KPI Guidance Tool

General Merchandise
Assessment NameKPI TitleCalculation & ScopeCertifications, Standards & ToolsBackground InformationDefinitions
TapeGreenhouse gas emissions - PetrochemicalsThis question addresses petrochemicals, including those used in plastic tape films and in synthetic resins, but excluding those used in sales packaging. Scope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the total spend on ingredient suppliers that reported emissions divided by total spend on all ingredient suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
TapeGreenhouse gas emissions - Pulp productsThis question addresses pulp-based materials, including those used to make jumbos and some tape films, but not those used for sales packaging. Scope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate C1 as the mass purchased from suppliers that reported emissions divided by total mass purchased from all suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
TapePackaging Raw Material SourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

ISO 18604: ISO 18604 (Packaging and the environment -- Material recycling) provides measurement standards for determining how recyclable a particular product is. https://www.iso.org/standard/55872.html

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Pre-consumer recycled material: “Material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Renewable material: “Material that is composed of biomass from a living source and that can be continually replenished. To be defined as renewable, virgin materials shall come from sources which are replenished at a rate equal to or greater than the rate of depletion.” (FTC Green Guides:2012)

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably-sourced material: Material for which it can be demonstrated through second- or third-party verification that the virgin raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities. Materials such as paper can be included in this definition if the source of the packaging content comes from sustainably-managed forests with no deforestation.
TapeProduct design - SustainabilityThis question does not address packaging materials. Product design strategies may include design for lightweighting, durability, recycled content, and compostability. N/AISO 14040: ISO 14040 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Principles and Framework" document for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/37456.html

ISO 14044: ISO 14044 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Requirements and Guidelines" standard for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/38498.html
Material and process efficiency: Material efficiency is the ratio between the material input and the benefits derived. Resource conservation (source reduction) of material inputs and/or improving the functionality of the packaging can positively impact material efficiency. Process efficiency is the ratio between the time spent on production steps to the output. Opportunities to improve material and process efficiency include process improvement, product redesign, and technology changes to packaging equipment. It should be noted that continual source reduction has benefits, but there are trade-offs that must be assessed.

Public disclosure: Manufacturer-based acts of making information available and readily accessible to the public through one or more forms of media (e.g., online, print, telephone). Print media includes product labels and also includes, but is not limited to, books, magazines, newspapers, and readily accessible journal articles. Online disclosure includes, but is not limited to, publicly accessible websites (desktop or mobile) as well as making information electronically available through reporting platforms or mobile apps.

Resource conservation: Practices that reduce the consumption and waste of energy and natural resources.
TapeSustainable Packaging Design and ProductionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

EPA Energy Benefits Calculator: Use the EPA Energy Benefits Calculator to help quantify environmental impact reductions for packaging design choices. https://www.epa.gov/lmop/landfill-gas-energy-benefits-calculator

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

Recycle Now: Recycle Now is the national recycling effort in England. The website contains examples of recycling labels that may be used on packaging and how to interpret them. http://www.recyclenow.com/recycle/packaging-symbols-explained

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: Material efficiency is the ratio between the material input and the benefits derived. Resource conservation (source reduction) of material inputs and/or improving the functionality of the packaging can positively impact material efficiency. Process efficiency is the ratio between the time spent on production steps to the output. Opportunities to improve material and process efficiency include process improvement, product redesign, and technology changes to packaging equipment. It should be noted that continual source reduction has benefits, but there are trade-offs that must be assessed.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
TapeWorker health and safety - Petrochemical supply chainTo be included in B1-B5, risk assessments, training programs, safety plans, performance monitoring systems, and audits must be verifiable and address health and safety issues such as worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. The assessments and audits must be conducted by second or third parties. The risk assessment must be conducted once per year while the audit must have been conducted at least once every three years, both using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles such as International Labour Organization Occupational Safety and Health Conventions (e.g., No. 155). The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions, which can inform your responses. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for examples of initiatives that meet these requirements.
Calculate B1 as the mass of your petrochemical supply that came from operations that have performed a risk assessment to identify high risk areas for health and safety, divided by the total mass of your petrochemical supply, then multiply by 100.
To determine if an operation is high risk for health and safety, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic review assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. It must be conducted at least once per year. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your petrochemical supply that came from operations that train workers on health and safety procedures, divided by the total mass of your petrochemical supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B2, the training on health and safety procedures must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and must be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for workers on health and safety procedures and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional worker training may be required to perform job duties. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your petrochemical supply that came from operations that implement a verifiable worker health and safety plan, divided by the total mass of your petrochemical supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B3, a worker health and safety plan must be verifiable and must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and be prominently displayed in the workplace where employees normally report. The plan should include best practices specific to ergonomics; repetitive motions; chemical and particulate exposure; appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE); and proper use of tools, machinery, and the handling of animals (if applicable). On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B4 as the mass of your petrochemical supply that came from operations that have a worker health and safety performance monitoring system in place, divided by the total mass of your petrochemical supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B4, a worker health and safety performance monitoring system should include metrics on issues including, but not limited to, incidence of worker injuries and prevalence of diseases. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B5 as the mass of your petrochemical supply that came from operations that were audited in the last three years on worker health and safety issues, divided by the total mass of your petrochemical supply, then multiply by 100. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
To be included in B5, the audits must be verifiable and address preventive measures, freely provided personal protective equipment, identification of worker health and safety hazards and effects on the exposed people, statistics and reasons behind injuries, design of work area, processes, installations, machinery/work equipment, operating processes and work organization, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Standards on Occupational Health and Safety.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Recommended Practices for Safety and Health Programs: Defines and enforces standards for the safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women. OHSA also provides training, outreach education, and assistance. The OSHA tools can be used for self-evaluations, to compare elements and actions of different health and safety standards, to track implemented actions, identify remaining weaknesses, and strategies for continued improvement. https://www.osha.gov/shpguidelines/explore-tools.html

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit: Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit is an auditing system that aligns with Ethical Trading Initiative's Base Code as well International Labour Organization Conventions. It has been developed to provide a public auditing methodology and format for companies to use to assess compliance. https://www.sedex.com/our-services/smeta-audit/
International Organization for Standardization - ISO 26000 Guidance on Social Responsibility: The ISO 26000 standard promotes common understanding in the field of social responsibility and addresses seven core subjects of social responsibility: human rights, labor practices, the environment, fair operating practices, consumer issues, and community involvement and development. Suppliers can demonstrate worker health and safety by developing programs and systems to monitor and control worker health and safety risks. Programs should include management oversight, removal or control of safety risks, safety training and equipment, recording and investigating safety incidents, access to water and toilet facilities, monitoring of risks to new and expectant mothers, and safe and clean dormitory spaces where applicable. https://www.iso.org/iso-26000-social-responsibility.html

Social Accountability International Guidance Document for Social Accountability 8000: According to Social Accountability International, "this guidance document provides various tools and information for users of the Social Accountability 8000 standard, including definitions, background information, and examples." https://sa-intl.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/SA8000-2014-Guidance-Document.pdf

United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9
Corrective actions: Prompt actions taken to eliminate the causes of a problem, thus preventing their recurrence.

First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
AntifreezeGreenhouse gas emissions - Glycol supplyScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate C1 as the mass purchased from ingredient suppliers that reported emissions divided by total mass purchased from all ingredient suppliers, then multiply by 100. Treat ethylene and propylene glycol supplies collectively and use their combined masses for the calculation.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
AntifreezePackaging Raw Material SourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

ISO 18604: ISO 18604 (Packaging and the environment -- Material recycling) provides measurement standards for determining how recyclable a particular product is. https://www.iso.org/standard/55872.html

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Pre-consumer recycled material: “Material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Renewable material: “Material that is composed of biomass from a living source and that can be continually replenished. To be defined as renewable, virgin materials shall come from sources which are replenished at a rate equal to or greater than the rate of depletion.” (FTC Green Guides:2012)

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably-sourced material: Material for which it can be demonstrated through second- or third-party verification that the virgin raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities. Materials such as paper can be included in this definition if the source of the packaging content comes from sustainably-managed forests with no deforestation.
AntifreezePriority chemicals - DisclosureFor this question, a priority chemical is one that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis.
Relevant criteria in the US EPA Safer Choice Program and Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals, listed below, may be used to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment.to health or the environment from multiple agents or stressors” (EPA, 2003).
Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Disclosure KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Disclosure KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750684

The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS): GHS provides specific human and environmental health criteria along with physical hazard criteria for chemicals in industry. These criteria are used for hazard communication and labeling of chemicals. https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/global.html
N/APriority chemical: A chemical that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis.
AntifreezePriority chemicals - ManagementFor this question, a priority chemical is one that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis.
Relevant criteria in the US EPA Safer Choice Program and Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals, listed below, may be used to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment.
For C, informed substitution implies that factors such as cost and performance, technical feasibility, life cycle impacts, economic and social accountability, and potential to result in lasting change have been taken into consideration to ensure that substitutes and the final product are safer based on their health and environmental profiles.
For D, goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound. Public disclosure of goals and progress must have occurred within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Examples of tools and protocols for screening chemicals and assessing alternatives include green chemistry, alternatives analysis, restricted substances lists, and other tools that are listed in the Background Information.
GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals: GreenScreen is a "Chemical Hazard Assessment" method that can be used to identify chemicals of high concern and determine safer alternatives. The tool was developed and is administered by Clean Production Action. A second tool, the GreenScreen List Translator, is a publicly available abbreviated version that screens and classifies chemicals based solely on their presence on authoritative hazard lists. https://www.greenscreenchemicals.org/

GreenSuite: GreenSuite is an environmental sustainability tool that can be customized to specific users' needs. Environmental issues throughout the supply chain are covered by this web based solution. http://greensuite360.com/index.html

Greenlist Process: According to their website, "In 2001, SC Johnson developed the Greenlist Process to classify ingredients in order to minimize the human and environmental impacts of their products." The process is now available for license to other companies and organizations. https://www.scjohnson.com/en/our-purpose/sustainability-report/explaining-the-sc-johnson-greenlist-program-an-excerpt-from-our-2017-sustainability-report

NSF/GCI/ANSI 355-2011 - Greener Chemicals and Processes Information: According to this website, "The purpose of the Information Standard is to provide the chemical enterprise with a voluntary and standardized way to define and report environmental and human health hazards associated with a chemical product and its gate-to-gate manufacturing process impacts." http://www.worldcat.org/title/nsfgciansi-355-2011-greener-chemicals-and-processes-information/oclc/772118815

Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Management KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Management KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528286

The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS): GHS provides specific human and environmental health criteria along with physical hazard criteria for chemicals in industry. These criteria are used for hazard communication and labeling of chemicals. https://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/global.html

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Exposure Assessment Tools and Models: According to their website, "The Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) has developed several exposure assessment methods, databases, and predictive models to help in evaluating what happens to chemicals when they are used and released to the environment and how workers, the general public, consumers and the aquatic ecosystems may be exposed to chemicals." https://www.epa.gov/ceam/tools-data-exposure-assessment

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Sustainable Futures: According to their website, "The goal of the Sustainable Futures Initiative (SF) is to make new chemicals safer, available faster, and at lower cost. It works by giving chemical developers the same risk-screening models that EPA uses to evaluate new chemicals before they enter the market."? https://www.epa.gov/sustainable-futures
BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

Lowell Center for Sustainable Production (LSCP): A Compendium of Methods and Tools for Chemical Hazard Assessment: This report was commissioned by The Sustainability Consortium in a joint effort with The Lowell Center for Sustainable Production. This compendium is not meant to be exhaustive, but rather to provide an overview of the methods and tools being used by governments, the for-profit private sector, and nonprofit organizations to more effectively screen and prioritize chemical hazards and identify safer alternatives. http://www.sustainableproduction.org/publ.alternatives.php

The Guide to Safer Chemicals: The Guide to Safer Chemicals provides guidance on how to design and implement a chemicals management program based on the Principles for Safer Chemicals. The Principles and Guide were developed by BizNGO, a collaboration of business and NGO leaders to create and adopt "safer chemicals and sustainable materials." https://www.bizngo.org/safer-chemicals/guide-to-safer-chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Existing Chemicals Program: According to their website, "EPA's existing chemical programs address pollution prevention, risk assessment, hazard and exposure assessment and characterization, and risk management for chemical substances in commercial use." The current chemicals management program is undergoing review and update, including how the agency identifies and prioritizes priority chemicals for review and assessment under TSCA. https://www.epa.gov/compliance/toxic-substances-control-act-tsca-compliance-monitoring#chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
Priority chemical: A chemical that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis.

