KPI Guidance Tool

Clothing Footwear and Textiles
Assessment NameKPI TitleCalculation & ScopeCertifications, Standards & ToolsBackground InformationDefinitions
Baby ClothingAir quality - ManufacturingCalculate B1 as the mass of products that were produced in final cut, sew, and dyeing facilities that tracked and reported annual air emissions, divided by the total mass of products produced by all final cut, sew, and dyeing facilities, then multiply by 100. Include all company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities that performed final cut, sew, and dyeing operations. If the final cut, sew, and dyeing steps are performed in different facilities, then each must report their air emissions in order to be included in your calculation. Facilities included in this calculation must track all air emissions required by locally applicable regulations, as well as those emissions for which there is scientific evidence of serious effects to human health or the environment. Air emissions may include, but are not limited to, nitrogen and sulphur oxides from boilers, hydrocarbons from drying ovens, carbon monoxide from sizing, aniline vapors, and ammonia from printing/dyeing, and VOCs and ozone from textile finishing, and may be emitted as dust, oil mists, acid vapors, odors, and boiler exhausts. Testing of emissions must occur according to a rigorous and internationally accepted testing methodology.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Information entered into the Higg Index Facility Environment Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Air Emissions - Level 1, Questions 1-3" may be used in responding to B1. The information reported to the FEM is at the facility level; if your products are produced in multiple facilities you may aggregate the data to represent the entirety of final product produced.
Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Air quality - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Air quality - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750750
N/AN/A
Baby ClothingCellulosic material sourcing - Chemical useCanopyStyle’s Hot Button Ranking and Report is the primary viscose and cellulosic fiber sourcing analysis tool for the fashion sector. Calculate D1 as the mass of your cellulosic material that was supplied by producers or mills included in the CanopyStyle Hot Button Report and ranked in the yellow to green bottle range for the Chemical Use and Emissions column, divided by your total mass of cellulosic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Button up to Protect Forests — Producer Progress Criteria: The audit standard and process were developed by Canopy, in partnership with NEPCon, and is supported by the CanopyStyle Leaders for Forest Conservation and brands, retailers and designers looking to implement their sourcing policies for man-made cellulosic textiles. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/ranking-criteria-explained/

CanopyStyle Hot Button Report: The Hot Button Ranking of viscose producers is conducted using the consistent application of the tools and standards of the CanopyStyle initiative, including the CanopyStyle Audit. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/
N/AN/A
Baby ClothingCellulosic material sourcing - DeforestationCanopyStyle’s Hot Button Ranking and Report is the primary viscose and cellulosic fiber sourcing analysis tool for the fashion sector. Calculate D1 as the mass of your cellulosic material that was supplied by producers or mills included in the Canopy Hot Button Report and ranked in the yellow to green shirt range for the Hot Button Assessment column, divided by your total mass of cellulosic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Button up to Protect Forests — Producer Progress Criteria: The audit standard and process were developed by Canopy, in partnership with NEPCon, and is supported by the CanopyStyle Leaders for Forest Conservation and brands, retailers and designers looking to implement their sourcing policies for man-made cellulosic textiles. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/ranking-criteria-explained/

CanopyStyle Hot Button Report: The Hot Button Ranking of viscose producers is conducted using the consistent application of the tools and standards of the CanopyStyle initiative, including the CanopyStyle Audit. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/

ForestMapper: This interactive tool is the only one of its kind to visually represent ancient and endangered forests at a global scale. ForestMapper includes information on numerous ecological values divided into four categories: forests, species, carbon and landscapes. https://canopyplanet.org/tools/forestmapper/
N/AAncient and Endangered Forests: Intact forest landscape mosaics, naturally rare forest types, forest types that have been made rare due to human activity, and/or other forests that are ecologically critical for the protection of biological diversity. As a starting point to geographically locate ancient and endangered forests, maps of High Conservation Value Forests (HCVF), as defined by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), and of intact forest landscapes (IFL), can be used and paired with maps of other key ecological values like the habitat range of key endangered species and forests containing high concentrations of terrestrial carbon and High Carbon Stocks (HCS).
Baby ClothingGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the mass purchased from fabric suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total mass purchased from all fabric suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Suppliers who have entered and communicated information required by the Higg Index Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Energy Use & GHG - Level 1" for their facilities may be used to answer this KPI.
If using Field to Market's Fieldprint Platform to determine greenhouse gas emissions associated with cotton production, include energy use for field operations and activities through the first point of sale. This may include on-farm drying and any transport of the crop prior to sale.
Energy Efficiency Assessment and Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Tool for the Textile Industry (EAGER Textile): This tool was developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to aid in evaluating the impacts of introducing energy efficiency measures into a textile facility. According to the China Energy Group, "the EAGER tool will calculate the typical energy savings (electricity, fuel, final, and primary energy), CO2 emissions reduction, cost, and simple payback period...[the tool] is designed to work for textile facilities that have one or more of the following processes: spinning, weaving/knitting, dyeing, printing, finishing, and man-made fiber production." https://china.lbl.gov/eager-textile

Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator: Harnessing the power of collaboration across the agricultural value chain and locally-led conservation solutions, Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator provides a process-based standard for delivering sustainable outcomes for agriculture, people and the planet. The hallmark of the Accelerator’s approach lies in a process-based approach to advancing continuous improvement, which is grounded in a foundation that delivers solutions to global sustainable development priorities while also addressing local natural resource concerns. These projects utilize the power of voluntary, and often market-driven, solutions to incentivize improved environmental outcomes and enhance farmer livelihoods. By following a standardized and validated approach, these project pathways can leverage the collective action of the value chain to support resilient ecosystems and enhance farmer livelihoods. The Accelerator currently covers alfalfa, barley, corn, cotton, peanuts, potato, rice, sorghum, soy, sugar beet, and wheat produced in the U.S. and Canada. https://fieldtomarket.org/our-programs/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

THESIS Help Center Video: Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Supply Chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Supply Chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/465914322
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Baby ClothingGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total mass produced of each product.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total mass of final product produced/revenue from final product produced/number of units produced. If the manufacturing facilities produce more than one category of product, only weight using the total mass of production specific to the product category in question.
Calculate B2 as the mass of final products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total mass of final products produced, then multiply by 100. For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
Information entered into the Higg Index Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Energy Use & GHG - Level 1" may be used to answer this KPI.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

Energy Efficiency Assessment and Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Tool for the Textile Industry (EAGER Textile): This tool was developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to aid in evaluating the impacts of introducing energy efficiency measures into a textile facility. According to the China Energy Group, "the EAGER tool will calculate the typical energy savings (electricity, fuel, final, and primary energy), CO2 emissions reduction, cost, and simple payback period...[the tool] is designed to work for textile facilities that have one or more of the following processes: spinning, weaving/knitting, dyeing, printing, finishing, and man-made fiber production." https://china.lbl.gov/eager-textile

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardGreenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Baby ClothingHazardous Chemical Discharge ManagementFor C, informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles.
For D, goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound. Public disclosure of goals and progress must have occurred within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Examples of tools and protocols for screening chemicals and assessing alternatives include green chemistry, alternatives analysis, restricted substances lists, and other tools that are listed in the Background Information.
To calculate E1, subtract the number of chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List used this year across all manufacturing facilities where your product is cut and sewed from the number of chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List used last year across all manufacturing facilities where your product was cut and sewed. If more chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List were used this year than last, enter zero.
Calculate E1 as the number of manufacturing facilities where your product is cut and sewed that reduced the use of chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List this year compared to last year divided by the total number of manufacturing facilities where your product is cut and sewed, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
American Apparel & Footwear Association (AAFA) - Restricted Substance List: The AAFA provides guidelines for restricted chemicals and substances. https://www.aafaglobal.org/AAFA/Solutions_Pages/Restricted_Substance_List

BHive: The BHive enables the creation and management of chemical inventories, identifies chemical products that meet sustainability credentials. The BHive enhances supply chain transparency as factories, brands, and retailers can view and compare the safety of chemical products. https://www.thebhive.net/

Detox to Zero by OEKO-TEX: This analysis and assessment tool creates transparency and provides textile and leather producers the ability to control the use of hazardous substances. The tool focuses on continuous improvement and gradual reduction of harmful substances in production processes. https://www.oeko-tex.com/en/our-standards/detox-to-zero-by-oeko-tex

GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

GreenSuite: GreenSuite is an environmental sustainability tool that can be customized to specific users' needs. Environmental issues throughout the supply chain are covered by this web based solution. http://greensuite360.com/index.html

Greenlist Process: According to their website, "In 2001, SC Johnson developed the Greenlist Process to classify ingredients in order to minimize the human and environmental impacts of their products." The process is now available for license to other companies and organizations. https://www.scjohnson.com/en/our-purpose/sustainability-report/explaining-the-sc-johnson-greenlist-program-an-excerpt-from-our-2017-sustainability-report

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815

PRIO: PRIO is a web-based tool developed by the Swedish government to facilitate the assessment of environmental and health risks of chemicals. ? https://www.kemi.se/prioguiden/english/start

Roadmap to Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals (ZDHC): This plan is intended to reduce and eliminate the discharge of hazardous chemicals. https://www.roadmaptozero.com/

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS): Sustainable Textile Solutions programs support brands, retailers, and industry partners in their efforts to achieve compliance to environmental, health, and safety standards. https://sustexsolutions.com/

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Management KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Management KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528286

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Exposure Assessment Tools and Models: According to their website, "The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) has developed several exposure assessment methods, databases, and predictive models to help in evaluating what happens to chemicals when they are used and released to the environment and how workers, the general public, consumers and the aquatic ecosystems may be exposed to chemicals." https://www.epa.gov/ceam/tools-data-exposure-assessment

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Sustainable Futures: According to their website, "The goal of the Sustainable Futures Initiative (SF) is to make new chemicals safer, available faster, and at lower cost. It works by giving chemical developers the same risk-screening models that EPA uses to evaluate new chemicals before they enter the market."? https://www.epa.gov/sustainable-futures
BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Existing Chemicals Program: According to their website, "EPA's existing chemical programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and characterization, and risk management for chemical substances in commercial use." The current chemicals management program is undergoing review and update, including how the agency identifies and prioritizes priority chemicals for review and assessment under TSCA. https://www.epa.gov/compliance/toxic-substances-control-act-tsca-compliance-monitoring#chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
N/A
Baby ClothingLabor Rights - ManufacturingThe scope of this KPI includes company owned and contract manufacturing facilities performing final cut, sew, and dyeing operations for final product.

Calculate B1 as the mass of your final product that is covered by an internal policy that has quantitative time-bound goals related to child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100. Where freedom of association and collective bargaining are restricted by law, employers can use other forms of non-union employee representation and relations to respect this aspect of workers' rights.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your final product that has been reviewed by a risk assessment which identifies high-risk areas for labor rights abuses, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100.
To be included in B2, a risk assessment must have been conducted by second or third parties and must have been conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles. The risk assessments and standard must be verifiable and must address labor rights abuses such as discrimination on grounds of gender, age, ethnicity or disability, physical violence, sexual harassment and abuse, child labor, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining or any other range of behaviors and practices as outlined by internationally-recognized labor standards. The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions which can inform your responses.
In addition, to determine if an operation is in a high-risk area for labor rights abuses, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally-recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic risk assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. The AMFORI Countries' Risk Classification tool listed below may be used to inform your response. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B3 as the number of staff responsible for procurement activities that have been trained on labor rights issues in the supply chain, divided by the total number of staff responsible for procurement activities, then multiply by 100. Include both full-time and contracted employees. The training must be verifiable. Staff training should cover child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Staff training should be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for labor rights issues and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional staff training may be required to perform job duties.
Calculate B4 as the number staff responsible for procurement activities that have been evaluated via performance metrics on labor rights improvements in the supply chain, divided by the total staff responsible for procurement activities, then multiply by 100. Evaluation on labor rights should include, child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples of improvements include decreased incidence of child labor, forced labor, or discrimination, or an Increased worker participation in collective bargaining.
Calculate B5 as the mass of your final product that was produced in operations that were low risk, that were high risk but corrective actions were taken, or that were audited on child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining in the last three years, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B5, audits must be verifiable and address child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work. Where freedom of association & collective bargaining is restricted by law, employers can use other forms of non-union employee representation and relations to respect this aspect of workers' rights. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

THESIS Help Center Video: Labor Rights - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Labor Rights - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520093618
International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work: This declaration outlines the universal rights of all workers regardless of citizenship status, gender, or the local level of economic development. http://www.ilo.org/declaration/lang--en/index.htm

United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9
First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Forced labor: Any task or service performed by a person against their will or under threat of negative consequence. Forced labor includes debt bondage, human trafficking, withholding of wages or identity papers, threats of violence, unreasonable restriction of movement, and exploitation of marginalized workers.

Freedom of collective bargaining: The right to negotiate the conditions of employment as a group rather than individually without fear of repercussions.

Internationally-recognized labor principles: Internationally-recognized labor principles include the United Nations Global Compact and International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work or equivalent.

Labor rights: The universal rights of workers, regardless of race, gender, nationality, or other distinguishing characteristic. These include protection from the worst forms of child labor, forced labor, and discrimination, as well as freedom of association and collective bargaining as outlined by the United Nations Global Compact or the International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work.

Risk assessment: A systematic process to evaluate potential risks within an operation, system, or supply chain. It can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party or a country risk classification analysis that judges the site risk due to prevailing conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Baby ClothingMicrofiber release - ManufacturingAnswer A if your company only works with plant-derived materials (e.g., cotton, linen) which have been proven to biodegrade in water.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your synthetic textile supply that was sourced from manufacturers, either contracted or company owned, who monitored microfiber release during wet processing, divided by your total mass of synthetic textile supply, then multiply by 100. Monitoring may include, but is not limited to, wastewater and lint analysis.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your synthetic textile supply that was sourced from manufacturers, either contracted or company owned, who utilized alternatives to wet processing, divided by your total mass of synthetic textile supply, then multiply by 100.
Alternatives should replace at least one full stage of wet processing to qualify. Examples include, but are not limited to, inkjet printing and plasma technologies, which replace the dyeing stage of wet processing.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your synthetic textile supply that was sourced from manufacturers, either contracted or company owned, who have implemented practices and technologies to minimize microfiber release, divided by your total mass of synthetic textile supply, then multiply by 100.
The maximum possible response for each response option is 100%. However, multiple response options may be applicable to the same portion of your supply. For example, supply included in the calculation for C1 could also be included in the calculation for C2 if the stated conditions are also met.
Practices and technologies that minimize microfiber release include, but are not limited to, lowering the melting temperature of yarn to improve tensile strength, and adding coatings to yarn to reduce fiber loss.
N/AN/AMicrofiber release: Small synthetic fibers less than 10 micrometers in diameter that are released into the environment via wastewater during textile manufacturing that cause a variety of impacts to humans and wildlife, in addition to persisting in rivers, streams, and oceans.
Baby ClothingPlant-derived material sourcingPlant derived materials include cotton, linen, and hemp. Regenerated or semisynthetic cellulosic materials such as rayon and viscose are considered in the Synthetic Material Sourcing KPI.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your plant-derived material supply that was traced to the processing facility, divided by the total mass of your plant-derived material supply, then multiply by 100. The processing facility is where pre-spinning material processing takes place such as ginning for cotton, or scutching and heckling/hackling for linen.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your plant-derived material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for managing farm-level environmental impacts, divided by the total mass of your plant-derived material supply, then multiply by 100. A comprehensive plan will address pesticide use, fertilizer use, water use, greenhouse gas emissions and all other impacts relevant for the farm. Supply that has been certified by Better Cotton Initiative and Global Organic Textile Standard can be included in the numerator for this calculation.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your plant-derived material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for farm-level social impacts, divided by the total mass of your plant-derived material supply, then multiply by 100. A comprehensive plan will address worker health and safety, community health and safety, support for smallholders where present, and labor rights, including child labor, as well as all other impacts relevant for the farm. Supply that has been certified by Better Cotton Initiative, Fair Trade International, and Fair for Life can be included in the numerator for this calculation.
Calculate C4 as the mass of your cotton material supply that was assessed and met criteria for C1, C2, and C3, divided by the total mass of your material supply, then multiply by 100. The percent entered cannot exceed 100%.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Better Cotton Initiative: The Better Cotton Initiative offers publically available resources to provided background information on best practices for growing cotton. https://bettercotton.org/resources/

Cotton USA: Cotton USA is the trademark of the nonprofit Cotton Council International (CCI) which works through quality, sustainability, transparent partnerships, and ethical standards to make US cotton the preferred fiber for the clothing, footwear, and textiles value chain. Through their sustainability value, they aim to make US cotton the most sustainably produced in the world. https://cottonusa.org/

Fair for Life Certification Program: The Fair Life program provides certification for fair trade and responsible supply chains. The goal of Fair for Life is to ensure social and economic benefits to socioeconomically disadvantaged agricultural producers and workers and to ensure that smallholder producers receive a fair share. http://www.fairforlife.org/

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

Global Organic Textile Standard: This is an example of textile chemical use standards. http://www.global-standard.org/the-standard/general-description.html

Recycled Claim Standard (RCS) and Global Recycled Standard (GRS): The Recycled Claim Standard and Global Recycled Standard have the goal to increase recycled materials in consumer products by developing voluntary standards for the certification of recycled input. These standards also cover chain of custody, environmental processing, and chemical restrictions. https://textileexchange.org/standards/recycled-claim-standard-global-recycled-standard/

THESIS Help Center Video: Plant-derived material sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Plant-derived material sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750670
N/AFarming operation: An area of land and its buildings, comprised of one or more locations managed together that is used for growing crops that are delivered for further processing or as ingredients to other final products.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Baby ClothingProduct DesignCalculate B1 as the unit volume of your products that underwent a life cycle assessment, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
A life cycle assessment should be conducted against ISO 14040 \(Life Cycle Assessment - Principles and framework\).
Calculate B2 as the unit volume of your products that were designed to maximize material efficiency, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Material efficiency may include, but is not limited to, design to reduce total amount of materials needed to cut and sew a product, design to reduce material waste during cut and sew process.
Addressing material efficiency during the design stage may include, but is not limited to employing zero waste patternmaking to reduce material waste during the cut and sew process, and using whole garment knitting techniques to reduce the amount of yarn wasted during the knitting process.
Calculate B3 as the unit volume of your products designed to reduce laundering impacts, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Laundering impacts may include, but are not limited to, energy use during laundering and microfiber release during laundering.
Addressing laundering impacts at the design stage may include, but is not limited to choosing fabrics made from natural fibers that biodegrade, or adding care instructions to a garment's label that specify practices known to reduce energy use like cold water wash.
Calculate B4 as the unit volume of your products that underwent a durability assessment as part of the design process, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Both physical and emotional durability should be considered in this assessment.
Attributes to consider while assessing physical durability may include, but are not limited to stability/longevity of materials used, and strength/quality of cut and sew techniques.
Attributes to consider while assessing emotional durability include a product's flexibility or changeability to adapt to changing tastes over time.
Calculate B5 as the unit volume of your products that were designed to maximize resource utilization, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Resource utilization maximization may include, but is not limited to, materials that are able to be reused or recycled.
Addressing resource utilization maximization during the design stage may include, but is not limited to choosing single fiber fabrics that can be recycled, and using simple construction methods that can be disassembled after use.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS Help Center Video: Product Design KPI: Short video tutorial on the Product Design KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520107448B Corp Certification: B Corp offers certification at a company level and focuses on social and environmental performance, public transparency, and legal accountability. https://bcorporation.net/

BlueSign: Bluesign is a third party verification and consultant service. Verification is performed for social and environmental impacts, and consulting services are available for multiple supply chain, manufacturing, and production stages. https://www.bluesign.com/en/business/services

Cradle to Cradle Certified (TM) - Material Health: The Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute, a non-profit organization, administers the Cradle to Cradle Certified™ Product Standard, and provide guidance on chemical hazard assessments and their use for material assessments. The Cradle to Cradle™ Material Health Assessment Methodology examines product chemical composition break down and data collection rules and guidelines, guidance and criteria for chemical profiling methods, assessment of metabolism considerations, and guidance for the evaluation of material assessments. http://www.c2ccertified.org/get-certified/product-certification

Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

ISO 14040: ISO 14040 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Principles and Framework" document for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/37456.html

ISO 14044: ISO 14044 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Requirements and Guidelines" standard for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/38498.html

ISO/TC 207/SC 5: ISO/TC 207/SC 5 is the International Standardization Organization's life cycle assessment standard. https://www.iso.org/committee/54854.html
N/A
Baby ClothingRecycled contentCalculate B1 as the mass of fiber in your final products that can be defined as recycled content, divided by the total mass of fiber in your final products. Only include post-consumer recycled content. Exclude packaging from this calculation.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your products for which you were able to obtain data on recycled content, divided by the total mass of your products, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Recycled material available for textile manufacturing can vary based on fiber type. This should be considered when evaluating the ratio of recycled content based upon specific textile products.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your recycled material supply that was assessed and met criteria for B1 and B2 that is polyester divided by the total mass of your recycled material supply, then multiply by 100.
Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

THESIS Help Center Video: Recycled Content KPI: Short video tutorial on the Recycled Content KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017179
N/APost-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Pre-consumer recycled material: “Material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))
Baby ClothingSynthetic material sourcingThis KPI covers synthetic (e.g., polyester, nylon) and semisynthetic (e.g., rayon, viscose, lyocell) materials.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was traced to the production facility of origin, divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100. The production facility is where the chemical processes (e.g., synthesis, regeneration) to produce the fiber or material are carried out.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for managing facility environmental impacts, divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for facility social impacts, divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was assessed and met criteria for C1, C2, and C3 that is polyester divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
N/AN/AVerifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Baby ClothingWastewater generation - Supply ChainCalculate B1 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for COD, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B2 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for BOD, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B3 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for TSS, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B4 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met the standard for pH, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B5 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met the standard for temperature, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Audits should include verification that discharged wastewater is meeting the standards set forth by the American Apparel & Footwear Association Global Textile Effluent Guidelines for 95% of the sampling period:
- Measurements for BOD and TSS should be below or equal to 30 ppm.
- Measurements for COD should be below or equal to 100 ppm.
- Measurements for temperature should be below or equal to 37 degrees Celsius.
- Measurements for pH should be between 6.0 - 9.0.
Testing should follow a rigorous and internationally accepted methodology and frequency. Local or corporate standards may be stricter. The water quality metrics ideally approach ambient conditions.
Suppliers who have entered and communicated information required by the Higg Index Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Wastewater - Level 2, Question 7" may be used in responding to B1-B5 if the chosen wastewater standard meets or exceeds the values listed above, or if the values of the parameters listed in the detection table meet or exceed the values listed above. The information reported to the FEM is at the facility level; if your products are produced in multiple facilities you may aggregate the data to represent the entirety of final product produced.
AWS International Water Stewardship Standard: The International Water Stewardship Standard is a globally-applicable framework that helps water users understand their water use and impacts. Developed by the Alliance for Water Stewardship, the standard addresses 1) sustainable water balance, 2) good water quality, 3) healthy important water-related areas, and 4) good water governance. https://a4ws.org/the-aws-standard-2-0/

American Apparel & Footwear Association (AAFA) - Restricted Substance List: The AAFA provides guidelines for restricted chemicals and substances. https://www.aafaglobal.org/AAFA/Solutions_Pages/Restricted_Substance_List

BHive: The BHive enables the creation and management of chemical inventories, identifies chemical products that meet sustainability credentials. The BHive enhances supply chain transparency as factories, brands, and retailers can view and compare the safety of chemical products. https://www.thebhive.net/

Detox to Zero by OEKO-TEX: This analysis and assessment tool creates transparency and provides textile and leather producers the ability to control the use of hazardous substances. The tool focuses on continuous improvement and gradual reduction of harmful substances in production processes. https://www.oeko-tex.com/en/our-standards/detox-to-zero-by-oeko-tex

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS): Sustainable Textile Solutions programs support brands, retailers, and industry partners in their efforts to achieve compliance to environmental, health, and safety standards. https://sustexsolutions.com/

THESIS Help Center Video: Wastewater generation - Supply Chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Wastewater generation - Supply Chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/448595442
Roadmap to Zero by ZDHC (Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals): This plan is intended to reduce and eliminate the discharge of hazardous chemicals. https://www.roadmaptozero.com/

Textile Effluent Treatment Technology: The Journal of Cotton Science has produced a document addressing the treatment of textile effluent and specific wastewater management methods. http://www.cotton.org/journal/2007-11/3/upload/jcs11-141.pdf

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - Effluent Limitation Guidelines: This source provides current wastewater discharge guidelines and provides resources for reducing environmental impacts from wastewater discharge. https://www.epa.gov/eg

Wastewater 101 Toolbox: A free online resource for the textile industry to learn, act, and share experiences related to the treatment of wastewater. https://wastewater.sustainabilityconsortium.org/
Biological oxygen demand (BOD): An indicator for the amount of oxygen required/consumed for the microbiological decomposition (oxidation) of organic material in water bodies.

Chemical oxygen demand (COD): An indicator for the amount of oxygen required to oxidize an organic compound to carbon dioxide, ammonia, and water. The measurement is a proxy for the amount of organic compounds in water. Measuring COD in wastewater provides an estimated level of organic pollutants. The standard for measurement can be referenced in ISO 6060.

Total suspended solids (TSS): A water quality measurement that reflects the amount of particulates in a sample. The dry weight of residue in a filter is used to calculate units in milligrams per liter (mg/L).

Water use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.

pH: A measure of a substance's acidity or basicity. The measurement is based upon the molar concentration of hydrogen (H) ions in an aqueous solution of the substance. Pure water is at a neutral pH of 7. For wastewater quality testing, measuring pH allows for benchmarking pH levels to ambient conditions existing naturally in the surrounding environment.
Baby ClothingWater use - Supply chainCalculate B1 as the mass purchased from fabric suppliers that reported their annual water use, divided by the total mass purchased from all fabric suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using purchasing data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Water use is defined as the total amount of withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells. Supplier water use reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
If suppliers completed the CDP Water Security Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report water use.
Suppliers who have entered and communicated the information required by the Higg Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Water Use - Level 1" may be included in percentage calculated for response option B1.
If using Field to Market's Fieldprint Platform to determine water use during cotton production, report data from the "Irrigated yield" field of the summary report, not the "Yield difference due to irrigation" field.
Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator: Harnessing the power of collaboration across the agricultural value chain and locally-led conservation solutions, Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator provides a process-based standard for delivering sustainable outcomes for agriculture, people and the planet. The hallmark of the Accelerator’s approach lies in a process-based approach to advancing continuous improvement, which is grounded in a foundation that delivers solutions to global sustainable development priorities while also addressing local natural resource concerns. These projects utilize the power of voluntary, and often market-driven, solutions to incentivize improved environmental outcomes and enhance farmer livelihoods. By following a standardized and validated approach, these project pathways can leverage the collective action of the value chain to support resilient ecosystems and enhance farmer livelihoods. The Accelerator currently covers alfalfa, barley, corn, cotton, peanuts, potato, rice, sorghum, soy, sugar beet, and wheat produced in the U.S. and Canada. https://fieldtomarket.org/our-programs/CDP Water Information Request: The CDP Water Information Request provides questions that assess a company's water use, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. CDP can be contacted to respond to the Water Information Request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/
Water use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.
Baby ClothingWool and down sourcingCalculate B1 as the mass of your wool and down supply that was traced to the animal farm operation of origin, divided by the total mass of your wool and down supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your wool and down supply that was covered by a current comprehensive certification for farm-level environmental impacts or by verifiable, regularly conducted audits for farm-level impacts, divided by the total mass of your wool and down supply, then multiply by 100. The certification or audits should address all material environmental impacts including, but not limited to, soil health and erosion, biodiversity and deforestation, fertilizer use, and pesticide use. Material certified to the Responsible Wool Standard may be included in the calculation of B2.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your wool and down supply that came from animal farm operations that either maintain a current comprehensive animal welfare certification or verifiable, regularly conducted animal welfare audit, divided by the total mass of your wool and down supply, then multiply by 100.
To be included in B3, verifiable, regularly conducted audits should be performed by a second party or third party. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain can initiate these audits. Regulations, audits, and certifications that align with the animal welfare standards as described in Section 7 of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Terrestrial Animal Health Code and are well-enforced by the implementation of auditing systems can be included in your calculation.
Efforts should be taken to achieve minimization of pain, risk of injury, and transmission of diseases or parasites to animals; a physical environment in which the air quality, temperature, and humidity support good animal health; a structural and social environment that allows animals to rest comfortably, provides opportunities for physical and cognitive activity, and allows for the opportunity to perform all beneficial natural, individual, and social behaviors.
Animals should have access to sufficient water and appropriate feed, so as to be free from hunger and thirst. The handling of animals should foster a positive relationship between humans and animals and should not cause injury, panic, lasting fear, or avoidable stress.
Genetic selection should take into account the health and welfare of animals
Material certified to the Responsible Wool Standard and Responsible Down Standard may be included in the calculation of B3.
Responsible Down Standard: The Responsible Down Standard is a voluntary standard for the certification of down from ducks and geese. It addresses issues of animal welfare at the farm, transport, and slaughter stages. http://responsibledown.org/for-business/certification/

Responsible Wool Standard: The Responsible Wool Standard is a voluntary standard for the certification of wool from sheep. It addressees issues of animal welfare, land management, and traceability. https://textileexchange.org/standards/responsible-wool/
N/AAnimal farm operations: An area of land and its buildings, comprised of one or more locations managed together, that is used for rearing animals. This includes the growing of crops for animal feed on this land.

Animal welfare: Animal welfare refers to the well-being of an animal and how an animal is coping with the conditions in which it lives. A good state of welfare varies substantially between different contexts, but in general an animal is in a good state of welfare if it is healthy, comfortable, well-nourished, safe, able to express innate behavior, and not suffering from pain, fear, and distress. Ensuring animal welfare is a human responsibility that requires treatments such as good housing, good care, good feed, humane handling and humane slaughter/killing. The treatments that an animal receives is covered by other terms such as animal care, animal husbandry, and humane management (adapted from The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE)).

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Baby ClothingWorker Health and Safety - ManufacturingThis question aligns with the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Injury and Illness rate. This rate can be normalized for global applicability.
Calculate B1 according to OSHA's injury and illness rate by multiplying the number of recordable injuries and illnesses by 200,000. Divide this number by the total employee hours worked to produce your final product. If multiple facilities manufacture the final product, the injury and illness rate will need to be adjusted using a weighted average based on each facility's percentage of total production. Include all employees at a facility that participate in the production of the final product. This includes both full-time and contracted employees.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your final product for which you were able to obtain data, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS General Guidance document provides guidance to calculate the weighted average. See Background Information for access to this document.
The Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool is an online calculator that will compute your injury and illness rate. The OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses provides forms and information for computing your facility injury and illness rate.
Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool: This tool calculates the injury and illness incidence rate for employers. https://data.bls.gov/iirc/

OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses: This webpage contains information on how to record workplace injuries and illnesses and provides the worksheets needed to correctly do so. https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/forms

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520108472
Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh: The Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh is an agreement between brands and trade unions to improve worker health and safety. It can be a model for factory inspections, remediation, and worker participation & training. https://bangladeshaccord.org/

How to Compute a Firm's Incidence Rate for Safety Management: This website from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics provides in-depth guidance on computing injury and illness numbers. https://www.bls.gov/iif/osheval.htm

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Baby ClothingWorker Health and Safety - Supply ChainTo be included in B1-B5, risk assessments, training programs, safety plans, performance monitoring systems, and audits must be verifiable and address health and safety issues such as worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. The assessments and audits must be conducted by second or third parties. The risk assessment must be conducted once per year while the audit must have been conducted at least once every three years, both using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles such as International Labour Organization Occupational Safety and Health Conventions (e.g., No. 155). The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions, which can inform your responses. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for examples of initiatives that meet these requirements.
Calculate B1 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product that came from operations that have performed a risk assessment to identify high risk areas for health and safety, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in our final product, then multiply by 100.
To determine if an operation is high risk for health and safety, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic review assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. It must be conducted at least once per year. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B2 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product that came from operations that train workers on health and safety procedures, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B2, the training on health and safety procedures must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and must be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for workers on health and safety procedures and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional worker training may be required to perform job duties. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B3 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product that came from operations that implement a verifiable worker health and safety plan, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B3, a worker health and safety plan must be verifiable and must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and be prominently displayed in the workplace where employees normally report. The plan should include best practices specific to ergonomics; repetitive motions; chemical and particulate exposure; appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE); and proper use of tools, machinery. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B4 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, that came from operations that have a worker health and safety performance monitoring system in place, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B4, a worker health and safety performance monitoring system should include metrics on issues including, but not limited to, incidence of worker injuries and prevalence of diseases. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B5 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, that came from operations that were audited in the last three years on worker health and safety issues, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
To be included in B5, the audits must be verifiable and address preventive measures, freely provided personal protective equipment, identification of worker health and safety hazards and effects on the exposed people, statistics and reasons behind injuries, design of work area, processes, installations, machinery/work equipment, operating processes and work organization, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Standards on Occupational Health and Safety.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528345
United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Risk assessment: A systematic process to evaluate potential risks within an operation, system, or supply chain. It can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party or a country risk classification analysis that judges the site risk due to prevailing conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Backpacks and BriefcasesAir quality - ManufacturingCalculate B1 as the mass of products that were produced in final cut, sew, and dyeing facilities that tracked and reported annual air emissions, divided by the total mass of products produced by all final cut, sew, and dyeing facilities, then multiply by 100. Include all company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities that performed final cut, sew, and dyeing operations. If the final cut, sew, and dyeing steps are performed in different facilities, then each must report their air emissions in order to be included in your calculation. Facilities included in this calculation must track all air emissions required by locally applicable regulations, as well as those emissions for which there is scientific evidence of serious effects to human health or the environment. Air emissions may include, but are not limited to, nitrogen and sulphur oxides from boilers, hydrocarbons from drying ovens, carbon monoxide from sizing, aniline vapors, and ammonia from printing/dyeing, and VOCs and ozone from textile finishing, and may be emitted as dust, oil mists, acid vapors, odors, and boiler exhausts. Testing of emissions must occur according to a rigorous and internationally accepted testing methodology.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Information entered into the Higg Index Facility Environment Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Air Emissions - Level 1, Questions 1-3" may be used in responding to B1. The information reported to the FEM is at the facility level; if your products are produced in multiple facilities you may aggregate the data to represent the entirety of final product produced.
Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Air quality - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Air quality - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750750
N/AN/A
Backpacks and BriefcasesCellulosic material sourcing - Chemical useCanopyStyle’s Hot Button Ranking and Report is the primary viscose and cellulosic fiber sourcing analysis tool for the fashion sector. Calculate D1 as the mass of your cellulosic material that was supplied by producers or mills included in the CanopyStyle Hot Button Report and ranked in the yellow to green bottle range for the Chemical Use and Emissions column, divided by your total mass of cellulosic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Button up to Protect Forests — Producer Progress Criteria: The audit standard and process were developed by Canopy, in partnership with NEPCon, and is supported by the CanopyStyle Leaders for Forest Conservation and brands, retailers and designers looking to implement their sourcing policies for man-made cellulosic textiles. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/ranking-criteria-explained/

CanopyStyle Hot Button Report: The Hot Button Ranking of viscose producers is conducted using the consistent application of the tools and standards of the CanopyStyle initiative, including the CanopyStyle Audit. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/
N/AN/A
Backpacks and BriefcasesCellulosic material sourcing - DeforestationCanopyStyle’s Hot Button Ranking and Report is the primary viscose and cellulosic fiber sourcing analysis tool for the fashion sector. Calculate D1 as the mass of your cellulosic material that was supplied by producers or mills included in the Canopy Hot Button Report and ranked in the yellow to green shirt range for the Hot Button Assessment column, divided by your total mass of cellulosic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Button up to Protect Forests — Producer Progress Criteria: The audit standard and process were developed by Canopy, in partnership with NEPCon, and is supported by the CanopyStyle Leaders for Forest Conservation and brands, retailers and designers looking to implement their sourcing policies for man-made cellulosic textiles. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/ranking-criteria-explained/

CanopyStyle Hot Button Report: The Hot Button Ranking of viscose producers is conducted using the consistent application of the tools and standards of the CanopyStyle initiative, including the CanopyStyle Audit. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/

ForestMapper: This interactive tool is the only one of its kind to visually represent ancient and endangered forests at a global scale. ForestMapper includes information on numerous ecological values divided into four categories: forests, species, carbon and landscapes. https://canopyplanet.org/tools/forestmapper/
N/AAncient and Endangered Forests: Intact forest landscape mosaics, naturally rare forest types, forest types that have been made rare due to human activity, and/or other forests that are ecologically critical for the protection of biological diversity. As a starting point to geographically locate ancient and endangered forests, maps of High Conservation Value Forests (HCVF), as defined by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), and of intact forest landscapes (IFL), can be used and paired with maps of other key ecological values like the habitat range of key endangered species and forests containing high concentrations of terrestrial carbon and High Carbon Stocks (HCS).
Backpacks and BriefcasesGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the mass purchased from fabric suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total mass purchased from all fabric suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Suppliers who have entered and communicated information required by the Higg Index Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Energy Use & GHG - Level 1" for their facilities may be used to answer this KPI.
If using Field to Market's Fieldprint Platform to determine greenhouse gas emissions associated with cotton production, include energy use for field operations and activities through the first point of sale. This may include on-farm drying and any transport of the crop prior to sale.
Energy Efficiency Assessment and Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Tool for the Textile Industry (EAGER Textile): This tool was developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to aid in evaluating the impacts of introducing energy efficiency measures into a textile facility. According to the China Energy Group, "the EAGER tool will calculate the typical energy savings (electricity, fuel, final, and primary energy), CO2 emissions reduction, cost, and simple payback period...[the tool] is designed to work for textile facilities that have one or more of the following processes: spinning, weaving/knitting, dyeing, printing, finishing, and man-made fiber production." https://china.lbl.gov/eager-textile

Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator: Harnessing the power of collaboration across the agricultural value chain and locally-led conservation solutions, Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator provides a process-based standard for delivering sustainable outcomes for agriculture, people and the planet. The hallmark of the Accelerator’s approach lies in a process-based approach to advancing continuous improvement, which is grounded in a foundation that delivers solutions to global sustainable development priorities while also addressing local natural resource concerns. These projects utilize the power of voluntary, and often market-driven, solutions to incentivize improved environmental outcomes and enhance farmer livelihoods. By following a standardized and validated approach, these project pathways can leverage the collective action of the value chain to support resilient ecosystems and enhance farmer livelihoods. The Accelerator currently covers alfalfa, barley, corn, cotton, peanuts, potato, rice, sorghum, soy, sugar beet, and wheat produced in the U.S. and Canada. https://fieldtomarket.org/our-programs/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

THESIS Help Center Video: Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Supply Chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Supply Chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/465914322
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Backpacks and BriefcasesGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total mass produced of each product.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total mass of final product produced/revenue from final product produced/number of units produced. If the manufacturing facilities produce more than one category of product, only weight using the total mass of production specific to the product category in question.
Calculate B2 as the mass of final products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total mass of final products produced, then multiply by 100. For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
Information entered into the Higg Index Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Energy Use & GHG - Level 1" may be used to answer this KPI.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

Energy Efficiency Assessment and Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Tool for the Textile Industry (EAGER Textile): This tool was developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to aid in evaluating the impacts of introducing energy efficiency measures into a textile facility. According to the China Energy Group, "the EAGER tool will calculate the typical energy savings (electricity, fuel, final, and primary energy), CO2 emissions reduction, cost, and simple payback period...[the tool] is designed to work for textile facilities that have one or more of the following processes: spinning, weaving/knitting, dyeing, printing, finishing, and man-made fiber production." https://china.lbl.gov/eager-textile

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardGreenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Backpacks and BriefcasesHazardous Chemical Discharge ManagementFor C, informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles.
For D, goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound. Public disclosure of goals and progress must have occurred within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Examples of tools and protocols for screening chemicals and assessing alternatives include green chemistry, alternatives analysis, restricted substances lists, and other tools that are listed in the Background Information.
To calculate E1, subtract the number of chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List used this year across all manufacturing facilities where your product is cut and sewed from the number of chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List used last year across all manufacturing facilities where your product was cut and sewed. If more chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List were used this year than last, enter zero.
Calculate E1 as the number of manufacturing facilities where your product is cut and sewed that reduced the use of chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List this year compared to last year divided by the total number of manufacturing facilities where your product is cut and sewed, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
American Apparel & Footwear Association (AAFA) - Restricted Substance List: The AAFA provides guidelines for restricted chemicals and substances. https://www.aafaglobal.org/AAFA/Solutions_Pages/Restricted_Substance_List

BHive: The BHive enables the creation and management of chemical inventories, identifies chemical products that meet sustainability credentials. The BHive enhances supply chain transparency as factories, brands, and retailers can view and compare the safety of chemical products. https://www.thebhive.net/

Detox to Zero by OEKO-TEX: This analysis and assessment tool creates transparency and provides textile and leather producers the ability to control the use of hazardous substances. The tool focuses on continuous improvement and gradual reduction of harmful substances in production processes. https://www.oeko-tex.com/en/our-standards/detox-to-zero-by-oeko-tex

GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

GreenSuite: GreenSuite is an environmental sustainability tool that can be customized to specific users' needs. Environmental issues throughout the supply chain are covered by this web based solution. http://greensuite360.com/index.html

Greenlist Process: According to their website, "In 2001, SC Johnson developed the Greenlist Process to classify ingredients in order to minimize the human and environmental impacts of their products." The process is now available for license to other companies and organizations. https://www.scjohnson.com/en/our-purpose/sustainability-report/explaining-the-sc-johnson-greenlist-program-an-excerpt-from-our-2017-sustainability-report

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815

PRIO: PRIO is a web-based tool developed by the Swedish government to facilitate the assessment of environmental and health risks of chemicals. ? https://www.kemi.se/prioguiden/english/start

Roadmap to Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals (ZDHC): This plan is intended to reduce and eliminate the discharge of hazardous chemicals. https://www.roadmaptozero.com/

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS): Sustainable Textile Solutions programs support brands, retailers, and industry partners in their efforts to achieve compliance to environmental, health, and safety standards. https://sustexsolutions.com/

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Management KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Management KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528286

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Exposure Assessment Tools and Models: According to their website, "The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) has developed several exposure assessment methods, databases, and predictive models to help in evaluating what happens to chemicals when they are used and released to the environment and how workers, the general public, consumers and the aquatic ecosystems may be exposed to chemicals." https://www.epa.gov/ceam/tools-data-exposure-assessment

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Sustainable Futures: According to their website, "The goal of the Sustainable Futures Initiative (SF) is to make new chemicals safer, available faster, and at lower cost. It works by giving chemical developers the same risk-screening models that EPA uses to evaluate new chemicals before they enter the market."? https://www.epa.gov/sustainable-futures
BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Existing Chemicals Program: According to their website, "EPA's existing chemical programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and characterization, and risk management for chemical substances in commercial use." The current chemicals management program is undergoing review and update, including how the agency identifies and prioritizes priority chemicals for review and assessment under TSCA. https://www.epa.gov/compliance/toxic-substances-control-act-tsca-compliance-monitoring#chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
N/A
Backpacks and BriefcasesLabor Rights - ManufacturingThe scope of this KPI includes company owned and contract manufacturing facilities performing final cut, sew, and dyeing operations for final product.

