manufacturing facilities produce more than one category of product, only weight using the total spend required to produce the product specific to the product category in question.
Calculate B2 as the total spend on final products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total spend for final products produced, then multiply by 100.
For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardGreenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Entertainment ElectronicsHazardous substances - Alternatives assessmentHazardous substances are defined as chemicals that meet the criteria for classification as carcinogens, mutagens, reproductive toxicants, or are persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemicals for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57).GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

PRIO: PRIO is a web-based tool developed by the Swedish government to facilitate the assessment of environmental and health risks of chemicals. ? https://www.kemi.se/prioguiden/english/start

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Exposure Assessment Tools and Models: According to their website, "The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) has developed several exposure assessment methods, databases, and predictive models to help in evaluating what happens to chemicals when they are used and released to the environment and how workers, the general public, consumers and the aquatic ecosystems may be exposed to chemicals." https://www.epa.gov/ceam/tools-data-exposure-assessment
BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815

REACH: A Priority Chemical is defined as a chemical that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57).  Priority Chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis. http://www.reachonline.eu/REACH/EN/REACH_EN/article57.html

The Guide to Safer Chemicals: The Guide to Safer Chemicals provides guidance on how to design and implement a chemicals management program based on the Principles for Safer Chemicals. The Principles and Guide were developed by BizNGO, a collaboration of business and NGO leaders to create and adopt "safer chemicals and sustainable materials." https://www.bizngo.org/safer-chemicals/guide-to-safer-chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Existing Chemicals Program: According to their website, "EPA's existing chemical programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and characterization, and risk management for chemical substances in commercial use." The current chemicals management program is undergoing review and update, including how the agency identifies and prioritizes priority chemicals for review and assessment under TSCA. https://www.epa.gov/compliance/toxic-substances-control-act-tsca-compliance-monitoring#chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
Informed substitution: Informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles (Adapted from United States Environmental Protection Agency Design for Environment Program Alternative Assessment information).

Public disclosure: Manufacturer-based acts of making information available and readily accessible to the public through one or more forms of media (e.g., online, print, telephone). Print media includes product labels and also includes, but is not limited to, books, magazines, newspapers, and readily accessible journal articles. Online disclosure includes, but is not limited to, publicly accessible websites (desktop or mobile) as well as making information electronically available through reporting platforms or mobile apps.
Entertainment ElectronicsHazardous substances - DisclosureCalculate B1 as the number of suppliers which have provided disclosure information, divided by the total number of suppliers, then multiply by 100. Include all company-owned or contract component manufacturers, as well as organizations contracted for direct material supply to company-owned or contract manufacturers. To be included in this percentage, a supplier must disclose intentionally-added materials listed in the declarable substance groups and declarable substances above the thresholds specified in IEC 62474.
Suppliers who only report substances whose declaration is already mandated by relevant regulations in the market(s) of sale (e.g., by RoHS Directive) should not be considered as having provided disclosure. If an organization has not adopted IEC 62474, suppliers who report declarable substances in line with the declarable substances list in IEC 62474 can count as having provided disclosure.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
International Electrotechnical Commission Standard 62474: If you are using this - this has been moved to the standards field. Please link that to your categories - this item will be going away. http://webstore.iec.ch/webstore/webstore.nsf/mysearchajax?Openform&key=62474&sorting=&start=1&onglet=1Dell, Inc. Materials Restricted for Use: "Materials Restricted for Use," published by Dell, Inc., is one example of an internal hazardous substances management list used within the electronics industry. https://www.dell.com/downloads/global/corporate/environ/restricted_materials_guid.pdf

GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

Panasonic Corporation Chemical Substances Management Rank Guidelines: "The Chemical Substances Management Rank Guide," published by the Industrial Devices Company Group, Panasonic Corporation, is one example of an internal hazardous substances management list used within the electronics industry. https://www.panasonic.com/global/corporate/management/procurement/green.html
N/A
Entertainment ElectronicsMaterial disposition tracking - Product takeback programFinal disposition means the point at which 1) a product enters its next life cycle through reuse or refurbishment; 2) the components of a product are recaptured for reuse as part of a refurbishment program; or 3) the product or materials contained within the product reach landfilling, incineration or material recovery where they are returned to the commodity market.R2 Certified Recyclers: According to the R2:2013 Standard, "certifying to this Standard through an accredited third-party Certification Body, electronics recyclers can help prospective purchasers of their services (customers) make informed decisions and have increased confidence that used and end -of-life electronic equipment are managed in an environmentally responsible manner, protective of the health and safety of workers and the public, and that all data on all media devices is secure until destroyed." https://sustainableelectronics.org/r2-standard

WEEELABEX: WEEELABEX standards cover the collection, logistics, and treatment of electronic wastes in all ten categories of the European Union's Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive. http://www.weeelabex.org/#!standards/component_41229

e-Stewards: According to the e-Stewards Certification website, "The e-Stewards Certification Program provides a high level of confidence that a recycler consistently conforms to the e-Stewards Standard." http://www.e-stewards.org/certification-overview/
N/ACertified third-party e-waste vendors: "Vendors that demonstrate to an accredited, independent third-party auditor that they meet specific standards to safely recycle and manage electronics. These certification programs must be based on strong environmental standards which maximize reuse and recycling, minimize exposure to human health or the environment, ensure safe management of materials by downstream handlers, and require destruction of all data on used electronics. Two accredited certification standards are the Responsible Recycling Practices (R2) and the e-Stewards® standards."(Source: EPA, E-cycling certification definition)

Hazardous materials and components - Used electronics: The phrase "...hazardous materials and components..." indicates materials and components that are regulated or require special handling. This list may include components such as mercury lamps, rechargeable batteries, CRT displays, and circuit boards. (Source: US EPA e-Cycling Regulations and Standards)

Responsible final disposition: Takeback programs may achieve the goal of responsible final material disposition by doing one or more of the following:
1. Including contractual requirements regarding downstream partner responsibility, all the way to final material disposition;
2. Verifying responsible final disposition by tracking a sampling of materials to final disposition; and/or;
3. Contracting exclusively with certified third-party e-waste vendors to ensure responsible final disposition.

Takeback program operation: The phrase "... operate programs in regions or countries globally where required by law or regulation" means programs that are created in response to laws or regulations. This includes State-level or Province-level legislation in North America, and national levels in other regions, such as the European Union or Japan.
Entertainment ElectronicsPackaging Raw Material SourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

ISO 18604: ISO 18604 (Packaging and the environment -- Material recycling) provides measurement standards for determining how recyclable a particular product is. https://www.iso.org/standard/55872.html

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Pre-consumer recycled material: “Material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Renewable material: “Material that is composed of biomass from a living source and that can be continually replenished. To be defined as renewable, virgin materials shall come from sources which are replenished at a rate equal to or greater than the rate of depletion.” (FTC Green Guides:2012)