Public disclosure: Manufacturer-based acts of making information available and readily accessible to the public through one or more forms of media (e.g., online, print, telephone). Print media includes product labels and also includes, but is not limited to, books, magazines, newspapers, and readily accessible journal articles. Online disclosure includes, but is not limited to, publicly accessible websites (desktop or mobile) as well as making information electronically available through reporting platforms or mobile apps.
AntifreezeRecycled content - GlycolCalculate the percentage on a either a percent volume-by-volume or a percent mass-by-mass basis.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
N/AN/AN/A
AntifreezeSustainable Packaging Design and ProductionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

EPA Energy Benefits Calculator: Use the EPA Energy Benefits Calculator to help quantify environmental impact reductions for packaging design choices. https://www.epa.gov/lmop/landfill-gas-energy-benefits-calculator

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

Recycle Now: Recycle Now is the national recycling effort in England. The website contains examples of recycling labels that may be used on packaging and how to interpret them. http://www.recyclenow.com/recycle/packaging-symbols-explained

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: Material efficiency is the ratio between the material input and the benefits derived. Resource conservation (source reduction) of material inputs and/or improving the functionality of the packaging can positively impact material efficiency. Process efficiency is the ratio between the time spent on production steps to the output. Opportunities to improve material and process efficiency include process improvement, product redesign, and technology changes to packaging equipment. It should be noted that continual source reduction has benefits, but there are trade-offs that must be assessed.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
AntifreezeWorker health and safety - Petrochemical supply chainTo be included in B1-B5, risk assessments, training programs, safety plans, performance monitoring systems, and audits must be verifiable and address health and safety issues such as worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. The assessments and audits must be conducted by second or third parties. The risk assessment must be conducted once per year while the audit must have been conducted at least once every three years, both using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles such as International Labour Organization Occupational Safety and Health Conventions (e.g., No. 155). The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions, which can inform your responses. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for examples of initiatives that meet these requirements.
Calculate B1 as the mass of your petrochemical supply that came from operations that have performed a risk assessment to identify high risk areas for health and safety, divided by the total mass of your petrochemical supply, then multiply by 100.
To determine if an operation is high risk for health and safety, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic review assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. It must be conducted at least once per year. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your petrochemical supply that came from operations that train workers on health and safety procedures, divided by the total mass of your petrochemical supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B2, the training on health and safety procedures must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and must be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for workers on health and safety procedures and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional worker training may be required to perform job duties. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your petrochemical supply that came from operations that implement a verifiable worker health and safety plan, divided by the total mass of your petrochemical supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B3, a worker health and safety plan must be verifiable and must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and be prominently displayed in the workplace where employees normally report. The plan should include best practices specific to ergonomics; repetitive motions; chemical and particulate exposure; appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE); and proper use of tools, machinery, and the handling of animals (if applicable). On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B4 as the mass of your petrochemical supply that came from operations that have a worker health and safety performance monitoring system in place, divided by the total mass of your petrochemical supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B4, a worker health and safety performance monitoring system should include metrics on issues including, but not limited to, incidence of worker injuries and prevalence of diseases. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B5 as the mass of your petrochemical supply that came from operations that were audited in the last three years on worker health and safety issues, divided by the total mass of your petrochemical supply, then multiply by 100. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
To be included in B5, the audits must be verifiable and address preventive measures, freely provided personal protective equipment, identification of worker health and safety hazards and effects on the exposed people, statistics and reasons behind injuries, design of work area, processes, installations, machinery/work equipment, operating processes and work organization, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Standards on Occupational Health and Safety.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Recommended Practices for Safety and Health Programs: Defines and enforces standards for the safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women. OHSA also provides training, outreach education, and assistance. The OSHA tools can be used for self-evaluations, to compare elements and actions of different health and safety standards, to track implemented actions, identify remaining weaknesses, and strategies for continued improvement. https://www.osha.gov/shpguidelines/explore-tools.html

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit: Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit is an auditing system that aligns with Ethical Trading Initiative's Base Code as well International Labour Organization Conventions. It has been developed to provide a public auditing methodology and format for companies to use to assess compliance. https://www.sedex.com/our-services/smeta-audit/
International Organization for Standardization - ISO 26000 Guidance on Social Responsibility: The ISO 26000 standard promotes common understanding in the field of social responsibility and addresses seven core subjects of social responsibility: human rights, labor practices, the environment, fair operating practices, consumer issues, and community involvement and development. Suppliers can demonstrate worker health and safety by developing programs and systems to monitor and control worker health and safety risks. Programs should include management oversight, removal or control of safety risks, safety training and equipment, recording and investigating safety incidents, access to water and toilet facilities, monitoring of risks to new and expectant mothers, and safe and clean dormitory spaces where applicable. https://www.iso.org/iso-26000-social-responsibility.html

Social Accountability International Guidance Document for Social Accountability 8000: According to Social Accountability International, "this guidance document provides various tools and information for users of the Social Accountability 8000 standard, including definitions, background information, and examples." https://sa-intl.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/SA8000-2014-Guidance-Document.pdf

United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9
Corrective actions: Prompt actions taken to eliminate the causes of a problem, thus preventing their recurrence.

First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
FuelsBenzene reduction - GasolineCalculate a volume-weighted percent by first multiplying the volume of each grade of gasoline supplied by its average percent by volume of benzene, then by summing these values and dividing their total by the total volume of gasoline supplied (across all grades).
’In the past year’ means perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the completion date of this question.
N/AASTM D6277: This standard protocol from ASTM International provides a test method for determining the concentration of benzene in spark-ignition engine fuels. http://www.astm.org/Standards/D6277.htmN/A
FuelsFugitive emissions control - Fuel storage facilities’In the past year’ means perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the completion date of this question.N/AN/AAutomatic overfill protection: Devices used on liquid storage tanks to prevent spills such as alarms, automatic shutoff devices, and ball float valves.
FuelsFugitive emissions control - Refueling stationsExclude from the calculation any fuel pumps that have been specifically exempted from implementation of stage II vapor recovery systems as part of a state implementation plan, for example.
’In the past year’ means perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the completion date of this question.
N/AVapor Recovery Certification: This website maintained by the California Air Resources Board lists approved Stage II vapor recovery systems in the state of California. https://ww2.arb.ca.gov/resources/documents/vapor-recovery-phase-ii-pre-evr-executive-ordersStage-II vapor recovery systems: Technologies that recapture fuel vapors generated during vehicle refueling.
FuelsGreenhouse gas emissions - Refined products supplyScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the total spend on ingredient suppliers that reported emissions divided by total spend on all ingredient suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
FuelsNoise abatement - Petroleum refineriesCalculate B1 as the spend on refined products produced by conforming suppliers divided by the total spend on refined products, then multiply by 100. Treat masses obtained from suppliers whose performance is unknown as non-conforming. Include in your calculation refined products sourced from both internal and external suppliers.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
An assessment can include an on-site audit by a second or third party.
N/AEuropean Commission's BAT Reference Document for Mineral Oil and Gas Refineries: This guidance document describes best practices for pollution control at mineral oil and gas refineries, as defined in 2003. https://ec.europa.eu/jrc/en/publication/eur-scientific-and-technical-research-reports/best-available-techniques-bat-reference-document-refining-mineral-oil-and-gas-industrial

International Finance Corporation: Environmental, Health, and Safety Guidelines for Petroleum Refining: This IFC guidance document outlines best practices for pollution reduction and worker safety at petroleum refineries. https://www.ifc.org/wps/wcm/connect/topics_ext_content/ifc_external_corporate_site/sustainability-at-ifc/publications/publications_policy_ehs-petroleumrefining
Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.
FuelsSulfur reduction - DieselCalculate a volume-weighted average concentration by first multiplying the volume of each grade of diesel supplied by its average parts-per-million concentration of sulfur, then by summing these values and dividing their total by the total volume of diesel supplied (across all grades).
’In the past year’ means perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the completion date of this question.
N/AASTM D7039: This is one example of a standard protocol by ASTM International for measuring the sulfur content of fuels, including gasoline and diesel. http://www.astm.org/Standards/D7039.htmN/A
FuelsSulfur reduction - GasolineCalculate a volume-weighted average concentration by first multiplying the volume of each grade of gasoline supplied by its average parts-per-million concentration of sulfur, then by summing these values and dividing their total by the total volume of gasoline supplied (across all grades).
’In the past year’ means perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the completion date of this question.
N/AASTM D7039: This is one example of a standard protocol by ASTM International for measuring the sulfur content of fuels, including gasoline and diesel. http://www.astm.org/Standards/D7039.htmN/A
FuelsWastewater management - Petroleum refineriesThis question only applies to direct discharges of treated or untreated effluent to surface waters. Refined ingredients may include combustible hydrocarbons and any refined additives, such as those used as anti-knock agents and detergents.
Calculate C1 as the mass of refined ingredients provided by compliant facilities divided by the total mass provided by all facilities, then multiply by 100. Include refined ingredients produced by external and internal suppliers. Treat facilities whose performance is unknown as non-compliant.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Compliance must be demonstrated through an on-site audit by a second or third party in accordance with an internationally recognized standard or by reporting publicly to an appropriate governmental authority. Compliance requires that undiluted effluent meets pollutant guideline values established in the International Finance Corporation's (IFC’s) Environmental, Health and Safety Guidelines for Petroleum Refining (2007, Table 2). Available data must demonstrate satisfaction of all criteria presented in the IFC guidelines, and at least 75% of the IFC criteria must be quantified by available data. Maximum concentrations of pollutants, as measured at the point of discharge, must not exceed the IFC guidelines on any single day. Monitoring programs should conform to an internationally recognized standard for the collection and analysis of samples.
International Finance Corporation: Environmental, Health, and Safety Guidelines for Petroleum Refining: This IFC guidance document outlines best practices for pollution reduction and worker safety at petroleum refineries. https://www.ifc.org/wps/wcm/connect/topics_ext_content/ifc_external_corporate_site/sustainability-at-ifc/publications/publications_policy_ehs-petroleumrefiningInternational Finance Corporation: Environmental, Health, and Safety Guidelines for Petroleum Refining: This IFC guidance document outlines best practices for pollution reduction and worker safety at petroleum refineries. https://www.ifc.org/wps/wcm/connect/topics_ext_content/ifc_external_corporate_site/sustainability-at-ifc/publications/publications_policy_ehs-petroleumrefiningSecond-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.
FuelsWorker health and safety - Refined products supplyTo be included in B1-B5, risk assessments, training programs, safety plans, performance monitoring systems, and audits must be verifiable and address health and safety issues such as worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. The assessments and audits must be conducted by second or third parties. The risk assessment must be conducted once per year while the audit must have been conducted at least once every three years, both using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles such as International Labour Organization Occupational Safety and Health Conventions (e.g., No. 155). The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions, which can inform your responses. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for examples of initiatives that meet these requirements.
Calculate B1 as the spend on your refined products supply that came from operations that have performed a risk assessment to identify high risk areas for health and safety, divided by the total spend on your refined materials supply, then multiply by 100.
To determine if an operation is high risk for health and safety, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic review assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. It must be conducted at least once per year. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B2 as the spend on your refined products supply that came from operations that train workers on health and safety procedures, divided by the total spend on your refined products supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B2, the training on health and safety procedures must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and must be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for workers on health and safety procedures and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional worker training may be required to perform job duties. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B3 as the spend on your refined products supply that came from operations that implement a verifiable worker health and safety plan, divided by the total spend on your refined products supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B3, a worker health and safety plan must be verifiable and must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and be prominently displayed in the workplace where employees normally report. The plan should include best practices specific to ergonomics; repetitive motions; chemical and particulate exposure; appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE); and proper use of tools, machinery, and the handling of animals (if applicable). On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B4 as the spend on your refined products supply that came from operations that have a worker health and safety performance monitoring system in place, divided by the total spend on your refined products supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B4, a worker health and safety performance monitoring system should include metrics on issues including, but not limited to, incidence of worker injuries and prevalence of diseases. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B5 as the spend on your refined products supply that came from operations that were audited in the last three years on worker health and safety issues, divided by the total spend on your refined products supply, then multiply by 100. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
To be included in B5, the audits must be verifiable and address preventive measures, freely provided personal protective equipment, identification of worker health and safety hazards and effects on the exposed people, statistics and reasons behind injuries, design of work area, processes, installations, machinery/work equipment, operating processes and work organization, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Standards on Occupational Health and Safety.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Recommended Practices for Safety and Health Programs: Defines and enforces standards for the safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women. OHSA also provides training, outreach education, and assistance. The OSHA tools can be used for self-evaluations, to compare elements and actions of different health and safety standards, to track implemented actions, identify remaining weaknesses, and strategies for continued improvement. https://www.osha.gov/shpguidelines/explore-tools.html