Calculate B1 as the mass of your final product that is covered by an internal policy that has quantitative time-bound goals related to child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100. Where freedom of association and collective bargaining are restricted by law, employers can use other forms of non-union employee representation and relations to respect this aspect of workers' rights.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your final product that has been reviewed by a risk assessment which identifies high-risk areas for labor rights abuses, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100.
To be included in B2, a risk assessment must have been conducted by second or third parties and must have been conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles. The risk assessments and standard must be verifiable and must address labor rights abuses such as discrimination on grounds of gender, age, ethnicity or disability, physical violence, sexual harassment and abuse, child labor, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining or any other range of behaviors and practices as outlined by internationally-recognized labor standards. The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions which can inform your responses.
In addition, to determine if an operation is in a high-risk area for labor rights abuses, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally-recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic risk assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. The AMFORI Countries' Risk Classification tool listed below may be used to inform your response. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B3 as the number of staff responsible for procurement activities that have been trained on labor rights issues in the supply chain, divided by the total number of staff responsible for procurement activities, then multiply by 100. Include both full-time and contracted employees. The training must be verifiable. Staff training should cover child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Staff training should be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for labor rights issues and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional staff training may be required to perform job duties.
Calculate B4 as the number staff responsible for procurement activities that have been evaluated via performance metrics on labor rights improvements in the supply chain, divided by the total staff responsible for procurement activities, then multiply by 100. Evaluation on labor rights should include, child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples of improvements include decreased incidence of child labor, forced labor, or discrimination, or an Increased worker participation in collective bargaining.
Calculate B5 as the mass of your final product that was produced in operations that were low risk, that were high risk but corrective actions were taken, or that were audited on child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining in the last three years, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B5, audits must be verifiable and address child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work. Where freedom of association & collective bargaining is restricted by law, employers can use other forms of non-union employee representation and relations to respect this aspect of workers' rights. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

THESIS Help Center Video: Labor Rights - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Labor Rights - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520093618
International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work: This declaration outlines the universal rights of all workers regardless of citizenship status, gender, or the local level of economic development. http://www.ilo.org/declaration/lang--en/index.htm

United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9
First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Forced labor: Any task or service performed by a person against their will or under threat of negative consequence. Forced labor includes debt bondage, human trafficking, withholding of wages or identity papers, threats of violence, unreasonable restriction of movement, and exploitation of marginalized workers.

Freedom of collective bargaining: The right to negotiate the conditions of employment as a group rather than individually without fear of repercussions.

Internationally-recognized labor principles: Internationally-recognized labor principles include the United Nations Global Compact and International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work or equivalent.

Labor rights: The universal rights of workers, regardless of race, gender, nationality, or other distinguishing characteristic. These include protection from the worst forms of child labor, forced labor, and discrimination, as well as freedom of association and collective bargaining as outlined by the United Nations Global Compact or the International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work.

Risk assessment: A systematic process to evaluate potential risks within an operation, system, or supply chain. It can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party or a country risk classification analysis that judges the site risk due to prevailing conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Backpacks and BriefcasesMicrofiber release - ManufacturingAnswer A if your company only works with plant-derived materials (e.g., cotton, linen) which have been proven to biodegrade in water.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your synthetic textile supply that was sourced from manufacturers, either contracted or company owned, who monitored microfiber release during wet processing, divided by your total mass of synthetic textile supply, then multiply by 100. Monitoring may include, but is not limited to, wastewater and lint analysis.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your synthetic textile supply that was sourced from manufacturers, either contracted or company owned, who utilized alternatives to wet processing, divided by your total mass of synthetic textile supply, then multiply by 100.
Alternatives should replace at least one full stage of wet processing to qualify. Examples include, but are not limited to, inkjet printing and plasma technologies, which replace the dyeing stage of wet processing.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your synthetic textile supply that was sourced from manufacturers, either contracted or company owned, who have implemented practices and technologies to minimize microfiber release, divided by your total mass of synthetic textile supply, then multiply by 100.
The maximum possible response for each response option is 100%. However, multiple response options may be applicable to the same portion of your supply. For example, supply included in the calculation for C1 could also be included in the calculation for C2 if the stated conditions are also met.
Practices and technologies that minimize microfiber release include, but are not limited to, lowering the melting temperature of yarn to improve tensile strength, and adding coatings to yarn to reduce fiber loss.
N/AN/AMicrofiber release: Small synthetic fibers less than 10 micrometers in diameter that are released into the environment via wastewater during textile manufacturing that cause a variety of impacts to humans and wildlife, in addition to persisting in rivers, streams, and oceans.
Backpacks and BriefcasesPlant-derived material sourcingPlant derived materials include cotton, linen, and hemp. Regenerated or semisynthetic cellulosic materials such as rayon and viscose are considered in the Synthetic Material Sourcing KPI.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your plant-derived material supply that was traced to the processing facility, divided by the total mass of your plant-derived material supply, then multiply by 100. The processing facility is where pre-spinning material processing takes place such as ginning for cotton, or scutching and heckling/hackling for linen.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your plant-derived material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for managing farm-level environmental impacts, divided by the total mass of your plant-derived material supply, then multiply by 100. A comprehensive plan will address pesticide use, fertilizer use, water use, greenhouse gas emissions and all other impacts relevant for the farm. Supply that has been certified by Better Cotton Initiative and Global Organic Textile Standard can be included in the numerator for this calculation.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your plant-derived material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for farm-level social impacts, divided by the total mass of your plant-derived material supply, then multiply by 100. A comprehensive plan will address worker health and safety, community health and safety, support for smallholders where present, and labor rights, including child labor, as well as all other impacts relevant for the farm. Supply that has been certified by Better Cotton Initiative, Fair Trade International, and Fair for Life can be included in the numerator for this calculation.
Calculate C4 as the mass of your cotton material supply that was assessed and met criteria for C1, C2, and C3, divided by the total mass of your material supply, then multiply by 100. The percent entered cannot exceed 100%.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Better Cotton Initiative: The Better Cotton Initiative offers publically available resources to provided background information on best practices for growing cotton. https://bettercotton.org/resources/

Cotton USA: Cotton USA is the trademark of the nonprofit Cotton Council International (CCI) which works through quality, sustainability, transparent partnerships, and ethical standards to make US cotton the preferred fiber for the clothing, footwear, and textiles value chain. Through their sustainability value, they aim to make US cotton the most sustainably produced in the world. https://cottonusa.org/

Fair for Life Certification Program: The Fair Life program provides certification for fair trade and responsible supply chains. The goal of Fair for Life is to ensure social and economic benefits to socioeconomically disadvantaged agricultural producers and workers and to ensure that smallholder producers receive a fair share. http://www.fairforlife.org/

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

Global Organic Textile Standard: This is an example of textile chemical use standards. http://www.global-standard.org/the-standard/general-description.html

Recycled Claim Standard (RCS) and Global Recycled Standard (GRS): The Recycled Claim Standard and Global Recycled Standard have the goal to increase recycled materials in consumer products by developing voluntary standards for the certification of recycled input. These standards also cover chain of custody, environmental processing, and chemical restrictions. https://textileexchange.org/standards/recycled-claim-standard-global-recycled-standard/

THESIS Help Center Video: Plant-derived material sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Plant-derived material sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750670
N/AFarming operation: An area of land and its buildings, comprised of one or more locations managed together that is used for growing crops that are delivered for further processing or as ingredients to other final products.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Backpacks and BriefcasesProduct DesignCalculate B1 as the unit volume of your products that underwent a life cycle assessment, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
A life cycle assessment should be conducted against ISO 14040 \(Life Cycle Assessment - Principles and framework\).
Calculate B2 as the unit volume of your products that were designed to maximize material efficiency, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Material efficiency may include, but is not limited to, design to reduce total amount of materials needed to cut and sew a product, design to reduce material waste during cut and sew process.
Addressing material efficiency during the design stage may include, but is not limited to employing zero waste patternmaking to reduce material waste during the cut and sew process, and using whole garment knitting techniques to reduce the amount of yarn wasted during the knitting process.
Calculate B3 as the unit volume of your products designed to reduce laundering impacts, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Laundering impacts may include, but are not limited to, energy use during laundering and microfiber release during laundering.
Addressing laundering impacts at the design stage may include, but is not limited to choosing fabrics made from natural fibers that biodegrade, or adding care instructions to a garment's label that specify practices known to reduce energy use like cold water wash.
Calculate B4 as the unit volume of your products that underwent a durability assessment as part of the design process, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Both physical and emotional durability should be considered in this assessment.
Attributes to consider while assessing physical durability may include, but are not limited to stability/longevity of materials used, and strength/quality of cut and sew techniques.
Attributes to consider while assessing emotional durability include a product's flexibility or changeability to adapt to changing tastes over time.
Calculate B5 as the unit volume of your products that were designed to maximize resource utilization, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Resource utilization maximization may include, but is not limited to, materials that are able to be reused or recycled.
Addressing resource utilization maximization during the design stage may include, but is not limited to choosing single fiber fabrics that can be recycled, and using simple construction methods that can be disassembled after use.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS Help Center Video: Product Design KPI: Short video tutorial on the Product Design KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520107448B Corp Certification: B Corp offers certification at a company level and focuses on social and environmental performance, public transparency, and legal accountability. https://bcorporation.net/

BlueSign: Bluesign is a third party verification and consultant service. Verification is performed for social and environmental impacts, and consulting services are available for multiple supply chain, manufacturing, and production stages. https://www.bluesign.com/en/business/services

Cradle to Cradle Certified (TM) - Material Health: The Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute, a non-profit organization, administers the Cradle to Cradle Certified™ Product Standard, and provide guidance on chemical hazard assessments and their use for material assessments. The Cradle to Cradle™ Material Health Assessment Methodology examines product chemical composition break down and data collection rules and guidelines, guidance and criteria for chemical profiling methods, assessment of metabolism considerations, and guidance for the evaluation of material assessments. http://www.c2ccertified.org/get-certified/product-certification

Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

ISO 14040: ISO 14040 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Principles and Framework" document for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/37456.html

ISO 14044: ISO 14044 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Requirements and Guidelines" standard for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/38498.html

ISO/TC 207/SC 5: ISO/TC 207/SC 5 is the International Standardization Organization's life cycle assessment standard. https://www.iso.org/committee/54854.html
N/A
Backpacks and BriefcasesRecycled contentCalculate B1 as the mass of fiber in your final products that can be defined as recycled content, divided by the total mass of fiber in your final products. Only include post-consumer recycled content. Exclude packaging from this calculation.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your products for which you were able to obtain data on recycled content, divided by the total mass of your products, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Recycled material available for textile manufacturing can vary based on fiber type. This should be considered when evaluating the ratio of recycled content based upon specific textile products.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your recycled material supply that was assessed and met criteria for B1 and B2 that is polyester divided by the total mass of your recycled material supply, then multiply by 100.
Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

THESIS Help Center Video: Recycled Content KPI: Short video tutorial on the Recycled Content KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017179
N/APost-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Pre-consumer recycled material: “Material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))
Backpacks and BriefcasesSynthetic material sourcingThis KPI covers synthetic (e.g., polyester, nylon) and semisynthetic (e.g., rayon, viscose, lyocell) materials.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was traced to the production facility of origin, divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100. The production facility is where the chemical processes (e.g., synthesis, regeneration) to produce the fiber or material are carried out.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for managing facility environmental impacts, divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for facility social impacts, divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was assessed and met criteria for C1, C2, and C3 that is polyester divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
N/AN/AVerifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Backpacks and BriefcasesWastewater generation - Supply ChainCalculate B1 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for COD, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B2 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for BOD, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B3 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for TSS, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B4 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met the standard for pH, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B5 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met the standard for temperature, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Audits should include verification that discharged wastewater is meeting the standards set forth by the American Apparel & Footwear Association Global Textile Effluent Guidelines for 95% of the sampling period:
- Measurements for BOD and TSS should be below or equal to 30 ppm.
- Measurements for COD should be below or equal to 100 ppm.
- Measurements for temperature should be below or equal to 37 degrees Celsius.
- Measurements for pH should be between 6.0 - 9.0.
Testing should follow a rigorous and internationally accepted methodology and frequency. Local or corporate standards may be stricter. The water quality metrics ideally approach ambient conditions.
Suppliers who have entered and communicated information required by the Higg Index Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Wastewater - Level 2, Question 7" may be used in responding to B1-B5 if the chosen wastewater standard meets or exceeds the values listed above, or if the values of the parameters listed in the detection table meet or exceed the values listed above. The information reported to the FEM is at the facility level; if your products are produced in multiple facilities you may aggregate the data to represent the entirety of final product produced.
AWS International Water Stewardship Standard: The International Water Stewardship Standard is a globally-applicable framework that helps water users understand their water use and impacts. Developed by the Alliance for Water Stewardship, the standard addresses 1) sustainable water balance, 2) good water quality, 3) healthy important water-related areas, and 4) good water governance. https://a4ws.org/the-aws-standard-2-0/

American Apparel & Footwear Association (AAFA) - Restricted Substance List: The AAFA provides guidelines for restricted chemicals and substances. https://www.aafaglobal.org/AAFA/Solutions_Pages/Restricted_Substance_List

BHive: The BHive enables the creation and management of chemical inventories, identifies chemical products that meet sustainability credentials. The BHive enhances supply chain transparency as factories, brands, and retailers can view and compare the safety of chemical products. https://www.thebhive.net/

Detox to Zero by OEKO-TEX: This analysis and assessment tool creates transparency and provides textile and leather producers the ability to control the use of hazardous substances. The tool focuses on continuous improvement and gradual reduction of harmful substances in production processes. https://www.oeko-tex.com/en/our-standards/detox-to-zero-by-oeko-tex

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS): Sustainable Textile Solutions programs support brands, retailers, and industry partners in their efforts to achieve compliance to environmental, health, and safety standards. https://sustexsolutions.com/

THESIS Help Center Video: Wastewater generation - Supply Chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Wastewater generation - Supply Chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/448595442
Roadmap to Zero by ZDHC (Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals): This plan is intended to reduce and eliminate the discharge of hazardous chemicals. https://www.roadmaptozero.com/

Textile Effluent Treatment Technology: The Journal of Cotton Science has produced a document addressing the treatment of textile effluent and specific wastewater management methods. http://www.cotton.org/journal/2007-11/3/upload/jcs11-141.pdf

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - Effluent Limitation Guidelines: This source provides current wastewater discharge guidelines and provides resources for reducing environmental impacts from wastewater discharge. https://www.epa.gov/eg

Wastewater 101 Toolbox: A free online resource for the textile industry to learn, act, and share experiences related to the treatment of wastewater. https://wastewater.sustainabilityconsortium.org/
Biological oxygen demand (BOD): An indicator for the amount of oxygen required/consumed for the microbiological decomposition (oxidation) of organic material in water bodies.

Chemical oxygen demand (COD): An indicator for the amount of oxygen required to oxidize an organic compound to carbon dioxide, ammonia, and water. The measurement is a proxy for the amount of organic compounds in water. Measuring COD in wastewater provides an estimated level of organic pollutants. The standard for measurement can be referenced in ISO 6060.

Total suspended solids (TSS): A water quality measurement that reflects the amount of particulates in a sample. The dry weight of residue in a filter is used to calculate units in milligrams per liter (mg/L).

Water use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.

pH: A measure of a substance's acidity or basicity. The measurement is based upon the molar concentration of hydrogen (H) ions in an aqueous solution of the substance. Pure water is at a neutral pH of 7. For wastewater quality testing, measuring pH allows for benchmarking pH levels to ambient conditions existing naturally in the surrounding environment.
Backpacks and BriefcasesWater use - Supply chainCalculate B1 as the mass purchased from fabric suppliers that reported their annual water use, divided by the total mass purchased from all fabric suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using purchasing data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Water use is defined as the total amount of withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells. Supplier water use reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
If suppliers completed the CDP Water Security Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report water use.
Suppliers who have entered and communicated the information required by the Higg Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Water Use - Level 1" may be included in percentage calculated for response option B1.
If using Field to Market's Fieldprint Platform to determine water use during cotton production, report data from the "Irrigated yield" field of the summary report, not the "Yield difference due to irrigation" field.
Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator: Harnessing the power of collaboration across the agricultural value chain and locally-led conservation solutions, Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator provides a process-based standard for delivering sustainable outcomes for agriculture, people and the planet. The hallmark of the Accelerator’s approach lies in a process-based approach to advancing continuous improvement, which is grounded in a foundation that delivers solutions to global sustainable development priorities while also addressing local natural resource concerns. These projects utilize the power of voluntary, and often market-driven, solutions to incentivize improved environmental outcomes and enhance farmer livelihoods. By following a standardized and validated approach, these project pathways can leverage the collective action of the value chain to support resilient ecosystems and enhance farmer livelihoods. The Accelerator currently covers alfalfa, barley, corn, cotton, peanuts, potato, rice, sorghum, soy, sugar beet, and wheat produced in the U.S. and Canada. https://fieldtomarket.org/our-programs/CDP Water Information Request: The CDP Water Information Request provides questions that assess a company's water use, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. CDP can be contacted to respond to the Water Information Request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/
Water use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.
Backpacks and BriefcasesWool and down sourcingCalculate B1 as the mass of your wool and down supply that was traced to the animal farm operation of origin, divided by the total mass of your wool and down supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your wool and down supply that was covered by a current comprehensive certification for farm-level environmental impacts or by verifiable, regularly conducted audits for farm-level impacts, divided by the total mass of your wool and down supply, then multiply by 100. The certification or audits should address all material environmental impacts including, but not limited to, soil health and erosion, biodiversity and deforestation, fertilizer use, and pesticide use. Material certified to the Responsible Wool Standard may be included in the calculation of B2.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your wool and down supply that came from animal farm operations that either maintain a current comprehensive animal welfare certification or verifiable, regularly conducted animal welfare audit, divided by the total mass of your wool and down supply, then multiply by 100.
To be included in B3, verifiable, regularly conducted audits should be performed by a second party or third party. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain can initiate these audits. Regulations, audits, and certifications that align with the animal welfare standards as described in Section 7 of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Terrestrial Animal Health Code and are well-enforced by the implementation of auditing systems can be included in your calculation.
Efforts should be taken to achieve minimization of pain, risk of injury, and transmission of diseases or parasites to animals; a physical environment in which the air quality, temperature, and humidity support good animal health; a structural and social environment that allows animals to rest comfortably, provides opportunities for physical and cognitive activity, and allows for the opportunity to perform all beneficial natural, individual, and social behaviors.
Animals should have access to sufficient water and appropriate feed, so as to be free from hunger and thirst. The handling of animals should foster a positive relationship between humans and animals and should not cause injury, panic, lasting fear, or avoidable stress.
Genetic selection should take into account the health and welfare of animals
Material certified to the Responsible Wool Standard and Responsible Down Standard may be included in the calculation of B3.
Responsible Down Standard: The Responsible Down Standard is a voluntary standard for the certification of down from ducks and geese. It addresses issues of animal welfare at the farm, transport, and slaughter stages. http://responsibledown.org/for-business/certification/

Responsible Wool Standard: The Responsible Wool Standard is a voluntary standard for the certification of wool from sheep. It addressees issues of animal welfare, land management, and traceability. https://textileexchange.org/standards/responsible-wool/
N/AAnimal farm operations: An area of land and its buildings, comprised of one or more locations managed together, that is used for rearing animals. This includes the growing of crops for animal feed on this land.

Animal welfare: Animal welfare refers to the well-being of an animal and how an animal is coping with the conditions in which it lives. A good state of welfare varies substantially between different contexts, but in general an animal is in a good state of welfare if it is healthy, comfortable, well-nourished, safe, able to express innate behavior, and not suffering from pain, fear, and distress. Ensuring animal welfare is a human responsibility that requires treatments such as good housing, good care, good feed, humane handling and humane slaughter/killing. The treatments that an animal receives is covered by other terms such as animal care, animal husbandry, and humane management (adapted from The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE)).

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Backpacks and BriefcasesWorker Health and Safety - ManufacturingThis question aligns with the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Injury and Illness rate. This rate can be normalized for global applicability.
Calculate B1 according to OSHA's injury and illness rate by multiplying the number of recordable injuries and illnesses by 200,000. Divide this number by the total employee hours worked to produce your final product. If multiple facilities manufacture the final product, the injury and illness rate will need to be adjusted using a weighted average based on each facility's percentage of total production. Include all employees at a facility that participate in the production of the final product. This includes both full-time and contracted employees.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your final product for which you were able to obtain data, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS General Guidance document provides guidance to calculate the weighted average. See Background Information for access to this document.
The Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool is an online calculator that will compute your injury and illness rate. The OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses provides forms and information for computing your facility injury and illness rate.
Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool: This tool calculates the injury and illness incidence rate for employers. https://data.bls.gov/iirc/

OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses: This webpage contains information on how to record workplace injuries and illnesses and provides the worksheets needed to correctly do so. https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/forms

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520108472
Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh: The Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh is an agreement between brands and trade unions to improve worker health and safety. It can be a model for factory inspections, remediation, and worker participation & training. https://bangladeshaccord.org/

How to Compute a Firm's Incidence Rate for Safety Management: This website from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics provides in-depth guidance on computing injury and illness numbers. https://www.bls.gov/iif/osheval.htm

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Backpacks and BriefcasesWorker Health and Safety - Supply ChainTo be included in B1-B5, risk assessments, training programs, safety plans, performance monitoring systems, and audits must be verifiable and address health and safety issues such as worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. The assessments and audits must be conducted by second or third parties. The risk assessment must be conducted once per year while the audit must have been conducted at least once every three years, both using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles such as International Labour Organization Occupational Safety and Health Conventions (e.g., No. 155). The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions, which can inform your responses. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for examples of initiatives that meet these requirements.
Calculate B1 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product that came from operations that have performed a risk assessment to identify high risk areas for health and safety, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in our final product, then multiply by 100.
To determine if an operation is high risk for health and safety, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic review assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. It must be conducted at least once per year. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B2 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product that came from operations that train workers on health and safety procedures, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B2, the training on health and safety procedures must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and must be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for workers on health and safety procedures and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional worker training may be required to perform job duties. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B3 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product that came from operations that implement a verifiable worker health and safety plan, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B3, a worker health and safety plan must be verifiable and must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and be prominently displayed in the workplace where employees normally report. The plan should include best practices specific to ergonomics; repetitive motions; chemical and particulate exposure; appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE); and proper use of tools, machinery. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B4 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, that came from operations that have a worker health and safety performance monitoring system in place, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B4, a worker health and safety performance monitoring system should include metrics on issues including, but not limited to, incidence of worker injuries and prevalence of diseases. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B5 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, that came from operations that were audited in the last three years on worker health and safety issues, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
To be included in B5, the audits must be verifiable and address preventive measures, freely provided personal protective equipment, identification of worker health and safety hazards and effects on the exposed people, statistics and reasons behind injuries, design of work area, processes, installations, machinery/work equipment, operating processes and work organization, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Standards on Occupational Health and Safety.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528345
United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Risk assessment: A systematic process to evaluate potential risks within an operation, system, or supply chain. It can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party or a country risk classification analysis that judges the site risk due to prevailing conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Bath TowelsAir quality - ManufacturingCalculate B1 as the mass of products that were produced in final cut, sew, and dyeing facilities that tracked and reported annual air emissions, divided by the total mass of products produced by all final cut, sew, and dyeing facilities, then multiply by 100. Include all company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities that performed final cut, sew, and dyeing operations. If the final cut, sew, and dyeing steps are performed in different facilities, then each must report their air emissions in order to be included in your calculation. Facilities included in this calculation must track all air emissions required by locally applicable regulations, as well as those emissions for which there is scientific evidence of serious effects to human health or the environment. Air emissions may include, but are not limited to, nitrogen and sulphur oxides from boilers, hydrocarbons from drying ovens, carbon monoxide from sizing, aniline vapors, and ammonia from printing/dyeing, and VOCs and ozone from textile finishing, and may be emitted as dust, oil mists, acid vapors, odors, and boiler exhausts. Testing of emissions must occur according to a rigorous and internationally accepted testing methodology.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Information entered into the Higg Index Facility Environment Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Air Emissions - Level 1, Questions 1-3" may be used in responding to B1. The information reported to the FEM is at the facility level; if your products are produced in multiple facilities you may aggregate the data to represent the entirety of final product produced.
Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Air quality - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Air quality - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750750
N/AN/A
Bath TowelsCellulosic material sourcing - Chemical useCanopyStyle’s Hot Button Ranking and Report is the primary viscose and cellulosic fiber sourcing analysis tool for the fashion sector. Calculate D1 as the mass of your cellulosic material that was supplied by producers or mills included in the CanopyStyle Hot Button Report and ranked in the yellow to green bottle range for the Chemical Use and Emissions column, divided by your total mass of cellulosic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Button up to Protect Forests — Producer Progress Criteria: The audit standard and process were developed by Canopy, in partnership with NEPCon, and is supported by the CanopyStyle Leaders for Forest Conservation and brands, retailers and designers looking to implement their sourcing policies for man-made cellulosic textiles. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/ranking-criteria-explained/

CanopyStyle Hot Button Report: The Hot Button Ranking of viscose producers is conducted using the consistent application of the tools and standards of the CanopyStyle initiative, including the CanopyStyle Audit. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/
N/AN/A
Bath TowelsCellulosic material sourcing - DeforestationCanopyStyle’s Hot Button Ranking and Report is the primary viscose and cellulosic fiber sourcing analysis tool for the fashion sector. Calculate D1 as the mass of your cellulosic material that was supplied by producers or mills included in the Canopy Hot Button Report and ranked in the yellow to green shirt range for the Hot Button Assessment column, divided by your total mass of cellulosic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Button up to Protect Forests — Producer Progress Criteria: The audit standard and process were developed by Canopy, in partnership with NEPCon, and is supported by the CanopyStyle Leaders for Forest Conservation and brands, retailers and designers looking to implement their sourcing policies for man-made cellulosic textiles. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/ranking-criteria-explained/

CanopyStyle Hot Button Report: The Hot Button Ranking of viscose producers is conducted using the consistent application of the tools and standards of the CanopyStyle initiative, including the CanopyStyle Audit. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/

ForestMapper: This interactive tool is the only one of its kind to visually represent ancient and endangered forests at a global scale. ForestMapper includes information on numerous ecological values divided into four categories: forests, species, carbon and landscapes. https://canopyplanet.org/tools/forestmapper/
N/AAncient and Endangered Forests: Intact forest landscape mosaics, naturally rare forest types, forest types that have been made rare due to human activity, and/or other forests that are ecologically critical for the protection of biological diversity. As a starting point to geographically locate ancient and endangered forests, maps of High Conservation Value Forests (HCVF), as defined by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), and of intact forest landscapes (IFL), can be used and paired with maps of other key ecological values like the habitat range of key endangered species and forests containing high concentrations of terrestrial carbon and High Carbon Stocks (HCS).
Bath TowelsGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the mass purchased from fabric suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total mass purchased from all fabric suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Suppliers who have entered and communicated information required by the Higg Index Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Energy Use & GHG - Level 1" for their facilities may be used to answer this KPI.
If using Field to Market's Fieldprint Platform to determine greenhouse gas emissions associated with cotton production, include energy use for field operations and activities through the first point of sale. This may include on-farm drying and any transport of the crop prior to sale.
Energy Efficiency Assessment and Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Tool for the Textile Industry (EAGER Textile): This tool was developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to aid in evaluating the impacts of introducing energy efficiency measures into a textile facility. According to the China Energy Group, "the EAGER tool will calculate the typical energy savings (electricity, fuel, final, and primary energy), CO2 emissions reduction, cost, and simple payback period...[the tool] is designed to work for textile facilities that have one or more of the following processes: spinning, weaving/knitting, dyeing, printing, finishing, and man-made fiber production." https://china.lbl.gov/eager-textile

Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator: Harnessing the power of collaboration across the agricultural value chain and locally-led conservation solutions, Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator provides a process-based standard for delivering sustainable outcomes for agriculture, people and the planet. The hallmark of the Accelerator’s approach lies in a process-based approach to advancing continuous improvement, which is grounded in a foundation that delivers solutions to global sustainable development priorities while also addressing local natural resource concerns. These projects utilize the power of voluntary, and often market-driven, solutions to incentivize improved environmental outcomes and enhance farmer livelihoods. By following a standardized and validated approach, these project pathways can leverage the collective action of the value chain to support resilient ecosystems and enhance farmer livelihoods. The Accelerator currently covers alfalfa, barley, corn, cotton, peanuts, potato, rice, sorghum, soy, sugar beet, and wheat produced in the U.S. and Canada. https://fieldtomarket.org/our-programs/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

THESIS Help Center Video: Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Supply Chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Supply Chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/465914322
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Bath TowelsGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total mass produced of each product.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total mass of final product produced/revenue from final product produced/number of units produced. If the manufacturing facilities produce more than one category of product, only weight using the total mass of production specific to the product category in question.
Calculate B2 as the mass of final products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total mass of final products produced, then multiply by 100. For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
Information entered into the Higg Index Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Energy Use & GHG - Level 1" may be used to answer this KPI.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

Energy Efficiency Assessment and Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Tool for the Textile Industry (EAGER Textile): This tool was developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to aid in evaluating the impacts of introducing energy efficiency measures into a textile facility. According to the China Energy Group, "the EAGER tool will calculate the typical energy savings (electricity, fuel, final, and primary energy), CO2 emissions reduction, cost, and simple payback period...[the tool] is designed to work for textile facilities that have one or more of the following processes: spinning, weaving/knitting, dyeing, printing, finishing, and man-made fiber production." https://china.lbl.gov/eager-textile

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardGreenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Bath TowelsHazardous Chemical Discharge ManagementFor C, informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles.
For D, goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound. Public disclosure of goals and progress must have occurred within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Examples of tools and protocols for screening chemicals and assessing alternatives include green chemistry, alternatives analysis, restricted substances lists, and other tools that are listed in the Background Information.
To calculate E1, subtract the number of chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List used this year across all manufacturing facilities where your product is cut and sewed from the number of chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List used last year across all manufacturing facilities where your product was cut and sewed. If more chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List were used this year than last, enter zero.
Calculate E1 as the number of manufacturing facilities where your product is cut and sewed that reduced the use of chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List this year compared to last year divided by the total number of manufacturing facilities where your product is cut and sewed, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
American Apparel & Footwear Association (AAFA) - Restricted Substance List: The AAFA provides guidelines for restricted chemicals and substances. https://www.aafaglobal.org/AAFA/Solutions_Pages/Restricted_Substance_List

BHive: The BHive enables the creation and management of chemical inventories, identifies chemical products that meet sustainability credentials. The BHive enhances supply chain transparency as factories, brands, and retailers can view and compare the safety of chemical products. https://www.thebhive.net/

Detox to Zero by OEKO-TEX: This analysis and assessment tool creates transparency and provides textile and leather producers the ability to control the use of hazardous substances. The tool focuses on continuous improvement and gradual reduction of harmful substances in production processes. https://www.oeko-tex.com/en/our-standards/detox-to-zero-by-oeko-tex

GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

GreenSuite: GreenSuite is an environmental sustainability tool that can be customized to specific users' needs. Environmental issues throughout the supply chain are covered by this web based solution. http://greensuite360.com/index.html

Greenlist Process: According to their website, "In 2001, SC Johnson developed the Greenlist Process to classify ingredients in order to minimize the human and environmental impacts of their products." The process is now available for license to other companies and organizations. https://www.scjohnson.com/en/our-purpose/sustainability-report/explaining-the-sc-johnson-greenlist-program-an-excerpt-from-our-2017-sustainability-report

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815

PRIO: PRIO is a web-based tool developed by the Swedish government to facilitate the assessment of environmental and health risks of chemicals. ? https://www.kemi.se/prioguiden/english/start

Roadmap to Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals (ZDHC): This plan is intended to reduce and eliminate the discharge of hazardous chemicals. https://www.roadmaptozero.com/

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS): Sustainable Textile Solutions programs support brands, retailers, and industry partners in their efforts to achieve compliance to environmental, health, and safety standards. https://sustexsolutions.com/

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Management KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Management KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528286

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Exposure Assessment Tools and Models: According to their website, "The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) has developed several exposure assessment methods, databases, and predictive models to help in evaluating what happens to chemicals when they are used and released to the environment and how workers, the general public, consumers and the aquatic ecosystems may be exposed to chemicals." https://www.epa.gov/ceam/tools-data-exposure-assessment

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Sustainable Futures: According to their website, "The goal of the Sustainable Futures Initiative (SF) is to make new chemicals safer, available faster, and at lower cost. It works by giving chemical developers the same risk-screening models that EPA uses to evaluate new chemicals before they enter the market."? https://www.epa.gov/sustainable-futures
BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Existing Chemicals Program: According to their website, "EPA's existing chemical programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and characterization, and risk management for chemical substances in commercial use." The current chemicals management program is undergoing review and update, including how the agency identifies and prioritizes priority chemicals for review and assessment under TSCA. https://www.epa.gov/compliance/toxic-substances-control-act-tsca-compliance-monitoring#chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
N/A
Bath TowelsLabor Rights - ManufacturingThe scope of this KPI includes company owned and contract manufacturing facilities performing final cut, sew, and dyeing operations for final product.

Calculate B1 as the mass of your final product that is covered by an internal policy that has quantitative time-bound goals related to child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100. Where freedom of association and collective bargaining are restricted by law, employers can use other forms of non-union employee representation and relations to respect this aspect of workers' rights.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your final product that has been reviewed by a risk assessment which identifies high-risk areas for labor rights abuses, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100.
To be included in B2, a risk assessment must have been conducted by second or third parties and must have been conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles. The risk assessments and standard must be verifiable and must address labor rights abuses such as discrimination on grounds of gender, age, ethnicity or disability, physical violence, sexual harassment and abuse, child labor, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining or any other range of behaviors and practices as outlined by internationally-recognized labor standards. The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions which can inform your responses.
In addition, to determine if an operation is in a high-risk area for labor rights abuses, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally-recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic risk assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. The AMFORI Countries' Risk Classification tool listed below may be used to inform your response. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B3 as the number of staff responsible for procurement activities that have been trained on labor rights issues in the supply chain, divided by the total number of staff responsible for procurement activities, then multiply by 100. Include both full-time and contracted employees. The training must be verifiable. Staff training should cover child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Staff training should be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for labor rights issues and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional staff training may be required to perform job duties.
Calculate B4 as the number staff responsible for procurement activities that have been evaluated via performance metrics on labor rights improvements in the supply chain, divided by the total staff responsible for procurement activities, then multiply by 100. Evaluation on labor rights should include, child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples of improvements include decreased incidence of child labor, forced labor, or discrimination, or an Increased worker participation in collective bargaining.
Calculate B5 as the mass of your final product that was produced in operations that were low risk, that were high risk but corrective actions were taken, or that were audited on child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining in the last three years, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B5, audits must be verifiable and address child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work. Where freedom of association & collective bargaining is restricted by law, employers can use other forms of non-union employee representation and relations to respect this aspect of workers' rights. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

THESIS Help Center Video: Labor Rights - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Labor Rights - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520093618
International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work: This declaration outlines the universal rights of all workers regardless of citizenship status, gender, or the local level of economic development. http://www.ilo.org/declaration/lang--en/index.htm

United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9
First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Forced labor: Any task or service performed by a person against their will or under threat of negative consequence. Forced labor includes debt bondage, human trafficking, withholding of wages or identity papers, threats of violence, unreasonable restriction of movement, and exploitation of marginalized workers.

Freedom of collective bargaining: The right to negotiate the conditions of employment as a group rather than individually without fear of repercussions.

Internationally-recognized labor principles: Internationally-recognized labor principles include the United Nations Global Compact and International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work or equivalent.

Labor rights: The universal rights of workers, regardless of race, gender, nationality, or other distinguishing characteristic. These include protection from the worst forms of child labor, forced labor, and discrimination, as well as freedom of association and collective bargaining as outlined by the United Nations Global Compact or the International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work.