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably-sourced material: Material for which it can be demonstrated through second- or third-party verification that the virgin raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities. Materials such as paper can be included in this definition if the source of the packaging content comes from sustainably-managed forests with no deforestation.
Entertainment ElectronicsProduct takeback programThis question addresses takeback programs that an organization may fund, contract, or physically operate, in whole or in part, to enable consumers to return products for responsible end-of-life management. Include only products and materials for which an organization has the ability to decide or influence the handling, treatment, and disposal of returned devices, components, and materials. These calculations should be made at the program level rather than category level. The same percentage can be reported across multiple product categories if the products are collected and managed in the same program. Separate programs require separate percentage calculations. For example, if two separate programs are run to collect hardware and printer ink cartridges, percentages for each program should be calculated separately and reported in the appropriate product category.
Calculate B1, B2, B3, and B4 as the weight of products or materials recovered from products in each category, divided by the weight of total products recovered globally through both voluntary and mandatory programs, then multiply by 100. The sum of B1, B2, B3, and B4 must be less than or equal to 100%.
The weight for any given returned device can only be credited once. For example, a device whose weight is included in component reuse for a hard drive that was salvaged cannot also be included under the material recovery calculation, even if the rest of the materials from the device are sent for material recovery.
Material that is found or suspected to end in landfill or incineration through downstream auditing or the lack of a viable secondary market cannot be included in the material recovery percentage.
Components reused or refurbished means the percent of total volume representing parts that return to the market. Examples would be hard drives, motherboards, salvaged chips or other components removed for the secondary market.
Closed-loop system means that once material or components are recovered, they are returned to the materials supply chain for manufacturing new devices or products of the same value or greater value than the device that was recycled. For example, a closed loop system would be when printer ink cartridges are recycled and the recovered plastic is then used in new printer ink cartridges.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
R2 Certified Recyclers: According to the R2:2013 Standard, "certifying to this Standard through an accredited third-party Certification Body, electronics recyclers can help prospective purchasers of their services (customers) make informed decisions and have increased confidence that used and end -of-life electronic equipment are managed in an environmentally responsible manner, protective of the health and safety of workers and the public, and that all data on all media devices is secure until destroyed." https://sustainableelectronics.org/r2-standard

e-Stewards: According to the e-Stewards Certification website, "The e-Stewards Certification Program provides a high level of confidence that a recycler consistently conforms to the e-Stewards Standard." http://www.e-stewards.org/certification-overview/
N/AN/A
Entertainment ElectronicsSupply chain working conditions - Audit resultsCalculate B1 as the number of events resolved, divided by the total number of events recorded during both second- and third-party audits conducted in the previous year, then multiply by 100. Include all tier 1 company-owned or contract component manufacturing facilities, as well as all component manufacturing facilities that are directly contracted to supply custom parts or materials to company-owned or contract product assembly facilities that have had a second- or third-party audit conducted in the past year. For B1, answer 100% if zero non-conformance events have been recorded across all facilities. A non-conformance event indicates an audit finding that would trigger a corrective action plan. For audits performed under the Responsible Business Alliance Validated Auditing Program (VAP), this includes priority, major, and minor non-conformance events.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process: Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process (VAP) provides members the ability to audit manufacturing facilities within their supply chain and share audit results with other members to better leverage information on common upstream supplier facilities. Organizations that are not members of RBA but own facilities that are in the electronics supply chain may also participate in this effort. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/vap/

THESIS Help Center Video: Supply chain working conditions - Audit results KPI: Short video tutorial on the Supply chain working conditions - Audit results KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528319
Global Social Compliance Programme (GSCP) Reference Tools: The Global Social Compliance Program provides a publicly available suite of reference tools that describes existing best practices in social compliance. The reference tools can be used by companies to develop systems and initiatives. http://supply-chain.unglobalcompact.org/site/article/126

Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct: Companies can use the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct with their suppliers to improve the working conditions within facilities in their supply chain, the most recent version of which can be found on their website. The Code of Conduct was originally developed for use within the electronics industry, but has been revised to ensure relevance across most manufacturing sectors. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/code-of-conduct/

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.
Entertainment ElectronicsSustainable Packaging Design and ProductionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: Material efficiency is the ratio between the material input and the benefits derived. Resource conservation (source reduction) of material inputs and/or improving the functionality of the packaging can positively impact material efficiency. Process efficiency is the ratio between the time spent on production steps to the output. Opportunities to improve material and process efficiency include process improvement, product redesign, and technology changes to packaging equipment. It should be noted that continual source reduction has benefits, but there are trade-offs that must be assessed.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
Entertainment ElectronicsWorker health, safety, and labor rightsCalculate C1 as the number of facilities that have been audited by a third party in the last twelve months, divided by the total number of company-owned or contact facilities, then multiply by 100. Include all tier 1 company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities, and all component manufacturing facilities that are directly contracted to supply custom parts or materials to company-owned or contract product assembly facilities.
Facilities eligible for inclusion in the reported percentage are those that have either been deemed low risk through a verifiable assessment, or high-risk facilities audited by a third party. A verifiable assessment can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party, or a first-party systematic risk assessment against a code of conduct to determine risk based on conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The code of conduct must cover the following issues with requirements that meet or exceed those outlined in the in-force Responsible Business Alliance Code of Conduct: Child labor; Compensation; Discipline; Discrimination; Forced labor; Freedom of association and right to collective bargaining; Health and safety; Management systems for human resources; Working hours.
Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct: Companies can use the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Code of Conduct with their suppliers to improve the working conditions within facilities in their supply chain, the most recent version of which can be found on their website. The Code of Conduct was originally developed for use within the electronics industry, but has been revised to ensure relevance across most manufacturing sectors. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/code-of-conduct/

Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process: Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) Validated Audit Process (VAP) provides members the ability to audit manufacturing facilities within their supply chain and share audit results with other members to better leverage information on common upstream supplier facilities. Organizations that are not members of RBA but own facilities that are in the electronics supply chain may also participate in this effort. http://www.responsiblebusiness.org/standards/vap/

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

Ethical Trading Initiative Base Code of Labor Practices: This organization works in partnership to improve the working lives of poor and vulnerable people across the globe that make or grow consumer goods. ETI has a Base Code of Labor Practice and provides guidance and resources for implementing it. https://www.ethicaltrade.org/resources/eti-base-code

Global Social Compliance Programme (GSCP) Reference Tools: The Global Social Compliance Program provides a publicly available suite of reference tools that describes existing best practices in social compliance. The reference tools can be used by companies to develop systems and initiatives. http://supply-chain.unglobalcompact.org/site/article/126
First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Networking EquipmentConflict mineralsCalculate D1 as the total number of validated smelters, divided by the total number of smelters, then multiply by 100. Include all smelters identified as supplying some portion of the tin, tungsten, tantalum, or gold in your products.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
To be considered conflict-free, smelters must have a valid certification established or confirmed in the previous 12-month period as defined above.
Smelters may be validated through any internationally recognized body, such as the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI), Responsible Jewellery Council, ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group, or the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA).
Better Sourcing Program: The Better Sourcing Program (BSP) provides a technology-based communications solution to allow global organizations to source artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) ores through upstream due diligence, auditing and risk management. https://www.rcsglobal.com/bettersourcing/

ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group: The International Tin Association (ITA) has convened the Responsible Tin Supply Group (RTS) to enable organizations to source cassiterite (ore from which tin is derived) from responsible supply chain actors in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and surrounding countries while meeting due diligence guidance developed by the UN and OECD and required by national laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act. https://www.internationaltin.org/rts-group/

OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas: Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) has developed due diligence guidelines for organizations to implement when sourcing minerals from conflict regions, including but not limited to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. These guidelines have become normative in the industry and can be used to demonstrate due diligence under national and regional laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act in the U.S. and the European Commission draft proposal for supply chain due diligence for conflict minerals. http://www.oecd.org/daf/inv/mne/mining.htm

Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC) chain-of-custody certification: The Responsible Jewellery Council is a standard-setting and certification organization that has developed an ISEAL-accredited chain-of-custody certification program for use by the jewellery industry and manufacturers, which applies to gold and platinum group metals. https://www.responsiblejewellery.com/rjc-certification/

Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI): Formerly known as the Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative, the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI) is a joint effort between the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) and GeSI to establish supply chain transparency tools, resources and training to assist organizations in responsibly sourcing conflict-free minerals from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. Of note is their Responsible Minerals Assurance Process, which enables auditing and assessment of smelters for responsible ore sourcing and provides a centralized database for tracking smelter performance. http://www.responsiblemineralsinitiative.org/

THESIS Help Center Video: Conflict minerals KPI: Short video tutorial on the Conflict minerals KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017273

The London Bullion Market Association Good Delivery Lists: According to their website, the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA) produces "Good Delivery Lists for gold and silver bars; detailing the names of accredited refiners, their listing date and the marking details of their bars." http://www.lbma.org.uk/the-good-delivery-list

World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard: As