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit: Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit is an auditing system that aligns with Ethical Trading Initiative's Base Code as well International Labour Organization Conventions. It has been developed to provide a public auditing methodology and format for companies to use to assess compliance. https://www.sedex.com/our-services/smeta-audit/
International Organization for Standardization - ISO 26000 Guidance on Social Responsibility: The ISO 26000 standard promotes common understanding in the field of social responsibility and addresses seven core subjects of social responsibility: human rights, labor practices, the environment, fair operating practices, consumer issues, and community involvement and development. Suppliers can demonstrate worker health and safety by developing programs and systems to monitor and control worker health and safety risks. Programs should include management oversight, removal or control of safety risks, safety training and equipment, recording and investigating safety incidents, access to water and toilet facilities, monitoring of risks to new and expectant mothers, and safe and clean dormitory spaces where applicable. https://www.iso.org/iso-26000-social-responsibility.html

Social Accountability International Guidance Document for Social Accountability 8000: According to Social Accountability International, "this guidance document provides various tools and information for users of the Social Accountability 8000 standard, including definitions, background information, and examples." https://sa-intl.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/SA8000-2014-Guidance-Document.pdf

United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9
Corrective actions: Prompt actions taken to eliminate the causes of a problem, thus preventing their recurrence.

First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Risk assessment: A systematic process to evaluate potential risks within an operation, system, or supply chain. It can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party or a country risk classification analysis that judges the site risk due to prevailing conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Automotive LubricantsDesign for the environmentThis question does not address packaging materials. Product design strategies may include informed substitution of ingredients with less toxic alternatives and modifying current manufacturing processes to incorporate pollution prevention (P2) strategies. Examples of P2 practices include: modifying a production process to produce less waste; using non-toxic or less toxic chemicals as cleaners, degreasers and other maintenance chemicals; implementing water and energy conservation practices.N/ABizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol: The BizNGO Chemical Alternatives Assessment Protocol is a "decision framework for substituting chemicals of concern to human health or the environment with safer alternatives." https://www.bizngo.org/alternatives-assessment/chemical-alternatives-assessment-protocol

EU Ecolabel: This voluntary labelling scheme certifies products as having reduced environmental impact across their life cycle stages. http://ec.europa.eu/environment/ecolabel/

OECD Guidelines for the Testing of Chemicals: The OECD has compiled this list of internationally accepted methods for testing chemical safety, both for humans and the environment. https://www.oecd.org/chemicalsafety/testing/oecdguidelinesforthetestingofchemicals.htm

The Guide to Safer Chemicals: The Guide to Safer Chemicals provides guidance on how to design and implement a chemicals management program based on the Principles for Safer Chemicals. The Principles and Guide were developed by BizNGO, a collaboration of business and NGO leaders to create and adopt "safer chemicals and sustainable materials." https://www.bizngo.org/safer-chemicals/guide-to-safer-chemicals

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Pollution Prevention (P2) Resoruces : Pollution prevention (P2) is any practice that reduces, eliminates, or prevents pollution at its source, also known as "source reduction." The US EPA provides information and resources to businesses, communities, and consumers on best practices and implementation strategies to reduce pollution at its source. https://www.epa.gov/p2

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
Public disclosure: Manufacturer-based acts of making information available and readily accessible to the public through one or more forms of media (e.g., online, print, telephone). Print media includes product labels and also includes, but is not limited to, books, magazines, newspapers, and readily accessible journal articles. Online disclosure includes, but is not limited to, publicly accessible websites (desktop or mobile) as well as making information electronically available through reporting platforms or mobile apps.
Automotive LubricantsGreenhouse gas emissions - Refined products supplyScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the total spend on ingredient suppliers that reported emissions divided by total spend on all ingredient suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Automotive LubricantsLubricant recycling - Lubricant manufacturingCalculate B1 on a either a percent volume-by-volume or a percent mass-by-mass basis. ’In the past year’ means perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the completion date of this question.
N/AN/AN/A
Automotive LubricantsNoise abatement - Petroleum refineriesCalculate B1 as the spend on refined products produced by conforming suppliers divided by the total spend on refined products, then multiply by 100. Treat masses obtained from suppliers whose performance is unknown as non-conforming. Include in your calculation refined products sourced from both internal and external suppliers.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
An assessment can include an on-site audit by a second or third party.
N/AEuropean Commission's BAT Reference Document for Mineral Oil and Gas Refineries: This guidance document describes best practices for pollution control at mineral oil and gas refineries, as defined in 2003. https://ec.europa.eu/jrc/en/publication/eur-scientific-and-technical-research-reports/best-available-techniques-bat-reference-document-refining-mineral-oil-and-gas-industrial

International Finance Corporation: Environmental, Health, and Safety Guidelines for Petroleum Refining: This IFC guidance document outlines best practices for pollution reduction and worker safety at petroleum refineries. https://www.ifc.org/wps/wcm/connect/topics_ext_content/ifc_external_corporate_site/sustainability-at-ifc/publications/publications_policy_ehs-petroleumrefining
Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.
Automotive LubricantsPackaging Raw Material SourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

ISO 18604: ISO 18604 (Packaging and the environment -- Material recycling) provides measurement standards for determining how recyclable a particular product is. https://www.iso.org/standard/55872.html

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Pre-consumer recycled material: “Material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Renewable material: “Material that is composed of biomass from a living source and that can be continually replenished. To be defined as renewable, virgin materials shall come from sources which are replenished at a rate equal to or greater than the rate of depletion.” (FTC Green Guides:2012)

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably-sourced material: Material for which it can be demonstrated through second- or third-party verification that the virgin raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities. Materials such as paper can be included in this definition if the source of the packaging content comes from sustainably-managed forests with no deforestation.
Automotive LubricantsStorage tank management’In the past year’ means perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the completion date of this question.N/AEuropean Commission's BAT Reference Document for Mineral Oil and Gas Refineries: This guidance document describes best practices for pollution control at mineral oil and gas refineries, as defined in 2003. https://ec.europa.eu/jrc/en/publication/eur-scientific-and-technical-research-reports/best-available-techniques-bat-reference-document-refining-mineral-oil-and-gas-industrial

International Finance Corporation: Environmental, Health, and Safety Guidelines for Crude Oil and Petroleum Product Terminals: This IFC guidance document outlines best available technologies for pollution control and worker safety at petroleum terminal storage facilities. https://www.ifc.org/wps/wcm/connect/topics_ext_content/ifc_external_corporate_site/sustainability-at-ifc/policies-standards/ehs-guidelines
Automatic overfill protection: Devices used on liquid storage tanks to prevent spills such as alarms, automatic shutoff devices, and ball float valves.
Automotive LubricantsSustainable Packaging Design and ProductionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

EPA Energy Benefits Calculator: Use the EPA Energy Benefits Calculator to help quantify environmental impact reductions for packaging design choices. https://www.epa.gov/lmop/landfill-gas-energy-benefits-calculator

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

Recycle Now: Recycle Now is the national recycling effort in England. The website contains examples of recycling labels that may be used on packaging and how to interpret them. http://www.recyclenow.com/recycle/packaging-symbols-explained