Risk assessment: A systematic process to evaluate potential risks within an operation, system, or supply chain. It can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party or a country risk classification analysis that judges the site risk due to prevailing conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Bath TowelsMicrofiber release - ManufacturingAnswer A if your company only works with plant-derived materials (e.g., cotton, linen) which have been proven to biodegrade in water.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your synthetic textile supply that was sourced from manufacturers, either contracted or company owned, who monitored microfiber release during wet processing, divided by your total mass of synthetic textile supply, then multiply by 100. Monitoring may include, but is not limited to, wastewater and lint analysis.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your synthetic textile supply that was sourced from manufacturers, either contracted or company owned, who utilized alternatives to wet processing, divided by your total mass of synthetic textile supply, then multiply by 100.
Alternatives should replace at least one full stage of wet processing to qualify. Examples include, but are not limited to, inkjet printing and plasma technologies, which replace the dyeing stage of wet processing.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your synthetic textile supply that was sourced from manufacturers, either contracted or company owned, who have implemented practices and technologies to minimize microfiber release, divided by your total mass of synthetic textile supply, then multiply by 100.
The maximum possible response for each response option is 100%. However, multiple response options may be applicable to the same portion of your supply. For example, supply included in the calculation for C1 could also be included in the calculation for C2 if the stated conditions are also met.
Practices and technologies that minimize microfiber release include, but are not limited to, lowering the melting temperature of yarn to improve tensile strength, and adding coatings to yarn to reduce fiber loss.
N/AN/AMicrofiber release: Small synthetic fibers less than 10 micrometers in diameter that are released into the environment via wastewater during textile manufacturing that cause a variety of impacts to humans and wildlife, in addition to persisting in rivers, streams, and oceans.
Bath TowelsPlant-derived material sourcingPlant derived materials include cotton, linen, and hemp. Regenerated or semisynthetic cellulosic materials such as rayon and viscose are considered in the Synthetic Material Sourcing KPI.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your plant-derived material supply that was traced to the processing facility, divided by the total mass of your plant-derived material supply, then multiply by 100. The processing facility is where pre-spinning material processing takes place such as ginning for cotton, or scutching and heckling/hackling for linen.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your plant-derived material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for managing farm-level environmental impacts, divided by the total mass of your plant-derived material supply, then multiply by 100. A comprehensive plan will address pesticide use, fertilizer use, water use, greenhouse gas emissions and all other impacts relevant for the farm. Supply that has been certified by Better Cotton Initiative and Global Organic Textile Standard can be included in the numerator for this calculation.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your plant-derived material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for farm-level social impacts, divided by the total mass of your plant-derived material supply, then multiply by 100. A comprehensive plan will address worker health and safety, community health and safety, support for smallholders where present, and labor rights, including child labor, as well as all other impacts relevant for the farm. Supply that has been certified by Better Cotton Initiative, Fair Trade International, and Fair for Life can be included in the numerator for this calculation.
Calculate C4 as the mass of your cotton material supply that was assessed and met criteria for C1, C2, and C3, divided by the total mass of your material supply, then multiply by 100. The percent entered cannot exceed 100%.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Better Cotton Initiative: The Better Cotton Initiative offers publically available resources to provided background information on best practices for growing cotton. https://bettercotton.org/resources/

Cotton USA: Cotton USA is the trademark of the nonprofit Cotton Council International (CCI) which works through quality, sustainability, transparent partnerships, and ethical standards to make US cotton the preferred fiber for the clothing, footwear, and textiles value chain. Through their sustainability value, they aim to make US cotton the most sustainably produced in the world. https://cottonusa.org/

Fair for Life Certification Program: The Fair Life program provides certification for fair trade and responsible supply chains. The goal of Fair for Life is to ensure social and economic benefits to socioeconomically disadvantaged agricultural producers and workers and to ensure that smallholder producers receive a fair share. http://www.fairforlife.org/

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

Global Organic Textile Standard: This is an example of textile chemical use standards. http://www.global-standard.org/the-standard/general-description.html

Recycled Claim Standard (RCS) and Global Recycled Standard (GRS): The Recycled Claim Standard and Global Recycled Standard have the goal to increase recycled materials in consumer products by developing voluntary standards for the certification of recycled input. These standards also cover chain of custody, environmental processing, and chemical restrictions. https://textileexchange.org/standards/recycled-claim-standard-global-recycled-standard/

THESIS Help Center Video: Plant-derived material sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Plant-derived material sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750670
N/AFarming operation: An area of land and its buildings, comprised of one or more locations managed together that is used for growing crops that are delivered for further processing or as ingredients to other final products.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Bath TowelsProduct DesignCalculate B1 as the unit volume of your products that underwent a life cycle assessment, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
A life cycle assessment should be conducted against ISO 14040 \(Life Cycle Assessment - Principles and framework\).
Calculate B2 as the unit volume of your products that were designed to maximize material efficiency, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Material efficiency may include, but is not limited to, design to reduce total amount of materials needed to cut and sew a product, design to reduce material waste during cut and sew process.
Addressing material efficiency during the design stage may include, but is not limited to employing zero waste patternmaking to reduce material waste during the cut and sew process, and using whole garment knitting techniques to reduce the amount of yarn wasted during the knitting process.
Calculate B3 as the unit volume of your products designed to reduce laundering impacts, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Laundering impacts may include, but are not limited to, energy use during laundering and microfiber release during laundering.
Addressing laundering impacts at the design stage may include, but is not limited to choosing fabrics made from natural fibers that biodegrade, or adding care instructions to a garment's label that specify practices known to reduce energy use like cold water wash.
Calculate B4 as the unit volume of your products that underwent a durability assessment as part of the design process, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Both physical and emotional durability should be considered in this assessment.
Attributes to consider while assessing physical durability may include, but are not limited to stability/longevity of materials used, and strength/quality of cut and sew techniques.
Attributes to consider while assessing emotional durability include a product's flexibility or changeability to adapt to changing tastes over time.
Calculate B5 as the unit volume of your products that were designed to maximize resource utilization, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Resource utilization maximization may include, but is not limited to, materials that are able to be reused or recycled.
Addressing resource utilization maximization during the design stage may include, but is not limited to choosing single fiber fabrics that can be recycled, and using simple construction methods that can be disassembled after use.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS Help Center Video: Product Design KPI: Short video tutorial on the Product Design KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520107448B Corp Certification: B Corp offers certification at a company level and focuses on social and environmental performance, public transparency, and legal accountability. https://bcorporation.net/

BlueSign: Bluesign is a third party verification and consultant service. Verification is performed for social and environmental impacts, and consulting services are available for multiple supply chain, manufacturing, and production stages. https://www.bluesign.com/en/business/services

Cradle to Cradle Certified (TM) - Material Health: The Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute, a non-profit organization, administers the Cradle to Cradle Certified™ Product Standard, and provide guidance on chemical hazard assessments and their use for material assessments. The Cradle to Cradle™ Material Health Assessment Methodology examines product chemical composition break down and data collection rules and guidelines, guidance and criteria for chemical profiling methods, assessment of metabolism considerations, and guidance for the evaluation of material assessments. http://www.c2ccertified.org/get-certified/product-certification

Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

ISO 14040: ISO 14040 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Principles and Framework" document for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/37456.html

ISO 14044: ISO 14044 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Requirements and Guidelines" standard for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/38498.html

ISO/TC 207/SC 5: ISO/TC 207/SC 5 is the International Standardization Organization's life cycle assessment standard. https://www.iso.org/committee/54854.html
N/A
Bath TowelsRecycled contentCalculate B1 as the mass of fiber in your final products that can be defined as recycled content, divided by the total mass of fiber in your final products. Only include post-consumer recycled content. Exclude packaging from this calculation.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your products for which you were able to obtain data on recycled content, divided by the total mass of your products, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Recycled material available for textile manufacturing can vary based on fiber type. This should be considered when evaluating the ratio of recycled content based upon specific textile products.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your recycled material supply that was assessed and met criteria for B1 and B2 that is polyester divided by the total mass of your recycled material supply, then multiply by 100.
Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

THESIS Help Center Video: Recycled Content KPI: Short video tutorial on the Recycled Content KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017179
N/APost-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Pre-consumer recycled material: “Material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))
Bath TowelsSynthetic material sourcingThis KPI covers synthetic (e.g., polyester, nylon) and semisynthetic (e.g., rayon, viscose, lyocell) materials.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was traced to the production facility of origin, divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100. The production facility is where the chemical processes (e.g., synthesis, regeneration) to produce the fiber or material are carried out.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for managing facility environmental impacts, divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for facility social impacts, divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was assessed and met criteria for C1, C2, and C3 that is polyester divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
N/AN/AVerifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Bath TowelsWastewater generation - Supply ChainCalculate B1 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for COD, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B2 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for BOD, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B3 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for TSS, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B4 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met the standard for pH, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B5 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met the standard for temperature, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Audits should include verification that discharged wastewater is meeting the standards set forth by the American Apparel & Footwear Association Global Textile Effluent Guidelines for 95% of the sampling period:
- Measurements for BOD and TSS should be below or equal to 30 ppm.
- Measurements for COD should be below or equal to 100 ppm.
- Measurements for temperature should be below or equal to 37 degrees Celsius.
- Measurements for pH should be between 6.0 - 9.0.
Testing should follow a rigorous and internationally accepted methodology and frequency. Local or corporate standards may be stricter. The water quality metrics ideally approach ambient conditions.
Suppliers who have entered and communicated information required by the Higg Index Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Wastewater - Level 2, Question 7" may be used in responding to B1-B5 if the chosen wastewater standard meets or exceeds the values listed above, or if the values of the parameters listed in the detection table meet or exceed the values listed above. The information reported to the FEM is at the facility level; if your products are produced in multiple facilities you may aggregate the data to represent the entirety of final product produced.
AWS International Water Stewardship Standard: The International Water Stewardship Standard is a globally-applicable framework that helps water users understand their water use and impacts. Developed by the Alliance for Water Stewardship, the standard addresses 1) sustainable water balance, 2) good water quality, 3) healthy important water-related areas, and 4) good water governance. https://a4ws.org/the-aws-standard-2-0/

American Apparel & Footwear Association (AAFA) - Restricted Substance List: The AAFA provides guidelines for restricted chemicals and substances. https://www.aafaglobal.org/AAFA/Solutions_Pages/Restricted_Substance_List

BHive: The BHive enables the creation and management of chemical inventories, identifies chemical products that meet sustainability credentials. The BHive enhances supply chain transparency as factories, brands, and retailers can view and compare the safety of chemical products. https://www.thebhive.net/

Detox to Zero by OEKO-TEX: This analysis and assessment tool creates transparency and provides textile and leather producers the ability to control the use of hazardous substances. The tool focuses on continuous improvement and gradual reduction of harmful substances in production processes. https://www.oeko-tex.com/en/our-standards/detox-to-zero-by-oeko-tex

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS): Sustainable Textile Solutions programs support brands, retailers, and industry partners in their efforts to achieve compliance to environmental, health, and safety standards. https://sustexsolutions.com/

THESIS Help Center Video: Wastewater generation - Supply Chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Wastewater generation - Supply Chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/448595442
Roadmap to Zero by ZDHC (Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals): This plan is intended to reduce and eliminate the discharge of hazardous chemicals. https://www.roadmaptozero.com/

Textile Effluent Treatment Technology: The Journal of Cotton Science has produced a document addressing the treatment of textile effluent and specific wastewater management methods. http://www.cotton.org/journal/2007-11/3/upload/jcs11-141.pdf

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - Effluent Limitation Guidelines: This source provides current wastewater discharge guidelines and provides resources for reducing environmental impacts from wastewater discharge. https://www.epa.gov/eg

Wastewater 101 Toolbox: A free online resource for the textile industry to learn, act, and share experiences related to the treatment of wastewater. https://wastewater.sustainabilityconsortium.org/
Biological oxygen demand (BOD): An indicator for the amount of oxygen required/consumed for the microbiological decomposition (oxidation) of organic material in water bodies.

Chemical oxygen demand (COD): An indicator for the amount of oxygen required to oxidize an organic compound to carbon dioxide, ammonia, and water. The measurement is a proxy for the amount of organic compounds in water. Measuring COD in wastewater provides an estimated level of organic pollutants. The standard for measurement can be referenced in ISO 6060.

Total suspended solids (TSS): A water quality measurement that reflects the amount of particulates in a sample. The dry weight of residue in a filter is used to calculate units in milligrams per liter (mg/L).

Water use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.

pH: A measure of a substance's acidity or basicity. The measurement is based upon the molar concentration of hydrogen (H) ions in an aqueous solution of the substance. Pure water is at a neutral pH of 7. For wastewater quality testing, measuring pH allows for benchmarking pH levels to ambient conditions existing naturally in the surrounding environment.
Bath TowelsWater use - Supply chainCalculate B1 as the mass purchased from fabric suppliers that reported their annual water use, divided by the total mass purchased from all fabric suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using purchasing data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Water use is defined as the total amount of withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells. Supplier water use reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
If suppliers completed the CDP Water Security Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report water use.
Suppliers who have entered and communicated the information required by the Higg Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Water Use - Level 1" may be included in percentage calculated for response option B1.
If using Field to Market's Fieldprint Platform to determine water use during cotton production, report data from the "Irrigated yield" field of the summary report, not the "Yield difference due to irrigation" field.
Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator: Harnessing the power of collaboration across the agricultural value chain and locally-led conservation solutions, Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator provides a process-based standard for delivering sustainable outcomes for agriculture, people and the planet. The hallmark of the Accelerator’s approach lies in a process-based approach to advancing continuous improvement, which is grounded in a foundation that delivers solutions to global sustainable development priorities while also addressing local natural resource concerns. These projects utilize the power of voluntary, and often market-driven, solutions to incentivize improved environmental outcomes and enhance farmer livelihoods. By following a standardized and validated approach, these project pathways can leverage the collective action of the value chain to support resilient ecosystems and enhance farmer livelihoods. The Accelerator currently covers alfalfa, barley, corn, cotton, peanuts, potato, rice, sorghum, soy, sugar beet, and wheat produced in the U.S. and Canada. https://fieldtomarket.org/our-programs/CDP Water Information Request: The CDP Water Information Request provides questions that assess a company's water use, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. CDP can be contacted to respond to the Water Information Request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/
Water use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.
Bath TowelsWool and down sourcingCalculate B1 as the mass of your wool and down supply that was traced to the animal farm operation of origin, divided by the total mass of your wool and down supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your wool and down supply that was covered by a current comprehensive certification for farm-level environmental impacts or by verifiable, regularly conducted audits for farm-level impacts, divided by the total mass of your wool and down supply, then multiply by 100. The certification or audits should address all material environmental impacts including, but not limited to, soil health and erosion, biodiversity and deforestation, fertilizer use, and pesticide use. Material certified to the Responsible Wool Standard may be included in the calculation of B2.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your wool and down supply that came from animal farm operations that either maintain a current comprehensive animal welfare certification or verifiable, regularly conducted animal welfare audit, divided by the total mass of your wool and down supply, then multiply by 100.
To be included in B3, verifiable, regularly conducted audits should be performed by a second party or third party. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain can initiate these audits. Regulations, audits, and certifications that align with the animal welfare standards as described in Section 7 of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Terrestrial Animal Health Code and are well-enforced by the implementation of auditing systems can be included in your calculation.
Efforts should be taken to achieve minimization of pain, risk of injury, and transmission of diseases or parasites to animals; a physical environment in which the air quality, temperature, and humidity support good animal health; a structural and social environment that allows animals to rest comfortably, provides opportunities for physical and cognitive activity, and allows for the opportunity to perform all beneficial natural, individual, and social behaviors.
Animals should have access to sufficient water and appropriate feed, so as to be free from hunger and thirst. The handling of animals should foster a positive relationship between humans and animals and should not cause injury, panic, lasting fear, or avoidable stress.
Genetic selection should take into account the health and welfare of animals
Material certified to the Responsible Wool Standard and Responsible Down Standard may be included in the calculation of B3.
Responsible Down Standard: The Responsible Down Standard is a voluntary standard for the certification of down from ducks and geese. It addresses issues of animal welfare at the farm, transport, and slaughter stages. http://responsibledown.org/for-business/certification/

Responsible Wool Standard: The Responsible Wool Standard is a voluntary standard for the certification of wool from sheep. It addressees issues of animal welfare, land management, and traceability. https://textileexchange.org/standards/responsible-wool/
N/AAnimal farm operations: An area of land and its buildings, comprised of one or more locations managed together, that is used for rearing animals. This includes the growing of crops for animal feed on this land.

Animal welfare: Animal welfare refers to the well-being of an animal and how an animal is coping with the conditions in which it lives. A good state of welfare varies substantially between different contexts, but in general an animal is in a good state of welfare if it is healthy, comfortable, well-nourished, safe, able to express innate behavior, and not suffering from pain, fear, and distress. Ensuring animal welfare is a human responsibility that requires treatments such as good housing, good care, good feed, humane handling and humane slaughter/killing. The treatments that an animal receives is covered by other terms such as animal care, animal husbandry, and humane management (adapted from The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE)).

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Bath TowelsWorker Health and Safety - ManufacturingThis question aligns with the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Injury and Illness rate. This rate can be normalized for global applicability.
Calculate B1 according to OSHA's injury and illness rate by multiplying the number of recordable injuries and illnesses by 200,000. Divide this number by the total employee hours worked to produce your final product. If multiple facilities manufacture the final product, the injury and illness rate will need to be adjusted using a weighted average based on each facility's percentage of total production. Include all employees at a facility that participate in the production of the final product. This includes both full-time and contracted employees.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your final product for which you were able to obtain data, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS General Guidance document provides guidance to calculate the weighted average. See Background Information for access to this document.
The Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool is an online calculator that will compute your injury and illness rate. The OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses provides forms and information for computing your facility injury and illness rate.
Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool: This tool calculates the injury and illness incidence rate for employers. https://data.bls.gov/iirc/

OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses: This webpage contains information on how to record workplace injuries and illnesses and provides the worksheets needed to correctly do so. https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/forms

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520108472
Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh: The Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh is an agreement between brands and trade unions to improve worker health and safety. It can be a model for factory inspections, remediation, and worker participation & training. https://bangladeshaccord.org/

How to Compute a Firm's Incidence Rate for Safety Management: This website from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics provides in-depth guidance on computing injury and illness numbers. https://www.bls.gov/iif/osheval.htm

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Bath TowelsWorker Health and Safety - Supply ChainTo be included in B1-B5, risk assessments, training programs, safety plans, performance monitoring systems, and audits must be verifiable and address health and safety issues such as worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. The assessments and audits must be conducted by second or third parties. The risk assessment must be conducted once per year while the audit must have been conducted at least once every three years, both using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles such as International Labour Organization Occupational Safety and Health Conventions (e.g., No. 155). The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions, which can inform your responses. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for examples of initiatives that meet these requirements.
Calculate B1 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product that came from operations that have performed a risk assessment to identify high risk areas for health and safety, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in our final product, then multiply by 100.
To determine if an operation is high risk for health and safety, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic review assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. It must be conducted at least once per year. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B2 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product that came from operations that train workers on health and safety procedures, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B2, the training on health and safety procedures must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and must be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for workers on health and safety procedures and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional worker training may be required to perform job duties. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B3 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product that came from operations that implement a verifiable worker health and safety plan, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B3, a worker health and safety plan must be verifiable and must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and be prominently displayed in the workplace where employees normally report. The plan should include best practices specific to ergonomics; repetitive motions; chemical and particulate exposure; appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE); and proper use of tools, machinery. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B4 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, that came from operations that have a worker health and safety performance monitoring system in place, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B4, a worker health and safety performance monitoring system should include metrics on issues including, but not limited to, incidence of worker injuries and prevalence of diseases. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B5 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, that came from operations that were audited in the last three years on worker health and safety issues, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
To be included in B5, the audits must be verifiable and address preventive measures, freely provided personal protective equipment, identification of worker health and safety hazards and effects on the exposed people, statistics and reasons behind injuries, design of work area, processes, installations, machinery/work equipment, operating processes and work organization, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Standards on Occupational Health and Safety.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528345
United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Risk assessment: A systematic process to evaluate potential risks within an operation, system, or supply chain. It can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party or a country risk classification analysis that judges the site risk due to prevailing conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
BeddingAir quality - ManufacturingCalculate B1 as the mass of products that were produced in final cut, sew, and dyeing facilities that tracked and reported annual air emissions, divided by the total mass of products produced by all final cut, sew, and dyeing facilities, then multiply by 100. Include all company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities that performed final cut, sew, and dyeing operations. If the final cut, sew, and dyeing steps are performed in different facilities, then each must report their air emissions in order to be included in your calculation. Facilities included in this calculation must track all air emissions required by locally applicable regulations, as well as those emissions for which there is scientific evidence of serious effects to human health or the environment. Air emissions may include, but are not limited to, nitrogen and sulphur oxides from boilers, hydrocarbons from drying ovens, carbon monoxide from sizing, aniline vapors, and ammonia from printing/dyeing, and VOCs and ozone from textile finishing, and may be emitted as dust, oil mists, acid vapors, odors, and boiler exhausts. Testing of emissions must occur according to a rigorous and internationally accepted testing methodology.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Information entered into the Higg Index Facility Environment Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Air Emissions - Level 1, Questions 1-3" may be used in responding to B1. The information reported to the FEM is at the facility level; if your products are produced in multiple facilities you may aggregate the data to represent the entirety of final product produced.
Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Air quality - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Air quality - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750750
N/AN/A
BeddingCellulosic material sourcing - Chemical useCanopyStyle’s Hot Button Ranking and Report is the primary viscose and cellulosic fiber sourcing analysis tool for the fashion sector. Calculate D1 as the mass of your cellulosic material that was supplied by producers or mills included in the CanopyStyle Hot Button Report and ranked in the yellow to green bottle range for the Chemical Use and Emissions column, divided by your total mass of cellulosic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Button up to Protect Forests — Producer Progress Criteria: The audit standard and process were developed by Canopy, in partnership with NEPCon, and is supported by the CanopyStyle Leaders for Forest Conservation and brands, retailers and designers looking to implement their sourcing policies for man-made cellulosic textiles. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/ranking-criteria-explained/

CanopyStyle Hot Button Report: The Hot Button Ranking of viscose producers is conducted using the consistent application of the tools and standards of the CanopyStyle initiative, including the CanopyStyle Audit. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/
N/AN/A
BeddingCellulosic material sourcing - DeforestationCanopyStyle’s Hot Button Ranking and Report is the primary viscose and cellulosic fiber sourcing analysis tool for the fashion sector. Calculate D1 as the mass of your cellulosic material that was supplied by producers or mills included in the Canopy Hot Button Report and ranked in the yellow to green shirt range for the Hot Button Assessment column, divided by your total mass of cellulosic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Button up to Protect Forests — Producer Progress Criteria: The audit standard and process were developed by Canopy, in partnership with NEPCon, and is supported by the CanopyStyle Leaders for Forest Conservation and brands, retailers and designers looking to implement their sourcing policies for man-made cellulosic textiles. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/ranking-criteria-explained/

CanopyStyle Hot Button Report: The Hot Button Ranking of viscose producers is conducted using the consistent application of the tools and standards of the CanopyStyle initiative, including the CanopyStyle Audit. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/

ForestMapper: This interactive tool is the only one of its kind to visually represent ancient and endangered forests at a global scale. ForestMapper includes information on numerous ecological values divided into four categories: forests, species, carbon and landscapes. https://canopyplanet.org/tools/forestmapper/
N/AAncient and Endangered Forests: Intact forest landscape mosaics, naturally rare forest types, forest types that have been made rare due to human activity, and/or other forests that are ecologically critical for the protection of biological diversity. As a starting point to geographically locate ancient and endangered forests, maps of High Conservation Value Forests (HCVF), as defined by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), and of intact forest landscapes (IFL), can be used and paired with maps of other key ecological values like the habitat range of key endangered species and forests containing high concentrations of terrestrial carbon and High Carbon Stocks (HCS).
BeddingGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the mass purchased from fabric suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total mass purchased from all fabric suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Suppliers who have entered and communicated information required by the Higg Index Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Energy Use & GHG - Level 1" for their facilities may be used to answer this KPI.
If using Field to Market's Fieldprint Platform to determine greenhouse gas emissions associated with cotton production, include energy use for field operations and activities through the first point of sale. This may include on-farm drying and any transport of the crop prior to sale.
Energy Efficiency Assessment and Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Tool for the Textile Industry (EAGER Textile): This tool was developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to aid in evaluating the impacts of introducing energy efficiency measures into a textile facility. According to the China Energy Group, "the EAGER tool will calculate the typical energy savings (electricity, fuel, final, and primary energy), CO2 emissions reduction, cost, and simple payback period...[the tool] is designed to work for textile facilities that have one or more of the following processes: spinning, weaving/knitting, dyeing, printing, finishing, and man-made fiber production." https://china.lbl.gov/eager-textile

Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator: Harnessing the power of collaboration across the agricultural value chain and locally-led conservation solutions, Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator provides a process-based standard for delivering sustainable outcomes for agriculture, people and the planet. The hallmark of the Accelerator’s approach lies in a process-based approach to advancing continuous improvement, which is grounded in a foundation that delivers solutions to global sustainable development priorities while also addressing local natural resource concerns. These projects utilize the power of voluntary, and often market-driven, solutions to incentivize improved environmental outcomes and enhance farmer livelihoods. By following a standardized and validated approach, these project pathways can leverage the collective action of the value chain to support resilient ecosystems and enhance farmer livelihoods. The Accelerator currently covers alfalfa, barley, corn, cotton, peanuts, potato, rice, sorghum, soy, sugar beet, and wheat produced in the U.S. and Canada. https://fieldtomarket.org/our-programs/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

THESIS Help Center Video: Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Supply Chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Supply Chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/465914322
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
BeddingGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total mass produced of each product.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total mass of final product produced/revenue from final product produced/number of units produced. If the manufacturing facilities produce more than one category of product, only weight using the total mass of production specific to the product category in question.
Calculate B2 as the mass of final products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total mass of final products produced, then multiply by 100. For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
Information entered into the Higg Index Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Energy Use & GHG - Level 1" may be used to answer this KPI.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

Energy Efficiency Assessment and Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Tool for the Textile Industry (EAGER Textile): This tool was developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to aid in evaluating the impacts of introducing energy efficiency measures into a textile facility. According to the China Energy Group, "the EAGER tool will calculate the typical energy savings (electricity, fuel, final, and primary energy), CO2 emissions reduction, cost, and simple payback period...[the tool] is designed to work for textile facilities that have one or more of the following processes: spinning, weaving/knitting, dyeing, printing, finishing, and man-made fiber production." https://china.lbl.gov/eager-textile

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardGreenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
BeddingHazardous Chemical Discharge ManagementFor C, informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles.
For D, goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound. Public disclosure of goals and progress must have occurred within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Examples of tools and protocols for screening chemicals and assessing alternatives include green chemistry, alternatives analysis, restricted substances lists, and other tools that are listed in the Background Information.
To calculate E1, subtract the number of chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List used this year across all manufacturing facilities where your product is cut and sewed from the number of chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List used last year across all manufacturing facilities where your product was cut and sewed. If more chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List were used this year than last, enter zero.
Calculate E1 as the number of manufacturing facilities where your product is cut and sewed that reduced the use of chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List this year compared to last year divided by the total number of manufacturing facilities where your product is cut and sewed, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
American Apparel & Footwear Association (AAFA) - Restricted Substance List: The AAFA provides guidelines for restricted chemicals and substances. https://www.aafaglobal.org/AAFA/Solutions_Pages/Restricted_Substance_List

BHive: The BHive enables the creation and management of chemical inventories, identifies chemical products that meet sustainability credentials. The BHive enhances supply chain transparency as factories, brands, and retailers can view and compare the safety of chemical products. https://www.thebhive.net/

Detox to Zero by OEKO-TEX: This analysis and assessment tool creates transparency and provides textile and leather producers the ability to control the use of hazardous substances. The tool focuses on continuous improvement and gradual reduction of harmful substances in production processes. https://www.oeko-tex.com/en/our-standards/detox-to-zero-by-oeko-tex

GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

GreenSuite: GreenSuite is an environmental sustainability tool that can be customized to specific users' needs. Environmental issues throughout the supply chain are covered by this web based solution. http://greensuite360.com/index.html

Greenlist Process: According to their website, "In 2001, SC Johnson developed the Greenlist Process to classify ingredients in order to minimize the human and environmental impacts of their products." The process is now available for license to other companies and organizations. https://www.scjohnson.com/en/our-purpose/sustainability-report/explaining-the-sc-johnson-greenlist-program-an-excerpt-from-our-2017-sustainability-report

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815

PRIO: PRIO is a web-based tool developed by the Swedish government to facilitate the assessment of environmental and health risks of chemicals. ? https://www.kemi.se/prioguiden/english/start

Roadmap to Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals (ZDHC): This plan is intended to reduce and eliminate the discharge of hazardous chemicals. https://www.roadmaptozero.com/

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS): Sustainable Textile Solutions programs support brands, retailers, and industry partners in their efforts to achieve compliance to environmental, health, and safety standards. https://sustexsolutions.com/

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Management KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Management KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528286

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Exposure Assessment Tools and Models: According to their website, "The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) has developed several exposure assessment methods, databases, and predictive models to help in evaluating what happens to chemicals when they are used and released to the environment and how workers, the general public, consumers and the aquatic ecosystems may be exposed to chemicals." https://www.epa.gov/ceam/tools-data-exposure-assessment

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Sustainable Futures: According to their website, "The goal of the Sustainable Futures Initiative (SF) is to make new chemicals safer, available faster, and at lower cost. It works by giving chemical developers the same risk-screening models that EPA uses to evaluate new chemicals before they enter the market."? https://www.epa.gov/sustainable-futures
BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Existing Chemicals Program: According to their website, "EPA's existing chemical programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and characterization, and risk management for chemical substances in commercial use." The current chemicals management program is undergoing review and update, including how the agency identifies and prioritizes priority chemicals for review and assessment under TSCA. https://www.epa.gov/compliance/toxic-substances-control-act-tsca-compliance-monitoring#chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
N/A
BeddingLabor Rights - ManufacturingThe scope of this KPI includes company owned and contract manufacturing facilities performing final cut, sew, and dyeing operations for final product.

Calculate B1 as the mass of your final product that is covered by an internal policy that has quantitative time-bound goals related to child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100. Where freedom of association and collective bargaining are restricted by law, employers can use other forms of non-union employee representation and relations to respect this aspect of workers' rights.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your final product that has been reviewed by a risk assessment which identifies high-risk areas for labor rights abuses, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100.
To be included in B2, a risk assessment must have been conducted by second or third parties and must have been conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles. The risk assessments and standard must be verifiable and must address labor rights abuses such as discrimination on grounds of gender, age, ethnicity or disability, physical violence, sexual harassment and abuse, child labor, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining or any other range of behaviors and practices as outlined by internationally-recognized labor standards. The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions which can inform your responses.
In addition, to determine if an operation is in a high-risk area for labor rights abuses, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally-recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic risk assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. The AMFORI Countries' Risk Classification tool listed below may be used to inform your response. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B3 as the number of staff responsible for procurement activities that have been trained on labor rights issues in the supply chain, divided by the total number of staff responsible for procurement activities, then multiply by 100. Include both full-time and contracted employees. The training must be verifiable. Staff training should cover child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Staff training should be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for labor rights issues and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional staff training may be required to perform job duties.
Calculate B4 as the number staff responsible for procurement activities that have been evaluated via performance metrics on labor rights improvements in the supply chain, divided by the total staff responsible for procurement activities, then multiply by 100. Evaluation on labor rights should include, child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples of improvements include decreased incidence of child labor, forced labor, or discrimination, or an Increased worker participation in collective bargaining.
Calculate B5 as the mass of your final product that was produced in operations that were low risk, that were high risk but corrective actions were taken, or that were audited on child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining in the last three years, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B5, audits must be verifiable and address child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work. Where freedom of association & collective bargaining is restricted by law, employers can use other forms of non-union employee representation and relations to respect this aspect of workers' rights. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

THESIS Help Center Video: Labor Rights - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Labor Rights - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520093618
International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work: This declaration outlines the universal rights of all workers regardless of citizenship status, gender, or the local level of economic development. http://www.ilo.org/declaration/lang--en/index.htm

United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9
First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Forced labor: Any task or service performed by a person against their will or under threat of negative consequence. Forced labor includes debt bondage, human trafficking, withholding of wages or identity papers, threats of violence, unreasonable restriction of movement, and exploitation of marginalized workers.

Freedom of collective bargaining: The right to negotiate the conditions of employment as a group rather than individually without fear of repercussions.

Internationally-recognized labor principles: Internationally-recognized labor principles include the United Nations Global Compact and International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work or equivalent.

Labor rights: The universal rights of workers, regardless of race, gender, nationality, or other distinguishing characteristic. These include protection from the worst forms of child labor, forced labor, and discrimination, as well as freedom of association and collective bargaining as outlined by the United Nations Global Compact or the International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work.

Risk assessment: A systematic process to evaluate potential risks within an operation, system, or supply chain. It can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party or a country risk classification analysis that judges the site risk due to prevailing conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
BeddingMicrofiber release - ManufacturingAnswer A if your company only works with plant-derived materials (e.g., cotton, linen) which have been proven to biodegrade in water.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your synthetic textile supply that was sourced from manufacturers, either contracted or company owned, who monitored microfiber release during wet processing, divided by your total mass of synthetic textile supply, then multiply by 100. Monitoring may include, but is not limited to, wastewater and lint analysis.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your synthetic textile supply that was sourced from manufacturers, either contracted or company owned, who utilized alternatives to wet processing, divided by your total mass of synthetic textile supply, then multiply by 100.
Alternatives should replace at least one full stage of wet processing to qualify. Examples include, but are not limited to, inkjet printing and plasma technologies, which replace the dyeing stage of wet processing.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your synthetic textile supply that was sourced from manufacturers, either contracted or company owned, who have implemented practices and technologies to minimize microfiber release, divided by your total mass of synthetic textile supply, then multiply by 100.
The maximum possible response for each response option is 100%. However, multiple response options may be applicable to the same portion of your supply. For example, supply included in the calculation for C1 could also be included in the calculation for C2 if the stated conditions are also met.
Practices and technologies that minimize microfiber release include, but are not limited to, lowering the melting temperature of yarn to improve tensile strength, and adding coatings to yarn to reduce fiber loss.
N/AN/AMicrofiber release: Small synthetic fibers less than 10 micrometers in diameter that are released into the environment via wastewater during textile manufacturing that cause a variety of impacts to humans and wildlife, in addition to persisting in rivers, streams, and oceans.
BeddingPlant-derived material sourcingPlant derived materials include cotton, linen, and hemp. Regenerated or semisynthetic cellulosic materials such as rayon and viscose are considered in the Synthetic Material Sourcing KPI.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your plant-derived material supply that was traced to the processing facility, divided by the total mass of your plant-derived material supply, then multiply by 100. The processing facility is where pre-spinning material processing takes place such as ginning for cotton, or scutching and heckling/hackling for linen.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your plant-derived material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for managing farm-level environmental impacts, divided by the total mass of your plant-derived material supply, then multiply by 100. A comprehensive plan will address pesticide use, fertilizer use, water use, greenhouse gas emissions and all other impacts relevant for the farm. Supply that has been certified by Better Cotton Initiative and Global Organic Textile Standard can be included in the numerator for this calculation.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your plant-derived material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for farm-level social impacts, divided by the total mass of your plant-derived material supply, then multiply by 100. A comprehensive plan will address worker health and safety, community health and safety, support for smallholders where present, and labor rights, including child labor, as well as all other impacts relevant for the farm. Supply that has been certified by Better Cotton Initiative, Fair Trade International, and Fair for Life can be included in the numerator for this calculation.
Calculate C4 as the mass of your cotton material supply that was assessed and met criteria for C1, C2, and C3, divided by the total mass of your material supply, then multiply by 100. The percent entered cannot exceed 100%.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Better Cotton Initiative: The Better Cotton Initiative offers publically available resources to provided background information on best practices for growing cotton. https://bettercotton.org/resources/

Cotton USA: Cotton USA is the trademark of the nonprofit Cotton Council International (CCI) which works through quality, sustainability, transparent partnerships, and ethical standards to make US cotton the preferred fiber for the clothing, footwear, and textiles value chain. Through their sustainability value, they aim to make US cotton the most sustainably produced in the world. https://cottonusa.org/

Fair for Life Certification Program: The Fair Life program provides certification for fair trade and responsible supply chains. The goal of Fair for Life is to ensure social and economic benefits to socioeconomically disadvantaged agricultural producers and workers and to ensure that smallholder producers receive a fair share. http://www.fairforlife.org/

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

Global Organic Textile Standard: This is an example of textile chemical use standards. http://www.global-standard.org/the-standard/general-description.html

Recycled Claim Standard (RCS) and Global Recycled Standard (GRS): The Recycled Claim Standard and Global Recycled Standard have the goal to increase recycled materials in consumer products by developing voluntary standards for the certification of recycled input. These standards also cover chain of custody, environmental processing, and chemical restrictions. https://textileexchange.org/standards/recycled-claim-standard-global-recycled-standard/

THESIS Help Center Video: Plant-derived material sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Plant-derived material sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750670
N/AFarming operation: An area of land and its buildings, comprised of one or more locations managed together that is used for growing crops that are delivered for further processing or as ingredients to other final products.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
BeddingProduct DesignCalculate B1 as the unit volume of your products that underwent a life cycle assessment, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
A life cycle assessment should be conducted against ISO 14040 \(Life Cycle Assessment - Principles and framework\).
Calculate B2 as the unit volume of your products that were designed to maximize material efficiency, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Material efficiency may include, but is not limited to, design to reduce total amount of materials needed to cut and sew a product, design to reduce material waste during cut and sew process.
Addressing material efficiency during the design stage may include, but is not limited to employing zero waste patternmaking to reduce material waste during the cut and sew process, and using whole garment knitting techniques to reduce the amount of yarn wasted during the knitting process.
Calculate B3 as the unit volume of your products designed to reduce laundering impacts, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Laundering impacts may include, but are not limited to, energy use during laundering and microfiber release during laundering.
Addressing laundering impacts at the design stage may include, but is not limited to choosing fabrics made from natural fibers that biodegrade, or adding care instructions to a garment's label that specify practices known to reduce energy use like cold water wash.
Calculate B4 as the unit volume of your products that underwent a durability assessment as part of the design process, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Both physical and emotional durability should be considered in this assessment.
Attributes to consider while assessing physical durability may include, but are not limited to stability/longevity of materials used, and strength/quality of cut and sew techniques.
Attributes to consider while assessing emotional durability include a product's flexibility or changeability to adapt to changing tastes over time.
Calculate B5 as the unit volume of your products that were designed to maximize resource utilization, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Resource utilization maximization may include, but is not limited to, materials that are able to be reused or recycled.
Addressing resource utilization maximization during the design stage may include, but is not limited to choosing single fiber fabrics that can be recycled, and using simple construction methods that can be disassembled after use.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS Help Center Video: Product Design KPI: Short video tutorial on the Product Design KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520107448B Corp Certification: B Corp offers certification at a company level and focuses on social and environmental performance, public transparency, and legal accountability. https://bcorporation.net/

BlueSign: Bluesign is a third party verification and consultant service. Verification is performed for social and environmental impacts, and consulting services are available for multiple supply chain, manufacturing, and production stages. https://www.bluesign.com/en/business/services

Cradle to Cradle Certified (TM) - Material Health: The Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute, a non-profit organization, administers the Cradle to Cradle Certified™ Product Standard, and provide guidance on chemical hazard assessments and their use for material assessments. The Cradle to Cradle™ Material Health Assessment Methodology examines product chemical composition break down and data collection rules and guidelines, guidance and criteria for chemical profiling methods, assessment of metabolism considerations, and guidance for the evaluation of material assessments. http://www.c2ccertified.org/get-certified/product-certification

Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

ISO 14040: ISO 14040 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Principles and Framework" document for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/37456.html

ISO 14044: ISO 14044 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Requirements and Guidelines" standard for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/38498.html

ISO/TC 207/SC 5: ISO/TC 207/SC 5 is the International Standardization Organization's life cycle assessment standard. https://www.iso.org/committee/54854.html
N/A
BeddingRecycled contentCalculate B1 as the mass of fiber in your final products that can be defined as recycled content, divided by the total mass of fiber in your final products. Only include post-consumer recycled content. Exclude packaging from this calculation.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your products for which you were able to obtain data on recycled content, divided by the total mass of your products, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Recycled material available for textile manufacturing can vary based on fiber type. This should be considered when evaluating the ratio of recycled content based upon specific textile products.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your recycled material supply that was assessed and met criteria for B1 and B2 that is polyester divided by the total mass of your recycled material supply, then multiply by 100.
Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

THESIS Help Center Video: Recycled Content KPI: Short video tutorial on the Recycled Content KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017179
N/APost-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Pre-consumer recycled material: “Material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))
BeddingSynthetic material sourcingThis KPI covers synthetic (e.g., polyester, nylon) and semisynthetic (e.g., rayon, viscose, lyocell) materials.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was traced to the production facility of origin, divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100. The production facility is where the chemical processes (e.g., synthesis, regeneration) to produce the fiber or material are carried out.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for managing facility environmental impacts, divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for facility social impacts, divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was assessed and met criteria for C1, C2, and C3 that is polyester divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
N/AN/AVerifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
BeddingWastewater generation - Supply ChainCalculate B1 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for COD, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B2 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for BOD, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B3 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for TSS, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B4 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met the standard for pH, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B5 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met the standard for temperature, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Audits should include verification that discharged wastewater is meeting the standards set forth by the American Apparel & Footwear Association Global Textile Effluent Guidelines for 95% of the sampling period:
- Measurements for BOD and TSS should be below or equal to 30 ppm.
- Measurements for COD should be below or equal to 100 ppm.
- Measurements for temperature should be below or equal to 37 degrees Celsius.
- Measurements for pH should be between 6.0 - 9.0.
Testing should follow a rigorous and internationally accepted methodology and frequency. Local or corporate standards may be stricter. The water quality metrics ideally approach ambient conditions.
Suppliers who have entered and communicated information required by the Higg Index Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Wastewater - Level 2, Question 7" may be used in responding to B1-B5 if the chosen wastewater standard meets or exceeds the values listed above, or if the values of the parameters listed in the detection table meet or exceed the values listed above. The information reported to the FEM is at the facility level; if your products are produced in multiple facilities you may aggregate the data to represent the entirety of final product produced.
AWS International Water Stewardship Standard: The International Water Stewardship Standard is a globally-applicable framework that helps water users understand their water use and impacts. Developed by the Alliance for Water Stewardship, the standard addresses 1) sustainable water balance, 2) good water quality, 3) healthy important water-related areas, and 4) good water governance. https://a4ws.org/the-aws-standard-2-0/

American Apparel & Footwear Association (AAFA) - Restricted Substance List: The AAFA provides guidelines for restricted chemicals and substances. https://www.aafaglobal.org/AAFA/Solutions_Pages/Restricted_Substance_List

BHive: The BHive enables the creation and management of chemical inventories, identifies chemical products that meet sustainability credentials. The BHive enhances supply chain transparency as factories, brands, and retailers can view and compare the safety of chemical products. https://www.thebhive.net/

Detox to Zero by OEKO-TEX: This analysis and assessment tool creates transparency and provides textile and leather producers the ability to control the use of hazardous substances. The tool focuses on continuous improvement and gradual reduction of harmful substances in production processes. https://www.oeko-tex.com/en/our-standards/detox-to-zero-by-oeko-tex

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS): Sustainable Textile Solutions programs support brands, retailers, and industry partners in their efforts to achieve compliance to environmental, health, and safety standards. https://sustexsolutions.com/

THESIS Help Center Video: Wastewater generation - Supply Chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Wastewater generation - Supply Chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/448595442
Roadmap to Zero by ZDHC (Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals): This plan is intended to reduce and eliminate the discharge of hazardous chemicals. https://www.roadmaptozero.com/

Textile Effluent Treatment Technology: The Journal of Cotton Science has produced a document addressing the treatment of textile effluent and specific wastewater management methods. http://www.cotton.org/journal/2007-11/3/upload/jcs11-141.pdf

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - Effluent Limitation Guidelines: This source provides current wastewater discharge guidelines and provides resources for reducing environmental impacts from wastewater discharge. https://www.epa.gov/eg

Wastewater 101 Toolbox: A free online resource for the textile industry to learn, act, and share experiences related to the treatment of wastewater. https://wastewater.sustainabilityconsortium.org/
Biological oxygen demand (BOD): An indicator for the amount of oxygen required/consumed for the microbiological decomposition (oxidation) of organic material in water bodies.

Chemical oxygen demand (COD): An indicator for the amount of oxygen required to oxidize an organic compound to carbon dioxide, ammonia, and water. The measurement is a proxy for the amount of organic compounds in water. Measuring COD in wastewater provides an estimated level of organic pollutants. The standard for measurement can be referenced in ISO 6060.

Total suspended solids (TSS): A water quality measurement that reflects the amount of particulates in a sample. The dry weight of residue in a filter is used to calculate units in milligrams per liter (mg/L).

Water use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.

pH: A measure of a substance's acidity or basicity. The measurement is based upon the molar concentration of hydrogen (H) ions in an aqueous solution of the substance. Pure water is at a neutral pH of 7. For wastewater quality testing, measuring pH allows for benchmarking pH levels to ambient conditions existing naturally in the surrounding environment.
BeddingWater use - Supply chainCalculate B1 as the mass purchased from fabric suppliers that reported their annual water use, divided by the total mass purchased from all fabric suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using purchasing data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Water use is defined as the total amount of withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells. Supplier water use reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
If suppliers completed the CDP Water Security Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report water use.
Suppliers who have entered and communicated the information required by the Higg Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Water Use - Level 1" may be included in percentage calculated for response option B1.
If using Field to Market's Fieldprint Platform to determine water use during cotton production, report data from the "Irrigated yield" field of the summary report, not the "Yield difference due to irrigation" field.
Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator: Harnessing the power of collaboration across the agricultural value chain and locally-led conservation solutions, Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator provides a process-based standard for delivering sustainable outcomes for agriculture, people and the planet. The hallmark of the Accelerator’s approach lies in a process-based approach to advancing continuous improvement, which is grounded in a foundation that delivers solutions to global sustainable development priorities while also addressing local natural resource concerns. These projects utilize the power of voluntary, and often market-driven, solutions to incentivize improved environmental outcomes and enhance farmer livelihoods. By following a standardized and validated approach, these project pathways can leverage the collective action of the value chain to support resilient ecosystems and enhance farmer livelihoods. The Accelerator currently covers alfalfa, barley, corn, cotton, peanuts, potato, rice, sorghum, soy, sugar beet, and wheat produced in the U.S. and Canada. https://fieldtomarket.org/our-programs/CDP Water Information Request: The CDP Water Information Request provides questions that assess a company's water use, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. CDP can be contacted to respond to the Water Information Request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/
Water use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.
BeddingWool and down sourcingCalculate B1 as the mass of your wool and down supply that was traced to the animal farm operation of origin, divided by the total mass of your wool and down supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your wool and down supply that was covered by a current comprehensive certification for farm-level environmental impacts or by verifiable, regularly conducted audits for farm-level impacts, divided by the total mass of your wool and down supply, then multiply by 100. The certification or audits should address all material environmental impacts including, but not limited to, soil health and erosion, biodiversity and deforestation, fertilizer use, and pesticide use. Material certified to the Responsible Wool Standard may be included in the calculation of B2.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your wool and down supply that came from animal farm operations that either maintain a current comprehensive animal welfare certification or verifiable, regularly conducted animal welfare audit, divided by the total mass of your wool and down supply, then multiply by 100.
To be included in B3, verifiable, regularly conducted audits should be performed by a second party or third party. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain can initiate these audits. Regulations, audits, and certifications that align with the animal welfare standards as described in Section 7 of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Terrestrial Animal Health Code and are well-enforced by the implementation of auditing systems can be included in your calculation.
Efforts should be taken to achieve minimization of pain, risk of injury, and transmission of diseases or parasites to animals; a physical environment in which the air quality, temperature, and humidity support good animal health; a structural and social environment that allows animals to rest comfortably, provides opportunities for physical and cognitive activity, and allows for the opportunity to perform all beneficial natural, individual, and social behaviors.
Animals should have access to sufficient water and appropriate feed, so as to be free from hunger and thirst. The handling of animals should foster a positive relationship between humans and animals and should not cause injury, panic, lasting fear, or avoidable stress.
Genetic selection should take into account the health and welfare of animals
Material certified to the Responsible Wool Standard and Responsible Down Standard may be included in the calculation of B3.
Responsible Down Standard: The Responsible Down Standard is a voluntary standard for the certification of down from ducks and geese. It addresses issues of animal welfare at the farm, transport, and slaughter stages. http://responsibledown.org/for-business/certification/

Responsible Wool Standard: The Responsible Wool Standard is a voluntary standard for the certification of wool from sheep. It addressees issues of animal welfare, land management, and traceability. https://textileexchange.org/standards/responsible-wool/
N/AAnimal farm operations: An area of land and its buildings, comprised of one or more locations managed together, that is used for rearing animals. This includes the growing of crops for animal feed on this land.