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: Material efficiency is the ratio between the material input and the benefits derived. Resource conservation (source reduction) of material inputs and/or improving the functionality of the packaging can positively impact material efficiency. Process efficiency is the ratio between the time spent on production steps to the output. Opportunities to improve material and process efficiency include process improvement, product redesign, and technology changes to packaging equipment. It should be noted that continual source reduction has benefits, but there are trade-offs that must be assessed.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
Automotive LubricantsWastewater management - Petroleum refineriesThis question only applies to direct discharges of treated or untreated effluent to surface waters. Refined ingredients may include refined base oils and any refined additives, such as those used as viscosity modifiers and dispersants.
Calculate C1 as the total spend on refined ingredients provided by compliant facilities divided by the total spend on all facilities, then multiply by 100. Include refined ingredients produced by external and internal suppliers. Treat facilities whose performance is unknown as non-compliant.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Compliance must be demonstrated through an on-site audit by a second or third party in accordance with an internationally recognized standard or by reporting publicly to an appropriate governmental authority. Compliance requires that undiluted effluent meets pollutant guideline values established in the International Finance Corporation's (IFC’s) Environmental, Health and Safety Guidelines for Petroleum Refining (2016, Table 2). Available data must demonstrate satisfaction of all criteria presented in the IFC guidelines, and at least 75% of the IFC criteria must be quantified by available data. Maximum concentrations of pollutants, as measured at the point of discharge, must not exceed the IFC guidelines on any single day. Monitoring programs should conform to an internationally recognized standard for the collection and analysis of samples.
International Finance Corporation: Environmental, Health, and Safety Guidelines for Petroleum Refining: This IFC guidance document outlines best practices for pollution reduction and worker safety at petroleum refineries. https://www.ifc.org/wps/wcm/connect/topics_ext_content/ifc_external_corporate_site/sustainability-at-ifc/publications/publications_policy_ehs-petroleumrefiningInternational Finance Corporation: Environmental, Health, and Safety Guidelines for Petroleum Refining: This IFC guidance document outlines best practices for pollution reduction and worker safety at petroleum refineries. https://www.ifc.org/wps/wcm/connect/topics_ext_content/ifc_external_corporate_site/sustainability-at-ifc/publications/publications_policy_ehs-petroleumrefiningSecond-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.
Automotive LubricantsWorker health and safety - Refined products supplyTo be included in B1-B5, risk assessments, training programs, safety plans, performance monitoring systems, and audits must be verifiable and address health and safety issues such as worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. The assessments and audits must be conducted by second or third parties. The risk assessment must be conducted once per year while the audit must have been conducted at least once every three years, both using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles such as International Labour Organization Occupational Safety and Health Conventions (e.g., No. 155). The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions, which can inform your responses. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for examples of initiatives that meet these requirements.
Calculate B1 as the spend on your refined products supply that came from operations that have performed a risk assessment to identify high risk areas for health and safety, divided by the total spend on your refined materials supply, then multiply by 100.
To determine if an operation is high risk for health and safety, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic review assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. It must be conducted at least once per year. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B2 as the spend on your refined products supply that came from operations that train workers on health and safety procedures, divided by the total spend on your refined products supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B2, the training on health and safety procedures must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and must be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for workers on health and safety procedures and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional worker training may be required to perform job duties. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B3 as the spend on your refined products supply that came from operations that implement a verifiable worker health and safety plan, divided by the total spend on your refined products supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B3, a worker health and safety plan must be verifiable and must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and be prominently displayed in the workplace where employees normally report. The plan should include best practices specific to ergonomics; repetitive motions; chemical and particulate exposure; appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE); and proper use of tools, machinery, and the handling of animals (if applicable). On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B4 as the spend on your refined products supply that came from operations that have a worker health and safety performance monitoring system in place, divided by the total spend on your refined products supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B4, a worker health and safety performance monitoring system should include metrics on issues including, but not limited to, incidence of worker injuries and prevalence of diseases. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B5 as the spend on your refined products supply that came from operations that were audited in the last three years on worker health and safety issues, divided by the total spend on your refined products supply, then multiply by 100. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
To be included in B5, the audits must be verifiable and address preventive measures, freely provided personal protective equipment, identification of worker health and safety hazards and effects on the exposed people, statistics and reasons behind injuries, design of work area, processes, installations, machinery/work equipment, operating processes and work organization, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Standards on Occupational Health and Safety.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/
United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9Corrective actions: Prompt actions taken to eliminate the causes of a problem, thus preventing their recurrence.

First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Risk assessment: A systematic process to evaluate potential risks within an operation, system, or supply chain. It can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party or a country risk classification analysis that judges the site risk due to prevailing conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Automotive TiresCorporate policy - Natural rubber"Widely recognized principles" are those principles that underpin the Global Platform for Sustainable Natural Rubber. Global Platform for Sustainable Natural Rubber: The Global Platform for Sustainable Natural Rubber launched in March 2019. The purpose is to support the members of the WBCSD Tire Industry Project in improving the sustainability performance of their natural rubber supply. https://sustainablenaturalrubber.org/SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

Tire Industry Project: The Tire Industry Project exists under the aegis of the World Business Council for Sustainable Development to identify and address environmental and health impacts potentially associated with the production, use, and disposal of automotive tires. https://www.wbcsd.org/Sector-Projects/Tire-Industry-Project
N/A
Automotive TiresDeforestation and land conversion - Natural rubber sourcingCalculate D1 as the mass of your natural rubber supply that originated from farms determined to be low-risk of conversion for farm or non-forest use, can show zero deforestation, or have committed to zero conversion of HCV or HCS forest, divided by the total mass of your natural rubber supply, then multiply by 100.
For a farm to qualify for zero deforestation or commitments to HCV or HCS certification, a base year from which changes to those values can be calculated must be set that is in line with when commitments were made.
A growing operation can be considered low risk for conversion to non-forest use when one of the following is true: The farm is located in a jurisdiction that is assessed to be low risk by a risk classification analysis; the farm is located in a jurisdiction that is assessed to be high risk by a risk classification analysis but corrective actions are taken where needed; or, the site risk was determined to be low by an on-site audit.
Zero deforestation means that since January 1, 2010, no existing forest was converted to non-forest use for the production of natural rubber. Offsets or zero-net deforestation are not included in this definition. Land on which deforestation has occurred since 2010 may be considered to have “zero deforestation” if restored to its previous state as determined by tree cover, species composition, stored carbon, and all other relevant factors. The absence of deforestation must be confirmed using monitoring of the specific land tracts where the feed originated, such as remote sensing, audits, or other direct observations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
N/AGlobal Platform for Sustainable Natural Rubber: The Global Platform for Sustainable Natural Rubber launched in March 2019. The purpose is to support the members of the WBCSD Tire Industry Project in improving the sustainability performance of their natural rubber supply. https://sustainablenaturalrubber.org/

Greenpeace High Carbon Stock Approach: This website provides information about how to identify High Carbon Stock forests. https://www.greenpeace.org/archive-international/en/campaigns/forests/solutions/HCS-Approach/

High Carbon Stock Approach: This website provides a standardized methodology for identifying natural, high carbon stock forest areas. http://highcarbonstock.org

High Conservation Value Resource Network: This resource provides common guidance for how to identify, manage, and monitor High Conservation Value forest areas. https://hcvnetwork.org/

WWF High Conservation Value Forests: This website provides information describing the underlying concept of High Conservation Value forests. http://wwf.panda.org/?93560/High-Conservation-Value-Forests-The-concept-in-theory-and-practice
Corrective actions: Prompt actions taken to eliminate the causes of a problem, thus preventing their recurrence.

Deforestation: The direct human-induced conversion of forested land to non-forested land.

High Carbon Stock (HCS) forest: Forest areas with a significant amount of carbon stored within the vegetation and soil. Burning and clearing HCS forests releases stored carbon as greenhouse gas emissions. Different initiatives have set thresholds for identifying High Carbon Stock forests.

High Conservation Value (HCV) forest: Forested areas that support natural concentrations and distribution of species including significant species and ecosystems (e.g., endemic or endangered species, refuges), provide the basic services of nature in critical conditions (e.g., watershed protection, erosion control), and are fundamental to meeting the basic needs and traditional cultural identity of local communities.

Land conversion: The human-induced change of the prevailing physical and ecological conditions of an area of land to facilitate a new use or function. Examples include conversion of forests for pasture; conversion of native grasslands or other ecosystems for crop production, grazing, or other uses; conversion of farmland for urban development; and draining marshes or wetlands to create dry land.
Automotive TiresFugitive emissions control - Tire manufacturingImplementing fugitive gas emissions monitoring and reduction programs or plans for company-owed or contract facilities as part of an ISO 14001-compliant environmental management system would count toward this KPI. ISO 14001: This standard from the International Organization for Standardization governs the two-stage assessment of a company's environmental management systems. https://www.iso.org/standard/60857.htmlEuropean Commission's Reference Document on the General Principles of Monitoring: This guidance document describes best practices for the monitoring of industrial emissions at the source as prescribed by the EU's Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control program. https://ec.europa.eu/regional_policy/sources/docoffic/2014/working/wd_2014_en.pdf

Fugitive Guidance - Texas Commission on Environmental Quality: Prepared to help companies in Texas comply with state regulations regarding fugitive emissions, this guide also provides detailed information about how to assess and measure fugitive emissions and equipment and processes that can be used to decrease them. https://www.tceq.texas.gov/assets/public/permitting/air/Guidance/NewSourceReview/fugitive-guidance.pdf

ISO 14001: This standard from the International Organization for Standardization governs the two-stage assessment of a company's environmental management systems. https://www.iso.org/standard/60857.html

OECD Best Available Techniques (BAT) to Prevent and Control Industrial Pollution: This site describes the work the OECD has performed to define and identify best available techniques for pollution prevention and how best governments can support industry in implementing these techniques. https://www.oecd.org/chemicalsafety/risk-management/best-available-techniques.htm
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Fugitive emissions: Non-stack emissions released from a facility or operation and can include such constituents as volatile organic compounds and dust.

Public disclosure: Manufacturer-based acts of making information available and readily accessible to the public through one or more forms of media (e.g., online, print, telephone). Print media includes product labels and also includes, but is not limited to, books, magazines, newspapers, and readily accessible journal articles. Online disclosure includes, but is not limited to, publicly accessible websites (desktop or mobile) as well as making information electronically available through reporting platforms or mobile apps.
Automotive TiresGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the mass purchased from the suppliers of materials used in your final product that reported emissions divided by total mass purchased from all material suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Automotive TiresNatural rubber sourcingCalculate B1, B2, and B3 as the mass of your natural rubber supply for which you have identified the country, region, or site of origin, divided by the total mass of your natural rubber supply, then multiply by 100.
The percentages reported for B1, B2, and B3 must be mutually exclusive and their sum must equal 100%.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
A country is defined as a nation-state recognized by the United Nations. A region is defined as a sub-country area such as an agricultural zone or region, eco-region, or geo-political boundary (e.g., state, county, department). Due to the variance in how "region" may be defined, respondents are encouraged to use a consistent interpretation from year to year when reporting data for this question. A site is an area of land and its buildings that may be comprised of one or more locations that are managed together for the production of natural rubber products.
Procurement data, trade networks, or national or subnational product production data may help to identify the origin of your product supply.
Global Platform for Sustainable Natural Rubber: The Global Platform for Sustainable Natural Rubber launched in March 2019. The purpose is to support the members of the WBCSD Tire Industry Project in improving the sustainability performance of their natural rubber supply. https://sustainablenaturalrubber.org/Tire Industry Project: The Tire Industry Project exists under the aegis of the World Business Council for Sustainable Development to identify and address environmental and health impacts potentially associated with the production, use, and disposal of automotive tires. https://www.wbcsd.org/Sector-Projects/Tire-Industry-ProjectN/A
Automotive TiresProduct designProduct design strategies may include design for lightweighting, durability, reuse, recycled content, and recyclability.
Activities such as performing life cycle analyses to identify potential improvement opportunities, informed substitutions of materials that may be considered toxic to humans or the environment, reducing the amount of fossil fuel-sourced materials, or other design features aimed at reducing tire production, use, or disposal.
N/AISO 14040: ISO 14040 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Principles and Framework" document for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/37456.html

ISO 14044: ISO 14044 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Requirements and Guidelines" standard for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/38498.html

Tire Industry Project: The Tire Industry Project exists under the aegis of the World Business Council for Sustainable Development to identify and address environmental and health impacts potentially associated with the production, use, and disposal of automotive tires. https://www.wbcsd.org/Sector-Projects/Tire-Industry-Project

UL 10006: Product category rules (PCR) for Tires: Product Category Rules (PCR) for preparing an Environmental Product Declaration (EPD) for the Product Category: Tires was developed by the Tire Industry Project, an initiative of WBCSD. The PCR enables tire manufacturers to assess the environmetnal impact of their products and increase transparency in their supply chains. https://www.environdec.com/PCR/Detail/?Pcr=12057

UN Environment Design for Sustainability: Materials Efficiency: One example of a tool and protocol for material efficiency is included in the Design for Sustainability report published by UN Environment. https://wedocs.unep.org/handle/20.500.11822/7961
Alternative materials: Materials that are substitutes for conventional materials, however are not commonly used. These materials can be used to reduce environmental and social impacts.
Automotive TiresProduct design - Rolling ResistanceCalculate B1 as the number of tires shipped that were designed to increase fuel efficiency or decrease vehicle emissions divided by the total number of tires shipped, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the completion date of this question.
ISO 8124-1 - Methods of measuring rolling resistance: This standard from the International Organization for Standardization prescribes methods for measuring the rolling resistance of tires for cars, trucks, and buses. https://www.iso.org/standard/67531.htmlTire Industry Project: The Tire Industry Project exists under the aegis of the World Business Council for Sustainable Development to identify and address environmental and health impacts potentially associated with the production, use, and disposal of automotive tires. https://www.wbcsd.org/Sector-Projects/Tire-Industry-ProjectRolling resistance: The force opposing the motion of an object as it rolls across a surface.
Automotive TiresProduct stewardship programs - TiresCalculate C1 as the number of product units returned to you for recycling divided by the total number of product units sold, then multiply by 100. If this number exceeds 100, report it as 100.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Examples of stewardship programs include extender producer responsibility programs and product takeback programs. Such programs should ensure that materials are recycled or disposed of in an environmentally sensitive manner.
N/ARethink Tires: Rethink Tires is a website produced by the extended producer responsibility program for tires in the Canadian province of Ontario. It provides consumer education information about tire recycling and connects consumers to recyclers. http://rethinktires.ca/#sthash.YG8NCfX9.dpbsProduct stewardship: The set of activities by which those who participate in a product’s life cycle share responsibility for its total life cycle impacts.