Animal welfare: Animal welfare refers to the well-being of an animal and how an animal is coping with the conditions in which it lives. A good state of welfare varies substantially between different contexts, but in general an animal is in a good state of welfare if it is healthy, comfortable, well-nourished, safe, able to express innate behavior, and not suffering from pain, fear, and distress. Ensuring animal welfare is a human responsibility that requires treatments such as good housing, good care, good feed, humane handling and humane slaughter/killing. The treatments that an animal receives is covered by other terms such as animal care, animal husbandry, and humane management (adapted from The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE)).

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
BeddingWorker Health and Safety - ManufacturingThis question aligns with the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Injury and Illness rate. This rate can be normalized for global applicability.
Calculate B1 according to OSHA's injury and illness rate by multiplying the number of recordable injuries and illnesses by 200,000. Divide this number by the total employee hours worked to produce your final product. If multiple facilities manufacture the final product, the injury and illness rate will need to be adjusted using a weighted average based on each facility's percentage of total production. Include all employees at a facility that participate in the production of the final product. This includes both full-time and contracted employees.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your final product for which you were able to obtain data, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS General Guidance document provides guidance to calculate the weighted average. See Background Information for access to this document.
The Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool is an online calculator that will compute your injury and illness rate. The OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses provides forms and information for computing your facility injury and illness rate.
Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool: This tool calculates the injury and illness incidence rate for employers. https://data.bls.gov/iirc/

OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses: This webpage contains information on how to record workplace injuries and illnesses and provides the worksheets needed to correctly do so. https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/forms

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520108472
Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh: The Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh is an agreement between brands and trade unions to improve worker health and safety. It can be a model for factory inspections, remediation, and worker participation & training. https://bangladeshaccord.org/

How to Compute a Firm's Incidence Rate for Safety Management: This website from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics provides in-depth guidance on computing injury and illness numbers. https://www.bls.gov/iif/osheval.htm

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
BeddingWorker Health and Safety - Supply ChainTo be included in B1-B5, risk assessments, training programs, safety plans, performance monitoring systems, and audits must be verifiable and address health and safety issues such as worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. The assessments and audits must be conducted by second or third parties. The risk assessment must be conducted once per year while the audit must have been conducted at least once every three years, both using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles such as International Labour Organization Occupational Safety and Health Conventions (e.g., No. 155). The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions, which can inform your responses. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for examples of initiatives that meet these requirements.
Calculate B1 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product that came from operations that have performed a risk assessment to identify high risk areas for health and safety, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in our final product, then multiply by 100.
To determine if an operation is high risk for health and safety, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic review assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. It must be conducted at least once per year. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B2 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product that came from operations that train workers on health and safety procedures, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B2, the training on health and safety procedures must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and must be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for workers on health and safety procedures and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional worker training may be required to perform job duties. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B3 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product that came from operations that implement a verifiable worker health and safety plan, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B3, a worker health and safety plan must be verifiable and must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and be prominently displayed in the workplace where employees normally report. The plan should include best practices specific to ergonomics; repetitive motions; chemical and particulate exposure; appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE); and proper use of tools, machinery. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B4 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, that came from operations that have a worker health and safety performance monitoring system in place, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B4, a worker health and safety performance monitoring system should include metrics on issues including, but not limited to, incidence of worker injuries and prevalence of diseases. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B5 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, that came from operations that were audited in the last three years on worker health and safety issues, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
To be included in B5, the audits must be verifiable and address preventive measures, freely provided personal protective equipment, identification of worker health and safety hazards and effects on the exposed people, statistics and reasons behind injuries, design of work area, processes, installations, machinery/work equipment, operating processes and work organization, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Standards on Occupational Health and Safety.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528345
United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Risk assessment: A systematic process to evaluate potential risks within an operation, system, or supply chain. It can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party or a country risk classification analysis that judges the site risk due to prevailing conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Children's AccessoriesAir quality - ManufacturingCalculate B1 as the mass of products that were produced in final cut, sew, and dyeing facilities that tracked and reported annual air emissions, divided by the total mass of products produced by all final cut, sew, and dyeing facilities, then multiply by 100. Include all company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities that performed final cut, sew, and dyeing operations. If the final cut, sew, and dyeing steps are performed in different facilities, then each must report their air emissions in order to be included in your calculation. Facilities included in this calculation must track all air emissions required by locally applicable regulations, as well as those emissions for which there is scientific evidence of serious effects to human health or the environment. Air emissions may include, but are not limited to, nitrogen and sulphur oxides from boilers, hydrocarbons from drying ovens, carbon monoxide from sizing, aniline vapors, and ammonia from printing/dyeing, and VOCs and ozone from textile finishing, and may be emitted as dust, oil mists, acid vapors, odors, and boiler exhausts. Testing of emissions must occur according to a rigorous and internationally accepted testing methodology.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Information entered into the Higg Index Facility Environment Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Air Emissions - Level 1, Questions 1-3" may be used in responding to B1. The information reported to the FEM is at the facility level; if your products are produced in multiple facilities you may aggregate the data to represent the entirety of final product produced.
Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Air quality - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Air quality - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750750
N/AN/A
Children's AccessoriesCellulosic material sourcing - Chemical useCanopyStyle’s Hot Button Ranking and Report is the primary viscose and cellulosic fiber sourcing analysis tool for the fashion sector. Calculate D1 as the mass of your cellulosic material that was supplied by producers or mills included in the CanopyStyle Hot Button Report and ranked in the yellow to green bottle range for the Chemical Use and Emissions column, divided by your total mass of cellulosic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Button up to Protect Forests — Producer Progress Criteria: The audit standard and process were developed by Canopy, in partnership with NEPCon, and is supported by the CanopyStyle Leaders for Forest Conservation and brands, retailers and designers looking to implement their sourcing policies for man-made cellulosic textiles. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/ranking-criteria-explained/

CanopyStyle Hot Button Report: The Hot Button Ranking of viscose producers is conducted using the consistent application of the tools and standards of the CanopyStyle initiative, including the CanopyStyle Audit. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/
N/AN/A
Children's AccessoriesCellulosic material sourcing - DeforestationCanopyStyle’s Hot Button Ranking and Report is the primary viscose and cellulosic fiber sourcing analysis tool for the fashion sector. Calculate D1 as the mass of your cellulosic material that was supplied by producers or mills included in the Canopy Hot Button Report and ranked in the yellow to green shirt range for the Hot Button Assessment column, divided by your total mass of cellulosic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Button up to Protect Forests — Producer Progress Criteria: The audit standard and process were developed by Canopy, in partnership with NEPCon, and is supported by the CanopyStyle Leaders for Forest Conservation and brands, retailers and designers looking to implement their sourcing policies for man-made cellulosic textiles. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/ranking-criteria-explained/

CanopyStyle Hot Button Report: The Hot Button Ranking of viscose producers is conducted using the consistent application of the tools and standards of the CanopyStyle initiative, including the CanopyStyle Audit. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/

ForestMapper: This interactive tool is the only one of its kind to visually represent ancient and endangered forests at a global scale. ForestMapper includes information on numerous ecological values divided into four categories: forests, species, carbon and landscapes. https://canopyplanet.org/tools/forestmapper/
N/AAncient and Endangered Forests: Intact forest landscape mosaics, naturally rare forest types, forest types that have been made rare due to human activity, and/or other forests that are ecologically critical for the protection of biological diversity. As a starting point to geographically locate ancient and endangered forests, maps of High Conservation Value Forests (HCVF), as defined by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), and of intact forest landscapes (IFL), can be used and paired with maps of other key ecological values like the habitat range of key endangered species and forests containing high concentrations of terrestrial carbon and High Carbon Stocks (HCS).
Children's AccessoriesGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the mass purchased from fabric suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total mass purchased from all fabric suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Suppliers who have entered and communicated information required by the Higg Index Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Energy Use & GHG - Level 1" for their facilities may be used to answer this KPI.
If using Field to Market's Fieldprint Platform to determine greenhouse gas emissions associated with cotton production, include energy use for field operations and activities through the first point of sale. This may include on-farm drying and any transport of the crop prior to sale.
Energy Efficiency Assessment and Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Tool for the Textile Industry (EAGER Textile): This tool was developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to aid in evaluating the impacts of introducing energy efficiency measures into a textile facility. According to the China Energy Group, "the EAGER tool will calculate the typical energy savings (electricity, fuel, final, and primary energy), CO2 emissions reduction, cost, and simple payback period...[the tool] is designed to work for textile facilities that have one or more of the following processes: spinning, weaving/knitting, dyeing, printing, finishing, and man-made fiber production." https://china.lbl.gov/eager-textile

Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator: Harnessing the power of collaboration across the agricultural value chain and locally-led conservation solutions, Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator provides a process-based standard for delivering sustainable outcomes for agriculture, people and the planet. The hallmark of the Accelerator’s approach lies in a process-based approach to advancing continuous improvement, which is grounded in a foundation that delivers solutions to global sustainable development priorities while also addressing local natural resource concerns. These projects utilize the power of voluntary, and often market-driven, solutions to incentivize improved environmental outcomes and enhance farmer livelihoods. By following a standardized and validated approach, these project pathways can leverage the collective action of the value chain to support resilient ecosystems and enhance farmer livelihoods. The Accelerator currently covers alfalfa, barley, corn, cotton, peanuts, potato, rice, sorghum, soy, sugar beet, and wheat produced in the U.S. and Canada. https://fieldtomarket.org/our-programs/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

THESIS Help Center Video: Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Supply Chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Supply Chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/465914322
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Children's AccessoriesGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total mass produced of each product.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total mass of final product produced/revenue from final product produced/number of units produced. If the manufacturing facilities produce more than one category of product, only weight using the total mass of production specific to the product category in question.
Calculate B2 as the mass of final products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total mass of final products produced, then multiply by 100. For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
Information entered into the Higg Index Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Energy Use & GHG - Level 1" may be used to answer this KPI.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

Energy Efficiency Assessment and Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Tool for the Textile Industry (EAGER Textile): This tool was developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to aid in evaluating the impacts of introducing energy efficiency measures into a textile facility. According to the China Energy Group, "the EAGER tool will calculate the typical energy savings (electricity, fuel, final, and primary energy), CO2 emissions reduction, cost, and simple payback period...[the tool] is designed to work for textile facilities that have one or more of the following processes: spinning, weaving/knitting, dyeing, printing, finishing, and man-made fiber production." https://china.lbl.gov/eager-textile

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardGreenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Children's AccessoriesHazardous Chemical Discharge ManagementFor C, informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles.
For D, goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound. Public disclosure of goals and progress must have occurred within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Examples of tools and protocols for screening chemicals and assessing alternatives include green chemistry, alternatives analysis, restricted substances lists, and other tools that are listed in the Background Information.
To calculate E1, subtract the number of chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List used this year across all manufacturing facilities where your product is cut and sewed from the number of chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List used last year across all manufacturing facilities where your product was cut and sewed. If more chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List were used this year than last, enter zero.
Calculate E1 as the number of manufacturing facilities where your product is cut and sewed that reduced the use of chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List this year compared to last year divided by the total number of manufacturing facilities where your product is cut and sewed, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
American Apparel & Footwear Association (AAFA) - Restricted Substance List: The AAFA provides guidelines for restricted chemicals and substances. https://www.aafaglobal.org/AAFA/Solutions_Pages/Restricted_Substance_List

BHive: The BHive enables the creation and management of chemical inventories, identifies chemical products that meet sustainability credentials. The BHive enhances supply chain transparency as factories, brands, and retailers can view and compare the safety of chemical products. https://www.thebhive.net/

Detox to Zero by OEKO-TEX: This analysis and assessment tool creates transparency and provides textile and leather producers the ability to control the use of hazardous substances. The tool focuses on continuous improvement and gradual reduction of harmful substances in production processes. https://www.oeko-tex.com/en/our-standards/detox-to-zero-by-oeko-tex

GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

GreenSuite: GreenSuite is an environmental sustainability tool that can be customized to specific users' needs. Environmental issues throughout the supply chain are covered by this web based solution. http://greensuite360.com/index.html

Greenlist Process: According to their website, "In 2001, SC Johnson developed the Greenlist Process to classify ingredients in order to minimize the human and environmental impacts of their products." The process is now available for license to other companies and organizations. https://www.scjohnson.com/en/our-purpose/sustainability-report/explaining-the-sc-johnson-greenlist-program-an-excerpt-from-our-2017-sustainability-report

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815

PRIO: PRIO is a web-based tool developed by the Swedish government to facilitate the assessment of environmental and health risks of chemicals. ? https://www.kemi.se/prioguiden/english/start

Roadmap to Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals (ZDHC): This plan is intended to reduce and eliminate the discharge of hazardous chemicals. https://www.roadmaptozero.com/

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS): Sustainable Textile Solutions programs support brands, retailers, and industry partners in their efforts to achieve compliance to environmental, health, and safety standards. https://sustexsolutions.com/

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Management KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Management KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528286

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Exposure Assessment Tools and Models: According to their website, "The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) has developed several exposure assessment methods, databases, and predictive models to help in evaluating what happens to chemicals when they are used and released to the environment and how workers, the general public, consumers and the aquatic ecosystems may be exposed to chemicals." https://www.epa.gov/ceam/tools-data-exposure-assessment

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Sustainable Futures: According to their website, "The goal of the Sustainable Futures Initiative (SF) is to make new chemicals safer, available faster, and at lower cost. It works by giving chemical developers the same risk-screening models that EPA uses to evaluate new chemicals before they enter the market."? https://www.epa.gov/sustainable-futures
BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Existing Chemicals Program: According to their website, "EPA's existing chemical programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and characterization, and risk management for chemical substances in commercial use." The current chemicals management program is undergoing review and update, including how the agency identifies and prioritizes priority chemicals for review and assessment under TSCA. https://www.epa.gov/compliance/toxic-substances-control-act-tsca-compliance-monitoring#chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
N/A
Children's AccessoriesLabor Rights - ManufacturingThe scope of this KPI includes company owned and contract manufacturing facilities performing final cut, sew, and dyeing operations for final product.

Calculate B1 as the mass of your final product that is covered by an internal policy that has quantitative time-bound goals related to child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100. Where freedom of association and collective bargaining are restricted by law, employers can use other forms of non-union employee representation and relations to respect this aspect of workers' rights.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your final product that has been reviewed by a risk assessment which identifies high-risk areas for labor rights abuses, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100.
To be included in B2, a risk assessment must have been conducted by second or third parties and must have been conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles. The risk assessments and standard must be verifiable and must address labor rights abuses such as discrimination on grounds of gender, age, ethnicity or disability, physical violence, sexual harassment and abuse, child labor, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining or any other range of behaviors and practices as outlined by internationally-recognized labor standards. The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions which can inform your responses.
In addition, to determine if an operation is in a high-risk area for labor rights abuses, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally-recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic risk assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. The AMFORI Countries' Risk Classification tool listed below may be used to inform your response. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B3 as the number of staff responsible for procurement activities that have been trained on labor rights issues in the supply chain, divided by the total number of staff responsible for procurement activities, then multiply by 100. Include both full-time and contracted employees. The training must be verifiable. Staff training should cover child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Staff training should be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for labor rights issues and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional staff training may be required to perform job duties.
Calculate B4 as the number staff responsible for procurement activities that have been evaluated via performance metrics on labor rights improvements in the supply chain, divided by the total staff responsible for procurement activities, then multiply by 100. Evaluation on labor rights should include, child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples of improvements include decreased incidence of child labor, forced labor, or discrimination, or an Increased worker participation in collective bargaining.
Calculate B5 as the mass of your final product that was produced in operations that were low risk, that were high risk but corrective actions were taken, or that were audited on child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining in the last three years, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B5, audits must be verifiable and address child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work. Where freedom of association & collective bargaining is restricted by law, employers can use other forms of non-union employee representation and relations to respect this aspect of workers' rights. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

THESIS Help Center Video: Labor Rights - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Labor Rights - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520093618
International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work: This declaration outlines the universal rights of all workers regardless of citizenship status, gender, or the local level of economic development. http://www.ilo.org/declaration/lang--en/index.htm

United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9
First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Forced labor: Any task or service performed by a person against their will or under threat of negative consequence. Forced labor includes debt bondage, human trafficking, withholding of wages or identity papers, threats of violence, unreasonable restriction of movement, and exploitation of marginalized workers.

Freedom of collective bargaining: The right to negotiate the conditions of employment as a group rather than individually without fear of repercussions.

Internationally-recognized labor principles: Internationally-recognized labor principles include the United Nations Global Compact and International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work or equivalent.

Labor rights: The universal rights of workers, regardless of race, gender, nationality, or other distinguishing characteristic. These include protection from the worst forms of child labor, forced labor, and discrimination, as well as freedom of association and collective bargaining as outlined by the United Nations Global Compact or the International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work.

Risk assessment: A systematic process to evaluate potential risks within an operation, system, or supply chain. It can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party or a country risk classification analysis that judges the site risk due to prevailing conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Children's AccessoriesMicrofiber release - ManufacturingAnswer A if your company only works with plant-derived materials (e.g., cotton, linen) which have been proven to biodegrade in water.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your synthetic textile supply that was sourced from manufacturers, either contracted or company owned, who monitored microfiber release during wet processing, divided by your total mass of synthetic textile supply, then multiply by 100. Monitoring may include, but is not limited to, wastewater and lint analysis.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your synthetic textile supply that was sourced from manufacturers, either contracted or company owned, who utilized alternatives to wet processing, divided by your total mass of synthetic textile supply, then multiply by 100.
Alternatives should replace at least one full stage of wet processing to qualify. Examples include, but are not limited to, inkjet printing and plasma technologies, which replace the dyeing stage of wet processing.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your synthetic textile supply that was sourced from manufacturers, either contracted or company owned, who have implemented practices and technologies to minimize microfiber release, divided by your total mass of synthetic textile supply, then multiply by 100.
The maximum possible response for each response option is 100%. However, multiple response options may be applicable to the same portion of your supply. For example, supply included in the calculation for C1 could also be included in the calculation for C2 if the stated conditions are also met.
Practices and technologies that minimize microfiber release include, but are not limited to, lowering the melting temperature of yarn to improve tensile strength, and adding coatings to yarn to reduce fiber loss.
N/AN/AMicrofiber release: Small synthetic fibers less than 10 micrometers in diameter that are released into the environment via wastewater during textile manufacturing that cause a variety of impacts to humans and wildlife, in addition to persisting in rivers, streams, and oceans.
Children's AccessoriesPlant-derived material sourcingPlant derived materials include cotton, linen, and hemp. Regenerated or semisynthetic cellulosic materials such as rayon and viscose are considered in the Synthetic Material Sourcing KPI.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your plant-derived material supply that was traced to the processing facility, divided by the total mass of your plant-derived material supply, then multiply by 100. The processing facility is where pre-spinning material processing takes place such as ginning for cotton, or scutching and heckling/hackling for linen.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your plant-derived material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for managing farm-level environmental impacts, divided by the total mass of your plant-derived material supply, then multiply by 100. A comprehensive plan will address pesticide use, fertilizer use, water use, greenhouse gas emissions and all other impacts relevant for the farm. Supply that has been certified by Better Cotton Initiative and Global Organic Textile Standard can be included in the numerator for this calculation.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your plant-derived material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for farm-level social impacts, divided by the total mass of your plant-derived material supply, then multiply by 100. A comprehensive plan will address worker health and safety, community health and safety, support for smallholders where present, and labor rights, including child labor, as well as all other impacts relevant for the farm. Supply that has been certified by Better Cotton Initiative, Fair Trade International, and Fair for Life can be included in the numerator for this calculation.
Calculate C4 as the mass of your cotton material supply that was assessed and met criteria for C1, C2, and C3, divided by the total mass of your material supply, then multiply by 100. The percent entered cannot exceed 100%.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Better Cotton Initiative: The Better Cotton Initiative offers publically available resources to provided background information on best practices for growing cotton. https://bettercotton.org/resources/

Cotton USA: Cotton USA is the trademark of the nonprofit Cotton Council International (CCI) which works through quality, sustainability, transparent partnerships, and ethical standards to make US cotton the preferred fiber for the clothing, footwear, and textiles value chain. Through their sustainability value, they aim to make US cotton the most sustainably produced in the world. https://cottonusa.org/

Fair for Life Certification Program: The Fair Life program provides certification for fair trade and responsible supply chains. The goal of Fair for Life is to ensure social and economic benefits to socioeconomically disadvantaged agricultural producers and workers and to ensure that smallholder producers receive a fair share. http://www.fairforlife.org/

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

Global Organic Textile Standard: This is an example of textile chemical use standards. http://www.global-standard.org/the-standard/general-description.html

Recycled Claim Standard (RCS) and Global Recycled Standard (GRS): The Recycled Claim Standard and Global Recycled Standard have the goal to increase recycled materials in consumer products by developing voluntary standards for the certification of recycled input. These standards also cover chain of custody, environmental processing, and chemical restrictions. https://textileexchange.org/standards/recycled-claim-standard-global-recycled-standard/

THESIS Help Center Video: Plant-derived material sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Plant-derived material sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750670
N/AFarming operation: An area of land and its buildings, comprised of one or more locations managed together that is used for growing crops that are delivered for further processing or as ingredients to other final products.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Children's AccessoriesProduct DesignCalculate B1 as the unit volume of your products that underwent a life cycle assessment, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
A life cycle assessment should be conducted against ISO 14040 \(Life Cycle Assessment - Principles and framework\).
Calculate B2 as the unit volume of your products that were designed to maximize material efficiency, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Material efficiency may include, but is not limited to, design to reduce total amount of materials needed to cut and sew a product, design to reduce material waste during cut and sew process.
Addressing material efficiency during the design stage may include, but is not limited to employing zero waste patternmaking to reduce material waste during the cut and sew process, and using whole garment knitting techniques to reduce the amount of yarn wasted during the knitting process.
Calculate B3 as the unit volume of your products designed to reduce laundering impacts, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Laundering impacts may include, but are not limited to, energy use during laundering and microfiber release during laundering.
Addressing laundering impacts at the design stage may include, but is not limited to choosing fabrics made from natural fibers that biodegrade, or adding care instructions to a garment's label that specify practices known to reduce energy use like cold water wash.
Calculate B4 as the unit volume of your products that underwent a durability assessment as part of the design process, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Both physical and emotional durability should be considered in this assessment.
Attributes to consider while assessing physical durability may include, but are not limited to stability/longevity of materials used, and strength/quality of cut and sew techniques.
Attributes to consider while assessing emotional durability include a product's flexibility or changeability to adapt to changing tastes over time.
Calculate B5 as the unit volume of your products that were designed to maximize resource utilization, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Resource utilization maximization may include, but is not limited to, materials that are able to be reused or recycled.
Addressing resource utilization maximization during the design stage may include, but is not limited to choosing single fiber fabrics that can be recycled, and using simple construction methods that can be disassembled after use.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS Help Center Video: Product Design KPI: Short video tutorial on the Product Design KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520107448B Corp Certification: B Corp offers certification at a company level and focuses on social and environmental performance, public transparency, and legal accountability. https://bcorporation.net/

BlueSign: Bluesign is a third party verification and consultant service. Verification is performed for social and environmental impacts, and consulting services are available for multiple supply chain, manufacturing, and production stages. https://www.bluesign.com/en/business/services

Cradle to Cradle Certified (TM) - Material Health: The Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute, a non-profit organization, administers the Cradle to Cradle Certified™ Product Standard, and provide guidance on chemical hazard assessments and their use for material assessments. The Cradle to Cradle™ Material Health Assessment Methodology examines product chemical composition break down and data collection rules and guidelines, guidance and criteria for chemical profiling methods, assessment of metabolism considerations, and guidance for the evaluation of material assessments. http://www.c2ccertified.org/get-certified/product-certification

Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

ISO 14040: ISO 14040 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Principles and Framework" document for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/37456.html

ISO 14044: ISO 14044 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Requirements and Guidelines" standard for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/38498.html

ISO/TC 207/SC 5: ISO/TC 207/SC 5 is the International Standardization Organization's life cycle assessment standard. https://www.iso.org/committee/54854.html
N/A
Children's AccessoriesRecycled contentCalculate B1 as the mass of fiber in your final products that can be defined as recycled content, divided by the total mass of fiber in your final products. Only include post-consumer recycled content. Exclude packaging from this calculation.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your products for which you were able to obtain data on recycled content, divided by the total mass of your products, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Recycled material available for textile manufacturing can vary based on fiber type. This should be considered when evaluating the ratio of recycled content based upon specific textile products.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your recycled material supply that was assessed and met criteria for B1 and B2 that is polyester divided by the total mass of your recycled material supply, then multiply by 100.
Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

THESIS Help Center Video: Recycled Content KPI: Short video tutorial on the Recycled Content KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017179
N/APost-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Pre-consumer recycled material: “Material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))
Children's AccessoriesSynthetic material sourcingThis KPI covers synthetic (e.g., polyester, nylon) and semisynthetic (e.g., rayon, viscose, lyocell) materials.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was traced to the production facility of origin, divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100. The production facility is where the chemical processes (e.g., synthesis, regeneration) to produce the fiber or material are carried out.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for managing facility environmental impacts, divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for facility social impacts, divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was assessed and met criteria for C1, C2, and C3 that is polyester divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
N/AN/AVerifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Children's AccessoriesWastewater generation - Supply ChainCalculate B1 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for COD, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B2 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for BOD, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B3 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for TSS, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B4 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met the standard for pH, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B5 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met the standard for temperature, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Audits should include verification that discharged wastewater is meeting the standards set forth by the American Apparel & Footwear Association Global Textile Effluent Guidelines for 95% of the sampling period:
- Measurements for BOD and TSS should be below or equal to 30 ppm.
- Measurements for COD should be below or equal to 100 ppm.
- Measurements for temperature should be below or equal to 37 degrees Celsius.
- Measurements for pH should be between 6.0 - 9.0.
Testing should follow a rigorous and internationally accepted methodology and frequency. Local or corporate standards may be stricter. The water quality metrics ideally approach ambient conditions.
Suppliers who have entered and communicated information required by the Higg Index Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Wastewater - Level 2, Question 7" may be used in responding to B1-B5 if the chosen wastewater standard meets or exceeds the values listed above, or if the values of the parameters listed in the detection table meet or exceed the values listed above. The information reported to the FEM is at the facility level; if your products are produced in multiple facilities you may aggregate the data to represent the entirety of final product produced.
AWS International Water Stewardship Standard: The International Water Stewardship Standard is a globally-applicable framework that helps water users understand their water use and impacts. Developed by the Alliance for Water Stewardship, the standard addresses 1) sustainable water balance, 2) good water quality, 3) healthy important water-related areas, and 4) good water governance. https://a4ws.org/the-aws-standard-2-0/

American Apparel & Footwear Association (AAFA) - Restricted Substance List: The AAFA provides guidelines for restricted chemicals and substances. https://www.aafaglobal.org/AAFA/Solutions_Pages/Restricted_Substance_List

BHive: The BHive enables the creation and management of chemical inventories, identifies chemical products that meet sustainability credentials. The BHive enhances supply chain transparency as factories, brands, and retailers can view and compare the safety of chemical products. https://www.thebhive.net/

Detox to Zero by OEKO-TEX: This analysis and assessment tool creates transparency and provides textile and leather producers the ability to control the use of hazardous substances. The tool focuses on continuous improvement and gradual reduction of harmful substances in production processes. https://www.oeko-tex.com/en/our-standards/detox-to-zero-by-oeko-tex

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS): Sustainable Textile Solutions programs support brands, retailers, and industry partners in their efforts to achieve compliance to environmental, health, and safety standards. https://sustexsolutions.com/

THESIS Help Center Video: Wastewater generation - Supply Chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Wastewater generation - Supply Chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/448595442
Roadmap to Zero by ZDHC (Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals): This plan is intended to reduce and eliminate the discharge of hazardous chemicals. https://www.roadmaptozero.com/

Textile Effluent Treatment Technology: The Journal of Cotton Science has produced a document addressing the treatment of textile effluent and specific wastewater management methods. http://www.cotton.org/journal/2007-11/3/upload/jcs11-141.pdf

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - Effluent Limitation Guidelines: This source provides current wastewater discharge guidelines and provides resources for reducing environmental impacts from wastewater discharge. https://www.epa.gov/eg

Wastewater 101 Toolbox: A free online resource for the textile industry to learn, act, and share experiences related to the treatment of wastewater. https://wastewater.sustainabilityconsortium.org/
Biological oxygen demand (BOD): An indicator for the amount of oxygen required/consumed for the microbiological decomposition (oxidation) of organic material in water bodies.

Chemical oxygen demand (COD): An indicator for the amount of oxygen required to oxidize an organic compound to carbon dioxide, ammonia, and water. The measurement is a proxy for the amount of organic compounds in water. Measuring COD in wastewater provides an estimated level of organic pollutants. The standard for measurement can be referenced in ISO 6060.

Total suspended solids (TSS): A water quality measurement that reflects the amount of particulates in a sample. The dry weight of residue in a filter is used to calculate units in milligrams per liter (mg/L).

Water use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.

pH: A measure of a substance's acidity or basicity. The measurement is based upon the molar concentration of hydrogen (H) ions in an aqueous solution of the substance. Pure water is at a neutral pH of 7. For wastewater quality testing, measuring pH allows for benchmarking pH levels to ambient conditions existing naturally in the surrounding environment.
Children's AccessoriesWater use - Supply chainCalculate B1 as the mass purchased from fabric suppliers that reported their annual water use, divided by the total mass purchased from all fabric suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using purchasing data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Water use is defined as the total amount of withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells. Supplier water use reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
If suppliers completed the CDP Water Security Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report water use.
Suppliers who have entered and communicated the information required by the Higg Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Water Use - Level 1" may be included in percentage calculated for response option B1.
If using Field to Market's Fieldprint Platform to determine water use during cotton production, report data from the "Irrigated yield" field of the summary report, not the "Yield difference due to irrigation" field.
Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator: Harnessing the power of collaboration across the agricultural value chain and locally-led conservation solutions, Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator provides a process-based standard for delivering sustainable outcomes for agriculture, people and the planet. The hallmark of the Accelerator’s approach lies in a process-based approach to advancing continuous improvement, which is grounded in a foundation that delivers solutions to global sustainable development priorities while also addressing local natural resource concerns. These projects utilize the power of voluntary, and often market-driven, solutions to incentivize improved environmental outcomes and enhance farmer livelihoods. By following a standardized and validated approach, these project pathways can leverage the collective action of the value chain to support resilient ecosystems and enhance farmer livelihoods. The Accelerator currently covers alfalfa, barley, corn, cotton, peanuts, potato, rice, sorghum, soy, sugar beet, and wheat produced in the U.S. and Canada. https://fieldtomarket.org/our-programs/CDP Water Information Request: The CDP Water Information Request provides questions that assess a company's water use, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. CDP can be contacted to respond to the Water Information Request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/
Water use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.
Children's AccessoriesWool and down sourcingCalculate B1 as the mass of your wool and down supply that was traced to the animal farm operation of origin, divided by the total mass of your wool and down supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your wool and down supply that was covered by a current comprehensive certification for farm-level environmental impacts or by verifiable, regularly conducted audits for farm-level impacts, divided by the total mass of your wool and down supply, then multiply by 100. The certification or audits should address all material environmental impacts including, but not limited to, soil health and erosion, biodiversity and deforestation, fertilizer use, and pesticide use. Material certified to the Responsible Wool Standard may be included in the calculation of B2.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your wool and down supply that came from animal farm operations that either maintain a current comprehensive animal welfare certification or verifiable, regularly conducted animal welfare audit, divided by the total mass of your wool and down supply, then multiply by 100.
To be included in B3, verifiable, regularly conducted audits should be performed by a second party or third party. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain can initiate these audits. Regulations, audits, and certifications that align with the animal welfare standards as described in Section 7 of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Terrestrial Animal Health Code and are well-enforced by the implementation of auditing systems can be included in your calculation.
Efforts should be taken to achieve minimization of pain, risk of injury, and transmission of diseases or parasites to animals; a physical environment in which the air quality, temperature, and humidity support good animal health; a structural and social environment that allows animals to rest comfortably, provides opportunities for physical and cognitive activity, and allows for the opportunity to perform all beneficial natural, individual, and social behaviors.
Animals should have access to sufficient water and appropriate feed, so as to be free from hunger and thirst. The handling of animals should foster a positive relationship between humans and animals and should not cause injury, panic, lasting fear, or avoidable stress.
Genetic selection should take into account the health and welfare of animals
Material certified to the Responsible Wool Standard and Responsible Down Standard may be included in the calculation of B3.
Responsible Down Standard: The Responsible Down Standard is a voluntary standard for the certification of down from ducks and geese. It addresses issues of animal welfare at the farm, transport, and slaughter stages. http://responsibledown.org/for-business/certification/

Responsible Wool Standard: The Responsible Wool Standard is a voluntary standard for the certification of wool from sheep. It addressees issues of animal welfare, land management, and traceability. https://textileexchange.org/standards/responsible-wool/
N/AAnimal farm operations: An area of land and its buildings, comprised of one or more locations managed together, that is used for rearing animals. This includes the growing of crops for animal feed on this land.

Animal welfare: Animal welfare refers to the well-being of an animal and how an animal is coping with the conditions in which it lives. A good state of welfare varies substantially between different contexts, but in general an animal is in a good state of welfare if it is healthy, comfortable, well-nourished, safe, able to express innate behavior, and not suffering from pain, fear, and distress. Ensuring animal welfare is a human responsibility that requires treatments such as good housing, good care, good feed, humane handling and humane slaughter/killing. The treatments that an animal receives is covered by other terms such as animal care, animal husbandry, and humane management (adapted from The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE)).

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Children's AccessoriesWorker Health and Safety - ManufacturingThis question aligns with the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Injury and Illness rate. This rate can be normalized for global applicability.
Calculate B1 according to OSHA's injury and illness rate by multiplying the number of recordable injuries and illnesses by 200,000. Divide this number by the total employee hours worked to produce your final product. If multiple facilities manufacture the final product, the injury and illness rate will need to be adjusted using a weighted average based on each facility's percentage of total production. Include all employees at a facility that participate in the production of the final product. This includes both full-time and contracted employees.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your final product for which you were able to obtain data, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS General Guidance document provides guidance to calculate the weighted average. See Background Information for access to this document.
The Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool is an online calculator that will compute your injury and illness rate. The OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses provides forms and information for computing your facility injury and illness rate.
Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool: This tool calculates the injury and illness incidence rate for employers. https://data.bls.gov/iirc/

OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses: This webpage contains information on how to record workplace injuries and illnesses and provides the worksheets needed to correctly do so. https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/forms

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520108472
Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh: The Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh is an agreement between brands and trade unions to improve worker health and safety. It can be a model for factory inspections, remediation, and worker participation & training. https://bangladeshaccord.org/

How to Compute a Firm's Incidence Rate for Safety Management: This website from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics provides in-depth guidance on computing injury and illness numbers. https://www.bls.gov/iif/osheval.htm

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Children's AccessoriesWorker Health and Safety - Supply ChainTo be included in B1-B5, risk assessments, training programs, safety plans, performance monitoring systems, and audits must be verifiable and address health and safety issues such as worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. The assessments and audits must be conducted by second or third parties. The risk assessment must be conducted once per year while the audit must have been conducted at least once every three years, both using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles such as International Labour Organization Occupational Safety and Health Conventions (e.g., No. 155). The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions, which can inform your responses. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for examples of initiatives that meet these requirements.
Calculate B1 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product that came from operations that have performed a risk assessment to identify high risk areas for health and safety, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in our final product, then multiply by 100.
To determine if an operation is high risk for health and safety, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic review assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. It must be conducted at least once per year. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B2 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product that came from operations that train workers on health and safety procedures, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B2, the training on health and safety procedures must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and must be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for workers on health and safety procedures and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional worker training may be required to perform job duties. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B3 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product that came from operations that implement a verifiable worker health and safety plan, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B3, a worker health and safety plan must be verifiable and must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and be prominently displayed in the workplace where employees normally report. The plan should include best practices specific to ergonomics; repetitive motions; chemical and particulate exposure; appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE); and proper use of tools, machinery. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B4 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, that came from operations that have a worker health and safety performance monitoring system in place, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B4, a worker health and safety performance monitoring system should include metrics on issues including, but not limited to, incidence of worker injuries and prevalence of diseases. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B5 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, that came from operations that were audited in the last three years on worker health and safety issues, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
To be included in B5, the audits must be verifiable and address preventive measures, freely provided personal protective equipment, identification of worker health and safety hazards and effects on the exposed people, statistics and reasons behind injuries, design of work area, processes, installations, machinery/work equipment, operating processes and work organization, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Standards on Occupational Health and Safety.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528345
United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Risk assessment: A systematic process to evaluate potential risks within an operation, system, or supply chain. It can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party or a country risk classification analysis that judges the site risk due to prevailing conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Children's ActivewearAir quality - ManufacturingCalculate B1 as the mass of products that were produced in final cut, sew, and dyeing facilities that tracked and reported annual air emissions, divided by the total mass of products produced by all final cut, sew, and dyeing facilities, then multiply by 100. Include all company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities that performed final cut, sew, and dyeing operations. If the final cut, sew, and dyeing steps are performed in different facilities, then each must report their air emissions in order to be included in your calculation. Facilities included in this calculation must track all air emissions required by locally applicable regulations, as well as those emissions for which there is scientific evidence of serious effects to human health or the environment. Air emissions may include, but are not limited to, nitrogen and sulphur oxides from boilers, hydrocarbons from drying ovens, carbon monoxide from sizing, aniline vapors, and ammonia from printing/dyeing, and VOCs and ozone from textile finishing, and may be emitted as dust, oil mists, acid vapors, odors, and boiler exhausts. Testing of emissions must occur according to a rigorous and internationally accepted testing methodology.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Information entered into the Higg Index Facility Environment Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Air Emissions - Level 1, Questions 1-3" may be used in responding to B1. The information reported to the FEM is at the facility level; if your products are produced in multiple facilities you may aggregate the data to represent the entirety of final product produced.
Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Air quality - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Air quality - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750750
N/AN/A
Children's ActivewearCellulosic material sourcing - Chemical useCanopyStyle’s Hot Button Ranking and Report is the primary viscose and cellulosic fiber sourcing analysis tool for the fashion sector. Calculate D1 as the mass of your cellulosic material that was supplied by producers or mills included in the CanopyStyle Hot Button Report and ranked in the yellow to green bottle range for the Chemical Use and Emissions column, divided by your total mass of cellulosic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Button up to Protect Forests — Producer Progress Criteria: The audit standard and process were developed by Canopy, in partnership with NEPCon, and is supported by the CanopyStyle Leaders for Forest Conservation and brands, retailers and designers looking to implement their sourcing policies for man-made cellulosic textiles. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/ranking-criteria-explained/

CanopyStyle Hot Button Report: The Hot Button Ranking of viscose producers is conducted using the consistent application of the tools and standards of the CanopyStyle initiative, including the CanopyStyle Audit. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/
N/AN/A
Children's ActivewearCellulosic material sourcing - DeforestationCanopyStyle’s Hot Button Ranking and Report is the primary viscose and cellulosic fiber sourcing analysis tool for the fashion sector. Calculate D1 as the mass of your cellulosic material that was supplied by producers or mills included in the Canopy Hot Button Report and ranked in the yellow to green shirt range for the Hot Button Assessment column, divided by your total mass of cellulosic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Button up to Protect Forests — Producer Progress Criteria: The audit standard and process were developed by Canopy, in partnership with NEPCon, and is supported by the CanopyStyle Leaders for Forest Conservation and brands, retailers and designers looking to implement their sourcing policies for man-made cellulosic textiles. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/ranking-criteria-explained/

CanopyStyle Hot Button Report: The Hot Button Ranking of viscose producers is conducted using the consistent application of the tools and standards of the CanopyStyle initiative, including the CanopyStyle Audit. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/

ForestMapper: This interactive tool is the only one of its kind to visually represent ancient and endangered forests at a global scale. ForestMapper includes information on numerous ecological values divided into four categories: forests, species, carbon and landscapes. https://canopyplanet.org/tools/forestmapper/
N/AAncient and Endangered Forests: Intact forest landscape mosaics, naturally rare forest types, forest types that have been made rare due to human activity, and/or other forests that are ecologically critical for the protection of biological diversity. As a starting point to geographically locate ancient and endangered forests, maps of High Conservation Value Forests (HCVF), as defined by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), and of intact forest landscapes (IFL), can be used and paired with maps of other key ecological values like the habitat range of key endangered species and forests containing high concentrations of terrestrial carbon and High Carbon Stocks (HCS).
Children's ActivewearGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the mass purchased from fabric suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total mass purchased from all fabric suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Suppliers who have entered and communicated information required by the Higg Index Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Energy Use & GHG - Level 1" for their facilities may be used to answer this KPI.
If using Field to Market's Fieldprint Platform to determine greenhouse gas emissions associated with cotton production, include energy use for field operations and activities through the first point of sale. This may include on-farm drying and any transport of the crop prior to sale.
Energy Efficiency Assessment and Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Tool for the Textile Industry (EAGER Textile): This tool was developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to aid in evaluating the impacts of introducing energy efficiency measures into a textile facility. According to the China Energy Group, "the EAGER tool will calculate the typical energy savings (electricity, fuel, final, and primary energy), CO2 emissions reduction, cost, and simple payback period...[the tool] is designed to work for textile facilities that have one or more of the following processes: spinning, weaving/knitting, dyeing, printing, finishing, and man-made fiber production." https://china.lbl.gov/eager-textile

Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator: Harnessing the power of collaboration across the agricultural value chain and locally-led conservation solutions, Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator provides a process-based standard for delivering sustainable outcomes for agriculture, people and the planet. The hallmark of the Accelerator’s approach lies in a process-based approach to advancing continuous improvement, which is grounded in a foundation that delivers solutions to global sustainable development priorities while also addressing local natural resource concerns. These projects utilize the power of voluntary, and often market-driven, solutions to incentivize improved environmental outcomes and enhance farmer livelihoods. By following a standardized and validated approach, these project pathways can leverage the collective action of the value chain to support resilient ecosystems and enhance farmer livelihoods. The Accelerator currently covers alfalfa, barley, corn, cotton, peanuts, potato, rice, sorghum, soy, sugar beet, and wheat produced in the U.S. and Canada. https://fieldtomarket.org/our-programs/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

THESIS Help Center Video: Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Supply Chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Supply Chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/465914322
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Children's ActivewearGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total mass produced of each product.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total mass of final product produced/revenue from final product produced/number of units produced. If the manufacturing facilities produce more than one category of product, only weight using the total mass of production specific to the product category in question.
Calculate B2 as the mass of final products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total mass of final products produced, then multiply by 100. For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
Information entered into the Higg Index Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Energy Use & GHG - Level 1" may be used to answer this KPI.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

Energy Efficiency Assessment and Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Tool for the Textile Industry (EAGER Textile): This tool was developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to aid in evaluating the impacts of introducing energy efficiency measures into a textile facility. According to the China Energy Group, "the EAGER tool will calculate the typical energy savings (electricity, fuel, final, and primary energy), CO2 emissions reduction, cost, and simple payback period...[the tool] is designed to work for textile facilities that have one or more of the following processes: spinning, weaving/knitting, dyeing, printing, finishing, and man-made fiber production." https://china.lbl.gov/eager-textile

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardGreenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Children's ActivewearHazardous Chemical Discharge ManagementFor C, informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles.
For D, goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound. Public disclosure of goals and progress must have occurred within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Examples of tools and protocols for screening chemicals and assessing alternatives include green chemistry, alternatives analysis, restricted substances lists, and other tools that are listed in the Background Information.
To calculate E1, subtract the number of chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List used this year across all manufacturing facilities where your product is cut and sewed from the number of chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List used last year across all manufacturing facilities where your product was cut and sewed. If more chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List were used this year than last, enter zero.
Calculate E1 as the number of manufacturing facilities where your product is cut and sewed that reduced the use of chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List this year compared to last year divided by the total number of manufacturing facilities where your product is cut and sewed, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
American Apparel & Footwear Association (AAFA) - Restricted Substance List: The AAFA provides guidelines for restricted chemicals and substances. https://www.aafaglobal.org/AAFA/Solutions_Pages/Restricted_Substance_List

BHive: The BHive enables the creation and management of chemical inventories, identifies chemical products that meet sustainability credentials. The BHive enhances supply chain transparency as factories, brands, and retailers can view and compare the safety of chemical products. https://www.thebhive.net/

Detox to Zero by OEKO-TEX: This analysis and assessment tool creates transparency and provides textile and leather producers the ability to control the use of hazardous substances. The tool focuses on continuous improvement and gradual reduction of harmful substances in production processes. https://www.oeko-tex.com/en/our-standards/detox-to-zero-by-oeko-tex

GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

GreenSuite: GreenSuite is an environmental sustainability tool that can be customized to specific users' needs. Environmental issues throughout the supply chain are covered by this web based solution. http://greensuite360.com/index.html

Greenlist Process: According to their website, "In 2001, SC Johnson developed the Greenlist Process to classify ingredients in order to minimize the human and environmental impacts of their products." The process is now available for license to other companies and organizations. https://www.scjohnson.com/en/our-purpose/sustainability-report/explaining-the-sc-johnson-greenlist-program-an-excerpt-from-our-2017-sustainability-report

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815

PRIO: PRIO is a web-based tool developed by the Swedish government to facilitate the assessment of environmental and health risks of chemicals. ? https://www.kemi.se/prioguiden/english/start

Roadmap to Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals (ZDHC): This plan is intended to reduce and eliminate the discharge of hazardous chemicals. https://www.roadmaptozero.com/

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS): Sustainable Textile Solutions programs support brands, retailers, and industry partners in their efforts to achieve compliance to environmental, health, and safety standards. https://sustexsolutions.com/

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Management KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Management KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528286

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Exposure Assessment Tools and Models: According to their website, "The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) has developed several exposure assessment methods, databases, and predictive models to help in evaluating what happens to chemicals when they are used and released to the environment and how workers, the general public, consumers and the aquatic ecosystems may be exposed to chemicals." https://www.epa.gov/ceam/tools-data-exposure-assessment

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Sustainable Futures: According to their website, "The goal of the Sustainable Futures Initiative (SF) is to make new chemicals safer, available faster, and at lower cost. It works by giving chemical developers the same risk-screening models that EPA uses to evaluate new chemicals before they enter the market."? https://www.epa.gov/sustainable-futures
BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Existing Chemicals Program: According to their website, "EPA's existing chemical programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and characterization, and risk management for chemical substances in commercial use." The current chemicals management program is undergoing review and update, including how the agency identifies and prioritizes priority chemicals for review and assessment under TSCA. https://www.epa.gov/compliance/toxic-substances-control-act-tsca-compliance-monitoring#chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
N/A
Children's ActivewearLabor Rights - ManufacturingThe scope of this KPI includes company owned and contract manufacturing facilities performing final cut, sew, and dyeing operations for final product.

Calculate B1 as the mass of your final product that is covered by an internal policy that has quantitative time-bound goals related to child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100. Where freedom of association and collective bargaining are restricted by law, employers can use other forms of non-union employee representation and relations to respect this aspect of workers' rights.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your final product that has been reviewed by a risk assessment which identifies high-risk areas for labor rights abuses, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100.
To be included in B2, a risk assessment must have been conducted by second or third parties and must have been conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles. The risk assessments and standard must be verifiable and must address labor rights abuses such as discrimination on grounds of gender, age, ethnicity or disability, physical violence, sexual harassment and abuse, child labor, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining or any other range of behaviors and practices as outlined by internationally-recognized labor standards. The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions which can inform your responses.
In addition, to determine if an operation is in a high-risk area for labor rights abuses, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally-recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic risk assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. The AMFORI Countries' Risk Classification tool listed below may be used to inform your response. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B3 as the number of staff responsible for procurement activities that have been trained on labor rights issues in the supply chain, divided by the total number of staff responsible for procurement activities, then multiply by 100. Include both full-time and contracted employees. The training must be verifiable. Staff training should cover child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Staff training should be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for labor rights issues and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional staff training may be required to perform job duties.
Calculate B4 as the number staff responsible for procurement activities that have been evaluated via performance metrics on labor rights improvements in the supply chain, divided by the total staff responsible for procurement activities, then multiply by 100. Evaluation on labor rights should include, child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples of improvements include decreased incidence of child labor, forced labor, or discrimination, or an Increased worker participation in collective bargaining.
Calculate B5 as the mass of your final product that was produced in operations that were low risk, that were high risk but corrective actions were taken, or that were audited on child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining in the last three years, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B5, audits must be verifiable and address child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work. Where freedom of association & collective bargaining is restricted by law, employers can use other forms of non-union employee representation and relations to respect this aspect of workers' rights. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

THESIS Help Center Video: Labor Rights - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Labor Rights - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520093618
International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work: This declaration outlines the universal rights of all workers regardless of citizenship status, gender, or the local level of economic development. http://www.ilo.org/declaration/lang--en/index.htm

United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9
First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Forced labor: Any task or service performed by a person against their will or under threat of negative consequence. Forced labor includes debt bondage, human trafficking, withholding of wages or identity papers, threats of violence, unreasonable restriction of movement, and exploitation of marginalized workers.

Freedom of collective bargaining: The right to negotiate the conditions of employment as a group rather than individually without fear of repercussions.

Internationally-recognized labor principles: Internationally-recognized labor principles include the United Nations Global Compact and International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work or equivalent.

Labor rights: The universal rights of workers, regardless of race, gender, nationality, or other distinguishing characteristic. These include protection from the worst forms of child labor, forced labor, and discrimination, as well as freedom of association and collective bargaining as outlined by the United Nations Global Compact or the International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work.

Risk assessment: A systematic process to evaluate potential risks within an operation, system, or supply chain. It can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party or a country risk classification analysis that judges the site risk due to prevailing conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Children's ActivewearMicrofiber release - ManufacturingAnswer A if your company only works with plant-derived materials (e.g., cotton, linen) which have been proven to biodegrade in water.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your synthetic textile supply that was sourced from manufacturers, either contracted or company owned, who monitored microfiber release during wet processing, divided by your total mass of synthetic textile supply, then multiply by 100. Monitoring may include, but is not limited to, wastewater and lint analysis.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your synthetic textile supply that was sourced from manufacturers, either contracted or company owned, who utilized alternatives to wet processing, divided by your total mass of synthetic textile supply, then multiply by 100.
Alternatives should replace at least one full stage of wet processing to qualify. Examples include, but are not limited to, inkjet printing and plasma technologies, which replace the dyeing stage of wet processing.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your synthetic textile supply that was sourced from manufacturers, either contracted or company owned, who have implemented practices and technologies to minimize microfiber release, divided by your total mass of synthetic textile supply, then multiply by 100.
The maximum possible response for each response option is 100%. However, multiple response options may be applicable to the same portion of your supply. For example, supply included in the calculation for C1 could also be included in the calculation for C2 if the stated conditions are also met.
Practices and technologies that minimize microfiber release include, but are not limited to, lowering the melting temperature of yarn to improve tensile strength, and adding coatings to yarn to reduce fiber loss.
N/AN/AMicrofiber release: Small synthetic fibers less than 10 micrometers in diameter that are released into the environment via wastewater during textile manufacturing that cause a variety of impacts to humans and wildlife, in addition to persisting in rivers, streams, and oceans.
Children's ActivewearPlant-derived material sourcingPlant derived materials include cotton, linen, and hemp. Regenerated or semisynthetic cellulosic materials such as rayon and viscose are considered in the Synthetic Material Sourcing KPI.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your plant-derived material supply that was traced to the processing facility, divided by the total mass of your plant-derived material supply, then multiply by 100. The processing facility is where pre-spinning material processing takes place such as ginning for cotton, or scutching and heckling/hackling for linen.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your plant-derived material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for managing farm-level environmental impacts, divided by the total mass of your plant-derived material supply, then multiply by 100. A comprehensive plan will address pesticide use, fertilizer use, water use, greenhouse gas emissions and all other impacts relevant for the farm. Supply that has been certified by Better Cotton Initiative and Global Organic Textile Standard can be included in the numerator for this calculation.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your plant-derived material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for farm-level social impacts, divided by the total mass of your plant-derived material supply, then multiply by 100. A comprehensive plan will address worker health and safety, community health and safety, support for smallholders where present, and labor rights, including child labor, as well as all other impacts relevant for the farm. Supply that has been certified by Better Cotton Initiative, Fair Trade International, and Fair for Life can be included in the numerator for this calculation.
Calculate C4 as the mass of your cotton material supply that was assessed and met criteria for C1, C2, and C3, divided by the total mass of your material supply, then multiply by 100. The percent entered cannot exceed 100%.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Better Cotton Initiative: The Better Cotton Initiative offers publically available resources to provided background information on best practices for growing cotton. https://bettercotton.org/resources/

Cotton USA: Cotton USA is the trademark of the nonprofit Cotton Council International (CCI) which works through quality, sustainability, transparent partnerships, and ethical standards to make US cotton the preferred fiber for the clothing, footwear, and textiles value chain. Through their sustainability value, they aim to make US cotton the most sustainably produced in the world. https://cottonusa.org/

Fair for Life Certification Program: The Fair Life program provides certification for fair trade and responsible supply chains. The goal of Fair for Life is to ensure social and economic benefits to socioeconomically disadvantaged agricultural producers and workers and to ensure that smallholder producers receive a fair share. http://www.fairforlife.org/

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

Global Organic Textile Standard: This is an example of textile chemical use standards. http://www.global-standard.org/the-standard/general-description.html

Recycled Claim Standard (RCS) and Global Recycled Standard (GRS): The Recycled Claim Standard and Global Recycled Standard have the goal to increase recycled materials in consumer products by developing voluntary standards for the certification of recycled input. These standards also cover chain of custody, environmental processing, and chemical restrictions. https://textileexchange.org/standards/recycled-claim-standard-global-recycled-standard/

THESIS Help Center Video: Plant-derived material sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Plant-derived material sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750670
N/AFarming operation: An area of land and its buildings, comprised of one or more locations managed together that is used for growing crops that are delivered for further processing or as ingredients to other final products.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Children's ActivewearProduct DesignCalculate B1 as the unit volume of your products that underwent a life cycle assessment, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
A life cycle assessment should be conducted against ISO 14040 \(Life Cycle Assessment - Principles and framework\).
Calculate B2 as the unit volume of your products that were designed to maximize material efficiency, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Material efficiency may include, but is not limited to, design to reduce total amount of materials needed to cut and sew a product, design to reduce material waste during cut and sew process.
Addressing material efficiency during the design stage may include, but is not limited to employing zero waste patternmaking to reduce material waste during the cut and sew process, and using whole garment knitting techniques to reduce the amount of yarn wasted during the knitting process.
Calculate B3 as the unit volume of your products designed to reduce laundering impacts, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Laundering impacts may include, but are not limited to, energy use during laundering and microfiber release during laundering.
Addressing laundering impacts at the design stage may include, but is not limited to choosing fabrics made from natural fibers that biodegrade, or adding care instructions to a garment's label that specify practices known to reduce energy use like cold water wash.
Calculate B4 as the unit volume of your products that underwent a durability assessment as part of the design process, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Both physical and emotional durability should be considered in this assessment.
Attributes to consider while assessing physical durability may include, but are not limited to stability/longevity of materials used, and strength/quality of cut and sew techniques.
Attributes to consider while assessing emotional durability include a product's flexibility or changeability to adapt to changing tastes over time.
Calculate B5 as the unit volume of your products that were designed to maximize resource utilization, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Resource utilization maximization may include, but is not limited to, materials that are able to be reused or recycled.
Addressing resource utilization maximization during the design stage may include, but is not limited to choosing single fiber fabrics that can be recycled, and using simple construction methods that can be disassembled after use.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS Help Center Video: Product Design KPI: Short video tutorial on the Product Design KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520107448B Corp Certification: B Corp offers certification at a company level and focuses on social and environmental performance, public transparency, and legal accountability. https://bcorporation.net/

BlueSign: Bluesign is a third party verification and consultant service. Verification is performed for social and environmental impacts, and consulting services are available for multiple supply chain, manufacturing, and production stages. https://www.bluesign.com/en/business/services

Cradle to Cradle Certified (TM) - Material Health: The Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute, a non-profit organization, administers the Cradle to Cradle Certified™ Product Standard, and provide guidance on chemical hazard assessments and their use for material assessments. The Cradle to Cradle™ Material Health Assessment Methodology examines product chemical composition break down and data collection rules and guidelines, guidance and criteria for chemical profiling methods, assessment of metabolism considerations, and guidance for the evaluation of material assessments. http://www.c2ccertified.org/get-certified/product-certification

Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

ISO 14040: ISO 14040 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Principles and Framework" document for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/37456.html

ISO 14044: ISO 14044 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Requirements and Guidelines" standard for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/38498.html

ISO/TC 207/SC 5: ISO/TC 207/SC 5 is the International Standardization Organization's life cycle assessment standard. https://www.iso.org/committee/54854.html
N/A
Children's ActivewearRecycled contentCalculate B1 as the mass of fiber in your final products that can be defined as recycled content, divided by the total mass of fiber in your final products. Only include post-consumer recycled content. Exclude packaging from this calculation.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your products for which you were able to obtain data on recycled content, divided by the total mass of your products, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Recycled material available for textile manufacturing can vary based on fiber type. This should be considered when evaluating the ratio of recycled content based upon specific textile products.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your recycled material supply that was assessed and met criteria for B1 and B2 that is polyester divided by the total mass of your recycled material supply, then multiply by 100.
Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

THESIS Help Center Video: Recycled Content KPI: Short video tutorial on the Recycled Content KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017179
N/APost-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Pre-consumer recycled material: “Material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))
Children's ActivewearSynthetic material sourcingThis KPI covers synthetic (e.g., polyester, nylon) and semisynthetic (e.g., rayon, viscose, lyocell) materials.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was traced to the production facility of origin, divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100. The production facility is where the chemical processes (e.g., synthesis, regeneration) to produce the fiber or material are carried out.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for managing facility environmental impacts, divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for facility social impacts, divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was assessed and met criteria for C1, C2, and C3 that is polyester divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
N/AN/AVerifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Children's ActivewearWastewater generation - Supply ChainCalculate B1 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for COD, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B2 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for BOD, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B3 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for TSS, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B4 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met the standard for pH, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B5 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met the standard for temperature, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Audits should include verification that discharged wastewater is meeting the standards set forth by the American Apparel & Footwear Association Global Textile Effluent Guidelines for 95% of the sampling period:
- Measurements for BOD and TSS should be below or equal to 30 ppm.
- Measurements for COD should be below or equal to 100 ppm.
- Measurements for temperature should be below or equal to 37 degrees Celsius.
- Measurements for pH should be between 6.0 - 9.0.
Testing should follow a rigorous and internationally accepted methodology and frequency. Local or corporate standards may be stricter. The water quality metrics ideally approach ambient conditions.
Suppliers who have entered and communicated information required by the Higg Index Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Wastewater - Level 2, Question 7" may be used in responding to B1-B5 if the chosen wastewater standard meets or exceeds the values listed above, or if the values of the parameters listed in the detection table meet or exceed the values listed above. The information reported to the FEM is at the facility level; if your products are produced in multiple facilities you may aggregate the data to represent the entirety of final product produced.
AWS International Water Stewardship Standard: The International Water Stewardship Standard is a globally-applicable framework that helps water users understand their water use and impacts. Developed by the Alliance for Water Stewardship, the standard addresses 1) sustainable water balance, 2) good water quality, 3) healthy important water-related areas, and 4) good water governance. https://a4ws.org/the-aws-standard-2-0/

American Apparel & Footwear Association (AAFA) - Restricted Substance List: The AAFA provides guidelines for restricted chemicals and substances. https://www.aafaglobal.org/AAFA/Solutions_Pages/Restricted_Substance_List

BHive: The BHive enables the creation and management of chemical inventories, identifies chemical products that meet sustainability credentials. The BHive enhances supply chain transparency as factories, brands, and retailers can view and compare the safety of chemical products. https://www.thebhive.net/

Detox to Zero by OEKO-TEX: This analysis and assessment tool creates transparency and provides textile and leather producers the ability to control the use of hazardous substances. The tool focuses on continuous improvement and gradual reduction of harmful substances in production processes. https://www.oeko-tex.com/en/our-standards/detox-to-zero-by-oeko-tex

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS): Sustainable Textile Solutions programs support brands, retailers, and industry partners in their efforts to achieve compliance to environmental, health, and safety standards. https://sustexsolutions.com/

THESIS Help Center Video: Wastewater generation - Supply Chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Wastewater generation - Supply Chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/448595442
Roadmap to Zero by ZDHC (Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals): This plan is intended to reduce and eliminate the discharge of hazardous chemicals. https://www.roadmaptozero.com/

Textile Effluent Treatment Technology: The Journal of Cotton Science has produced a document addressing the treatment of textile effluent and specific wastewater management methods. http://www.cotton.org/journal/2007-11/3/upload/jcs11-141.pdf

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - Effluent Limitation Guidelines: This source provides current wastewater discharge guidelines and provides resources for reducing environmental impacts from wastewater discharge. https://www.epa.gov/eg

Wastewater 101 Toolbox: A free online resource for the textile industry to learn, act, and share experiences related to the treatment of wastewater. https://wastewater.sustainabilityconsortium.org/
Biological oxygen demand (BOD): An indicator for the amount of oxygen required/consumed for the microbiological decomposition (oxidation) of organic material in water bodies.

Chemical oxygen demand (COD): An indicator for the amount of oxygen required to oxidize an organic compound to carbon dioxide, ammonia, and water. The measurement is a proxy for the amount of organic compounds in water. Measuring COD in wastewater provides an estimated level of organic pollutants. The standard for measurement can be referenced in ISO 6060.

Total suspended solids (TSS): A water quality measurement that reflects the amount of particulates in a sample. The dry weight of residue in a filter is used to calculate units in milligrams per liter (mg/L).

Water use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.

pH: A measure of a substance's acidity or basicity. The measurement is based upon the molar concentration of hydrogen (H) ions in an aqueous solution of the substance. Pure water is at a neutral pH of 7. For wastewater quality testing, measuring pH allows for benchmarking pH levels to ambient conditions existing naturally in the surrounding environment.
Children's ActivewearWater use - Supply chainCalculate B1 as the mass purchased from fabric suppliers that reported their annual water use, divided by the total mass purchased from all fabric suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using purchasing data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Water use is defined as the total amount of withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells. Supplier water use reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
If suppliers completed the CDP Water Security Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report water use.
Suppliers who have entered and communicated the information required by the Higg Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Water Use - Level 1" may be included in percentage calculated for response option B1.
If using Field to Market's Fieldprint Platform to determine water use during cotton production, report data from the "Irrigated yield" field of the summary report, not the "Yield difference due to irrigation" field.
Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator: Harnessing the power of collaboration across the agricultural value chain and locally-led conservation solutions, Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator provides a process-based standard for delivering sustainable outcomes for agriculture, people and the planet. The hallmark of the Accelerator’s approach lies in a process-based approach to advancing continuous improvement, which is grounded in a foundation that delivers solutions to global sustainable development priorities while also addressing local natural resource concerns. These projects utilize the power of voluntary, and often market-driven, solutions to incentivize improved environmental outcomes and enhance farmer livelihoods. By following a standardized and validated approach, these project pathways can leverage the collective action of the value chain to support resilient ecosystems and enhance farmer livelihoods. The Accelerator currently covers alfalfa, barley, corn, cotton, peanuts, potato, rice, sorghum, soy, sugar beet, and wheat produced in the U.S. and Canada. https://fieldtomarket.org/our-programs/CDP Water Information Request: The CDP Water Information Request provides questions that assess a company's water use, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. CDP can be contacted to respond to the Water Information Request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/
Water use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.
Children's ActivewearWool and down sourcingCalculate B1 as the mass of your wool and down supply that was traced to the animal farm operation of origin, divided by the total mass of your wool and down supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your wool and down supply that was covered by a current comprehensive certification for farm-level environmental impacts or by verifiable, regularly conducted audits for farm-level impacts, divided by the total mass of your wool and down supply, then multiply by 100. The certification or audits should address all material environmental impacts including, but not limited to, soil health and erosion, biodiversity and deforestation, fertilizer use, and pesticide use. Material certified to the Responsible Wool Standard may be included in the calculation of B2.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your wool and down supply that came from animal farm operations that either maintain a current comprehensive animal welfare certification or verifiable, regularly conducted animal welfare audit, divided by the total mass of your wool and down supply, then multiply by 100.
To be included in B3, verifiable, regularly conducted audits should be performed by a second party or third party. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain can initiate these audits. Regulations, audits, and certifications that align with the animal welfare standards as described in Section 7 of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Terrestrial Animal Health Code and are well-enforced by the implementation of auditing systems can be included in your calculation.
Efforts should be taken to achieve minimization of pain, risk of injury, and transmission of diseases or parasites to animals; a physical environment in which the air quality, temperature, and humidity support good animal health; a structural and social environment that allows animals to rest comfortably, provides opportunities for physical and cognitive activity, and allows for the opportunity to perform all beneficial natural, individual, and social behaviors.
Animals should have access to sufficient water and appropriate feed, so as to be free from hunger and thirst. The handling of animals should foster a positive relationship between humans and animals and should not cause injury, panic, lasting fear, or avoidable stress.
Genetic selection should take into account the health and welfare of animals
Material certified to the Responsible Wool Standard and Responsible Down Standard may be included in the calculation of B3.
Responsible Down Standard: The Responsible Down Standard is a voluntary standard for the certification of down from ducks and geese. It addresses issues of animal welfare at the farm, transport, and slaughter stages. http://responsibledown.org/for-business/certification/

Responsible Wool Standard: The Responsible Wool Standard is a voluntary standard for the certification of wool from sheep. It addressees issues of animal welfare, land management, and traceability. https://textileexchange.org/standards/responsible-wool/
N/AAnimal farm operations: An area of land and its buildings, comprised of one or more locations managed together, that is used for rearing animals. This includes the growing of crops for animal feed on this land.

Animal welfare: Animal welfare refers to the well-being of an animal and how an animal is coping with the conditions in which it lives. A good state of welfare varies substantially between different contexts, but in general an animal is in a good state of welfare if it is healthy, comfortable, well-nourished, safe, able to express innate behavior, and not suffering from pain, fear, and distress. Ensuring animal welfare is a human responsibility that requires treatments such as good housing, good care, good feed, humane handling and humane slaughter/killing. The treatments that an animal receives is covered by other terms such as animal care, animal husbandry, and humane management (adapted from The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE)).

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Children's ActivewearWorker Health and Safety - ManufacturingThis question aligns with the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Injury and Illness rate. This rate can be normalized for global applicability.
Calculate B1 according to OSHA's injury and illness rate by multiplying the number of recordable injuries and illnesses by 200,000. Divide this number by the total employee hours worked to produce your final product. If multiple facilities manufacture the final product, the injury and illness rate will need to be adjusted using a weighted average based on each facility's percentage of total production. Include all employees at a facility that participate in the production of the final product. This includes both full-time and contracted employees.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your final product for which you were able to obtain data, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS General Guidance document provides guidance to calculate the weighted average. See Background Information for access to this document.
The Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool is an online calculator that will compute your injury and illness rate. The OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses provides forms and information for computing your facility injury and illness rate.
Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool: This tool calculates the injury and illness incidence rate for employers. https://data.bls.gov/iirc/

OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses: This webpage contains information on how to record workplace injuries and illnesses and provides the worksheets needed to correctly do so. https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/forms

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520108472
Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh: The Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh is an agreement between brands and trade unions to improve worker health and safety. It can be a model for factory inspections, remediation, and worker participation & training. https://bangladeshaccord.org/

How to Compute a Firm's Incidence Rate for Safety Management: This website from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics provides in-depth guidance on computing injury and illness numbers. https://www.bls.gov/iif/osheval.htm

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Children's ActivewearWorker Health and Safety - Supply ChainTo be included in B1-B5, risk assessments, training programs, safety plans, performance monitoring systems, and audits must be verifiable and address health and safety issues such as worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. The assessments and audits must be conducted by second or third parties. The risk assessment must be conducted once per year while the audit must have been conducted at least once every three years, both using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles such as International Labour Organization Occupational Safety and Health Conventions (e.g., No. 155). The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions, which can inform your responses. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for examples of initiatives that meet these requirements.
Calculate B1 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product that came from operations that have performed a risk assessment to identify high risk areas for health and safety, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in our final product, then multiply by 100.
To determine if an operation is high risk for health and safety, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic review assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. It must be conducted at least once per year. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B2 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product that came from operations that train workers on health and safety procedures, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B2, the training on health and safety procedures must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and must be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for workers on health and safety procedures and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional worker training may be required to perform job duties. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B3 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product that came from operations that implement a verifiable worker health and safety plan, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B3, a worker health and safety plan must be verifiable and must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and be prominently displayed in the workplace where employees normally report. The plan should include best practices specific to ergonomics; repetitive motions; chemical and particulate exposure; appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE); and proper use of tools, machinery. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B4 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, that came from operations that have a worker health and safety performance monitoring system in place, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B4, a worker health and safety performance monitoring system should include metrics on issues including, but not limited to, incidence of worker injuries and prevalence of diseases. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B5 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, that came from operations that were audited in the last three years on worker health and safety issues, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
To be included in B5, the audits must be verifiable and address preventive measures, freely provided personal protective equipment, identification of worker health and safety hazards and effects on the exposed people, statistics and reasons behind injuries, design of work area, processes, installations, machinery/work equipment, operating processes and work organization, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Standards on Occupational Health and Safety.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528345
United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Risk assessment: A systematic process to evaluate potential risks within an operation, system, or supply chain. It can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party or a country risk classification analysis that judges the site risk due to prevailing conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Children's ClothingAir quality - ManufacturingCalculate B1 as the mass of products that were produced in final cut, sew, and dyeing facilities that tracked and reported annual air emissions, divided by the total mass of products produced by all final cut, sew, and dyeing facilities, then multiply by 100. Include all company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities that performed final cut, sew, and dyeing operations. If the final cut, sew, and dyeing steps are performed in different facilities, then each must report their air emissions in order to be included in your calculation. Facilities included in this calculation must track all air emissions required by locally applicable regulations, as well as those emissions for which there is scientific evidence of serious effects to human health or the environment. Air emissions may include, but are not limited to, nitrogen and sulphur oxides from boilers, hydrocarbons from drying ovens, carbon monoxide from sizing, aniline vapors, and ammonia from printing/dyeing, and VOCs and ozone from textile finishing, and may be emitted as dust, oil mists, acid vapors, odors, and boiler exhausts. Testing of emissions must occur according to a rigorous and internationally accepted testing methodology.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Information entered into the Higg Index Facility Environment Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Air Emissions - Level 1, Questions 1-3" may be used in responding to B1. The information reported to the FEM is at the facility level; if your products are produced in multiple facilities you may aggregate the data to represent the entirety of final product produced.
Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Air quality - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Air quality - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750750
N/AN/A
Children's ClothingCellulosic material sourcing - Chemical useCanopyStyle’s Hot Button Ranking and Report is the primary viscose and cellulosic fiber sourcing analysis tool for the fashion sector. Calculate D1 as the mass of your cellulosic material that was supplied by producers or mills included in the CanopyStyle Hot Button Report and ranked in the yellow to green bottle range for the Chemical Use and Emissions column, divided by your total mass of cellulosic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Button up to Protect Forests — Producer Progress Criteria: The audit standard and process were developed by Canopy, in partnership with NEPCon, and is supported by the CanopyStyle Leaders for Forest Conservation and brands, retailers and designers looking to implement their sourcing policies for man-made cellulosic textiles. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/ranking-criteria-explained/

CanopyStyle Hot Button Report: The Hot Button Ranking of viscose producers is conducted using the consistent application of the tools and standards of the CanopyStyle initiative, including the CanopyStyle Audit. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/
N/AN/A
Children's ClothingCellulosic material sourcing - DeforestationCanopyStyle’s Hot Button Ranking and Report is the primary viscose and cellulosic fiber sourcing analysis tool for the fashion sector. Calculate D1 as the mass of your cellulosic material that was supplied by producers or mills included in the Canopy Hot Button Report and ranked in the yellow to green shirt range for the Hot Button Assessment column, divided by your total mass of cellulosic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Button up to Protect Forests — Producer Progress Criteria: The audit standard and process were developed by Canopy, in partnership with NEPCon, and is supported by the CanopyStyle Leaders for Forest Conservation and brands, retailers and designers looking to implement their sourcing policies for man-made cellulosic textiles. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/ranking-criteria-explained/

CanopyStyle Hot Button Report: The Hot Button Ranking of viscose producers is conducted using the consistent application of the tools and standards of the CanopyStyle initiative, including the CanopyStyle Audit. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/

ForestMapper: This interactive tool is the only one of its kind to visually represent ancient and endangered forests at a global scale. ForestMapper includes information on numerous ecological values divided into four categories: forests, species, carbon and landscapes. https://canopyplanet.org/tools/forestmapper/
N/AAncient and Endangered Forests: Intact forest landscape mosaics, naturally rare forest types, forest types that have been made rare due to human activity, and/or other forests that are ecologically critical for the protection of biological diversity. As a starting point to geographically locate ancient and endangered forests, maps of High Conservation Value Forests (HCVF), as defined by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), and of intact forest landscapes (IFL), can be used and paired with maps of other key ecological values like the habitat range of key endangered species and forests containing high concentrations of terrestrial carbon and High Carbon Stocks (HCS).
Children's ClothingGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the mass purchased from fabric suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total mass purchased from all fabric suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Suppliers who have entered and communicated information required by the Higg Index Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Energy Use & GHG - Level 1" for their facilities may be used to answer this KPI.
If using Field to Market's Fieldprint Platform to determine greenhouse gas emissions associated with cotton production, include energy use for field operations and activities through the first point of sale. This may include on-farm drying and any transport of the crop prior to sale.
Energy Efficiency Assessment and Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Tool for the Textile Industry (EAGER Textile): This tool was developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to aid in evaluating the impacts of introducing energy efficiency measures into a textile facility. According to the China Energy Group, "the EAGER tool will calculate the typical energy savings (electricity, fuel, final, and primary energy), CO2 emissions reduction, cost, and simple payback period...[the tool] is designed to work for textile facilities that have one or more of the following processes: spinning, weaving/knitting, dyeing, printing, finishing, and man-made fiber production." https://china.lbl.gov/eager-textile

Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator: Harnessing the power of collaboration across the agricultural value chain and locally-led conservation solutions, Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator provides a process-based standard for delivering sustainable outcomes for agriculture, people and the planet. The hallmark of the Accelerator’s approach lies in a process-based approach to advancing continuous improvement, which is grounded in a foundation that delivers solutions to global sustainable development priorities while also addressing local natural resource concerns. These projects utilize the power of voluntary, and often market-driven, solutions to incentivize improved environmental outcomes and enhance farmer livelihoods. By following a standardized and validated approach, these project pathways can leverage the collective action of the value chain to support resilient ecosystems and enhance farmer livelihoods. The Accelerator currently covers alfalfa, barley, corn, cotton, peanuts, potato, rice, sorghum, soy, sugar beet, and wheat produced in the U.S. and Canada. https://fieldtomarket.org/our-programs/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

THESIS Help Center Video: Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Supply Chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Supply Chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/465914322
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Children's ClothingGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total mass produced of each product.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total mass of final product produced/revenue from final product produced/number of units produced. If the manufacturing facilities produce more than one category of product, only weight using the total mass of production specific to the product category in question.
Calculate B2 as the mass of final products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total mass of final products produced, then multiply by 100. For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
Information entered into the Higg Index Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Energy Use & GHG - Level 1" may be used to answer this KPI.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

Energy Efficiency Assessment and Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Tool for the Textile Industry (EAGER Textile): This tool was developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to aid in evaluating the impacts of introducing energy efficiency measures into a textile facility. According to the China Energy Group, "the EAGER tool will calculate the typical energy savings (electricity, fuel, final, and primary energy), CO2 emissions reduction, cost, and simple payback period...[the tool] is designed to work for textile facilities that have one or more of the following processes: spinning, weaving/knitting, dyeing, printing, finishing, and man-made fiber production." https://china.lbl.gov/eager-textile

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardGreenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Children's ClothingHazardous Chemical Discharge ManagementFor C, informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles.
For D, goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound. Public disclosure of goals and progress must have occurred within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Examples of tools and protocols for screening chemicals and assessing alternatives include green chemistry, alternatives analysis, restricted substances lists, and other tools that are listed in the Background Information.
To calculate E1, subtract the number of chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List used this year across all manufacturing facilities where your product is cut and sewed from the number of chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List used last year across all manufacturing facilities where your product was cut and sewed. If more chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List were used this year than last, enter zero.
Calculate E1 as the number of manufacturing facilities where your product is cut and sewed that reduced the use of chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List this year compared to last year divided by the total number of manufacturing facilities where your product is cut and sewed, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
American Apparel & Footwear Association (AAFA) - Restricted Substance List: The AAFA provides guidelines for restricted chemicals and substances. https://www.aafaglobal.org/AAFA/Solutions_Pages/Restricted_Substance_List

BHive: The BHive enables the creation and management of chemical inventories, identifies chemical products that meet sustainability credentials. The BHive enhances supply chain transparency as factories, brands, and retailers can view and compare the safety of chemical products. https://www.thebhive.net/

Detox to Zero by OEKO-TEX: This analysis and assessment tool creates transparency and provides textile and leather producers the ability to control the use of hazardous substances. The tool focuses on continuous improvement and gradual reduction of harmful substances in production processes. https://www.oeko-tex.com/en/our-standards/detox-to-zero-by-oeko-tex

GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

GreenSuite: GreenSuite is an environmental sustainability tool that can be customized to specific users' needs. Environmental issues throughout the supply chain are covered by this web based solution. http://greensuite360.com/index.html

Greenlist Process: According to their website, "In 2001, SC Johnson developed the Greenlist Process to classify ingredients in order to minimize the human and environmental impacts of their products." The process is now available for license to other companies and organizations. https://www.scjohnson.com/en/our-purpose/sustainability-report/explaining-the-sc-johnson-greenlist-program-an-excerpt-from-our-2017-sustainability-report

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815

PRIO: PRIO is a web-based tool developed by the Swedish government to facilitate the assessment of environmental and health risks of chemicals. ? https://www.kemi.se/prioguiden/english/start

Roadmap to Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals (ZDHC): This plan is intended to reduce and eliminate the discharge of hazardous chemicals. https://www.roadmaptozero.com/

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS): Sustainable Textile Solutions programs support brands, retailers, and industry partners in their efforts to achieve compliance to environmental, health, and safety standards. https://sustexsolutions.com/

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Management KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Management KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528286

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Exposure Assessment Tools and Models: According to their website, "The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) has developed several exposure assessment methods, databases, and predictive models to help in evaluating what happens to chemicals when they are used and released to the environment and how workers, the general public, consumers and the aquatic ecosystems may be exposed to chemicals." https://www.epa.gov/ceam/tools-data-exposure-assessment

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Sustainable Futures: According to their website, "The goal of the Sustainable Futures Initiative (SF) is to make new chemicals safer, available faster, and at lower cost. It works by giving chemical developers the same risk-screening models that EPA uses to evaluate new chemicals before they enter the market."? https://www.epa.gov/sustainable-futures
BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Existing Chemicals Program: According to their website, "EPA's existing chemical programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and characterization, and risk management for chemical substances in commercial use." The current chemicals management program is undergoing review and update, including how the agency identifies and prioritizes priority chemicals for review and assessment under TSCA. https://www.epa.gov/compliance/toxic-substances-control-act-tsca-compliance-monitoring#chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
N/A
Children's ClothingLabor Rights - ManufacturingThe scope of this KPI includes company owned and contract manufacturing facilities performing final cut, sew, and dyeing operations for final product.

Calculate B1 as the mass of your final product that is covered by an internal policy that has quantitative time-bound goals related to child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100. Where freedom of association and collective bargaining are restricted by law, employers can use other forms of non-union employee representation and relations to respect this aspect of workers' rights.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your final product that has been reviewed by a risk assessment which identifies high-risk areas for labor rights abuses, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100.
To be included in B2, a risk assessment must have been conducted by second or third parties and must have been conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles. The risk assessments and standard must be verifiable and must address labor rights abuses such as discrimination on grounds of gender, age, ethnicity or disability, physical violence, sexual harassment and abuse, child labor, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining or any other range of behaviors and practices as outlined by internationally-recognized labor standards. The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions which can inform your responses.
In addition, to determine if an operation is in a high-risk area for labor rights abuses, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally-recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic risk assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. The AMFORI Countries' Risk Classification tool listed below may be used to inform your response. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B3 as the number of staff responsible for procurement activities that have been trained on labor rights issues in the supply chain, divided by the total number of staff responsible for procurement activities, then multiply by 100. Include both full-time and contracted employees. The training must be verifiable. Staff training should cover child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Staff training should be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for labor rights issues and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional staff training may be required to perform job duties.
Calculate B4 as the number staff responsible for procurement activities that have been evaluated via performance metrics on labor rights improvements in the supply chain, divided by the total staff responsible for procurement activities, then multiply by 100. Evaluation on labor rights should include, child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples of improvements include decreased incidence of child labor, forced labor, or discrimination, or an Increased worker participation in collective bargaining.
Calculate B5 as the mass of your final product that was produced in operations that were low risk, that were high risk but corrective actions were taken, or that were audited on child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining in the last three years, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B5, audits must be verifiable and address child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work. Where freedom of association & collective bargaining is restricted by law, employers can use other forms of non-union employee representation and relations to respect this aspect of workers' rights. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

THESIS Help Center Video: Labor Rights - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Labor Rights - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520093618
International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work: This declaration outlines the universal rights of all workers regardless of citizenship status, gender, or the local level of economic development. http://www.ilo.org/declaration/lang--en/index.htm

United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9
First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Forced labor: Any task or service performed by a person against their will or under threat of negative consequence. Forced labor includes debt bondage, human trafficking, withholding of wages or identity papers, threats of violence, unreasonable restriction of movement, and exploitation of marginalized workers.

Freedom of collective bargaining: The right to negotiate the conditions of employment as a group rather than individually without fear of repercussions.

Internationally-recognized labor principles: Internationally-recognized labor principles include the United Nations Global Compact and International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work or equivalent.

Labor rights: The universal rights of workers, regardless of race, gender, nationality, or other distinguishing characteristic. These include protection from the worst forms of child labor, forced labor, and discrimination, as well as freedom of association and collective bargaining as outlined by the United Nations Global Compact or the International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work.