Takeback program: A collection method whereby consumers return specific products or classes of products at the end of their useful lives for potential reuse and refurbishment, followed by material recovery and appropriate disposal.
Automotive TiresRetreading programs - TiresPerform these calculations based on units retreaded in company-owned or formal partner facilities employing US EPA SmartWays Verified Technology divided by total number of tires retreaded. For tires retreaded outside the United States, programs that meet or exceed the criteria for a Verified Technology count toward this KPI.
Perform this calculation for a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.

US Environmental Protection Agency SmartWay Verified Technology: As part of the SmartWay program, the US EPA verifies organizations that provide low rolling resistance (LRR) new and retread tire technoloigeas that save fuel or reduce emissions. This service is currently available for commercial trucks and buses, but may be expanded to include passenger vehicles in the future. https://www.epa.gov/smartwayTCS Business Management Software: A software management program coupled to a barcode tracking system that is designed to facilitate tire retreading operations. These software solutions are for the retailer, wholesaler, and retreader. https://tcstire.com/

Tire Retread and Repair Information Bureau: This industry-run website provides information about tire retreading and repair programs. https://www.retread.org/
Retreading service: A process by which used automotive tires, typically truck tires, are returned to a service provider who refurbishes the tire for extended use.
Automotive TiresSmallholder farmersCalculate C1 as the mass of your natural rubber supply that came from traders or cooperatives that support programs to increase smallholder farmer opportunities, divided by the total mass of your natural rubber supply that came from smallholder farmers, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
A program to increase smallholder farmer opportunities includes a documented strategy to identify, engage with, and provide support to smallholder farmers in the supply chain. This program can be developed internally or through external partnerships.
Global Platform for Sustainable Natural Rubber: The Global Platform for Sustainable Natural Rubber launched in March 2019. The purpose is to support the members of the WBCSD Tire Industry Project in improving the sustainability performance of their natural rubber supply. https://sustainablenaturalrubber.org/Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit: Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit is an auditing system that aligns with Ethical Trading Initiative's Base Code as well International Labour Organization Conventions. It has been developed to provide a public auditing methodology and format for companies to use to assess compliance. https://www.sedex.com/our-services/smeta-audit/

Tire Industry Project: The Tire Industry Project exists under the aegis of the World Business Council for Sustainable Development to identify and address environmental and health impacts potentially associated with the production, use, and disposal of automotive tires. https://www.wbcsd.org/Sector-Projects/Tire-Industry-Project

United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9
N/A
Automotive TiresSustainable material sourcing - Tire componentsCalculate C1 as the mass of recycled material content divided by the total mass of materials used across all product units manufactured in this product category, then multiply the result by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable material content divided by the total mass of materials used across all product units manufactured in this product category, then multiply the result by 100.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
For tires, examples of renewable materials are guayule and Russian dandelions. Recycled material examples are recycled rubber materials or carbon black generated from used tires (post-consumer recycled content). Materials recovered from waste streams during manufacturing that are re-introduced to the manufacturing process count as well (pre-consumer recycled content).

N/ARethink Tires: Rethink Tires is a website produced by the extended producer responsibility program for tires in the Canadian province of Ontario. It provides consumer education information about tire recycling and connects consumers to recyclers. http://rethinktires.ca/#sthash.YG8NCfX9.dpbs

Tire Industry Project: The Tire Industry Project exists under the aegis of the World Business Council for Sustainable Development to identify and address environmental and health impacts potentially associated with the production, use, and disposal of automotive tires. https://www.wbcsd.org/Sector-Projects/Tire-Industry-Project
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Pre-consumer recycled material: “Material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Renewable material: “Material that is composed of biomass from a living source and that can be continually replenished. To be defined as renewable, virgin materials shall come from sources which are replenished at a rate equal to or greater than the rate of depletion.” (FTC Green Guides:2012)
Automotive TiresWorker health and safety - Synthetic rubber supplyAn assessment can include on-site audits conducted by second or third parties or an on-site systematic risk assessment against a standard to determine risk based on conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors, and must have been conducted at least once every two years using a standard based on internationally recognized principles. The assessments, audits, and standard must be verifiable and must address worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements, and must align with applicable International Labour Organization Occupational Safety and Health Conventions (e.g., No. 155).
Facilities audited under ISO 45001 or OHSAS 18001 programs that include worker injury and exposure, or participation in the OSHA Voluntary Protection Program would meet the requirements for this KPI.
Calculate C1 as the mass of synthetic rubber used in your final product that came from facilities that are low risk with or without corrective actions divided by the total mass of synthetic rubber used in your final product, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
OSHA Volunatry Protection Program: The Occupational Safety and Health Administration's Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) recognizes private industry workers and employees that implement best-in-class health and safety programs. https://www.osha.gov/vpp/ISO 45001 - Occupational Health and Safety Management Systems: ISO 45001 helps organizations reduce their occupational health and safety burden by providing a framework to improve employee safety, reduce workplace risks, and create better, safer working conditions. The standard can be used in industries of any size, anywhere in the world. https://www.iso.org/standard/63787.html

OHSAS 18001 Occupational Health and Safety Zone: OHSAS 18001 is an internationally applied British standard that addresses occupational health and safety. OHSAS 18001 applies to all types and sizes of organizations and accommodates diverse geographical, cultural, and social conditions. OHSAS aligns with ISO 9001 and ISO 45001 management systems. http://www.ohsas-18001-occupational-health-and-safety.com/

Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit: Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit is an auditing system that aligns with Ethical Trading Initiative's Base Code as well International Labour Organization Conventions. It has been developed to provide a public auditing methodology and format for companies to use to assess compliance. https://www.sedex.com/our-services/smeta-audit/

United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9
Corrective actions: Prompt actions taken to eliminate the causes of a problem, thus preventing their recurrence.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
BicyclesGreenhouse gas emissions - Metal framesScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate C1 as the total spend on metal frame suppliers that reported emissions divided by total spend on all metal frame suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
BicyclesProduct DesignThis question does not address packaging materials. Product design strategies may include design for lightweighting, durability, disassembly, reuse, recycled content, and recyclability. N/AISO 14040: ISO 14040 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Principles and Framework" document for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/37456.html

ISO 14044: ISO 14044 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Requirements and Guidelines" standard for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/38498.html

UN Environment Design for Sustainability: Materials Efficiency: One example of a tool and protocol for material efficiency is included in the Design for Sustainability report published by UN Environment. https://wedocs.unep.org/handle/20.500.11822/7961
End-of-life: A product life cycle phase that begins at the end of a product’s useful life, including reuse and refurbishment cycles.

Material and process efficiency: Material efficiency is the ratio between the material input and the benefits derived. Resource conservation (source reduction) of material inputs and/or improving the functionality of the packaging can positively impact material efficiency. Process efficiency is the ratio between the time spent on production steps to the output. Opportunities to improve material and process efficiency include process improvement, product redesign, and technology changes to packaging equipment. It should be noted that continual source reduction has benefits, but there are trade-offs that must be assessed.

Public disclosure: Manufacturer-based acts of making information available and readily accessible to the public through one or more forms of media (e.g., online, print, telephone). Print media includes product labels and also includes, but is not limited to, books, magazines, newspapers, and readily accessible journal articles. Online disclosure includes, but is not limited to, publicly accessible websites (desktop or mobile) as well as making information electronically available through reporting platforms or mobile apps.

Resource conservation: Practices that reduce the consumption and waste of energy and natural resources.
BicyclesRecycled content - MetalDo not include packaging in this calculation.
Calculate B1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled metal divided by the total mass of metal used across all product units manufactured in this product category, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
N/AN/AN/A
BicyclesResponsible supply chains - Metals’In the past year’ means perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the completion date of this question.
An assessment should include an on-site audit of environmental and social sustainability performance by a second or third party, or a systematic risk assessment against a standard or set of principles to determine risk based on conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors. Examples of standards or sets of principles include those developed by the International Council on Mining & Metals (ICMM) and the Initiative for Responsible Mining Assurance (IRMA).
N/AInitiative for Responsible Mining Assurance: This website outlines a multi-stakeholder initiative building a sustainability certification system for mining operations.  Participation is open to manufacturers. https://responsiblemining.net/

International Council on Mining & Metals: The International Council on Mining & Metals (ICMM) requires organizations to commit to 10 principles related to sustainble and ethical business practices. http://www.icmm.com/jn/about-us/member-commitments/icmm-10-principles
Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Verifiable: Having the ability to demonstrate, through a reputable assessor, the truth or accuracy of a claim.
BicyclesWorker health and safety - Metal supplyTo be included in B1-B5, risk assessments, training programs, safety plans, performance monitoring systems, and audits must be verifiable and address health and safety issues such as worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. The assessments and audits must be conducted by second or third parties. The risk assessment must be conducted once per year while the audit must have been conducted at least once every three years, both using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles such as International Labour Organization Occupational Safety and Health Conventions (e.g., No. 155). The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions, which can inform your responses. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for examples of initiatives that meet these requirements.
Calculate B1 as the mass of your metals supply that came from operations that have performed a risk assessment to identify high risk areas for health and safety, divided by the total mass of your metals supply, then multiply by 100.
To determine if an operation is high risk for health and safety, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic review assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. It must be conducted at least once per year. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your metals supply that came from operations that train workers on health and safety procedures, divided by the total mass of your metals supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B2, the training on health and safety procedures must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and must be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for workers on health and safety procedures and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional worker training may be required to perform job duties. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your metals supply that came from operations that implement a verifiable worker health and safety plan, divided by the total mass of your metals supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B3, a worker health and safety plan must be verifiable and must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and be prominently displayed in the workplace where employees normally report. The plan should include best practices specific to ergonomics; repetitive motions; chemical and particulate exposure; appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE); and proper use of tools, machinery, and the handling of animals (if applicable). On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B4 as the mass of your metals supply that came from operations that have a worker health and safety performance monitoring system in place, divided by the total mass of your metals supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B4, a worker health and safety performance monitoring system should include metrics on issues including, but not limited to, incidence of worker injuries and prevalence of diseases. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B5 as the mass of your metals supply that came from operations that were audited in the last three years on worker health and safety issues, divided by the total mass of your metals supply, then multiply by 100. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
To be included in B5, the audits must be verifiable and address preventive measures, freely provided personal protective equipment, identification of worker health and safety hazards and effects on the exposed people, statistics and reasons behind injuries, design of work area, processes, installations, machinery/work equipment, operating processes and work organization, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Standards on Occupational Health and Safety.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Recommended Practices for Safety and Health Programs: Defines and enforces standards for the safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women. OHSA also provides training, outreach education, and assistance. The OSHA tools can be used for self-evaluations, to compare elements and actions of different health and safety standards, to track implemented actions, identify remaining weaknesses, and strategies for continued improvement. https://www.osha.gov/shpguidelines/explore-tools.html