Risk assessment: A systematic process to evaluate potential risks within an operation, system, or supply chain. It can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party or a country risk classification analysis that judges the site risk due to prevailing conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Children's ClothingMicrofiber release - ManufacturingAnswer A if your company only works with plant-derived materials (e.g., cotton, linen) which have been proven to biodegrade in water.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your synthetic textile supply that was sourced from manufacturers, either contracted or company owned, who monitored microfiber release during wet processing, divided by your total mass of synthetic textile supply, then multiply by 100. Monitoring may include, but is not limited to, wastewater and lint analysis.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your synthetic textile supply that was sourced from manufacturers, either contracted or company owned, who utilized alternatives to wet processing, divided by your total mass of synthetic textile supply, then multiply by 100.
Alternatives should replace at least one full stage of wet processing to qualify. Examples include, but are not limited to, inkjet printing and plasma technologies, which replace the dyeing stage of wet processing.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your synthetic textile supply that was sourced from manufacturers, either contracted or company owned, who have implemented practices and technologies to minimize microfiber release, divided by your total mass of synthetic textile supply, then multiply by 100.
The maximum possible response for each response option is 100%. However, multiple response options may be applicable to the same portion of your supply. For example, supply included in the calculation for C1 could also be included in the calculation for C2 if the stated conditions are also met.
Practices and technologies that minimize microfiber release include, but are not limited to, lowering the melting temperature of yarn to improve tensile strength, and adding coatings to yarn to reduce fiber loss.
N/AN/AMicrofiber release: Small synthetic fibers less than 10 micrometers in diameter that are released into the environment via wastewater during textile manufacturing that cause a variety of impacts to humans and wildlife, in addition to persisting in rivers, streams, and oceans.
Children's ClothingPlant-derived material sourcingPlant derived materials include cotton, linen, and hemp. Regenerated or semisynthetic cellulosic materials such as rayon and viscose are considered in the Synthetic Material Sourcing KPI.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your plant-derived material supply that was traced to the processing facility, divided by the total mass of your plant-derived material supply, then multiply by 100. The processing facility is where pre-spinning material processing takes place such as ginning for cotton, or scutching and heckling/hackling for linen.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your plant-derived material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for managing farm-level environmental impacts, divided by the total mass of your plant-derived material supply, then multiply by 100. A comprehensive plan will address pesticide use, fertilizer use, water use, greenhouse gas emissions and all other impacts relevant for the farm. Supply that has been certified by Better Cotton Initiative and Global Organic Textile Standard can be included in the numerator for this calculation.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your plant-derived material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for farm-level social impacts, divided by the total mass of your plant-derived material supply, then multiply by 100. A comprehensive plan will address worker health and safety, community health and safety, support for smallholders where present, and labor rights, including child labor, as well as all other impacts relevant for the farm. Supply that has been certified by Better Cotton Initiative, Fair Trade International, and Fair for Life can be included in the numerator for this calculation.
Calculate C4 as the mass of your cotton material supply that was assessed and met criteria for C1, C2, and C3, divided by the total mass of your material supply, then multiply by 100. The percent entered cannot exceed 100%.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Better Cotton Initiative: The Better Cotton Initiative offers publically available resources to provided background information on best practices for growing cotton. https://bettercotton.org/resources/

Cotton USA: Cotton USA is the trademark of the nonprofit Cotton Council International (CCI) which works through quality, sustainability, transparent partnerships, and ethical standards to make US cotton the preferred fiber for the clothing, footwear, and textiles value chain. Through their sustainability value, they aim to make US cotton the most sustainably produced in the world. https://cottonusa.org/

Fair for Life Certification Program: The Fair Life program provides certification for fair trade and responsible supply chains. The goal of Fair for Life is to ensure social and economic benefits to socioeconomically disadvantaged agricultural producers and workers and to ensure that smallholder producers receive a fair share. http://www.fairforlife.org/

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

Global Organic Textile Standard: This is an example of textile chemical use standards. http://www.global-standard.org/the-standard/general-description.html

Recycled Claim Standard (RCS) and Global Recycled Standard (GRS): The Recycled Claim Standard and Global Recycled Standard have the goal to increase recycled materials in consumer products by developing voluntary standards for the certification of recycled input. These standards also cover chain of custody, environmental processing, and chemical restrictions. https://textileexchange.org/standards/recycled-claim-standard-global-recycled-standard/

THESIS Help Center Video: Plant-derived material sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Plant-derived material sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750670
N/AFarming operation: An area of land and its buildings, comprised of one or more locations managed together that is used for growing crops that are delivered for further processing or as ingredients to other final products.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Children's ClothingProduct DesignCalculate B1 as the unit volume of your products that underwent a life cycle assessment, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
A life cycle assessment should be conducted against ISO 14040 \(Life Cycle Assessment - Principles and framework\).
Calculate B2 as the unit volume of your products that were designed to maximize material efficiency, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Material efficiency may include, but is not limited to, design to reduce total amount of materials needed to cut and sew a product, design to reduce material waste during cut and sew process.
Addressing material efficiency during the design stage may include, but is not limited to employing zero waste patternmaking to reduce material waste during the cut and sew process, and using whole garment knitting techniques to reduce the amount of yarn wasted during the knitting process.
Calculate B3 as the unit volume of your products designed to reduce laundering impacts, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Laundering impacts may include, but are not limited to, energy use during laundering and microfiber release during laundering.
Addressing laundering impacts at the design stage may include, but is not limited to choosing fabrics made from natural fibers that biodegrade, or adding care instructions to a garment's label that specify practices known to reduce energy use like cold water wash.
Calculate B4 as the unit volume of your products that underwent a durability assessment as part of the design process, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Both physical and emotional durability should be considered in this assessment.
Attributes to consider while assessing physical durability may include, but are not limited to stability/longevity of materials used, and strength/quality of cut and sew techniques.
Attributes to consider while assessing emotional durability include a product's flexibility or changeability to adapt to changing tastes over time.
Calculate B5 as the unit volume of your products that were designed to maximize resource utilization, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Resource utilization maximization may include, but is not limited to, materials that are able to be reused or recycled.
Addressing resource utilization maximization during the design stage may include, but is not limited to choosing single fiber fabrics that can be recycled, and using simple construction methods that can be disassembled after use.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS Help Center Video: Product Design KPI: Short video tutorial on the Product Design KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520107448B Corp Certification: B Corp offers certification at a company level and focuses on social and environmental performance, public transparency, and legal accountability. https://bcorporation.net/

BlueSign: Bluesign is a third party verification and consultant service. Verification is performed for social and environmental impacts, and consulting services are available for multiple supply chain, manufacturing, and production stages. https://www.bluesign.com/en/business/services

Cradle to Cradle Certified (TM) - Material Health: The Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute, a non-profit organization, administers the Cradle to Cradle Certified™ Product Standard, and provide guidance on chemical hazard assessments and their use for material assessments. The Cradle to Cradle™ Material Health Assessment Methodology examines product chemical composition break down and data collection rules and guidelines, guidance and criteria for chemical profiling methods, assessment of metabolism considerations, and guidance for the evaluation of material assessments. http://www.c2ccertified.org/get-certified/product-certification

Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

ISO 14040: ISO 14040 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Principles and Framework" document for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/37456.html

ISO 14044: ISO 14044 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Requirements and Guidelines" standard for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/38498.html

ISO/TC 207/SC 5: ISO/TC 207/SC 5 is the International Standardization Organization's life cycle assessment standard. https://www.iso.org/committee/54854.html
N/A
Children's ClothingRecycled contentCalculate B1 as the mass of fiber in your final products that can be defined as recycled content, divided by the total mass of fiber in your final products. Only include post-consumer recycled content. Exclude packaging from this calculation.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your products for which you were able to obtain data on recycled content, divided by the total mass of your products, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Recycled material available for textile manufacturing can vary based on fiber type. This should be considered when evaluating the ratio of recycled content based upon specific textile products.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your recycled material supply that was assessed and met criteria for B1 and B2 that is polyester divided by the total mass of your recycled material supply, then multiply by 100.
Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

THESIS Help Center Video: Recycled Content KPI: Short video tutorial on the Recycled Content KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017179
N/APost-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Pre-consumer recycled material: “Material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))
Children's ClothingSynthetic material sourcingThis KPI covers synthetic (e.g., polyester, nylon) and semisynthetic (e.g., rayon, viscose, lyocell) materials.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was traced to the production facility of origin, divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100. The production facility is where the chemical processes (e.g., synthesis, regeneration) to produce the fiber or material are carried out.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for managing facility environmental impacts, divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for facility social impacts, divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was assessed and met criteria for C1, C2, and C3 that is polyester divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
N/AN/AVerifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Children's ClothingWastewater generation - Supply ChainCalculate B1 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for COD, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B2 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for BOD, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B3 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for TSS, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B4 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met the standard for pH, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B5 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met the standard for temperature, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Audits should include verification that discharged wastewater is meeting the standards set forth by the American Apparel & Footwear Association Global Textile Effluent Guidelines for 95% of the sampling period:
- Measurements for BOD and TSS should be below or equal to 30 ppm.
- Measurements for COD should be below or equal to 100 ppm.
- Measurements for temperature should be below or equal to 37 degrees Celsius.
- Measurements for pH should be between 6.0 - 9.0.
Testing should follow a rigorous and internationally accepted methodology and frequency. Local or corporate standards may be stricter. The water quality metrics ideally approach ambient conditions.
Suppliers who have entered and communicated information required by the Higg Index Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Wastewater - Level 2, Question 7" may be used in responding to B1-B5 if the chosen wastewater standard meets or exceeds the values listed above, or if the values of the parameters listed in the detection table meet or exceed the values listed above. The information reported to the FEM is at the facility level; if your products are produced in multiple facilities you may aggregate the data to represent the entirety of final product produced.
AWS International Water Stewardship Standard: The International Water Stewardship Standard is a globally-applicable framework that helps water users understand their water use and impacts. Developed by the Alliance for Water Stewardship, the standard addresses 1) sustainable water balance, 2) good water quality, 3) healthy important water-related areas, and 4) good water governance. https://a4ws.org/the-aws-standard-2-0/

American Apparel & Footwear Association (AAFA) - Restricted Substance List: The AAFA provides guidelines for restricted chemicals and substances. https://www.aafaglobal.org/AAFA/Solutions_Pages/Restricted_Substance_List

BHive: The BHive enables the creation and management of chemical inventories, identifies chemical products that meet sustainability credentials. The BHive enhances supply chain transparency as factories, brands, and retailers can view and compare the safety of chemical products. https://www.thebhive.net/

Detox to Zero by OEKO-TEX: This analysis and assessment tool creates transparency and provides textile and leather producers the ability to control the use of hazardous substances. The tool focuses on continuous improvement and gradual reduction of harmful substances in production processes. https://www.oeko-tex.com/en/our-standards/detox-to-zero-by-oeko-tex

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS): Sustainable Textile Solutions programs support brands, retailers, and industry partners in their efforts to achieve compliance to environmental, health, and safety standards. https://sustexsolutions.com/

THESIS Help Center Video: Wastewater generation - Supply Chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Wastewater generation - Supply Chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/448595442
Roadmap to Zero by ZDHC (Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals): This plan is intended to reduce and eliminate the discharge of hazardous chemicals. https://www.roadmaptozero.com/

Textile Effluent Treatment Technology: The Journal of Cotton Science has produced a document addressing the treatment of textile effluent and specific wastewater management methods. http://www.cotton.org/journal/2007-11/3/upload/jcs11-141.pdf

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - Effluent Limitation Guidelines: This source provides current wastewater discharge guidelines and provides resources for reducing environmental impacts from wastewater discharge. https://www.epa.gov/eg

Wastewater 101 Toolbox: A free online resource for the textile industry to learn, act, and share experiences related to the treatment of wastewater. https://wastewater.sustainabilityconsortium.org/
Biological oxygen demand (BOD): An indicator for the amount of oxygen required/consumed for the microbiological decomposition (oxidation) of organic material in water bodies.

Chemical oxygen demand (COD): An indicator for the amount of oxygen required to oxidize an organic compound to carbon dioxide, ammonia, and water. The measurement is a proxy for the amount of organic compounds in water. Measuring COD in wastewater provides an estimated level of organic pollutants. The standard for measurement can be referenced in ISO 6060.

Total suspended solids (TSS): A water quality measurement that reflects the amount of particulates in a sample. The dry weight of residue in a filter is used to calculate units in milligrams per liter (mg/L).

Water use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.

pH: A measure of a substance's acidity or basicity. The measurement is based upon the molar concentration of hydrogen (H) ions in an aqueous solution of the substance. Pure water is at a neutral pH of 7. For wastewater quality testing, measuring pH allows for benchmarking pH levels to ambient conditions existing naturally in the surrounding environment.
Children's ClothingWater use - Supply chainCalculate B1 as the mass purchased from fabric suppliers that reported their annual water use, divided by the total mass purchased from all fabric suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using purchasing data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Water use is defined as the total amount of withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells. Supplier water use reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
If suppliers completed the CDP Water Security Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report water use.
Suppliers who have entered and communicated the information required by the Higg Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Water Use - Level 1" may be included in percentage calculated for response option B1.
If using Field to Market's Fieldprint Platform to determine water use during cotton production, report data from the "Irrigated yield" field of the summary report, not the "Yield difference due to irrigation" field.
Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator: Harnessing the power of collaboration across the agricultural value chain and locally-led conservation solutions, Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator provides a process-based standard for delivering sustainable outcomes for agriculture, people and the planet. The hallmark of the Accelerator’s approach lies in a process-based approach to advancing continuous improvement, which is grounded in a foundation that delivers solutions to global sustainable development priorities while also addressing local natural resource concerns. These projects utilize the power of voluntary, and often market-driven, solutions to incentivize improved environmental outcomes and enhance farmer livelihoods. By following a standardized and validated approach, these project pathways can leverage the collective action of the value chain to support resilient ecosystems and enhance farmer livelihoods. The Accelerator currently covers alfalfa, barley, corn, cotton, peanuts, potato, rice, sorghum, soy, sugar beet, and wheat produced in the U.S. and Canada. https://fieldtomarket.org/our-programs/CDP Water Information Request: The CDP Water Information Request provides questions that assess a company's water use, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. CDP can be contacted to respond to the Water Information Request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/
Water use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.
Children's ClothingWool and down sourcingCalculate B1 as the mass of your wool and down supply that was traced to the animal farm operation of origin, divided by the total mass of your wool and down supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your wool and down supply that was covered by a current comprehensive certification for farm-level environmental impacts or by verifiable, regularly conducted audits for farm-level impacts, divided by the total mass of your wool and down supply, then multiply by 100. The certification or audits should address all material environmental impacts including, but not limited to, soil health and erosion, biodiversity and deforestation, fertilizer use, and pesticide use. Material certified to the Responsible Wool Standard may be included in the calculation of B2.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your wool and down supply that came from animal farm operations that either maintain a current comprehensive animal welfare certification or verifiable, regularly conducted animal welfare audit, divided by the total mass of your wool and down supply, then multiply by 100.
To be included in B3, verifiable, regularly conducted audits should be performed by a second party or third party. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain can initiate these audits. Regulations, audits, and certifications that align with the animal welfare standards as described in Section 7 of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Terrestrial Animal Health Code and are well-enforced by the implementation of auditing systems can be included in your calculation.
Efforts should be taken to achieve minimization of pain, risk of injury, and transmission of diseases or parasites to animals; a physical environment in which the air quality, temperature, and humidity support good animal health; a structural and social environment that allows animals to rest comfortably, provides opportunities for physical and cognitive activity, and allows for the opportunity to perform all beneficial natural, individual, and social behaviors.
Animals should have access to sufficient water and appropriate feed, so as to be free from hunger and thirst. The handling of animals should foster a positive relationship between humans and animals and should not cause injury, panic, lasting fear, or avoidable stress.
Genetic selection should take into account the health and welfare of animals
Material certified to the Responsible Wool Standard and Responsible Down Standard may be included in the calculation of B3.
Responsible Down Standard: The Responsible Down Standard is a voluntary standard for the certification of down from ducks and geese. It addresses issues of animal welfare at the farm, transport, and slaughter stages. http://responsibledown.org/for-business/certification/

Responsible Wool Standard: The Responsible Wool Standard is a voluntary standard for the certification of wool from sheep. It addressees issues of animal welfare, land management, and traceability. https://textileexchange.org/standards/responsible-wool/
N/AAnimal farm operations: An area of land and its buildings, comprised of one or more locations managed together, that is used for rearing animals. This includes the growing of crops for animal feed on this land.

Animal welfare: Animal welfare refers to the well-being of an animal and how an animal is coping with the conditions in which it lives. A good state of welfare varies substantially between different contexts, but in general an animal is in a good state of welfare if it is healthy, comfortable, well-nourished, safe, able to express innate behavior, and not suffering from pain, fear, and distress. Ensuring animal welfare is a human responsibility that requires treatments such as good housing, good care, good feed, humane handling and humane slaughter/killing. The treatments that an animal receives is covered by other terms such as animal care, animal husbandry, and humane management (adapted from The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE)).

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Children's ClothingWorker Health and Safety - ManufacturingThis question aligns with the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Injury and Illness rate. This rate can be normalized for global applicability.
Calculate B1 according to OSHA's injury and illness rate by multiplying the number of recordable injuries and illnesses by 200,000. Divide this number by the total employee hours worked to produce your final product. If multiple facilities manufacture the final product, the injury and illness rate will need to be adjusted using a weighted average based on each facility's percentage of total production. Include all employees at a facility that participate in the production of the final product. This includes both full-time and contracted employees.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your final product for which you were able to obtain data, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS General Guidance document provides guidance to calculate the weighted average. See Background Information for access to this document.
The Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool is an online calculator that will compute your injury and illness rate. The OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses provides forms and information for computing your facility injury and illness rate.
Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool: This tool calculates the injury and illness incidence rate for employers. https://data.bls.gov/iirc/

OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses: This webpage contains information on how to record workplace injuries and illnesses and provides the worksheets needed to correctly do so. https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/forms

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520108472
Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh: The Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh is an agreement between brands and trade unions to improve worker health and safety. It can be a model for factory inspections, remediation, and worker participation & training. https://bangladeshaccord.org/

How to Compute a Firm's Incidence Rate for Safety Management: This website from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics provides in-depth guidance on computing injury and illness numbers. https://www.bls.gov/iif/osheval.htm

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Children's ClothingWorker Health and Safety - Supply ChainTo be included in B1-B5, risk assessments, training programs, safety plans, performance monitoring systems, and audits must be verifiable and address health and safety issues such as worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. The assessments and audits must be conducted by second or third parties. The risk assessment must be conducted once per year while the audit must have been conducted at least once every three years, both using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles such as International Labour Organization Occupational Safety and Health Conventions (e.g., No. 155). The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions, which can inform your responses. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for examples of initiatives that meet these requirements.
Calculate B1 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product that came from operations that have performed a risk assessment to identify high risk areas for health and safety, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in our final product, then multiply by 100.
To determine if an operation is high risk for health and safety, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic review assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. It must be conducted at least once per year. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B2 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product that came from operations that train workers on health and safety procedures, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B2, the training on health and safety procedures must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and must be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for workers on health and safety procedures and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional worker training may be required to perform job duties. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B3 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product that came from operations that implement a verifiable worker health and safety plan, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B3, a worker health and safety plan must be verifiable and must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and be prominently displayed in the workplace where employees normally report. The plan should include best practices specific to ergonomics; repetitive motions; chemical and particulate exposure; appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE); and proper use of tools, machinery. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B4 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, that came from operations that have a worker health and safety performance monitoring system in place, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B4, a worker health and safety performance monitoring system should include metrics on issues including, but not limited to, incidence of worker injuries and prevalence of diseases. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B5 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, that came from operations that were audited in the last three years on worker health and safety issues, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
To be included in B5, the audits must be verifiable and address preventive measures, freely provided personal protective equipment, identification of worker health and safety hazards and effects on the exposed people, statistics and reasons behind injuries, design of work area, processes, installations, machinery/work equipment, operating processes and work organization, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Standards on Occupational Health and Safety.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528345
United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Risk assessment: A systematic process to evaluate potential risks within an operation, system, or supply chain. It can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party or a country risk classification analysis that judges the site risk due to prevailing conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Children's Underwear, Socks, SleepwearAir quality - ManufacturingCalculate B1 as the mass of products that were produced in final cut, sew, and dyeing facilities that tracked and reported annual air emissions, divided by the total mass of products produced by all final cut, sew, and dyeing facilities, then multiply by 100. Include all company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities that performed final cut, sew, and dyeing operations. If the final cut, sew, and dyeing steps are performed in different facilities, then each must report their air emissions in order to be included in your calculation. Facilities included in this calculation must track all air emissions required by locally applicable regulations, as well as those emissions for which there is scientific evidence of serious effects to human health or the environment. Air emissions may include, but are not limited to, nitrogen and sulphur oxides from boilers, hydrocarbons from drying ovens, carbon monoxide from sizing, aniline vapors, and ammonia from printing/dyeing, and VOCs and ozone from textile finishing, and may be emitted as dust, oil mists, acid vapors, odors, and boiler exhausts. Testing of emissions must occur according to a rigorous and internationally accepted testing methodology.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Information entered into the Higg Index Facility Environment Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Air Emissions - Level 1, Questions 1-3" may be used in responding to B1. The information reported to the FEM is at the facility level; if your products are produced in multiple facilities you may aggregate the data to represent the entirety of final product produced.
Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Air quality - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Air quality - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750750
N/AN/A
Children's Underwear, Socks, SleepwearCellulosic material sourcing - Chemical useCanopyStyle’s Hot Button Ranking and Report is the primary viscose and cellulosic fiber sourcing analysis tool for the fashion sector. Calculate D1 as the mass of your cellulosic material that was supplied by producers or mills included in the CanopyStyle Hot Button Report and ranked in the yellow to green bottle range for the Chemical Use and Emissions column, divided by your total mass of cellulosic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Button up to Protect Forests — Producer Progress Criteria: The audit standard and process were developed by Canopy, in partnership with NEPCon, and is supported by the CanopyStyle Leaders for Forest Conservation and brands, retailers and designers looking to implement their sourcing policies for man-made cellulosic textiles. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/ranking-criteria-explained/

CanopyStyle Hot Button Report: The Hot Button Ranking of viscose producers is conducted using the consistent application of the tools and standards of the CanopyStyle initiative, including the CanopyStyle Audit. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/
N/AN/A
Children's Underwear, Socks, SleepwearCellulosic material sourcing - DeforestationCanopyStyle’s Hot Button Ranking and Report is the primary viscose and cellulosic fiber sourcing analysis tool for the fashion sector. Calculate D1 as the mass of your cellulosic material that was supplied by producers or mills included in the Canopy Hot Button Report and ranked in the yellow to green shirt range for the Hot Button Assessment column, divided by your total mass of cellulosic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Button up to Protect Forests — Producer Progress Criteria: The audit standard and process were developed by Canopy, in partnership with NEPCon, and is supported by the CanopyStyle Leaders for Forest Conservation and brands, retailers and designers looking to implement their sourcing policies for man-made cellulosic textiles. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/ranking-criteria-explained/

CanopyStyle Hot Button Report: The Hot Button Ranking of viscose producers is conducted using the consistent application of the tools and standards of the CanopyStyle initiative, including the CanopyStyle Audit. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/

ForestMapper: This interactive tool is the only one of its kind to visually represent ancient and endangered forests at a global scale. ForestMapper includes information on numerous ecological values divided into four categories: forests, species, carbon and landscapes. https://canopyplanet.org/tools/forestmapper/
N/AAncient and Endangered Forests: Intact forest landscape mosaics, naturally rare forest types, forest types that have been made rare due to human activity, and/or other forests that are ecologically critical for the protection of biological diversity. As a starting point to geographically locate ancient and endangered forests, maps of High Conservation Value Forests (HCVF), as defined by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), and of intact forest landscapes (IFL), can be used and paired with maps of other key ecological values like the habitat range of key endangered species and forests containing high concentrations of terrestrial carbon and High Carbon Stocks (HCS).
Children's Underwear, Socks, SleepwearGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the mass purchased from fabric suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total mass purchased from all fabric suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Suppliers who have entered and communicated information required by the Higg Index Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Energy Use & GHG - Level 1" for their facilities may be used to answer this KPI.
If using Field to Market's Fieldprint Platform to determine greenhouse gas emissions associated with cotton production, include energy use for field operations and activities through the first point of sale. This may include on-farm drying and any transport of the crop prior to sale.
Energy Efficiency Assessment and Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Tool for the Textile Industry (EAGER Textile): This tool was developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to aid in evaluating the impacts of introducing energy efficiency measures into a textile facility. According to the China Energy Group, "the EAGER tool will calculate the typical energy savings (electricity, fuel, final, and primary energy), CO2 emissions reduction, cost, and simple payback period...[the tool] is designed to work for textile facilities that have one or more of the following processes: spinning, weaving/knitting, dyeing, printing, finishing, and man-made fiber production." https://china.lbl.gov/eager-textile

Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator: Harnessing the power of collaboration across the agricultural value chain and locally-led conservation solutions, Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator provides a process-based standard for delivering sustainable outcomes for agriculture, people and the planet. The hallmark of the Accelerator’s approach lies in a process-based approach to advancing continuous improvement, which is grounded in a foundation that delivers solutions to global sustainable development priorities while also addressing local natural resource concerns. These projects utilize the power of voluntary, and often market-driven, solutions to incentivize improved environmental outcomes and enhance farmer livelihoods. By following a standardized and validated approach, these project pathways can leverage the collective action of the value chain to support resilient ecosystems and enhance farmer livelihoods. The Accelerator currently covers alfalfa, barley, corn, cotton, peanuts, potato, rice, sorghum, soy, sugar beet, and wheat produced in the U.S. and Canada. https://fieldtomarket.org/our-programs/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

THESIS Help Center Video: Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Supply Chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Supply Chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/465914322
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Children's Underwear, Socks, SleepwearGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total mass produced of each product.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total mass of final product produced/revenue from final product produced/number of units produced. If the manufacturing facilities produce more than one category of product, only weight using the total mass of production specific to the product category in question.
Calculate B2 as the mass of final products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total mass of final products produced, then multiply by 100. For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
Information entered into the Higg Index Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Energy Use & GHG - Level 1" may be used to answer this KPI.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

Energy Efficiency Assessment and Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Tool for the Textile Industry (EAGER Textile): This tool was developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to aid in evaluating the impacts of introducing energy efficiency measures into a textile facility. According to the China Energy Group, "the EAGER tool will calculate the typical energy savings (electricity, fuel, final, and primary energy), CO2 emissions reduction, cost, and simple payback period...[the tool] is designed to work for textile facilities that have one or more of the following processes: spinning, weaving/knitting, dyeing, printing, finishing, and man-made fiber production." https://china.lbl.gov/eager-textile

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardGreenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Children's Underwear, Socks, SleepwearHazardous Chemical Discharge ManagementFor C, informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles.
For D, goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound. Public disclosure of goals and progress must have occurred within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Examples of tools and protocols for screening chemicals and assessing alternatives include green chemistry, alternatives analysis, restricted substances lists, and other tools that are listed in the Background Information.
To calculate E1, subtract the number of chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List used this year across all manufacturing facilities where your product is cut and sewed from the number of chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List used last year across all manufacturing facilities where your product was cut and sewed. If more chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List were used this year than last, enter zero.
Calculate E1 as the number of manufacturing facilities where your product is cut and sewed that reduced the use of chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List this year compared to last year divided by the total number of manufacturing facilities where your product is cut and sewed, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
American Apparel & Footwear Association (AAFA) - Restricted Substance List: The AAFA provides guidelines for restricted chemicals and substances. https://www.aafaglobal.org/AAFA/Solutions_Pages/Restricted_Substance_List

BHive: The BHive enables the creation and management of chemical inventories, identifies chemical products that meet sustainability credentials. The BHive enhances supply chain transparency as factories, brands, and retailers can view and compare the safety of chemical products. https://www.thebhive.net/

Detox to Zero by OEKO-TEX: This analysis and assessment tool creates transparency and provides textile and leather producers the ability to control the use of hazardous substances. The tool focuses on continuous improvement and gradual reduction of harmful substances in production processes. https://www.oeko-tex.com/en/our-standards/detox-to-zero-by-oeko-tex

GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

GreenSuite: GreenSuite is an environmental sustainability tool that can be customized to specific users' needs. Environmental issues throughout the supply chain are covered by this web based solution. http://greensuite360.com/index.html

Greenlist Process: According to their website, "In 2001, SC Johnson developed the Greenlist Process to classify ingredients in order to minimize the human and environmental impacts of their products." The process is now available for license to other companies and organizations. https://www.scjohnson.com/en/our-purpose/sustainability-report/explaining-the-sc-johnson-greenlist-program-an-excerpt-from-our-2017-sustainability-report

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815

PRIO: PRIO is a web-based tool developed by the Swedish government to facilitate the assessment of environmental and health risks of chemicals. ? https://www.kemi.se/prioguiden/english/start

Roadmap to Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals (ZDHC): This plan is intended to reduce and eliminate the discharge of hazardous chemicals. https://www.roadmaptozero.com/

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS): Sustainable Textile Solutions programs support brands, retailers, and industry partners in their efforts to achieve compliance to environmental, health, and safety standards. https://sustexsolutions.com/

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Management KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Management KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528286

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Exposure Assessment Tools and Models: According to their website, "The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) has developed several exposure assessment methods, databases, and predictive models to help in evaluating what happens to chemicals when they are used and released to the environment and how workers, the general public, consumers and the aquatic ecosystems may be exposed to chemicals." https://www.epa.gov/ceam/tools-data-exposure-assessment

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Sustainable Futures: According to their website, "The goal of the Sustainable Futures Initiative (SF) is to make new chemicals safer, available faster, and at lower cost. It works by giving chemical developers the same risk-screening models that EPA uses to evaluate new chemicals before they enter the market."? https://www.epa.gov/sustainable-futures
BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Existing Chemicals Program: According to their website, "EPA's existing chemical programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and characterization, and risk management for chemical substances in commercial use." The current chemicals management program is undergoing review and update, including how the agency identifies and prioritizes priority chemicals for review and assessment under TSCA. https://www.epa.gov/compliance/toxic-substances-control-act-tsca-compliance-monitoring#chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
N/A
Children's Underwear, Socks, SleepwearLabor Rights - ManufacturingThe scope of this KPI includes company owned and contract manufacturing facilities performing final cut, sew, and dyeing operations for final product.

Calculate B1 as the mass of your final product that is covered by an internal policy that has quantitative time-bound goals related to child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100. Where freedom of association and collective bargaining are restricted by law, employers can use other forms of non-union employee representation and relations to respect this aspect of workers' rights.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your final product that has been reviewed by a risk assessment which identifies high-risk areas for labor rights abuses, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100.
To be included in B2, a risk assessment must have been conducted by second or third parties and must have been conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles. The risk assessments and standard must be verifiable and must address labor rights abuses such as discrimination on grounds of gender, age, ethnicity or disability, physical violence, sexual harassment and abuse, child labor, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining or any other range of behaviors and practices as outlined by internationally-recognized labor standards. The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions which can inform your responses.
In addition, to determine if an operation is in a high-risk area for labor rights abuses, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally-recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic risk assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. The AMFORI Countries' Risk Classification tool listed below may be used to inform your response. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B3 as the number of staff responsible for procurement activities that have been trained on labor rights issues in the supply chain, divided by the total number of staff responsible for procurement activities, then multiply by 100. Include both full-time and contracted employees. The training must be verifiable. Staff training should cover child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Staff training should be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for labor rights issues and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional staff training may be required to perform job duties.
Calculate B4 as the number staff responsible for procurement activities that have been evaluated via performance metrics on labor rights improvements in the supply chain, divided by the total staff responsible for procurement activities, then multiply by 100. Evaluation on labor rights should include, child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples of improvements include decreased incidence of child labor, forced labor, or discrimination, or an Increased worker participation in collective bargaining.
Calculate B5 as the mass of your final product that was produced in operations that were low risk, that were high risk but corrective actions were taken, or that were audited on child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining in the last three years, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B5, audits must be verifiable and address child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work. Where freedom of association & collective bargaining is restricted by law, employers can use other forms of non-union employee representation and relations to respect this aspect of workers' rights. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

THESIS Help Center Video: Labor Rights - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Labor Rights - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520093618
International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work: This declaration outlines the universal rights of all workers regardless of citizenship status, gender, or the local level of economic development. http://www.ilo.org/declaration/lang--en/index.htm

United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9
First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Forced labor: Any task or service performed by a person against their will or under threat of negative consequence. Forced labor includes debt bondage, human trafficking, withholding of wages or identity papers, threats of violence, unreasonable restriction of movement, and exploitation of marginalized workers.

Freedom of collective bargaining: The right to negotiate the conditions of employment as a group rather than individually without fear of repercussions.

Internationally-recognized labor principles: Internationally-recognized labor principles include the United Nations Global Compact and International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work or equivalent.

Labor rights: The universal rights of workers, regardless of race, gender, nationality, or other distinguishing characteristic. These include protection from the worst forms of child labor, forced labor, and discrimination, as well as freedom of association and collective bargaining as outlined by the United Nations Global Compact or the International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work.

Risk assessment: A systematic process to evaluate potential risks within an operation, system, or supply chain. It can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party or a country risk classification analysis that judges the site risk due to prevailing conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Children's Underwear, Socks, SleepwearMicrofiber release - ManufacturingAnswer A if your company only works with plant-derived materials (e.g., cotton, linen) which have been proven to biodegrade in water.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your synthetic textile supply that was sourced from manufacturers, either contracted or company owned, who monitored microfiber release during wet processing, divided by your total mass of synthetic textile supply, then multiply by 100. Monitoring may include, but is not limited to, wastewater and lint analysis.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your synthetic textile supply that was sourced from manufacturers, either contracted or company owned, who utilized alternatives to wet processing, divided by your total mass of synthetic textile supply, then multiply by 100.
Alternatives should replace at least one full stage of wet processing to qualify. Examples include, but are not limited to, inkjet printing and plasma technologies, which replace the dyeing stage of wet processing.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your synthetic textile supply that was sourced from manufacturers, either contracted or company owned, who have implemented practices and technologies to minimize microfiber release, divided by your total mass of synthetic textile supply, then multiply by 100.
The maximum possible response for each response option is 100%. However, multiple response options may be applicable to the same portion of your supply. For example, supply included in the calculation for C1 could also be included in the calculation for C2 if the stated conditions are also met.
Practices and technologies that minimize microfiber release include, but are not limited to, lowering the melting temperature of yarn to improve tensile strength, and adding coatings to yarn to reduce fiber loss.
N/AN/AMicrofiber release: Small synthetic fibers less than 10 micrometers in diameter that are released into the environment via wastewater during textile manufacturing that cause a variety of impacts to humans and wildlife, in addition to persisting in rivers, streams, and oceans.
Children's Underwear, Socks, SleepwearPlant-derived material sourcingPlant derived materials include cotton, linen, and hemp. Regenerated or semisynthetic cellulosic materials such as rayon and viscose are considered in the Synthetic Material Sourcing KPI.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your plant-derived material supply that was traced to the processing facility, divided by the total mass of your plant-derived material supply, then multiply by 100. The processing facility is where pre-spinning material processing takes place such as ginning for cotton, or scutching and heckling/hackling for linen.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your plant-derived material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for managing farm-level environmental impacts, divided by the total mass of your plant-derived material supply, then multiply by 100. A comprehensive plan will address pesticide use, fertilizer use, water use, greenhouse gas emissions and all other impacts relevant for the farm. Supply that has been certified by Better Cotton Initiative and Global Organic Textile Standard can be included in the numerator for this calculation.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your plant-derived material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for farm-level social impacts, divided by the total mass of your plant-derived material supply, then multiply by 100. A comprehensive plan will address worker health and safety, community health and safety, support for smallholders where present, and labor rights, including child labor, as well as all other impacts relevant for the farm. Supply that has been certified by Better Cotton Initiative, Fair Trade International, and Fair for Life can be included in the numerator for this calculation.
Calculate C4 as the mass of your cotton material supply that was assessed and met criteria for C1, C2, and C3, divided by the total mass of your material supply, then multiply by 100. The percent entered cannot exceed 100%.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Better Cotton Initiative: The Better Cotton Initiative offers publically available resources to provided background information on best practices for growing cotton. https://bettercotton.org/resources/

Cotton USA: Cotton USA is the trademark of the nonprofit Cotton Council International (CCI) which works through quality, sustainability, transparent partnerships, and ethical standards to make US cotton the preferred fiber for the clothing, footwear, and textiles value chain. Through their sustainability value, they aim to make US cotton the most sustainably produced in the world. https://cottonusa.org/

Fair for Life Certification Program: The Fair Life program provides certification for fair trade and responsible supply chains. The goal of Fair for Life is to ensure social and economic benefits to socioeconomically disadvantaged agricultural producers and workers and to ensure that smallholder producers receive a fair share. http://www.fairforlife.org/

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

Global Organic Textile Standard: This is an example of textile chemical use standards. http://www.global-standard.org/the-standard/general-description.html

Recycled Claim Standard (RCS) and Global Recycled Standard (GRS): The Recycled Claim Standard and Global Recycled Standard have the goal to increase recycled materials in consumer products by developing voluntary standards for the certification of recycled input. These standards also cover chain of custody, environmental processing, and chemical restrictions. https://textileexchange.org/standards/recycled-claim-standard-global-recycled-standard/

THESIS Help Center Video: Plant-derived material sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Plant-derived material sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750670
N/AFarming operation: An area of land and its buildings, comprised of one or more locations managed together that is used for growing crops that are delivered for further processing or as ingredients to other final products.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Children's Underwear, Socks, SleepwearProduct DesignCalculate B1 as the unit volume of your products that underwent a life cycle assessment, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
A life cycle assessment should be conducted against ISO 14040 \(Life Cycle Assessment - Principles and framework\).
Calculate B2 as the unit volume of your products that were designed to maximize material efficiency, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Material efficiency may include, but is not limited to, design to reduce total amount of materials needed to cut and sew a product, design to reduce material waste during cut and sew process.
Addressing material efficiency during the design stage may include, but is not limited to employing zero waste patternmaking to reduce material waste during the cut and sew process, and using whole garment knitting techniques to reduce the amount of yarn wasted during the knitting process.
Calculate B3 as the unit volume of your products designed to reduce laundering impacts, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Laundering impacts may include, but are not limited to, energy use during laundering and microfiber release during laundering.
Addressing laundering impacts at the design stage may include, but is not limited to choosing fabrics made from natural fibers that biodegrade, or adding care instructions to a garment's label that specify practices known to reduce energy use like cold water wash.
Calculate B4 as the unit volume of your products that underwent a durability assessment as part of the design process, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Both physical and emotional durability should be considered in this assessment.
Attributes to consider while assessing physical durability may include, but are not limited to stability/longevity of materials used, and strength/quality of cut and sew techniques.
Attributes to consider while assessing emotional durability include a product's flexibility or changeability to adapt to changing tastes over time.
Calculate B5 as the unit volume of your products that were designed to maximize resource utilization, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Resource utilization maximization may include, but is not limited to, materials that are able to be reused or recycled.
Addressing resource utilization maximization during the design stage may include, but is not limited to choosing single fiber fabrics that can be recycled, and using simple construction methods that can be disassembled after use.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS Help Center Video: Product Design KPI: Short video tutorial on the Product Design KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520107448B Corp Certification: B Corp offers certification at a company level and focuses on social and environmental performance, public transparency, and legal accountability. https://bcorporation.net/

BlueSign: Bluesign is a third party verification and consultant service. Verification is performed for social and environmental impacts, and consulting services are available for multiple supply chain, manufacturing, and production stages. https://www.bluesign.com/en/business/services

Cradle to Cradle Certified (TM) - Material Health: The Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute, a non-profit organization, administers the Cradle to Cradle Certified™ Product Standard, and provide guidance on chemical hazard assessments and their use for material assessments. The Cradle to Cradle™ Material Health Assessment Methodology examines product chemical composition break down and data collection rules and guidelines, guidance and criteria for chemical profiling methods, assessment of metabolism considerations, and guidance for the evaluation of material assessments. http://www.c2ccertified.org/get-certified/product-certification

Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

ISO 14040: ISO 14040 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Principles and Framework" document for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/37456.html

ISO 14044: ISO 14044 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Requirements and Guidelines" standard for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/38498.html

ISO/TC 207/SC 5: ISO/TC 207/SC 5 is the International Standardization Organization's life cycle assessment standard. https://www.iso.org/committee/54854.html
N/A
Children's Underwear, Socks, SleepwearRecycled contentCalculate B1 as the mass of fiber in your final products that can be defined as recycled content, divided by the total mass of fiber in your final products. Only include post-consumer recycled content. Exclude packaging from this calculation.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your products for which you were able to obtain data on recycled content, divided by the total mass of your products, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Recycled material available for textile manufacturing can vary based on fiber type. This should be considered when evaluating the ratio of recycled content based upon specific textile products.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your recycled material supply that was assessed and met criteria for B1 and B2 that is polyester divided by the total mass of your recycled material supply, then multiply by 100.
Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

THESIS Help Center Video: Recycled Content KPI: Short video tutorial on the Recycled Content KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017179
N/APost-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Pre-consumer recycled material: “Material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))
Children's Underwear, Socks, SleepwearSynthetic material sourcingThis KPI covers synthetic (e.g., polyester, nylon) and semisynthetic (e.g., rayon, viscose, lyocell) materials.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was traced to the production facility of origin, divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100. The production facility is where the chemical processes (e.g., synthesis, regeneration) to produce the fiber or material are carried out.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for managing facility environmental impacts, divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for facility social impacts, divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was assessed and met criteria for C1, C2, and C3 that is polyester divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
N/AN/AVerifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Children's Underwear, Socks, SleepwearWastewater generation - Supply ChainCalculate B1 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for COD, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B2 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for BOD, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B3 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for TSS, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B4 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met the standard for pH, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B5 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met the standard for temperature, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Audits should include verification that discharged wastewater is meeting the standards set forth by the American Apparel & Footwear Association Global Textile Effluent Guidelines for 95% of the sampling period:
- Measurements for BOD and TSS should be below or equal to 30 ppm.
- Measurements for COD should be below or equal to 100 ppm.
- Measurements for temperature should be below or equal to 37 degrees Celsius.
- Measurements for pH should be between 6.0 - 9.0.
Testing should follow a rigorous and internationally accepted methodology and frequency. Local or corporate standards may be stricter. The water quality metrics ideally approach ambient conditions.
Suppliers who have entered and communicated information required by the Higg Index Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Wastewater - Level 2, Question 7" may be used in responding to B1-B5 if the chosen wastewater standard meets or exceeds the values listed above, or if the values of the parameters listed in the detection table meet or exceed the values listed above. The information reported to the FEM is at the facility level; if your products are produced in multiple facilities you may aggregate the data to represent the entirety of final product produced.
AWS International Water Stewardship Standard: The International Water Stewardship Standard is a globally-applicable framework that helps water users understand their water use and impacts. Developed by the Alliance for Water Stewardship, the standard addresses 1) sustainable water balance, 2) good water quality, 3) healthy important water-related areas, and 4) good water governance. https://a4ws.org/the-aws-standard-2-0/

American Apparel & Footwear Association (AAFA) - Restricted Substance List: The AAFA provides guidelines for restricted chemicals and substances. https://www.aafaglobal.org/AAFA/Solutions_Pages/Restricted_Substance_List

BHive: The BHive enables the creation and management of chemical inventories, identifies chemical products that meet sustainability credentials. The BHive enhances supply chain transparency as factories, brands, and retailers can view and compare the safety of chemical products. https://www.thebhive.net/

Detox to Zero by OEKO-TEX: This analysis and assessment tool creates transparency and provides textile and leather producers the ability to control the use of hazardous substances. The tool focuses on continuous improvement and gradual reduction of harmful substances in production processes. https://www.oeko-tex.com/en/our-standards/detox-to-zero-by-oeko-tex

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS): Sustainable Textile Solutions programs support brands, retailers, and industry partners in their efforts to achieve compliance to environmental, health, and safety standards. https://sustexsolutions.com/

THESIS Help Center Video: Wastewater generation - Supply Chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Wastewater generation - Supply Chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/448595442
Roadmap to Zero by ZDHC (Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals): This plan is intended to reduce and eliminate the discharge of hazardous chemicals. https://www.roadmaptozero.com/

Textile Effluent Treatment Technology: The Journal of Cotton Science has produced a document addressing the treatment of textile effluent and specific wastewater management methods. http://www.cotton.org/journal/2007-11/3/upload/jcs11-141.pdf

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - Effluent Limitation Guidelines: This source provides current wastewater discharge guidelines and provides resources for reducing environmental impacts from wastewater discharge. https://www.epa.gov/eg

Wastewater 101 Toolbox: A free online resource for the textile industry to learn, act, and share experiences related to the treatment of wastewater. https://wastewater.sustainabilityconsortium.org/
Biological oxygen demand (BOD): An indicator for the amount of oxygen required/consumed for the microbiological decomposition (oxidation) of organic material in water bodies.

Chemical oxygen demand (COD): An indicator for the amount of oxygen required to oxidize an organic compound to carbon dioxide, ammonia, and water. The measurement is a proxy for the amount of organic compounds in water. Measuring COD in wastewater provides an estimated level of organic pollutants. The standard for measurement can be referenced in ISO 6060.

Total suspended solids (TSS): A water quality measurement that reflects the amount of particulates in a sample. The dry weight of residue in a filter is used to calculate units in milligrams per liter (mg/L).

Water use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.

pH: A measure of a substance's acidity or basicity. The measurement is based upon the molar concentration of hydrogen (H) ions in an aqueous solution of the substance. Pure water is at a neutral pH of 7. For wastewater quality testing, measuring pH allows for benchmarking pH levels to ambient conditions existing naturally in the surrounding environment.
Children's Underwear, Socks, SleepwearWater use - Supply chainCalculate B1 as the mass purchased from fabric suppliers that reported their annual water use, divided by the total mass purchased from all fabric suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using purchasing data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Water use is defined as the total amount of withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells. Supplier water use reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
If suppliers completed the CDP Water Security Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report water use.
Suppliers who have entered and communicated the information required by the Higg Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Water Use - Level 1" may be included in percentage calculated for response option B1.
If using Field to Market's Fieldprint Platform to determine water use during cotton production, report data from the "Irrigated yield" field of the summary report, not the "Yield difference due to irrigation" field.
Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator: Harnessing the power of collaboration across the agricultural value chain and locally-led conservation solutions, Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator provides a process-based standard for delivering sustainable outcomes for agriculture, people and the planet. The hallmark of the Accelerator’s approach lies in a process-based approach to advancing continuous improvement, which is grounded in a foundation that delivers solutions to global sustainable development priorities while also addressing local natural resource concerns. These projects utilize the power of voluntary, and often market-driven, solutions to incentivize improved environmental outcomes and enhance farmer livelihoods. By following a standardized and validated approach, these project pathways can leverage the collective action of the value chain to support resilient ecosystems and enhance farmer livelihoods. The Accelerator currently covers alfalfa, barley, corn, cotton, peanuts, potato, rice, sorghum, soy, sugar beet, and wheat produced in the U.S. and Canada. https://fieldtomarket.org/our-programs/CDP Water Information Request: The CDP Water Information Request provides questions that assess a company's water use, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. CDP can be contacted to respond to the Water Information Request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/
Water use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.
Children's Underwear, Socks, SleepwearWool and down sourcingCalculate B1 as the mass of your wool and down supply that was traced to the animal farm operation of origin, divided by the total mass of your wool and down supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your wool and down supply that was covered by a current comprehensive certification for farm-level environmental impacts or by verifiable, regularly conducted audits for farm-level impacts, divided by the total mass of your wool and down supply, then multiply by 100. The certification or audits should address all material environmental impacts including, but not limited to, soil health and erosion, biodiversity and deforestation, fertilizer use, and pesticide use. Material certified to the Responsible Wool Standard may be included in the calculation of B2.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your wool and down supply that came from animal farm operations that either maintain a current comprehensive animal welfare certification or verifiable, regularly conducted animal welfare audit, divided by the total mass of your wool and down supply, then multiply by 100.
To be included in B3, verifiable, regularly conducted audits should be performed by a second party or third party. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain can initiate these audits. Regulations, audits, and certifications that align with the animal welfare standards as described in Section 7 of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Terrestrial Animal Health Code and are well-enforced by the implementation of auditing systems can be included in your calculation.
Efforts should be taken to achieve minimization of pain, risk of injury, and transmission of diseases or parasites to animals; a physical environment in which the air quality, temperature, and humidity support good animal health; a structural and social environment that allows animals to rest comfortably, provides opportunities for physical and cognitive activity, and allows for the opportunity to perform all beneficial natural, individual, and social behaviors.
Animals should have access to sufficient water and appropriate feed, so as to be free from hunger and thirst. The handling of animals should foster a positive relationship between humans and animals and should not cause injury, panic, lasting fear, or avoidable stress.
Genetic selection should take into account the health and welfare of animals
Material certified to the Responsible Wool Standard and Responsible Down Standard may be included in the calculation of B3.
Responsible Down Standard: The Responsible Down Standard is a voluntary standard for the certification of down from ducks and geese. It addresses issues of animal welfare at the farm, transport, and slaughter stages. http://responsibledown.org/for-business/certification/

Responsible Wool Standard: The Responsible Wool Standard is a voluntary standard for the certification of wool from sheep. It addressees issues of animal welfare, land management, and traceability. https://textileexchange.org/standards/responsible-wool/
N/AAnimal farm operations: An area of land and its buildings, comprised of one or more locations managed together, that is used for rearing animals. This includes the growing of crops for animal feed on this land.

Animal welfare: Animal welfare refers to the well-being of an animal and how an animal is coping with the conditions in which it lives. A good state of welfare varies substantially between different contexts, but in general an animal is in a good state of welfare if it is healthy, comfortable, well-nourished, safe, able to express innate behavior, and not suffering from pain, fear, and distress. Ensuring animal welfare is a human responsibility that requires treatments such as good housing, good care, good feed, humane handling and humane slaughter/killing. The treatments that an animal receives is covered by other terms such as animal care, animal husbandry, and humane management (adapted from The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE)).

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
Children's Underwear, Socks, SleepwearWorker Health and Safety - ManufacturingThis question aligns with the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Injury and Illness rate. This rate can be normalized for global applicability.
Calculate B1 according to OSHA's injury and illness rate by multiplying the number of recordable injuries and illnesses by 200,000. Divide this number by the total employee hours worked to produce your final product. If multiple facilities manufacture the final product, the injury and illness rate will need to be adjusted using a weighted average based on each facility's percentage of total production. Include all employees at a facility that participate in the production of the final product. This includes both full-time and contracted employees.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your final product for which you were able to obtain data, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS General Guidance document provides guidance to calculate the weighted average. See Background Information for access to this document.
The Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool is an online calculator that will compute your injury and illness rate. The OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses provides forms and information for computing your facility injury and illness rate.
Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool: This tool calculates the injury and illness incidence rate for employers. https://data.bls.gov/iirc/

OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses: This webpage contains information on how to record workplace injuries and illnesses and provides the worksheets needed to correctly do so. https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/forms

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520108472
Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh: The Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh is an agreement between brands and trade unions to improve worker health and safety. It can be a model for factory inspections, remediation, and worker participation & training. https://bangladeshaccord.org/

How to Compute a Firm's Incidence Rate for Safety Management: This website from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics provides in-depth guidance on computing injury and illness numbers. https://www.bls.gov/iif/osheval.htm

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Children's Underwear, Socks, SleepwearWorker Health and Safety - Supply ChainTo be included in B1-B5, risk assessments, training programs, safety plans, performance monitoring systems, and audits must be verifiable and address health and safety issues such as worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. The assessments and audits must be conducted by second or third parties. The risk assessment must be conducted once per year while the audit must have been conducted at least once every three years, both using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles such as International Labour Organization Occupational Safety and Health Conventions (e.g., No. 155). The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions, which can inform your responses. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for examples of initiatives that meet these requirements.
Calculate B1 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product that came from operations that have performed a risk assessment to identify high risk areas for health and safety, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in our final product, then multiply by 100.
To determine if an operation is high risk for health and safety, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic review assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. It must be conducted at least once per year. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B2 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product that came from operations that train workers on health and safety procedures, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B2, the training on health and safety procedures must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and must be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for workers on health and safety procedures and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional worker training may be required to perform job duties. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B3 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product that came from operations that implement a verifiable worker health and safety plan, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B3, a worker health and safety plan must be verifiable and must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and be prominently displayed in the workplace where employees normally report. The plan should include best practices specific to ergonomics; repetitive motions; chemical and particulate exposure; appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE); and proper use of tools, machinery. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B4 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, that came from operations that have a worker health and safety performance monitoring system in place, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B4, a worker health and safety performance monitoring system should include metrics on issues including, but not limited to, incidence of worker injuries and prevalence of diseases. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B5 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, that came from operations that were audited in the last three years on worker health and safety issues, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
To be included in B5, the audits must be verifiable and address preventive measures, freely provided personal protective equipment, identification of worker health and safety hazards and effects on the exposed people, statistics and reasons behind injuries, design of work area, processes, installations, machinery/work equipment, operating processes and work organization, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Standards on Occupational Health and Safety.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528345
United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Risk assessment: A systematic process to evaluate potential risks within an operation, system, or supply chain. It can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party or a country risk classification analysis that judges the site risk due to prevailing conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
CurtainsAir quality - ManufacturingCalculate B1 as the mass of products that were produced in final cut, sew, and dyeing facilities that tracked and reported annual air emissions, divided by the total mass of products produced by all final cut, sew, and dyeing facilities, then multiply by 100. Include all company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities that performed final cut, sew, and dyeing operations. If the final cut, sew, and dyeing steps are performed in different facilities, then each must report their air emissions in order to be included in your calculation. Facilities included in this calculation must track all air emissions required by locally applicable regulations, as well as those emissions for which there is scientific evidence of serious effects to human health or the environment. Air emissions may include, but are not limited to, nitrogen and sulphur oxides from boilers, hydrocarbons from drying ovens, carbon monoxide from sizing, aniline vapors, and ammonia from printing/dyeing, and VOCs and ozone from textile finishing, and may be emitted as dust, oil mists, acid vapors, odors, and boiler exhausts. Testing of emissions must occur according to a rigorous and internationally accepted testing methodology.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Information entered into the Higg Index Facility Environment Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Air Emissions - Level 1, Questions 1-3" may be used in responding to B1. The information reported to the FEM is at the facility level; if your products are produced in multiple facilities you may aggregate the data to represent the entirety of final product produced.
Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Air quality - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Air quality - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750750
N/AN/A
CurtainsCellulosic material sourcing - Chemical useCanopyStyle’s Hot Button Ranking and Report is the primary viscose and cellulosic fiber sourcing analysis tool for the fashion sector. Calculate D1 as the mass of your cellulosic material that was supplied by producers or mills included in the CanopyStyle Hot Button Report and ranked in the yellow to green bottle range for the Chemical Use and Emissions column, divided by your total mass of cellulosic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Button up to Protect Forests — Producer Progress Criteria: The audit standard and process were developed by Canopy, in partnership with NEPCon, and is supported by the CanopyStyle Leaders for Forest Conservation and brands, retailers and designers looking to implement their sourcing policies for man-made cellulosic textiles. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/ranking-criteria-explained/

CanopyStyle Hot Button Report: The Hot Button Ranking of viscose producers is conducted using the consistent application of the tools and standards of the CanopyStyle initiative, including the CanopyStyle Audit. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/
N/AN/A
CurtainsCellulosic material sourcing - DeforestationCanopyStyle’s Hot Button Ranking and Report is the primary viscose and cellulosic fiber sourcing analysis tool for the fashion sector. Calculate D1 as the mass of your cellulosic material that was supplied by producers or mills included in the Canopy Hot Button Report and ranked in the yellow to green shirt range for the Hot Button Assessment column, divided by your total mass of cellulosic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Button up to Protect Forests — Producer Progress Criteria: The audit standard and process were developed by Canopy, in partnership with NEPCon, and is supported by the CanopyStyle Leaders for Forest Conservation and brands, retailers and designers looking to implement their sourcing policies for man-made cellulosic textiles. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/ranking-criteria-explained/

CanopyStyle Hot Button Report: The Hot Button Ranking of viscose producers is conducted using the consistent application of the tools and standards of the CanopyStyle initiative, including the CanopyStyle Audit. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/

ForestMapper: This interactive tool is the only one of its kind to visually represent ancient and endangered forests at a global scale. ForestMapper includes information on numerous ecological values divided into four categories: forests, species, carbon and landscapes. https://canopyplanet.org/tools/forestmapper/
N/AAncient and Endangered Forests: Intact forest landscape mosaics, naturally rare forest types, forest types that have been made rare due to human activity, and/or other forests that are ecologically critical for the protection of biological diversity. As a starting point to geographically locate ancient and endangered forests, maps of High Conservation Value Forests (HCVF), as defined by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), and of intact forest landscapes (IFL), can be used and paired with maps of other key ecological values like the habitat range of key endangered species and forests containing high concentrations of terrestrial carbon and High Carbon Stocks (HCS).
CurtainsGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the mass purchased from fabric suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total mass purchased from all fabric suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Suppliers who have entered and communicated information required by the Higg Index Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Energy Use & GHG - Level 1" for their facilities may be used to answer this KPI.
If using Field to Market's Fieldprint Platform to determine greenhouse gas emissions associated with cotton production, include energy use for field operations and activities through the first point of sale. This may include on-farm drying and any transport of the crop prior to sale.
Energy Efficiency Assessment and Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Tool for the Textile Industry (EAGER Textile): This tool was developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to aid in evaluating the impacts of introducing energy efficiency measures into a textile facility. According to the China Energy Group, "the EAGER tool will calculate the typical energy savings (electricity, fuel, final, and primary energy), CO2 emissions reduction, cost, and simple payback period...[the tool] is designed to work for textile facilities that have one or more of the following processes: spinning, weaving/knitting, dyeing, printing, finishing, and man-made fiber production." https://china.lbl.gov/eager-textile

Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator: Harnessing the power of collaboration across the agricultural value chain and locally-led conservation solutions, Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator provides a process-based standard for delivering sustainable outcomes for agriculture, people and the planet. The hallmark of the Accelerator’s approach lies in a process-based approach to advancing continuous improvement, which is grounded in a foundation that delivers solutions to global sustainable development priorities while also addressing local natural resource concerns. These projects utilize the power of voluntary, and often market-driven, solutions to incentivize improved environmental outcomes and enhance farmer livelihoods. By following a standardized and validated approach, these project pathways can leverage the collective action of the value chain to support resilient ecosystems and enhance farmer livelihoods. The Accelerator currently covers alfalfa, barley, corn, cotton, peanuts, potato, rice, sorghum, soy, sugar beet, and wheat produced in the U.S. and Canada. https://fieldtomarket.org/our-programs/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

THESIS Help Center Video: Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Supply Chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Supply Chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/465914322
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
CurtainsGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total mass produced of each product.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total mass of final product produced/revenue from final product produced/number of units produced. If the manufacturing facilities produce more than one category of product, only weight using the total mass of production specific to the product category in question.
Calculate B2 as the mass of final products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total mass of final products produced, then multiply by 100. For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
Information entered into the Higg Index Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Energy Use & GHG - Level 1" may be used to answer this KPI.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

Energy Efficiency Assessment and Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Tool for the Textile Industry (EAGER Textile): This tool was developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to aid in evaluating the impacts of introducing energy efficiency measures into a textile facility. According to the China Energy Group, "the EAGER tool will calculate the typical energy savings (electricity, fuel, final, and primary energy), CO2 emissions reduction, cost, and simple payback period...[the tool] is designed to work for textile facilities that have one or more of the following processes: spinning, weaving/knitting, dyeing, printing, finishing, and man-made fiber production." https://china.lbl.gov/eager-textile

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardGreenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
CurtainsHazardous Chemical Discharge ManagementFor C, informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles.
For D, goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound. Public disclosure of goals and progress must have occurred within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Examples of tools and protocols for screening chemicals and assessing alternatives include green chemistry, alternatives analysis, restricted substances lists, and other tools that are listed in the Background Information.
To calculate E1, subtract the number of chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List used this year across all manufacturing facilities where your product is cut and sewed from the number of chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List used last year across all manufacturing facilities where your product was cut and sewed. If more chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List were used this year than last, enter zero.
Calculate E1 as the number of manufacturing facilities where your product is cut and sewed that reduced the use of chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List this year compared to last year divided by the total number of manufacturing facilities where your product is cut and sewed, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
American Apparel & Footwear Association (AAFA) - Restricted Substance List: The AAFA provides guidelines for restricted chemicals and substances. https://www.aafaglobal.org/AAFA/Solutions_Pages/Restricted_Substance_List

BHive: The BHive enables the creation and management of chemical inventories, identifies chemical products that meet sustainability credentials. The BHive enhances supply chain transparency as factories, brands, and retailers can view and compare the safety of chemical products. https://www.thebhive.net/

Detox to Zero by OEKO-TEX: This analysis and assessment tool creates transparency and provides textile and leather producers the ability to control the use of hazardous substances. The tool focuses on continuous improvement and gradual reduction of harmful substances in production processes. https://www.oeko-tex.com/en/our-standards/detox-to-zero-by-oeko-tex

GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

GreenSuite: GreenSuite is an environmental sustainability tool that can be customized to specific users' needs. Environmental issues throughout the supply chain are covered by this web based solution. http://greensuite360.com/index.html

Greenlist Process: According to their website, "In 2001, SC Johnson developed the Greenlist Process to classify ingredients in order to minimize the human and environmental impacts of their products." The process is now available for license to other companies and organizations. https://www.scjohnson.com/en/our-purpose/sustainability-report/explaining-the-sc-johnson-greenlist-program-an-excerpt-from-our-2017-sustainability-report

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815

PRIO: PRIO is a web-based tool developed by the Swedish government to facilitate the assessment of environmental and health risks of chemicals. ? https://www.kemi.se/prioguiden/english/start

Roadmap to Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals (ZDHC): This plan is intended to reduce and eliminate the discharge of hazardous chemicals. https://www.roadmaptozero.com/

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS): Sustainable Textile Solutions programs support brands, retailers, and industry partners in their efforts to achieve compliance to environmental, health, and safety standards. https://sustexsolutions.com/

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Management KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Management KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528286

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Exposure Assessment Tools and Models: According to their website, "The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) has developed several exposure assessment methods, databases, and predictive models to help in evaluating what happens to chemicals when they are used and released to the environment and how workers, the general public, consumers and the aquatic ecosystems may be exposed to chemicals." https://www.epa.gov/ceam/tools-data-exposure-assessment

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Sustainable Futures: According to their website, "The goal of the Sustainable Futures Initiative (SF) is to make new chemicals safer, available faster, and at lower cost. It works by giving chemical developers the same risk-screening models that EPA uses to evaluate new chemicals before they enter the market."? https://www.epa.gov/sustainable-futures
BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Existing Chemicals Program: According to their website, "EPA's existing chemical programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and characterization, and risk management for chemical substances in commercial use." The current chemicals management program is undergoing review and update, including how the agency identifies and prioritizes priority chemicals for review and assessment under TSCA. https://www.epa.gov/compliance/toxic-substances-control-act-tsca-compliance-monitoring#chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
N/A
CurtainsLabor Rights - ManufacturingThe scope of this KPI includes company owned and contract manufacturing facilities performing final cut, sew, and dyeing operations for final product.

Calculate B1 as the mass of your final product that is covered by an internal policy that has quantitative time-bound goals related to child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100. Where freedom of association and collective bargaining are restricted by law, employers can use other forms of non-union employee representation and relations to respect this aspect of workers' rights.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your final product that has been reviewed by a risk assessment which identifies high-risk areas for labor rights abuses, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100.
To be included in B2, a risk assessment must have been conducted by second or third parties and must have been conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles. The risk assessments and standard must be verifiable and must address labor rights abuses such as discrimination on grounds of gender, age, ethnicity or disability, physical violence, sexual harassment and abuse, child labor, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining or any other range of behaviors and practices as outlined by internationally-recognized labor standards. The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions which can inform your responses.
In addition, to determine if an operation is in a high-risk area for labor rights abuses, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally-recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic risk assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. The AMFORI Countries' Risk Classification tool listed below may be used to inform your response. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B3 as the number of staff responsible for procurement activities that have been trained on labor rights issues in the supply chain, divided by the total number of staff responsible for procurement activities, then multiply by 100. Include both full-time and contracted employees. The training must be verifiable. Staff training should cover child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Staff training should be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for labor rights issues and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional staff training may be required to perform job duties.
Calculate B4 as the number staff responsible for procurement activities that have been evaluated via performance metrics on labor rights improvements in the supply chain, divided by the total staff responsible for procurement activities, then multiply by 100. Evaluation on labor rights should include, child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples of improvements include decreased incidence of child labor, forced labor, or discrimination, or an Increased worker participation in collective bargaining.
Calculate B5 as the mass of your final product that was produced in operations that were low risk, that were high risk but corrective actions were taken, or that were audited on child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining in the last three years, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B5, audits must be verifiable and address child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work. Where freedom of association & collective bargaining is restricted by law, employers can use other forms of non-union employee representation and relations to respect this aspect of workers' rights. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

THESIS Help Center Video: Labor Rights - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Labor Rights - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520093618
International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work: This declaration outlines the universal rights of all workers regardless of citizenship status, gender, or the local level of economic development. http://www.ilo.org/declaration/lang--en/index.htm

United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9
First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Forced labor: Any task or service performed by a person against their will or under threat of negative consequence. Forced labor includes debt bondage, human trafficking, withholding of wages or identity papers, threats of violence, unreasonable restriction of movement, and exploitation of marginalized workers.

Freedom of collective bargaining: The right to negotiate the conditions of employment as a group rather than individually without fear of repercussions.

Internationally-recognized labor principles: Internationally-recognized labor principles include the United Nations Global Compact and International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work or equivalent.

Labor rights: The universal rights of workers, regardless of race, gender, nationality, or other distinguishing characteristic. These include protection from the worst forms of child labor, forced labor, and discrimination, as well as freedom of association and collective bargaining as outlined by the United Nations Global Compact or the International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work.

Risk assessment: A systematic process to evaluate potential risks within an operation, system, or supply chain. It can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party or a country risk classification analysis that judges the site risk due to prevailing conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
CurtainsMicrofiber release - ManufacturingAnswer A if your company only works with plant-derived materials (e.g., cotton, linen) which have been proven to biodegrade in water.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your synthetic textile supply that was sourced from manufacturers, either contracted or company owned, who monitored microfiber release during wet processing, divided by your total mass of synthetic textile supply, then multiply by 100. Monitoring may include, but is not limited to, wastewater and lint analysis.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your synthetic textile supply that was sourced from manufacturers, either contracted or company owned, who utilized alternatives to wet processing, divided by your total mass of synthetic textile supply, then multiply by 100.
Alternatives should replace at least one full stage of wet processing to qualify. Examples include, but are not limited to, inkjet printing and plasma technologies, which replace the dyeing stage of wet processing.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your synthetic textile supply that was sourced from manufacturers, either contracted or company owned, who have implemented practices and technologies to minimize microfiber release, divided by your total mass of synthetic textile supply, then multiply by 100.
The maximum possible response for each response option is 100%. However, multiple response options may be applicable to the same portion of your supply. For example, supply included in the calculation for C1 could also be included in the calculation for C2 if the stated conditions are also met.
Practices and technologies that minimize microfiber release include, but are not limited to, lowering the melting temperature of yarn to improve tensile strength, and adding coatings to yarn to reduce fiber loss.
N/AN/AMicrofiber release: Small synthetic fibers less than 10 micrometers in diameter that are released into the environment via wastewater during textile manufacturing that cause a variety of impacts to humans and wildlife, in addition to persisting in rivers, streams, and oceans.
CurtainsPlant-derived material sourcingPlant derived materials include cotton, linen, and hemp. Regenerated or semisynthetic cellulosic materials such as rayon and viscose are considered in the Synthetic Material Sourcing KPI.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your plant-derived material supply that was traced to the processing facility, divided by the total mass of your plant-derived material supply, then multiply by 100. The processing facility is where pre-spinning material processing takes place such as ginning for cotton, or scutching and heckling/hackling for linen.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your plant-derived material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for managing farm-level environmental impacts, divided by the total mass of your plant-derived material supply, then multiply by 100. A comprehensive plan will address pesticide use, fertilizer use, water use, greenhouse gas emissions and all other impacts relevant for the farm. Supply that has been certified by Better Cotton Initiative and Global Organic Textile Standard can be included in the numerator for this calculation.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your plant-derived material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for farm-level social impacts, divided by the total mass of your plant-derived material supply, then multiply by 100. A comprehensive plan will address worker health and safety, community health and safety, support for smallholders where present, and labor rights, including child labor, as well as all other impacts relevant for the farm. Supply that has been certified by Better Cotton Initiative, Fair Trade International, and Fair for Life can be included in the numerator for this calculation.
Calculate C4 as the mass of your cotton material supply that was assessed and met criteria for C1, C2, and C3, divided by the total mass of your material supply, then multiply by 100. The percent entered cannot exceed 100%.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Better Cotton Initiative: The Better Cotton Initiative offers publically available resources to provided background information on best practices for growing cotton. https://bettercotton.org/resources/

Cotton USA: Cotton USA is the trademark of the nonprofit Cotton Council International (CCI) which works through quality, sustainability, transparent partnerships, and ethical standards to make US cotton the preferred fiber for the clothing, footwear, and textiles value chain. Through their sustainability value, they aim to make US cotton the most sustainably produced in the world. https://cottonusa.org/

Fair for Life Certification Program: The Fair Life program provides certification for fair trade and responsible supply chains. The goal of Fair for Life is to ensure social and economic benefits to socioeconomically disadvantaged agricultural producers and workers and to ensure that smallholder producers receive a fair share. http://www.fairforlife.org/

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

Global Organic Textile Standard: This is an example of textile chemical use standards. http://www.global-standard.org/the-standard/general-description.html

Recycled Claim Standard (RCS) and Global Recycled Standard (GRS): The Recycled Claim Standard and Global Recycled Standard have the goal to increase recycled materials in consumer products by developing voluntary standards for the certification of recycled input. These standards also cover chain of custody, environmental processing, and chemical restrictions. https://textileexchange.org/standards/recycled-claim-standard-global-recycled-standard/

THESIS Help Center Video: Plant-derived material sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Plant-derived material sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750670
N/AFarming operation: An area of land and its buildings, comprised of one or more locations managed together that is used for growing crops that are delivered for further processing or as ingredients to other final products.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
CurtainsProduct DesignCalculate B1 as the unit volume of your products that underwent a life cycle assessment, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
A life cycle assessment should be conducted against ISO 14040 \(Life Cycle Assessment - Principles and framework\).
Calculate B2 as the unit volume of your products that were designed to maximize material efficiency, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Material efficiency may include, but is not limited to, design to reduce total amount of materials needed to cut and sew a product, design to reduce material waste during cut and sew process.
Addressing material efficiency during the design stage may include, but is not limited to employing zero waste patternmaking to reduce material waste during the cut and sew process, and using whole garment knitting techniques to reduce the amount of yarn wasted during the knitting process.
Calculate B3 as the unit volume of your products designed to reduce laundering impacts, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Laundering impacts may include, but are not limited to, energy use during laundering and microfiber release during laundering.
Addressing laundering impacts at the design stage may include, but is not limited to choosing fabrics made from natural fibers that biodegrade, or adding care instructions to a garment's label that specify practices known to reduce energy use like cold water wash.
Calculate B4 as the unit volume of your products that underwent a durability assessment as part of the design process, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Both physical and emotional durability should be considered in this assessment.
Attributes to consider while assessing physical durability may include, but are not limited to stability/longevity of materials used, and strength/quality of cut and sew techniques.
Attributes to consider while assessing emotional durability include a product's flexibility or changeability to adapt to changing tastes over time.
Calculate B5 as the unit volume of your products that were designed to maximize resource utilization, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Resource utilization maximization may include, but is not limited to, materials that are able to be reused or recycled.
Addressing resource utilization maximization during the design stage may include, but is not limited to choosing single fiber fabrics that can be recycled, and using simple construction methods that can be disassembled after use.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS Help Center Video: Product Design KPI: Short video tutorial on the Product Design KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520107448B Corp Certification: B Corp offers certification at a company level and focuses on social and environmental performance, public transparency, and legal accountability. https://bcorporation.net/

BlueSign: Bluesign is a third party verification and consultant service. Verification is performed for social and environmental impacts, and consulting services are available for multiple supply chain, manufacturing, and production stages. https://www.bluesign.com/en/business/services

Cradle to Cradle Certified (TM) - Material Health: The Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute, a non-profit organization, administers the Cradle to Cradle Certified™ Product Standard, and provide guidance on chemical hazard assessments and their use for material assessments. The Cradle to Cradle™ Material Health Assessment Methodology examines product chemical composition break down and data collection rules and guidelines, guidance and criteria for chemical profiling methods, assessment of metabolism considerations, and guidance for the evaluation of material assessments. http://www.c2ccertified.org/get-certified/product-certification

Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

ISO 14040: ISO 14040 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Principles and Framework" document for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/37456.html

ISO 14044: ISO 14044 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Requirements and Guidelines" standard for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/38498.html

ISO/TC 207/SC 5: ISO/TC 207/SC 5 is the International Standardization Organization's life cycle assessment standard. https://www.iso.org/committee/54854.html
N/A
CurtainsRecycled contentCalculate B1 as the mass of fiber in your final products that can be defined as recycled content, divided by the total mass of fiber in your final products. Only include post-consumer recycled content. Exclude packaging from this calculation.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your products for which you were able to obtain data on recycled content, divided by the total mass of your products, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Recycled material available for textile manufacturing can vary based on fiber type. This should be considered when evaluating the ratio of recycled content based upon specific textile products.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your recycled material supply that was assessed and met criteria for B1 and B2 that is polyester divided by the total mass of your recycled material supply, then multiply by 100.
Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

THESIS Help Center Video: Recycled Content KPI: Short video tutorial on the Recycled Content KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017179
N/APost-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Pre-consumer recycled material: “Material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))
CurtainsSynthetic material sourcingThis KPI covers synthetic (e.g., polyester, nylon) and semisynthetic (e.g., rayon, viscose, lyocell) materials.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was traced to the production facility of origin, divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100. The production facility is where the chemical processes (e.g., synthesis, regeneration) to produce the fiber or material are carried out.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for managing facility environmental impacts, divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for facility social impacts, divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was assessed and met criteria for C1, C2, and C3 that is polyester divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
N/AN/AVerifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
CurtainsWastewater generation - Supply ChainCalculate B1 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for COD, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B2 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for BOD, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B3 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for TSS, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B4 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met the standard for pH, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B5 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met the standard for temperature, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Audits should include verification that discharged wastewater is meeting the standards set forth by the American Apparel & Footwear Association Global Textile Effluent Guidelines for 95% of the sampling period:
- Measurements for BOD and TSS should be below or equal to 30 ppm.
- Measurements for COD should be below or equal to 100 ppm.
- Measurements for temperature should be below or equal to 37 degrees Celsius.
- Measurements for pH should be between 6.0 - 9.0.
Testing should follow a rigorous and internationally accepted methodology and frequency. Local or corporate standards may be stricter. The water quality metrics ideally approach ambient conditions.
Suppliers who have entered and communicated information required by the Higg Index Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Wastewater - Level 2, Question 7" may be used in responding to B1-B5 if the chosen wastewater standard meets or exceeds the values listed above, or if the values of the parameters listed in the detection table meet or exceed the values listed above. The information reported to the FEM is at the facility level; if your products are produced in multiple facilities you may aggregate the data to represent the entirety of final product produced.
AWS International Water Stewardship Standard: The International Water Stewardship Standard is a globally-applicable framework that helps water users understand their water use and impacts. Developed by the Alliance for Water Stewardship, the standard addresses 1) sustainable water balance, 2) good water quality, 3) healthy important water-related areas, and 4) good water governance. https://a4ws.org/the-aws-standard-2-0/

American Apparel & Footwear Association (AAFA) - Restricted Substance List: The AAFA provides guidelines for restricted chemicals and substances. https://www.aafaglobal.org/AAFA/Solutions_Pages/Restricted_Substance_List

BHive: The BHive enables the creation and management of chemical inventories, identifies chemical products that meet sustainability credentials. The BHive enhances supply chain transparency as factories, brands, and retailers can view and compare the safety of chemical products. https://www.thebhive.net/

Detox to Zero by OEKO-TEX: This analysis and assessment tool creates transparency and provides textile and leather producers the ability to control the use of hazardous substances. The tool focuses on continuous improvement and gradual reduction of harmful substances in production processes. https://www.oeko-tex.com/en/our-standards/detox-to-zero-by-oeko-tex

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS): Sustainable Textile Solutions programs support brands, retailers, and industry partners in their efforts to achieve compliance to environmental, health, and safety standards. https://sustexsolutions.com/

THESIS Help Center Video: Wastewater generation - Supply Chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Wastewater generation - Supply Chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/448595442
Roadmap to Zero by ZDHC (Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals): This plan is intended to reduce and eliminate the discharge of hazardous chemicals. https://www.roadmaptozero.com/

Textile Effluent Treatment Technology: The Journal of Cotton Science has produced a document addressing the treatment of textile effluent and specific wastewater management methods. http://www.cotton.org/journal/2007-11/3/upload/jcs11-141.pdf

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - Effluent Limitation Guidelines: This source provides current wastewater discharge guidelines and provides resources for reducing environmental impacts from wastewater discharge. https://www.epa.gov/eg

Wastewater 101 Toolbox: A free online resource for the textile industry to learn, act, and share experiences related to the treatment of wastewater. https://wastewater.sustainabilityconsortium.org/
Biological oxygen demand (BOD): An indicator for the amount of oxygen required/consumed for the microbiological decomposition (oxidation) of organic material in water bodies.

Chemical oxygen demand (COD): An indicator for the amount of oxygen required to oxidize an organic compound to carbon dioxide, ammonia, and water. The measurement is a proxy for the amount of organic compounds in water. Measuring COD in wastewater provides an estimated level of organic pollutants. The standard for measurement can be referenced in ISO 6060.

Total suspended solids (TSS): A water quality measurement that reflects the amount of particulates in a sample. The dry weight of residue in a filter is used to calculate units in milligrams per liter (mg/L).

Water use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.

pH: A measure of a substance's acidity or basicity. The measurement is based upon the molar concentration of hydrogen (H) ions in an aqueous solution of the substance. Pure water is at a neutral pH of 7. For wastewater quality testing, measuring pH allows for benchmarking pH levels to ambient conditions existing naturally in the surrounding environment.
CurtainsWater use - Supply chainCalculate B1 as the mass purchased from fabric suppliers that reported their annual water use, divided by the total mass purchased from all fabric suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using purchasing data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Water use is defined as the total amount of withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells. Supplier water use reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
If suppliers completed the CDP Water Security Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report water use.
Suppliers who have entered and communicated the information required by the Higg Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Water Use - Level 1" may be included in percentage calculated for response option B1.
If using Field to Market's Fieldprint Platform to determine water use during cotton production, report data from the "Irrigated yield" field of the summary report, not the "Yield difference due to irrigation" field.
Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator: Harnessing the power of collaboration across the agricultural value chain and locally-led conservation solutions, Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator provides a process-based standard for delivering sustainable outcomes for agriculture, people and the planet. The hallmark of the Accelerator’s approach lies in a process-based approach to advancing continuous improvement, which is grounded in a foundation that delivers solutions to global sustainable development priorities while also addressing local natural resource concerns. These projects utilize the power of voluntary, and often market-driven, solutions to incentivize improved environmental outcomes and enhance farmer livelihoods. By following a standardized and validated approach, these project pathways can leverage the collective action of the value chain to support resilient ecosystems and enhance farmer livelihoods. The Accelerator currently covers alfalfa, barley, corn, cotton, peanuts, potato, rice, sorghum, soy, sugar beet, and wheat produced in the U.S. and Canada. https://fieldtomarket.org/our-programs/CDP Water Information Request: The CDP Water Information Request provides questions that assess a company's water use, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. CDP can be contacted to respond to the Water Information Request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/
Water use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.
CurtainsWool and down sourcingCalculate B1 as the mass of your wool and down supply that was traced to the animal farm operation of origin, divided by the total mass of your wool and down supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your wool and down supply that was covered by a current comprehensive certification for farm-level environmental impacts or by verifiable, regularly conducted audits for farm-level impacts, divided by the total mass of your wool and down supply, then multiply by 100. The certification or audits should address all material environmental impacts including, but not limited to, soil health and erosion, biodiversity and deforestation, fertilizer use, and pesticide use. Material certified to the Responsible Wool Standard may be included in the calculation of B2.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your wool and down supply that came from animal farm operations that either maintain a current comprehensive animal welfare certification or verifiable, regularly conducted animal welfare audit, divided by the total mass of your wool and down supply, then multiply by 100.
To be included in B3, verifiable, regularly conducted audits should be performed by a second party or third party. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain can initiate these audits. Regulations, audits, and certifications that align with the animal welfare standards as described in Section 7 of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Terrestrial Animal Health Code and are well-enforced by the implementation of auditing systems can be included in your calculation.
Efforts should be taken to achieve minimization of pain, risk of injury, and transmission of diseases or parasites to animals; a physical environment in which the air quality, temperature, and humidity support good animal health; a structural and social environment that allows animals to rest comfortably, provides opportunities for physical and cognitive activity, and allows for the opportunity to perform all beneficial natural, individual, and social behaviors.
Animals should have access to sufficient water and appropriate feed, so as to be free from hunger and thirst. The handling of animals should foster a positive relationship between humans and animals and should not cause injury, panic, lasting fear, or avoidable stress.
Genetic selection should take into account the health and welfare of animals
Material certified to the Responsible Wool Standard and Responsible Down Standard may be included in the calculation of B3.
Responsible Down Standard: The Responsible Down Standard is a voluntary standard for the certification of down from ducks and geese. It addresses issues of animal welfare at the farm, transport, and slaughter stages. http://responsibledown.org/for-business/certification/

Responsible Wool Standard: The Responsible Wool Standard is a voluntary standard for the certification of wool from sheep. It addressees issues of animal welfare, land management, and traceability. https://textileexchange.org/standards/responsible-wool/
N/AAnimal farm operations: An area of land and its buildings, comprised of one or more locations managed together, that is used for rearing animals. This includes the growing of crops for animal feed on this land.

Animal welfare: Animal welfare refers to the well-being of an animal and how an animal is coping with the conditions in which it lives. A good state of welfare varies substantially between different contexts, but in general an animal is in a good state of welfare if it is healthy, comfortable, well-nourished, safe, able to express innate behavior, and not suffering from pain, fear, and distress. Ensuring animal welfare is a human responsibility that requires treatments such as good housing, good care, good feed, humane handling and humane slaughter/killing. The treatments that an animal receives is covered by other terms such as animal care, animal husbandry, and humane management (adapted from The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE)).