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit: Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit is an auditing system that aligns with Ethical Trading Initiative's Base Code as well International Labour Organization Conventions. It has been developed to provide a public auditing methodology and format for companies to use to assess compliance. https://www.sedex.com/our-services/smeta-audit/
International Organization for Standardization - ISO 26000 Guidance on Social Responsibility: The ISO 26000 standard promotes common understanding in the field of social responsibility and addresses seven core subjects of social responsibility: human rights, labor practices, the environment, fair operating practices, consumer issues, and community involvement and development. Suppliers can demonstrate worker health and safety by developing programs and systems to monitor and control worker health and safety risks. Programs should include management oversight, removal or control of safety risks, safety training and equipment, recording and investigating safety incidents, access to water and toilet facilities, monitoring of risks to new and expectant mothers, and safe and clean dormitory spaces where applicable. https://www.iso.org/iso-26000-social-responsibility.html

Social Accountability International Guidance Document for Social Accountability 8000: According to Social Accountability International, "this guidance document provides various tools and information for users of the Social Accountability 8000 standard, including definitions, background information, and examples." https://sa-intl.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/SA8000-2014-Guidance-Document.pdf

United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9
Corrective actions: Prompt actions taken to eliminate the causes of a problem, thus preventing their recurrence.

First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
BicyclesWorker health and safety - Synthetic rubber supplyTo be included in B1-B5, risk assessments, training programs, safety plans, performance monitoring systems, and audits must be verifiable and address health and safety issues such as worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. The assessments and audits must be conducted by second or third parties. The risk assessment must be conducted once per year while the audit must have been conducted at least once every three years, both using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles such as International Labour Organization Occupational Safety and Health Conventions (e.g., No. 155). The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions, which can inform your responses. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for examples of initiatives that meet these requirements.
Calculate B1 as the mass of your synthetic rubber supply that came from operations that have performed a risk assessment to identify high risk areas for health and safety, divided by the total mass of your synthetic rubber supply, then multiply by 100.
To determine if an operation is high risk for health and safety, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic review assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. It must be conducted at least once per year. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your synthetic rubber supply that came from operations that train workers on health and safety procedures, divided by the total mass of your synthetic rubber supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B2, the training on health and safety procedures must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and must be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for workers on health and safety procedures and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional worker training may be required to perform job duties. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your synthetic rubber supply that came from operations that implement a verifiable worker health and safety plan, divided by the total mass of your synthetic rubber supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B3, a worker health and safety plan must be verifiable and must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and be prominently displayed in the workplace where employees normally report. The plan should include best practices specific to ergonomics; repetitive motions; chemical and particulate exposure; appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE); and proper use of tools, machinery, and the handling of animals (if applicable). On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B4 as the mass of your synthetic rubber supply that came from operations that have a worker health and safety performance monitoring system in place, divided by the total mass of your synthetic rubber supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B4, a worker health and safety performance monitoring system should include metrics on issues including, but not limited to, incidence of worker injuries and prevalence of diseases. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B5 as the mass of your synthetic rubber supply that came from operations that were audited in the last three years on worker health and safety issues, divided by the total mass of your synthetic rubber supply, then multiply by 100. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
To be included in B5, the audits must be verifiable and address preventive measures, freely provided personal protective equipment, identification of worker health and safety hazards and effects on the exposed people, statistics and reasons behind injuries, design of work area, processes, installations, machinery/work equipment, operating processes and work organization, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Standards on Occupational Health and Safety.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Recommended Practices for Safety and Health Programs: Defines and enforces standards for the safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women. OHSA also provides training, outreach education, and assistance. The OSHA tools can be used for self-evaluations, to compare elements and actions of different health and safety standards, to track implemented actions, identify remaining weaknesses, and strategies for continued improvement. https://www.osha.gov/shpguidelines/explore-tools.html

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit: Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit is an auditing system that aligns with Ethical Trading Initiative's Base Code as well International Labour Organization Conventions. It has been developed to provide a public auditing methodology and format for companies to use to assess compliance. https://www.sedex.com/our-services/smeta-audit/
International Organization for Standardization - ISO 26000 Guidance on Social Responsibility: The ISO 26000 standard promotes common understanding in the field of social responsibility and addresses seven core subjects of social responsibility: human rights, labor practices, the environment, fair operating practices, consumer issues, and community involvement and development. Suppliers can demonstrate worker health and safety by developing programs and systems to monitor and control worker health and safety risks. Programs should include management oversight, removal or control of safety risks, safety training and equipment, recording and investigating safety incidents, access to water and toilet facilities, monitoring of risks to new and expectant mothers, and safe and clean dormitory spaces where applicable. https://www.iso.org/iso-26000-social-responsibility.html

Social Accountability International Guidance Document for Social Accountability 8000: According to Social Accountability International, "this guidance document provides various tools and information for users of the Social Accountability 8000 standard, including definitions, background information, and examples." https://sa-intl.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/SA8000-2014-Guidance-Document.pdf

United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9
Corrective actions: Prompt actions taken to eliminate the causes of a problem, thus preventing their recurrence.

First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Blank CDs and DVDsConflict mineralsCalculate D1 as the total number of validated smelters, divided by the total number of smelters, then multiply by 100. Include all smelters identified as supplying some portion of the tin, tungsten, tantalum, or gold in your products.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
To be considered conflict-free, smelters must have a valid certification established or confirmed in the previous 12-month period as defined above.
Smelters may be validated through any internationally recognized body, such as the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI), Responsible Jewellery Council, ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group, or the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA).
ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group: The International Tin Association (ITA) has convened the Responsible Tin Supply Group (RTS) to enable organizations to source cassiterite (ore from which tin is derived) from responsible supply chain actors in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and surrounding countries while meeting due diligence guidance developed by the UN and OECD and required by national laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act. https://www.internationaltin.org/rts-group/

OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas: Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) has developed due diligence guidelines for organizations to implement when sourcing minerals from conflict regions, including but not limited to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. These guidelines have become normative in the industry and can be used to demonstrate due diligence under national and regional laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act in the U.S. and the European Commission draft proposal for supply chain due diligence for conflict minerals. http://www.oecd.org/daf/inv/mne/mining.htm

Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC) chain-of-custody certification: The Responsible Jewellery Council is a standard-setting and certification organization that has developed an ISEAL-accredited chain-of-custody certification program for use by the jewellery industry and manufacturers, which applies to gold and platinum group metals. https://www.responsiblejewellery.com/rjc-certification/

Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI): Formerly known as the Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative, the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI) is a joint effort between the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) and GeSI to establish supply chain transparency tools, resources and training to assist organizations in responsibly sourcing conflict-free minerals from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. Of note is their Responsible Minerals Assurance Process, which enables auditing and assessment of smelters for responsible ore sourcing and provides a centralized database for tracking smelter performance. http://www.responsiblemineralsinitiative.org/

THESIS Help Center Video: Conflict minerals KPI: Short video tutorial on the Conflict minerals KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017273

The London Bullion Market Association Good Delivery Lists: According to their website, the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA) produces "Good Delivery Lists for gold and silver bars; detailing the names of accredited refiners, their listing date and the marking details of their bars." http://www.lbma.org.uk/the-good-delivery-list

World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard: As part of their activities to support socially-responsible gold mining, the World Gold Council has developed the World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard to provide guidance to companies on responsible mining practices. https://www.gold.org/about-gold/gold-supply/responsible-gold/conflict-free-gold-standard
Better Sourcing Program: The Better Sourcing Program (BSP) provides a technology-based communications solution to allow global organizations to source artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) ores through upstream due diligence, auditing and risk management. https://www.rcsglobal.com/bettersourcing/

Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade: According to the website, "The Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade (PPA) is a joint initiative among governments, companies, and civil society to support supply chain solutions to conflict minerals challenges in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and the Great Lakes Region (GLR) of Central Africa." http://www.resolv.org/site-ppa/
Conflict minerals: Conflict minerals are defined per "Section 1502(e)(4) of the [Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform] Act as (A) columbite-tantalite, also known as coltan (the metal ore from which tantalum is extracted); cassiterite (the metal ore from which tin is extracted); gold; wolframite (the metal ore from which tungsten is extracted); or their derivatives; or (B) any other mineral or its derivatives determined by the Secretary of State to be financing conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo or an adjoining country." (US Securities and Exchange Commission, 17 CFR Parts 240 and 249b, RIN: 3235-AK84, Conflict Minerals Final Rule)
Blank CDs and DVDsGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the revenue from each product.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the revenue from final products produced. If the manufacturing facilities produce more than one category of product, only weight using revenue data specific to the product category in question.
Calculate B2 as the revenue from final products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total revenue from final products, then multiply by 100. For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardGreenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Blank CDs and DVDsPackaging Raw Material SourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Pre-consumer recycled material: “Material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Renewable material: “Material that is composed of biomass from a living source and that can be continually replenished. To be defined as renewable, virgin materials shall come from sources which are replenished at a rate equal to or greater than the rate of depletion.” (FTC Green Guides:2012)

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably-sourced material: Material for which it can be demonstrated through second- or third-party verification that the virgin raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities. Materials such as paper can be included in this definition if the source of the packaging content comes from sustainably-managed forests with no deforestation.
Blank CDs and DVDsSustainable Packaging Design and ProductionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

EPA Energy Benefits Calculator: Use the EPA Energy Benefits Calculator to help quantify environmental impact reductions for packaging design choices. https://www.epa.gov/lmop/landfill-gas-energy-benefits-calculator

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

Recycle Now: Recycle Now is the national recycling effort in England. The website contains examples of recycling labels that may be used on packaging and how to interpret them. http://www.recyclenow.com/recycle/packaging-symbols-explained

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: Material efficiency is the ratio between the material input and the benefits derived. Resource conservation (source reduction) of material inputs and/or improving the functionality of the packaging can positively impact material efficiency. Process efficiency is the ratio between the time spent on production steps to the output. Opportunities to improve material and process efficiency include process improvement, product redesign, and technology changes to packaging equipment. It should be noted that continual source reduction has benefits, but there are trade-offs that must be assessed.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
Blank CDs and DVDsTransportation to RetailersInclude shipments of your product from final manufacturing facilities to downstream retailers or distributors. Include both company-owned and contracted fleet. Exclude data for return trips. If retailers are responsible for the transportation of some or all of your final product, the retailer may hold the information necessary to calculate your response. It may be made available in a public report or by request.
Calculate B1 as the volume of product transported by carriers that reported emissions, divided by total volume of product transported, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If a supplier completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, you may count that as compliance with this question. Examples of other compliant standards are provided in the Certifications, Standards, & Tools section below.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