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
CurtainsWorker Health and Safety - ManufacturingThis question aligns with the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Injury and Illness rate. This rate can be normalized for global applicability.
Calculate B1 according to OSHA's injury and illness rate by multiplying the number of recordable injuries and illnesses by 200,000. Divide this number by the total employee hours worked to produce your final product. If multiple facilities manufacture the final product, the injury and illness rate will need to be adjusted using a weighted average based on each facility's percentage of total production. Include all employees at a facility that participate in the production of the final product. This includes both full-time and contracted employees.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your final product for which you were able to obtain data, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS General Guidance document provides guidance to calculate the weighted average. See Background Information for access to this document.
The Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool is an online calculator that will compute your injury and illness rate. The OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses provides forms and information for computing your facility injury and illness rate.
Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool: This tool calculates the injury and illness incidence rate for employers. https://data.bls.gov/iirc/

OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses: This webpage contains information on how to record workplace injuries and illnesses and provides the worksheets needed to correctly do so. https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/forms

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520108472
Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh: The Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh is an agreement between brands and trade unions to improve worker health and safety. It can be a model for factory inspections, remediation, and worker participation & training. https://bangladeshaccord.org/

How to Compute a Firm's Incidence Rate for Safety Management: This website from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics provides in-depth guidance on computing injury and illness numbers. https://www.bls.gov/iif/osheval.htm

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
CurtainsWorker Health and Safety - Supply ChainTo be included in B1-B5, risk assessments, training programs, safety plans, performance monitoring systems, and audits must be verifiable and address health and safety issues such as worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. The assessments and audits must be conducted by second or third parties. The risk assessment must be conducted once per year while the audit must have been conducted at least once every three years, both using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles such as International Labour Organization Occupational Safety and Health Conventions (e.g., No. 155). The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions, which can inform your responses. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for examples of initiatives that meet these requirements.
Calculate B1 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product that came from operations that have performed a risk assessment to identify high risk areas for health and safety, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in our final product, then multiply by 100.
To determine if an operation is high risk for health and safety, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic review assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. It must be conducted at least once per year. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B2 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product that came from operations that train workers on health and safety procedures, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B2, the training on health and safety procedures must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and must be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for workers on health and safety procedures and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional worker training may be required to perform job duties. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B3 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product that came from operations that implement a verifiable worker health and safety plan, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B3, a worker health and safety plan must be verifiable and must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and be prominently displayed in the workplace where employees normally report. The plan should include best practices specific to ergonomics; repetitive motions; chemical and particulate exposure; appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE); and proper use of tools, machinery. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B4 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, that came from operations that have a worker health and safety performance monitoring system in place, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B4, a worker health and safety performance monitoring system should include metrics on issues including, but not limited to, incidence of worker injuries and prevalence of diseases. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B5 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, that came from operations that were audited in the last three years on worker health and safety issues, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
To be included in B5, the audits must be verifiable and address preventive measures, freely provided personal protective equipment, identification of worker health and safety hazards and effects on the exposed people, statistics and reasons behind injuries, design of work area, processes, installations, machinery/work equipment, operating processes and work organization, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Standards on Occupational Health and Safety.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528345
United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Risk assessment: A systematic process to evaluate potential risks within an operation, system, or supply chain. It can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party or a country risk classification analysis that judges the site risk due to prevailing conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
FabricAir quality - ManufacturingCalculate B1 as the mass of products that were produced in final cut, sew, and dyeing facilities that tracked and reported annual air emissions, divided by the total mass of products produced by all final cut, sew, and dyeing facilities, then multiply by 100. Include all company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities that performed final cut, sew, and dyeing operations. If the final cut, sew, and dyeing steps are performed in different facilities, then each must report their air emissions in order to be included in your calculation. Facilities included in this calculation must track all air emissions required by locally applicable regulations, as well as those emissions for which there is scientific evidence of serious effects to human health or the environment. Air emissions may include, but are not limited to, nitrogen and sulphur oxides from boilers, hydrocarbons from drying ovens, carbon monoxide from sizing, aniline vapors, and ammonia from printing/dyeing, and VOCs and ozone from textile finishing, and may be emitted as dust, oil mists, acid vapors, odors, and boiler exhausts. Testing of emissions must occur according to a rigorous and internationally accepted testing methodology.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Information entered into the Higg Index Facility Environment Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Air Emissions - Level 1, Questions 1-3" may be used in responding to B1. The information reported to the FEM is at the facility level; if your products are produced in multiple facilities you may aggregate the data to represent the entirety of final product produced.
Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Air quality - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Air quality - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750750
N/AN/A
FabricCellulosic material sourcing - Chemical useCanopyStyle’s Hot Button Ranking and Report is the primary viscose and cellulosic fiber sourcing analysis tool for the fashion sector. Calculate D1 as the mass of your cellulosic material that was supplied by producers or mills included in the CanopyStyle Hot Button Report and ranked in the yellow to green bottle range for the Chemical Use and Emissions column, divided by your total mass of cellulosic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Button up to Protect Forests — Producer Progress Criteria: The audit standard and process were developed by Canopy, in partnership with NEPCon, and is supported by the CanopyStyle Leaders for Forest Conservation and brands, retailers and designers looking to implement their sourcing policies for man-made cellulosic textiles. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/ranking-criteria-explained/

CanopyStyle Hot Button Report: The Hot Button Ranking of viscose producers is conducted using the consistent application of the tools and standards of the CanopyStyle initiative, including the CanopyStyle Audit. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/
N/AN/A
FabricCellulosic material sourcing - DeforestationCanopyStyle’s Hot Button Ranking and Report is the primary viscose and cellulosic fiber sourcing analysis tool for the fashion sector. Calculate D1 as the mass of your cellulosic material that was supplied by producers or mills included in the Canopy Hot Button Report and ranked in the yellow to green shirt range for the Hot Button Assessment column, divided by your total mass of cellulosic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Button up to Protect Forests — Producer Progress Criteria: The audit standard and process were developed by Canopy, in partnership with NEPCon, and is supported by the CanopyStyle Leaders for Forest Conservation and brands, retailers and designers looking to implement their sourcing policies for man-made cellulosic textiles. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/ranking-criteria-explained/

CanopyStyle Hot Button Report: The Hot Button Ranking of viscose producers is conducted using the consistent application of the tools and standards of the CanopyStyle initiative, including the CanopyStyle Audit. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/

ForestMapper: This interactive tool is the only one of its kind to visually represent ancient and endangered forests at a global scale. ForestMapper includes information on numerous ecological values divided into four categories: forests, species, carbon and landscapes. https://canopyplanet.org/tools/forestmapper/
N/AAncient and Endangered Forests: Intact forest landscape mosaics, naturally rare forest types, forest types that have been made rare due to human activity, and/or other forests that are ecologically critical for the protection of biological diversity. As a starting point to geographically locate ancient and endangered forests, maps of High Conservation Value Forests (HCVF), as defined by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), and of intact forest landscapes (IFL), can be used and paired with maps of other key ecological values like the habitat range of key endangered species and forests containing high concentrations of terrestrial carbon and High Carbon Stocks (HCS).
FabricGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the mass purchased from fabric suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total mass purchased from all fabric suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Suppliers who have entered and communicated information required by the Higg Index Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Energy Use & GHG - Level 1" for their facilities may be used to answer this KPI.
If using Field to Market's Fieldprint Platform to determine greenhouse gas emissions associated with cotton production, include energy use for field operations and activities through the first point of sale. This may include on-farm drying and any transport of the crop prior to sale.
Energy Efficiency Assessment and Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Tool for the Textile Industry (EAGER Textile): This tool was developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to aid in evaluating the impacts of introducing energy efficiency measures into a textile facility. According to the China Energy Group, "the EAGER tool will calculate the typical energy savings (electricity, fuel, final, and primary energy), CO2 emissions reduction, cost, and simple payback period...[the tool] is designed to work for textile facilities that have one or more of the following processes: spinning, weaving/knitting, dyeing, printing, finishing, and man-made fiber production." https://china.lbl.gov/eager-textile

Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator: Harnessing the power of collaboration across the agricultural value chain and locally-led conservation solutions, Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator provides a process-based standard for delivering sustainable outcomes for agriculture, people and the planet. The hallmark of the Accelerator’s approach lies in a process-based approach to advancing continuous improvement, which is grounded in a foundation that delivers solutions to global sustainable development priorities while also addressing local natural resource concerns. These projects utilize the power of voluntary, and often market-driven, solutions to incentivize improved environmental outcomes and enhance farmer livelihoods. By following a standardized and validated approach, these project pathways can leverage the collective action of the value chain to support resilient ecosystems and enhance farmer livelihoods. The Accelerator currently covers alfalfa, barley, corn, cotton, peanuts, potato, rice, sorghum, soy, sugar beet, and wheat produced in the U.S. and Canada. https://fieldtomarket.org/our-programs/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

THESIS Help Center Video: Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Supply Chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Supply Chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/465914322
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
FabricGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total mass produced of each product.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total mass of final product produced/revenue from final product produced/number of units produced. If the manufacturing facilities produce more than one category of product, only weight using the total mass of production specific to the product category in question.
Calculate B2 as the mass of final products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total mass of final products produced, then multiply by 100. For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
Information entered into the Higg Index Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Energy Use & GHG - Level 1" may be used to answer this KPI.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

Energy Efficiency Assessment and Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Tool for the Textile Industry (EAGER Textile): This tool was developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to aid in evaluating the impacts of introducing energy efficiency measures into a textile facility. According to the China Energy Group, "the EAGER tool will calculate the typical energy savings (electricity, fuel, final, and primary energy), CO2 emissions reduction, cost, and simple payback period...[the tool] is designed to work for textile facilities that have one or more of the following processes: spinning, weaving/knitting, dyeing, printing, finishing, and man-made fiber production." https://china.lbl.gov/eager-textile

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardGreenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
FabricHazardous Chemical Discharge ManagementFor C, informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles.
For D, goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound. Public disclosure of goals and progress must have occurred within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Examples of tools and protocols for screening chemicals and assessing alternatives include green chemistry, alternatives analysis, restricted substances lists, and other tools that are listed in the Background Information.
To calculate E1, subtract the number of chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List used this year across all manufacturing facilities where your product is cut and sewed from the number of chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List used last year across all manufacturing facilities where your product was cut and sewed. If more chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List were used this year than last, enter zero.
Calculate E1 as the number of manufacturing facilities where your product is cut and sewed that reduced the use of chemicals on the ZDHC Manufacturing Restricted Substances List this year compared to last year divided by the total number of manufacturing facilities where your product is cut and sewed, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
American Apparel & Footwear Association (AAFA) - Restricted Substance List: The AAFA provides guidelines for restricted chemicals and substances. https://www.aafaglobal.org/AAFA/Solutions_Pages/Restricted_Substance_List

BHive: The BHive enables the creation and management of chemical inventories, identifies chemical products that meet sustainability credentials. The BHive enhances supply chain transparency as factories, brands, and retailers can view and compare the safety of chemical products. https://www.thebhive.net/

Detox to Zero by OEKO-TEX: This analysis and assessment tool creates transparency and provides textile and leather producers the ability to control the use of hazardous substances. The tool focuses on continuous improvement and gradual reduction of harmful substances in production processes. https://www.oeko-tex.com/en/our-standards/detox-to-zero-by-oeko-tex

GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

GreenSuite: GreenSuite is an environmental sustainability tool that can be customized to specific users' needs. Environmental issues throughout the supply chain are covered by this web based solution. http://greensuite360.com/index.html

Greenlist Process: According to their website, "In 2001, SC Johnson developed the Greenlist Process to classify ingredients in order to minimize the human and environmental impacts of their products." The process is now available for license to other companies and organizations. https://www.scjohnson.com/en/our-purpose/sustainability-report/explaining-the-sc-johnson-greenlist-program-an-excerpt-from-our-2017-sustainability-report

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815

PRIO: PRIO is a web-based tool developed by the Swedish government to facilitate the assessment of environmental and health risks of chemicals. ? https://www.kemi.se/prioguiden/english/start

Roadmap to Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals (ZDHC): This plan is intended to reduce and eliminate the discharge of hazardous chemicals. https://www.roadmaptozero.com/

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS): Sustainable Textile Solutions programs support brands, retailers, and industry partners in their efforts to achieve compliance to environmental, health, and safety standards. https://sustexsolutions.com/

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Management KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Management KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528286

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Exposure Assessment Tools and Models: According to their website, "The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) has developed several exposure assessment methods, databases, and predictive models to help in evaluating what happens to chemicals when they are used and released to the environment and how workers, the general public, consumers and the aquatic ecosystems may be exposed to chemicals." https://www.epa.gov/ceam/tools-data-exposure-assessment

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Sustainable Futures: According to their website, "The goal of the Sustainable Futures Initiative (SF) is to make new chemicals safer, available faster, and at lower cost. It works by giving chemical developers the same risk-screening models that EPA uses to evaluate new chemicals before they enter the market."? https://www.epa.gov/sustainable-futures
BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Existing Chemicals Program: According to their website, "EPA's existing chemical programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and characterization, and risk management for chemical substances in commercial use." The current chemicals management program is undergoing review and update, including how the agency identifies and prioritizes priority chemicals for review and assessment under TSCA. https://www.epa.gov/compliance/toxic-substances-control-act-tsca-compliance-monitoring#chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
N/A
FabricLabor Rights - ManufacturingThe scope of this KPI includes company owned and contract manufacturing facilities performing final cut, sew, and dyeing operations for final product.

Calculate B1 as the mass of your final product that is covered by an internal policy that has quantitative time-bound goals related to child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100. Where freedom of association and collective bargaining are restricted by law, employers can use other forms of non-union employee representation and relations to respect this aspect of workers' rights.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your final product that has been reviewed by a risk assessment which identifies high-risk areas for labor rights abuses, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100.
To be included in B2, a risk assessment must have been conducted by second or third parties and must have been conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles. The risk assessments and standard must be verifiable and must address labor rights abuses such as discrimination on grounds of gender, age, ethnicity or disability, physical violence, sexual harassment and abuse, child labor, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining or any other range of behaviors and practices as outlined by internationally-recognized labor standards. The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions which can inform your responses.
In addition, to determine if an operation is in a high-risk area for labor rights abuses, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally-recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic risk assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. The AMFORI Countries' Risk Classification tool listed below may be used to inform your response. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B3 as the number of staff responsible for procurement activities that have been trained on labor rights issues in the supply chain, divided by the total number of staff responsible for procurement activities, then multiply by 100. Include both full-time and contracted employees. The training must be verifiable. Staff training should cover child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Staff training should be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for labor rights issues and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional staff training may be required to perform job duties.
Calculate B4 as the number staff responsible for procurement activities that have been evaluated via performance metrics on labor rights improvements in the supply chain, divided by the total staff responsible for procurement activities, then multiply by 100. Evaluation on labor rights should include, child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples of improvements include decreased incidence of child labor, forced labor, or discrimination, or an Increased worker participation in collective bargaining.
Calculate B5 as the mass of your final product that was produced in operations that were low risk, that were high risk but corrective actions were taken, or that were audited on child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining in the last three years, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B5, audits must be verifiable and address child labor, discrimination, forced labor, and freedom of association and collective bargaining, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work. Where freedom of association & collective bargaining is restricted by law, employers can use other forms of non-union employee representation and relations to respect this aspect of workers' rights. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

THESIS Help Center Video: Labor Rights - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Labor Rights - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520093618
International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work: This declaration outlines the universal rights of all workers regardless of citizenship status, gender, or the local level of economic development. http://www.ilo.org/declaration/lang--en/index.htm

United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9
First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Forced labor: Any task or service performed by a person against their will or under threat of negative consequence. Forced labor includes debt bondage, human trafficking, withholding of wages or identity papers, threats of violence, unreasonable restriction of movement, and exploitation of marginalized workers.

Freedom of collective bargaining: The right to negotiate the conditions of employment as a group rather than individually without fear of repercussions.

Internationally-recognized labor principles: Internationally-recognized labor principles include the United Nations Global Compact and International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work or equivalent.

Labor rights: The universal rights of workers, regardless of race, gender, nationality, or other distinguishing characteristic. These include protection from the worst forms of child labor, forced labor, and discrimination, as well as freedom of association and collective bargaining as outlined by the United Nations Global Compact or the International Labour Organization Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work.

Risk assessment: A systematic process to evaluate potential risks within an operation, system, or supply chain. It can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party or a country risk classification analysis that judges the site risk due to prevailing conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
FabricMicrofiber release - ManufacturingAnswer A if your company only works with plant-derived materials (e.g., cotton, linen) which have been proven to biodegrade in water.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your synthetic textile supply that was sourced from manufacturers, either contracted or company owned, who monitored microfiber release during wet processing, divided by your total mass of synthetic textile supply, then multiply by 100. Monitoring may include, but is not limited to, wastewater and lint analysis.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your synthetic textile supply that was sourced from manufacturers, either contracted or company owned, who utilized alternatives to wet processing, divided by your total mass of synthetic textile supply, then multiply by 100.
Alternatives should replace at least one full stage of wet processing to qualify. Examples include, but are not limited to, inkjet printing and plasma technologies, which replace the dyeing stage of wet processing.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your synthetic textile supply that was sourced from manufacturers, either contracted or company owned, who have implemented practices and technologies to minimize microfiber release, divided by your total mass of synthetic textile supply, then multiply by 100.
The maximum possible response for each response option is 100%. However, multiple response options may be applicable to the same portion of your supply. For example, supply included in the calculation for C1 could also be included in the calculation for C2 if the stated conditions are also met.
Practices and technologies that minimize microfiber release include, but are not limited to, lowering the melting temperature of yarn to improve tensile strength, and adding coatings to yarn to reduce fiber loss.
N/AN/AMicrofiber release: Small synthetic fibers less than 10 micrometers in diameter that are released into the environment via wastewater during textile manufacturing that cause a variety of impacts to humans and wildlife, in addition to persisting in rivers, streams, and oceans.
FabricPlant-derived material sourcingPlant derived materials include cotton, linen, and hemp. Regenerated or semisynthetic cellulosic materials such as rayon and viscose are considered in the Synthetic Material Sourcing KPI.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your plant-derived material supply that was traced to the processing facility, divided by the total mass of your plant-derived material supply, then multiply by 100. The processing facility is where pre-spinning material processing takes place such as ginning for cotton, or scutching and heckling/hackling for linen.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your plant-derived material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for managing farm-level environmental impacts, divided by the total mass of your plant-derived material supply, then multiply by 100. A comprehensive plan will address pesticide use, fertilizer use, water use, greenhouse gas emissions and all other impacts relevant for the farm. Supply that has been certified by Better Cotton Initiative and Global Organic Textile Standard can be included in the numerator for this calculation.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your plant-derived material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for farm-level social impacts, divided by the total mass of your plant-derived material supply, then multiply by 100. A comprehensive plan will address worker health and safety, community health and safety, support for smallholders where present, and labor rights, including child labor, as well as all other impacts relevant for the farm. Supply that has been certified by Better Cotton Initiative, Fair Trade International, and Fair for Life can be included in the numerator for this calculation.
Calculate C4 as the mass of your cotton material supply that was assessed and met criteria for C1, C2, and C3, divided by the total mass of your material supply, then multiply by 100. The percent entered cannot exceed 100%.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Better Cotton Initiative: The Better Cotton Initiative offers publically available resources to provided background information on best practices for growing cotton. https://bettercotton.org/resources/

Cotton USA: Cotton USA is the trademark of the nonprofit Cotton Council International (CCI) which works through quality, sustainability, transparent partnerships, and ethical standards to make US cotton the preferred fiber for the clothing, footwear, and textiles value chain. Through their sustainability value, they aim to make US cotton the most sustainably produced in the world. https://cottonusa.org/

Fair for Life Certification Program: The Fair Life program provides certification for fair trade and responsible supply chains. The goal of Fair for Life is to ensure social and economic benefits to socioeconomically disadvantaged agricultural producers and workers and to ensure that smallholder producers receive a fair share. http://www.fairforlife.org/

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

Global Organic Textile Standard: This is an example of textile chemical use standards. http://www.global-standard.org/the-standard/general-description.html

Recycled Claim Standard (RCS) and Global Recycled Standard (GRS): The Recycled Claim Standard and Global Recycled Standard have the goal to increase recycled materials in consumer products by developing voluntary standards for the certification of recycled input. These standards also cover chain of custody, environmental processing, and chemical restrictions. https://textileexchange.org/standards/recycled-claim-standard-global-recycled-standard/

THESIS Help Center Video: Plant-derived material sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Plant-derived material sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750670
N/AFarming operation: An area of land and its buildings, comprised of one or more locations managed together that is used for growing crops that are delivered for further processing or as ingredients to other final products.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
FabricProduct DesignCalculate B1 as the unit volume of your products that underwent a life cycle assessment, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
A life cycle assessment should be conducted against ISO 14040 \(Life Cycle Assessment - Principles and framework\).
Calculate B2 as the unit volume of your products that were designed to maximize material efficiency, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Material efficiency may include, but is not limited to, design to reduce total amount of materials needed to cut and sew a product, design to reduce material waste during cut and sew process.
Addressing material efficiency during the design stage may include, but is not limited to employing zero waste patternmaking to reduce material waste during the cut and sew process, and using whole garment knitting techniques to reduce the amount of yarn wasted during the knitting process.
Calculate B3 as the unit volume of your products designed to reduce laundering impacts, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Laundering impacts may include, but are not limited to, energy use during laundering and microfiber release during laundering.
Addressing laundering impacts at the design stage may include, but is not limited to choosing fabrics made from natural fibers that biodegrade, or adding care instructions to a garment's label that specify practices known to reduce energy use like cold water wash.
Calculate B4 as the unit volume of your products that underwent a durability assessment as part of the design process, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Both physical and emotional durability should be considered in this assessment.
Attributes to consider while assessing physical durability may include, but are not limited to stability/longevity of materials used, and strength/quality of cut and sew techniques.
Attributes to consider while assessing emotional durability include a product's flexibility or changeability to adapt to changing tastes over time.
Calculate B5 as the unit volume of your products that were designed to maximize resource utilization, divided by the total unit volume of your product, then multiply by 100.
Resource utilization maximization may include, but is not limited to, materials that are able to be reused or recycled.
Addressing resource utilization maximization during the design stage may include, but is not limited to choosing single fiber fabrics that can be recycled, and using simple construction methods that can be disassembled after use.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS Help Center Video: Product Design KPI: Short video tutorial on the Product Design KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520107448B Corp Certification: B Corp offers certification at a company level and focuses on social and environmental performance, public transparency, and legal accountability. https://bcorporation.net/

BlueSign: Bluesign is a third party verification and consultant service. Verification is performed for social and environmental impacts, and consulting services are available for multiple supply chain, manufacturing, and production stages. https://www.bluesign.com/en/business/services

Cradle to Cradle Certified (TM) - Material Health: The Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute, a non-profit organization, administers the Cradle to Cradle Certified™ Product Standard, and provide guidance on chemical hazard assessments and their use for material assessments. The Cradle to Cradle™ Material Health Assessment Methodology examines product chemical composition break down and data collection rules and guidelines, guidance and criteria for chemical profiling methods, assessment of metabolism considerations, and guidance for the evaluation of material assessments. http://www.c2ccertified.org/get-certified/product-certification

Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

ISO 14040: ISO 14040 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Principles and Framework" document for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/37456.html

ISO 14044: ISO 14044 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Requirements and Guidelines" standard for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/38498.html

ISO/TC 207/SC 5: ISO/TC 207/SC 5 is the International Standardization Organization's life cycle assessment standard. https://www.iso.org/committee/54854.html
N/A
FabricRecycled contentCalculate B1 as the mass of fiber in your final products that can be defined as recycled content, divided by the total mass of fiber in your final products. Only include post-consumer recycled content. Exclude packaging from this calculation.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your products for which you were able to obtain data on recycled content, divided by the total mass of your products, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Recycled material available for textile manufacturing can vary based on fiber type. This should be considered when evaluating the ratio of recycled content based upon specific textile products.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your recycled material supply that was assessed and met criteria for B1 and B2 that is polyester divided by the total mass of your recycled material supply, then multiply by 100.
Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

THESIS Help Center Video: Recycled Content KPI: Short video tutorial on the Recycled Content KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017179
N/APost-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Pre-consumer recycled material: “Material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))
FabricSynthetic material sourcingThis KPI covers synthetic (e.g., polyester, nylon) and semisynthetic (e.g., rayon, viscose, lyocell) materials.
Calculate C1 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was traced to the production facility of origin, divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100. The production facility is where the chemical processes (e.g., synthesis, regeneration) to produce the fiber or material are carried out.
Calculate C2 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for managing facility environmental impacts, divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was covered by a verifiable comprehensive plan for facility social impacts, divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the mass of your synthetic material supply that was assessed and met criteria for C1, C2, and C3 that is polyester divided by the total mass of your synthetic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
N/AN/AVerifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
FabricWastewater generation - Supply ChainCalculate B1 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for COD, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B2 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for BOD, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B3 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for TSS, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B4 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met the standard for pH, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B5 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met the standard for temperature, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Audits should include verification that discharged wastewater is meeting the standards set forth by the American Apparel & Footwear Association Global Textile Effluent Guidelines for 95% of the sampling period:
- Measurements for BOD and TSS should be below or equal to 30 ppm.
- Measurements for COD should be below or equal to 100 ppm.
- Measurements for temperature should be below or equal to 37 degrees Celsius.
- Measurements for pH should be between 6.0 - 9.0.
Testing should follow a rigorous and internationally accepted methodology and frequency. Local or corporate standards may be stricter. The water quality metrics ideally approach ambient conditions.
Suppliers who have entered and communicated information required by the Higg Index Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Wastewater - Level 2, Question 7" may be used in responding to B1-B5 if the chosen wastewater standard meets or exceeds the values listed above, or if the values of the parameters listed in the detection table meet or exceed the values listed above. The information reported to the FEM is at the facility level; if your products are produced in multiple facilities you may aggregate the data to represent the entirety of final product produced.
AWS International Water Stewardship Standard: The International Water Stewardship Standard is a globally-applicable framework that helps water users understand their water use and impacts. Developed by the Alliance for Water Stewardship, the standard addresses 1) sustainable water balance, 2) good water quality, 3) healthy important water-related areas, and 4) good water governance. https://a4ws.org/the-aws-standard-2-0/

American Apparel & Footwear Association (AAFA) - Restricted Substance List: The AAFA provides guidelines for restricted chemicals and substances. https://www.aafaglobal.org/AAFA/Solutions_Pages/Restricted_Substance_List

BHive: The BHive enables the creation and management of chemical inventories, identifies chemical products that meet sustainability credentials. The BHive enhances supply chain transparency as factories, brands, and retailers can view and compare the safety of chemical products. https://www.thebhive.net/

Detox to Zero by OEKO-TEX: This analysis and assessment tool creates transparency and provides textile and leather producers the ability to control the use of hazardous substances. The tool focuses on continuous improvement and gradual reduction of harmful substances in production processes. https://www.oeko-tex.com/en/our-standards/detox-to-zero-by-oeko-tex

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS): Sustainable Textile Solutions programs support brands, retailers, and industry partners in their efforts to achieve compliance to environmental, health, and safety standards. https://sustexsolutions.com/

THESIS Help Center Video: Wastewater generation - Supply Chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Wastewater generation - Supply Chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/448595442
Roadmap to Zero by ZDHC (Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals): This plan is intended to reduce and eliminate the discharge of hazardous chemicals. https://www.roadmaptozero.com/

Textile Effluent Treatment Technology: The Journal of Cotton Science has produced a document addressing the treatment of textile effluent and specific wastewater management methods. http://www.cotton.org/journal/2007-11/3/upload/jcs11-141.pdf

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - Effluent Limitation Guidelines: This source provides current wastewater discharge guidelines and provides resources for reducing environmental impacts from wastewater discharge. https://www.epa.gov/eg

Wastewater 101 Toolbox: A free online resource for the textile industry to learn, act, and share experiences related to the treatment of wastewater. https://wastewater.sustainabilityconsortium.org/
Biological oxygen demand (BOD): An indicator for the amount of oxygen required/consumed for the microbiological decomposition (oxidation) of organic material in water bodies.

Chemical oxygen demand (COD): An indicator for the amount of oxygen required to oxidize an organic compound to carbon dioxide, ammonia, and water. The measurement is a proxy for the amount of organic compounds in water. Measuring COD in wastewater provides an estimated level of organic pollutants. The standard for measurement can be referenced in ISO 6060.

Total suspended solids (TSS): A water quality measurement that reflects the amount of particulates in a sample. The dry weight of residue in a filter is used to calculate units in milligrams per liter (mg/L).

Water use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.

pH: A measure of a substance's acidity or basicity. The measurement is based upon the molar concentration of hydrogen (H) ions in an aqueous solution of the substance. Pure water is at a neutral pH of 7. For wastewater quality testing, measuring pH allows for benchmarking pH levels to ambient conditions existing naturally in the surrounding environment.
FabricWater use - Supply chainCalculate B1 as the mass purchased from fabric suppliers that reported their annual water use, divided by the total mass purchased from all fabric suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using purchasing data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Water use is defined as the total amount of withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells. Supplier water use reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
If suppliers completed the CDP Water Security Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report water use.
Suppliers who have entered and communicated the information required by the Higg Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Water Use - Level 1" may be included in percentage calculated for response option B1.
If using Field to Market's Fieldprint Platform to determine water use during cotton production, report data from the "Irrigated yield" field of the summary report, not the "Yield difference due to irrigation" field.
Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator: Harnessing the power of collaboration across the agricultural value chain and locally-led conservation solutions, Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator provides a process-based standard for delivering sustainable outcomes for agriculture, people and the planet. The hallmark of the Accelerator’s approach lies in a process-based approach to advancing continuous improvement, which is grounded in a foundation that delivers solutions to global sustainable development priorities while also addressing local natural resource concerns. These projects utilize the power of voluntary, and often market-driven, solutions to incentivize improved environmental outcomes and enhance farmer livelihoods. By following a standardized and validated approach, these project pathways can leverage the collective action of the value chain to support resilient ecosystems and enhance farmer livelihoods. The Accelerator currently covers alfalfa, barley, corn, cotton, peanuts, potato, rice, sorghum, soy, sugar beet, and wheat produced in the U.S. and Canada. https://fieldtomarket.org/our-programs/CDP Water Information Request: The CDP Water Information Request provides questions that assess a company's water use, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. CDP can be contacted to respond to the Water Information Request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/
Water use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.
FabricWool and down sourcingCalculate B1 as the mass of your wool and down supply that was traced to the animal farm operation of origin, divided by the total mass of your wool and down supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your wool and down supply that was covered by a current comprehensive certification for farm-level environmental impacts or by verifiable, regularly conducted audits for farm-level impacts, divided by the total mass of your wool and down supply, then multiply by 100. The certification or audits should address all material environmental impacts including, but not limited to, soil health and erosion, biodiversity and deforestation, fertilizer use, and pesticide use. Material certified to the Responsible Wool Standard may be included in the calculation of B2.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your wool and down supply that came from animal farm operations that either maintain a current comprehensive animal welfare certification or verifiable, regularly conducted animal welfare audit, divided by the total mass of your wool and down supply, then multiply by 100.
To be included in B3, verifiable, regularly conducted audits should be performed by a second party or third party. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain can initiate these audits. Regulations, audits, and certifications that align with the animal welfare standards as described in Section 7 of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Terrestrial Animal Health Code and are well-enforced by the implementation of auditing systems can be included in your calculation.
Efforts should be taken to achieve minimization of pain, risk of injury, and transmission of diseases or parasites to animals; a physical environment in which the air quality, temperature, and humidity support good animal health; a structural and social environment that allows animals to rest comfortably, provides opportunities for physical and cognitive activity, and allows for the opportunity to perform all beneficial natural, individual, and social behaviors.
Animals should have access to sufficient water and appropriate feed, so as to be free from hunger and thirst. The handling of animals should foster a positive relationship between humans and animals and should not cause injury, panic, lasting fear, or avoidable stress.
Genetic selection should take into account the health and welfare of animals
Material certified to the Responsible Wool Standard and Responsible Down Standard may be included in the calculation of B3.
Responsible Down Standard: The Responsible Down Standard is a voluntary standard for the certification of down from ducks and geese. It addresses issues of animal welfare at the farm, transport, and slaughter stages. http://responsibledown.org/for-business/certification/

Responsible Wool Standard: The Responsible Wool Standard is a voluntary standard for the certification of wool from sheep. It addressees issues of animal welfare, land management, and traceability. https://textileexchange.org/standards/responsible-wool/
N/AAnimal farm operations: An area of land and its buildings, comprised of one or more locations managed together, that is used for rearing animals. This includes the growing of crops for animal feed on this land.

Animal welfare: Animal welfare refers to the well-being of an animal and how an animal is coping with the conditions in which it lives. A good state of welfare varies substantially between different contexts, but in general an animal is in a good state of welfare if it is healthy, comfortable, well-nourished, safe, able to express innate behavior, and not suffering from pain, fear, and distress. Ensuring animal welfare is a human responsibility that requires treatments such as good housing, good care, good feed, humane handling and humane slaughter/killing. The treatments that an animal receives is covered by other terms such as animal care, animal husbandry, and humane management (adapted from The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE)).

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
FabricWorker Health and Safety - ManufacturingThis question aligns with the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Injury and Illness rate. This rate can be normalized for global applicability.
Calculate B1 according to OSHA's injury and illness rate by multiplying the number of recordable injuries and illnesses by 200,000. Divide this number by the total employee hours worked to produce your final product. If multiple facilities manufacture the final product, the injury and illness rate will need to be adjusted using a weighted average based on each facility's percentage of total production. Include all employees at a facility that participate in the production of the final product. This includes both full-time and contracted employees.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your final product for which you were able to obtain data, divided by the total mass of your final product, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS General Guidance document provides guidance to calculate the weighted average. See Background Information for access to this document.
The Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool is an online calculator that will compute your injury and illness rate. The OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses provides forms and information for computing your facility injury and illness rate.
Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool: This tool calculates the injury and illness incidence rate for employers. https://data.bls.gov/iirc/

OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses: This webpage contains information on how to record workplace injuries and illnesses and provides the worksheets needed to correctly do so. https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/forms

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520108472
Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh: The Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh is an agreement between brands and trade unions to improve worker health and safety. It can be a model for factory inspections, remediation, and worker participation & training. https://bangladeshaccord.org/

How to Compute a Firm's Incidence Rate for Safety Management: This website from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics provides in-depth guidance on computing injury and illness numbers. https://www.bls.gov/iif/osheval.htm

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
FabricWorker Health and Safety - Supply ChainTo be included in B1-B5, risk assessments, training programs, safety plans, performance monitoring systems, and audits must be verifiable and address health and safety issues such as worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. The assessments and audits must be conducted by second or third parties. The risk assessment must be conducted once per year while the audit must have been conducted at least once every three years, both using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles such as International Labour Organization Occupational Safety and Health Conventions (e.g., No. 155). The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions, which can inform your responses. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for examples of initiatives that meet these requirements.
Calculate B1 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product that came from operations that have performed a risk assessment to identify high risk areas for health and safety, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in our final product, then multiply by 100.
To determine if an operation is high risk for health and safety, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic review assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. It must be conducted at least once per year. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B2 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product that came from operations that train workers on health and safety procedures, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B2, the training on health and safety procedures must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and must be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for workers on health and safety procedures and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional worker training may be required to perform job duties. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B3 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product that came from operations that implement a verifiable worker health and safety plan, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B3, a worker health and safety plan must be verifiable and must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and be prominently displayed in the workplace where employees normally report. The plan should include best practices specific to ergonomics; repetitive motions; chemical and particulate exposure; appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE); and proper use of tools, machinery. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B4 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, that came from operations that have a worker health and safety performance monitoring system in place, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. To be included in B4, a worker health and safety performance monitoring system should include metrics on issues including, but not limited to, incidence of worker injuries and prevalence of diseases. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B5 as the mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, that came from operations that were audited in the last three years on worker health and safety issues, divided by the total mass of the textile fabric supply used in your final product, then multiply by 100. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
To be included in B5, the audits must be verifiable and address preventive measures, freely provided personal protective equipment, identification of worker health and safety hazards and effects on the exposed people, statistics and reasons behind injuries, design of work area, processes, installations, machinery/work equipment, operating processes and work organization, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Standards on Occupational Health and Safety.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Fairtrade International Certification: Fairtrade International provides several standards (e.g. for smallholders and workers), and a certification through FLOCERT. Fairtrade aims to improve the livelihoods of smallholders and workers amongst others via fair trade relationships. https://www.fairtrade.net/about/certification

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528345
United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Risk assessment: A systematic process to evaluate potential risks within an operation, system, or supply chain. It can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party or a country risk classification analysis that judges the site risk due to prevailing conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Kitchen Towels, Napkins, ClothsAir quality - ManufacturingCalculate B1 as the mass of products that were produced in final cut, sew, and dyeing facilities that tracked and reported annual air emissions, divided by the total mass of products produced by all final cut, sew, and dyeing facilities, then multiply by 100. Include all company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities that performed final cut, sew, and dyeing operations. If the final cut, sew, and dyeing steps are performed in different facilities, then each must report their air emissions in order to be included in your calculation. Facilities included in this calculation must track all air emissions required by locally applicable regulations, as well as those emissions for which there is scientific evidence of serious effects to human health or the environment. Air emissions may include, but are not limited to, nitrogen and sulphur oxides from boilers, hydrocarbons from drying ovens, carbon monoxide from sizing, aniline vapors, and ammonia from printing/dyeing, and VOCs and ozone from textile finishing, and may be emitted as dust, oil mists, acid vapors, odors, and boiler exhausts. Testing of emissions must occur according to a rigorous and internationally accepted testing methodology.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Information entered into the Higg Index Facility Environment Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Air Emissions - Level 1, Questions 1-3" may be used in responding to B1. The information reported to the FEM is at the facility level; if your products are produced in multiple facilities you may aggregate the data to represent the entirety of final product produced.
Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Air quality - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Air quality - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750750
N/AN/A
Kitchen Towels, Napkins, ClothsCellulosic material sourcing - Chemical useCanopyStyle’s Hot Button Ranking and Report is the primary viscose and cellulosic fiber sourcing analysis tool for the fashion sector. Calculate D1 as the mass of your cellulosic material that was supplied by producers or mills included in the CanopyStyle Hot Button Report and ranked in the yellow to green bottle range for the Chemical Use and Emissions column, divided by your total mass of cellulosic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Button up to Protect Forests — Producer Progress Criteria: The audit standard and process were developed by Canopy, in partnership with NEPCon, and is supported by the CanopyStyle Leaders for Forest Conservation and brands, retailers and designers looking to implement their sourcing policies for man-made cellulosic textiles. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/ranking-criteria-explained/

CanopyStyle Hot Button Report: The Hot Button Ranking of viscose producers is conducted using the consistent application of the tools and standards of the CanopyStyle initiative, including the CanopyStyle Audit. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/
N/AN/A
Kitchen Towels, Napkins, ClothsCellulosic material sourcing - DeforestationCanopyStyle’s Hot Button Ranking and Report is the primary viscose and cellulosic fiber sourcing analysis tool for the fashion sector. Calculate D1 as the mass of your cellulosic material that was supplied by producers or mills included in the Canopy Hot Button Report and ranked in the yellow to green shirt range for the Hot Button Assessment column, divided by your total mass of cellulosic material supply, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Button up to Protect Forests — Producer Progress Criteria: The audit standard and process were developed by Canopy, in partnership with NEPCon, and is supported by the CanopyStyle Leaders for Forest Conservation and brands, retailers and designers looking to implement their sourcing policies for man-made cellulosic textiles. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/ranking-criteria-explained/

CanopyStyle Hot Button Report: The Hot Button Ranking of viscose producers is conducted using the consistent application of the tools and standards of the CanopyStyle initiative, including the CanopyStyle Audit. https://hotbutton.canopyplanet.org/

ForestMapper: This interactive tool is the only one of its kind to visually represent ancient and endangered forests at a global scale. ForestMapper includes information on numerous ecological values divided into four categories: forests, species, carbon and landscapes. https://canopyplanet.org/tools/forestmapper/
N/AAncient and Endangered Forests: Intact forest landscape mosaics, naturally rare forest types, forest types that have been made rare due to human activity, and/or other forests that are ecologically critical for the protection of biological diversity. As a starting point to geographically locate ancient and endangered forests, maps of High Conservation Value Forests (HCVF), as defined by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), and of intact forest landscapes (IFL), can be used and paired with maps of other key ecological values like the habitat range of key endangered species and forests containing high concentrations of terrestrial carbon and High Carbon Stocks (HCS).
Kitchen Towels, Napkins, ClothsGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the mass purchased from fabric suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total mass purchased from all fabric suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Suppliers who have entered and communicated information required by the Higg Index Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Energy Use & GHG - Level 1" for their facilities may be used to answer this KPI.
If using Field to Market's Fieldprint Platform to determine greenhouse gas emissions associated with cotton production, include energy use for field operations and activities through the first point of sale. This may include on-farm drying and any transport of the crop prior to sale.
Energy Efficiency Assessment and Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Tool for the Textile Industry (EAGER Textile): This tool was developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to aid in evaluating the impacts of introducing energy efficiency measures into a textile facility. According to the China Energy Group, "the EAGER tool will calculate the typical energy savings (electricity, fuel, final, and primary energy), CO2 emissions reduction, cost, and simple payback period...[the tool] is designed to work for textile facilities that have one or more of the following processes: spinning, weaving/knitting, dyeing, printing, finishing, and man-made fiber production." https://china.lbl.gov/eager-textile

Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator: Harnessing the power of collaboration across the agricultural value chain and locally-led conservation solutions, Field to Market’s Continuous Improvement Accelerator provides a process-based standard for delivering sustainable outcomes for agriculture, people and the planet. The hallmark of the Accelerator’s approach lies in a process-based approach to advancing continuous improvement, which is grounded in a foundation that delivers solutions to global sustainable development priorities while also addressing local natural resource concerns. These projects utilize the power of voluntary, and often market-driven, solutions to incentivize improved environmental outcomes and enhance farmer livelihoods. By following a standardized and validated approach, these project pathways can leverage the collective action of the value chain to support resilient ecosystems and enhance farmer livelihoods. The Accelerator currently covers alfalfa, barley, corn, cotton, peanuts, potato, rice, sorghum, soy, sugar beet, and wheat produced in the U.S. and Canada. https://fieldtomarket.org/our-programs/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

THESIS Help Center Video: Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Supply Chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Supply Chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/465914322
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Kitchen Towels, Napkins, ClothsGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total mass produced of each product.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total mass of final product produced/revenue from final product produced/number of units produced. If the manufacturing facilities produce more than one category of product, only weight using the total mass of production specific to the product category in question.
Calculate B2 as the mass of final products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total mass of final products produced, then multiply by 100. For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
Information entered into the Higg Index Facility Environmental Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Energy Use & GHG - Level 1" may be used to answer this KPI.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

Energy Efficiency Assessment and Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Tool for the Textile Industry (EAGER Textile): This tool was developed by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to aid in evaluating the impacts of introducing energy efficiency measures into a textile facility. According to the China Energy Group, "the EAGER tool will calculate the typical energy savings (electricity, fuel, final, and primary energy), CO2 emissions reduction, cost, and simple payback period...[the tool] is designed to work for textile facilities that have one or more of the following processes: spinning, weaving/knitting, dyeing, printing, finishing, and man-made fiber production." https://china.lbl.gov/eager-textile

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardGreenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Kitchen Towels, Napkins, ClothsHazardous Chemical Discharge ManagementFor C, informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles.
For D, goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound. Public disclosure of goals and progress must have occurred within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Examples of tools and protocols for screening chemicals and assessing alternatives include green chemistry, alternatives analysis, restricted substances lists, and other tools that are listed in the Background Information.
To calculate E1, subtract the