THESIS Help Center Video: Transportation to Retailers KPI: Short video tutorial on the Transportation to Retailers KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/529545735

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Transportation and Air Quality: SmartWay: This program provides information about how to improve fuel efficiency in trucking. Carriers can use the SmartWays carbon emission calculator to track and publicly report emissions associated with their trucking operations. https://www.epa.gov/smartway
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsN/A
Blank CDs and DVDsVolatile organic compounds (VOCs) - PrintingExamples of alternatives to traditional solvents and ink chemistries are isopropyl alcohol (IPA) reducers, vegetable- and citrus-based blanket, roller, and general washes, vegetable oil-based offset inks, and water-based flexo and gravure inks.N/AN/AVolatile organic compounds: Volatile organic compounds are defined as those which participate in atmospheric photochemical reactions. Specific exclusions, including carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides or carbonates, ammonium carbonate, and others, are provided by federal and state regulations United States 40 CFR 51.100, United States 40 CFR 59.203, and Title 17 of the California Code of Regulations, Division 3, Chapter 1, Subchapter 8.5, Article 2, Consumer Products, Sections 94507-94517.
Blank CDs and DVDsWorker health and safety - ManufacturingThis question aligns with the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Injury and Illness rate. This rate can be normalized for global applicability.
Calculate B1 according to OSHA's injury and illness rate by multiplying the number of recordable injuries and illnesses by 200,000. Divide this number by the total employee hours worked to produce your final product. If multiple facilities manufacture the final product, the injury and illness rate will need to be adjusted using a weighted average based on each facility's percentage of total production. Include all employees at a facility that participate in the production of the final product. This includes both full-time and contracted employees.
Calculate B2 as the revenue from your final product for which you were able to obtain data divided by the total revenue from your final product, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS General Guidance document provides guidance to calculate the weighted average. See Background Information for access to this document.
The Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool is an online calculator that will compute your injury and illness rate. The OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses provides forms and information for computing your facility injury and illness rate.
Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool: This tool calculates the injury and illness incidence rate for employers. https://data.bls.gov/iirc/

OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses: This webpage contains information on how to record workplace injuries and illnesses and provides the worksheets needed to correctly do so. https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/forms

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520108472
How to Compute a Firm's Incidence Rate for Safety Management: This website from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics provides in-depth guidance on computing injury and illness numbers. https://www.bls.gov/iif/osheval.htm

Phosgene - Chemical Weapons Convention: Phosgene is listed as an Annex Three chemical in the Chemical Weapons Convention, implemented by the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), due to its high human toxicity. However, annual reporting of aggregate production volumes required under the convention creates a highly regulated space for this chemical internationally, bringing focus on its production and use. https://www.opcw.org/chemical-weapons-convention

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

TSC General Guidance for Key Performance Indicators: The General Guidance Document for Key Performance Indicators (KPI) provides essential guidance to complement the specific guidance provided for each KPI. TSC recommends reading this document before you begin your first questionnaire and revisiting it as often as necessary for clarification and additional information. https://www.sustainabilityconsortium.org/tsc-downloads/general-guidance-document/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Blank CDs and DVDsWorker health and safety - Polycarbonate supply chainTo be included in B1-B5, risk assessments, training programs, safety plans, performance monitoring systems, and audits must be verifiable and address health and safety issues such as worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. The assessments and audits must be conducted by second or third parties. The risk assessment must be conducted once per year while the audit must have been conducted at least once every three years, both using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles such as International Labour Organization Occupational Safety and Health Conventions (e.g., No. 155). The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions, which can inform your responses. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for examples of initiatives that meet these requirements.
Calculate B1 as the mass of your polycarbonate supply that came from operations that have performed a risk assessment to identify high risk areas for health and safety, divided by the total mass of your polycarbonate supply, then multiply by 100.
To determine if an operation is high risk for health and safety, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic review assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. It must be conducted at least once per year. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your polycarbonate supply that came from operations that train workers on health and safety procedures, divided by the total mass of your polycarbonate supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B2, the training on health and safety procedures must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and must be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for workers on health and safety procedures and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional worker training may be required to perform job duties. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your polycarbonate supply that came from operations that implement a verifiable worker health and safety plan, divided by the total mass of your polycarbonate supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B3, a worker health and safety plan must be verifiable and must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and be prominently displayed in the workplace where employees normally report. The plan should include best practices specific to ergonomics; repetitive motions; chemical and particulate exposure; appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE); and proper use of tools, machinery, and the handling of animals (if applicable). On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B4 as the mass of your polycarbonate supply that came from operations that have a worker health and safety performance monitoring system in place, divided by the total mass of your polycarbonate supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B4, a worker health and safety performance monitoring system should include metrics on issues including, but not limited to, incidence of worker injuries and prevalence of diseases. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B5 as the mass of your polycarbonate supply that came from operations that were audited in the last three years on worker health and safety issues, divided by the total mass of your polycarbonate supply, then multiply by 100. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
To be included in B5, the audits must be verifiable and address preventive measures, freely provided personal protective equipment, identification of worker health and safety hazards and effects on the exposed people, statistics and reasons behind injuries, design of work area, processes, installations, machinery/work equipment, operating processes and work organization, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Standards on Occupational Health and Safety.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Recommended Practices for Safety and Health Programs: Defines and enforces standards for the safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women. OHSA also provides training, outreach education, and assistance. The OSHA tools can be used for self-evaluations, to compare elements and actions of different health and safety standards, to track implemented actions, identify remaining weaknesses, and strategies for continued improvement. https://www.osha.gov/shpguidelines/explore-tools.html

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit: Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit is an auditing system that aligns with Ethical Trading Initiative's Base Code as well International Labour Organization Conventions. It has been developed to provide a public auditing methodology and format for companies to use to assess compliance. https://www.sedex.com/our-services/smeta-audit/
International Organization for Standardization - ISO 26000 Guidance on Social Responsibility: The ISO 26000 standard promotes common understanding in the field of social responsibility and addresses seven core subjects of social responsibility: human rights, labor practices, the environment, fair operating practices, consumer issues, and community involvement and development. Suppliers can demonstrate worker health and safety by developing programs and systems to monitor and control worker health and safety risks. Programs should include management oversight, removal or control of safety risks, safety training and equipment, recording and investigating safety incidents, access to water and toilet facilities, monitoring of risks to new and expectant mothers, and safe and clean dormitory spaces where applicable. https://www.iso.org/iso-26000-social-responsibility.html

Social Accountability International Guidance Document for Social Accountability 8000: According to Social Accountability International, "this guidance document provides various tools and information for users of the Social Accountability 8000 standard, including definitions, background information, and examples." https://sa-intl.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/SA8000-2014-Guidance-Document.pdf

United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9
Corrective actions: Prompt actions taken to eliminate the causes of a problem, thus preventing their recurrence.

First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Music and Audio MediaConflict mineralsCalculate D1 as the total number of validated smelters, divided by the total number of smelters, then multiply by 100. Include all smelters identified as supplying some portion of the tin, tungsten, tantalum, or gold in your products.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
To be considered conflict-free, smelters must have a valid certification established or confirmed in the previous 12-month period as defined above.
Smelters may be validated through any internationally recognized body, such as the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI), Responsible Jewellery Council, ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group, or the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA).
ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group: The International Tin Association (ITA) has convened the Responsible Tin Supply Group (RTS) to enable organizations to source cassiterite (ore from which tin is derived) from responsible supply chain actors in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and surrounding countries while meeting due diligence guidance developed by the UN and OECD and required by national laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act. https://www.internationaltin.org/rts-group/

OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas: Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) has developed due diligence guidelines for organizations to implement when sourcing minerals from conflict regions, including but not limited to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. These guidelines have become normative in the industry and can be used to demonstrate due diligence under national and regional laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act in the U.S. and the European Commission draft proposal for supply chain due diligence for conflict minerals. http://www.oecd.org/daf/inv/mne/mining.htm

Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC) chain-of-custody certification: The Responsible Jewellery Council is a standard-setting and certification organization that has developed an ISEAL-accredited chain-of-custody certification program for use by the jewellery industry and manufacturers, which applies to gold and platinum group metals. https://www.responsiblejewellery.com/rjc-certification/

Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI): Formerly known as the Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative, the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI) is a joint effort between the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) and GeSI to establish supply chain transparency tools, resources and training to assist organizations in responsibly sourcing conflict-free minerals from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. Of note is their Responsible Minerals Assurance Process, which enables auditing and assessment of smelters for responsible ore sourcing and provides a centralized database for tracking smelter performance. http://www.responsiblemineralsinitiative.org/

THESIS Help Center Video: Conflict minerals KPI: Short video tutorial on the Conflict minerals KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017273

The London Bullion Market Association Good Delivery Lists: According to their website, the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA) produces "Good Delivery Lists for gold and silver bars; detailing the names of accredited refiners, their listing date and the marking details of their bars." http://www.lbma.org.uk/the-good-delivery-list

World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard: As part of their activities to support socially-responsible gold mining, the World Gold Council has developed the World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard to provide guidance to companies on responsible mining practices. https://www.gold.org/about-gold/gold-supply/responsible-gold/conflict-free-gold-standard
Better Sourcing Program: The Better Sourcing Program (BSP) provides a technology-based communications solution to allow global organizations to source artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) ores through upstream due diligence, auditing and risk management. https://www.rcsglobal.com/bettersourcing/

Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade: According to the website, "The Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade (PPA) is a joint initiative among governments, companies, and civil society to support supply chain solutions to conflict minerals challenges in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and the Great Lakes Region (GLR) of Central Africa." http://www.resolv.org/site-ppa/
Conflict minerals: Conflict minerals are defined per "Section 1502(e)(4) of the [Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform] Act as (A) columbite-tantalite, also known as coltan (the metal ore from which tantalum is extracted); cassiterite (the metal ore from which tin is extracted); gold; wolframite (the metal ore from which tungsten is extracted); or their derivatives; or (B) any other mineral or its derivatives determined by the Secretary of State to be financing conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo or an adjoining country." (US Securities and Exchange Commission, 17 CFR Parts 240 and 249b, RIN: 3235-AK84, Conflict Minerals Final Rule)
Music and Audio MediaGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the revenue from each product.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the revenue from final products produced. If the manufacturing facilities produce more than one category of product, only weight using revenue data specific to the product category in question.
Calculate B2 as the revenue from final products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total revenue from final products, then multiply by 100. For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardGreenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Music and Audio MediaPackaging Raw Material SourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Pre-consumer recycled material: “Material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Renewable material: “Material that is composed of biomass from a living source and that can be continually replenished. To be defined as renewable, virgin materials shall come from sources which are replenished at a rate equal to or greater than the rate of depletion.” (FTC Green Guides:2012)

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably-sourced material: Material for which it can be demonstrated through second- or third-party verification that the virgin raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities. Materials such as paper can be included in this definition if the source of the packaging content comes from sustainably-managed forests with no deforestation.
Music and Audio MediaSustainable Packaging Design and ProductionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

EPA Energy Benefits Calculator: Use the EPA Energy Benefits Calculator to help quantify environmental impact reductions for packaging design choices. https://www.epa.gov/lmop/landfill-gas-energy-benefits-calculator

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

Recycle Now: Recycle Now is the national recycling effort in England. The website contains examples of recycling labels that may be used on packaging and how to interpret them. http://www.recyclenow.com/recycle/packaging-symbols-explained

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: Material efficiency is the ratio between the material input and the benefits derived. Resource conservation (source reduction) of material inputs and/or improving the functionality of the packaging can positively impact material efficiency. Process efficiency is the ratio between the time spent on production steps to the output. Opportunities to improve material and process efficiency include process improvement, product redesign, and technology changes to packaging equipment. It should be noted that continual source reduction has benefits, but there are trade-offs that must be assessed.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
Music and Audio MediaTransportation to RetailersInclude shipments of your product from final manufacturing facilities to downstream retailers or distributors. Include both company-owned and contracted fleet. Exclude data for return trips. If retailers are responsible for the transportation of some or all of your final product, the retailer may hold the information necessary to calculate your response. It may be made available in a public report or by request.
Calculate B1 as the volume of product transported by carriers that reported emissions, divided by total volume of product transported, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If a supplier completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, you may count that as compliance with this question. Examples of other compliant standards are provided in the Certifications, Standards, & Tools section below.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

THESIS Help Center Video: Transportation to Retailers KPI: Short video tutorial on the Transportation to Retailers KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/529545735

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Transportation and Air Quality: SmartWay: This program provides information about how to improve fuel efficiency in trucking. Carriers can use the SmartWays carbon emission calculator to track and publicly report emissions associated with their trucking operations. https://www.epa.gov/smartway
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsN/A
Music and Audio MediaVolatile organic compounds (VOCs) - PrintingExamples of alternatives to traditional solvents and ink chemistries are isopropyl alcohol (IPA) reducers, vegetable- and citrus-based blanket, roller, and general washes, vegetable oil-based offset inks, and water-based flexo and gravure inks.N/AN/AVolatile organic compounds: Volatile organic compounds are defined as those which participate in atmospheric photochemical reactions. Specific exclusions, including carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides or carbonates, ammonium carbonate, and others, are provided by federal and state regulations United States 40 CFR 51.100, United States 40 CFR 59.203, and Title 17 of the California Code of Regulations, Division 3, Chapter 1, Subchapter 8.5, Article 2, Consumer Products, Sections 94507-94517.
Music and Audio MediaWorker health and safety - ManufacturingThis question aligns with the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Injury and Illness rate. This rate can be normalized for global applicability.
Calculate B1 according to OSHA's injury and illness rate by multiplying the number of recordable injuries and illnesses by 200,000. Divide this number by the total employee hours worked to produce your final product. If multiple facilities manufacture the final product, the injury and illness rate will need to be adjusted using a weighted average based on each facility's percentage of total production. Include all employees at a facility that participate in the production of the final product. This includes both full-time and contracted employees.
Calculate B2 as the revenue from your final product for which you were able to obtain data divided by the total revenue from your final product, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS General Guidance document provides guidance to calculate the weighted average. See Background Information for access to this document.
The Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool is an online calculator that will compute your injury and illness rate. The OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses provides forms and information for computing your facility injury and illness rate.
Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool: This tool calculates the injury and illness incidence rate for employers. https://data.bls.gov/iirc/

OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses: This webpage contains information on how to record workplace injuries and illnesses and provides the worksheets needed to correctly do so. https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/forms

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520108472
How to Compute a Firm's Incidence Rate for Safety Management: This website from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics provides in-depth guidance on computing injury and illness numbers. https://www.bls.gov/iif/osheval.htm

Phosgene - Chemical Weapons Convention: Phosgene is listed as an Annex Three chemical in the Chemical Weapons Convention, implemented by the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), due to its high human toxicity. However, annual reporting of aggregate production volumes required under the convention creates a highly regulated space for this chemical internationally, bringing focus on its production and use. https://www.opcw.org/chemical-weapons-convention

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

TSC General Guidance for Key Performance Indicators: The General Guidance Document for Key Performance Indicators (KPI) provides essential guidance to complement the specific guidance provided for each KPI. TSC recommends reading this document before you begin your first questionnaire and revisiting it as often as necessary for clarification and additional information. https://www.sustainabilityconsortium.org/tsc-downloads/general-guidance-document/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Music and Audio MediaWorker health and safety - Polycarbonate supply chainTo be included in B1-B5, risk assessments, training programs, safety plans, performance monitoring systems, and audits must be verifiable and address health and safety issues such as worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. The assessments and audits must be conducted by second or third parties. The risk assessment must be conducted once per year while the audit must have been conducted at least once every three years, both using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles such as International Labour Organization Occupational Safety and Health Conventions (e.g., No. 155). The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions, which can inform your responses. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for examples of initiatives that meet these requirements.
Calculate B1 as the mass of your polycarbonate supply that came from operations that have performed a risk assessment to identify high risk areas for health and safety, divided by the total mass of your polycarbonate supply, then multiply by 100.
To determine if an operation is high risk for health and safety, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic review assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. It must be conducted at least once per year. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your polycarbonate supply that came from operations that train workers on health and safety procedures, divided by the total mass of your polycarbonate supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B2, the training on health and safety procedures must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and must be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for workers on health and safety procedures and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional worker training may be required to perform job duties. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your polycarbonate supply that came from operations that implement a verifiable worker health and safety plan, divided by the total mass of your polycarbonate supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B3, a worker health and safety plan must be verifiable and must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and be prominently displayed in the workplace where employees normally report. The plan should include best practices specific to ergonomics; repetitive motions; chemical and particulate exposure; appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE); and proper use of tools, machinery, and the handling of animals (if applicable). On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B4 as the mass of your polycarbonate supply that came from operations that have a worker health and safety performance monitoring system in place, divided by the total mass of your polycarbonate supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B4, a worker health and safety performance monitoring system should include metrics on issues including, but not limited to, incidence of worker injuries and prevalence of diseases. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B5 as the mass of your polycarbonate supply that came from operations that were audited in the last three years on worker health and safety issues, divided by the total mass of your polycarbonate supply, then multiply by 100. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
To be included in B5, the audits must be verifiable and address preventive measures, freely provided personal protective equipment, identification of worker health and safety hazards and effects on the exposed people, statistics and reasons behind injuries, design of work area, processes, installations, machinery/work equipment, operating processes and work organization, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Standards on Occupational Health and Safety.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Recommended Practices for Safety and Health Programs: Defines and enforces standards for the safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women. OHSA also provides training, outreach education, and assistance. The OSHA tools can be used for self-evaluations, to compare elements and actions of different health and safety standards, to track implemented actions, identify remaining weaknesses, and strategies for continued improvement. https://www.osha.gov/shpguidelines/explore-tools.html

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit: Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit is an auditing system that aligns with Ethical Trading Initiative's Base Code as well International Labour Organization Conventions. It has been developed to provide a public auditing methodology and format for companies to use to assess compliance. https://www.sedex.com/our-services/smeta-audit/
International Organization for Standardization - ISO 26000 Guidance on Social Responsibility: The ISO 26000 standard promotes common understanding in the field of social responsibility and addresses seven core subjects of social responsibility: human rights, labor practices, the environment, fair operating practices, consumer issues, and community involvement and development. Suppliers can demonstrate worker health and safety by developing programs and systems to monitor and control worker health and safety risks. Programs should include management oversight, removal or control of safety risks, safety training and equipment, recording and investigating safety incidents, access to water and toilet facilities, monitoring of risks to new and expectant mothers, and safe and clean dormitory spaces where applicable. https://www.iso.org/iso-26000-social-responsibility.html

Social Accountability International Guidance Document for Social Accountability 8000: According to Social Accountability International, "this guidance document provides various tools and information for users of the Social Accountability 8000 standard, including definitions, background information, and examples." https://sa-intl.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/SA8000-2014-Guidance-Document.pdf

United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9
Corrective actions: Prompt actions taken to eliminate the causes of a problem, thus preventing their recurrence.

First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Software and Video GamesConflict mineralsCalculate D1 as the total number of validated smelters, divided by the total number of smelters, then multiply by 100. Include all smelters identified as supplying some portion of the tin, tungsten, tantalum, or gold in your products.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
To be considered conflict-free, smelters must have a valid certification established or confirmed in the previous 12-month period as defined above.
Smelters may be validated through any internationally recognized body, such as the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI), Responsible Jewellery Council, ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group, or the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA).
ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group: The International Tin Association (ITA) has convened the Responsible Tin Supply Group (RTS) to enable organizations to source cassiterite (ore from which tin is derived) from responsible supply chain actors in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and surrounding countries while meeting due diligence guidance developed by the UN and OECD and required by national laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act. https://www.internationaltin.org/rts-group/

OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas: Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) has developed due diligence guidelines for organizations to implement when sourcing minerals from conflict regions, including but not limited to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. These guidelines have become normative in the industry and can be used to demonstrate due diligence under national and regional laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act in the U.S. and the European Commission draft proposal for supply chain due diligence for conflict minerals. http://www.oecd.org/daf/inv/mne/mining.htm

Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC) chain-of-custody certification: The Responsible Jewellery Council is a standard-setting and certification organization that has developed an ISEAL-accredited chain-of-custody certification program for use by the jewellery industry and manufacturers, which applies to gold and platinum group metals. https://www.responsiblejewellery.com/rjc-certification/

Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI): Formerly known as the Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative, the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI) is a joint effort between the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) and GeSI to establish supply chain transparency tools, resources and training to assist organizations in responsibly sourcing conflict-free minerals from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. Of note is their Responsible Minerals Assurance Process, which enables auditing and assessment of smelters for responsible ore sourcing and provides a centralized database for tracking smelter performance. http://www.responsiblemineralsinitiative.org/

THESIS Help Center Video: Conflict minerals KPI: Short video tutorial on the Conflict minerals KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017273

The London Bullion Market Association Good Delivery Lists: According to their website, the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA) produces "Good Delivery Lists for gold and silver bars; detailing the names of accredited refiners, their listing date and the marking details of their bars." http://www.lbma.org.uk/the-good-delivery-list

World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard: As part of their activities to support socially-responsible gold mining, the World Gold Council has developed the World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard to provide guidance to companies on responsible mining practices. https://www.gold.org/about-gold/gold-supply/responsible-gold/conflict-free-gold-standard
Better Sourcing Program: The Better Sourcing Program (BSP) provides a technology-based communications solution to allow global organizations to source artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) ores through upstream due diligence, auditing and risk management. https://www.rcsglobal.com/bettersourcing/

Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade: According to the website, "The Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade (PPA) is a joint initiative among governments, companies, and civil society to support supply chain solutions to conflict minerals challenges in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and the Great Lakes Region (GLR) of Central Africa." http://www.resolv.org/site-ppa/
Conflict minerals: Conflict minerals are defined per "Section 1502(e)(4) of the [Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform] Act as (A) columbite-tantalite, also known as coltan (the metal ore from which tantalum is extracted); cassiterite (the metal ore from which tin is extracted); gold; wolframite (the metal ore from which tungsten is extracted); or their derivatives; or (B) any other mineral or its derivatives determined by the Secretary of State to be financing conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo or an adjoining country." (US Securities and Exchange Commission, 17 CFR Parts 240 and 249b, RIN: 3235-AK84, Conflict Minerals Final Rule)
Software and Video GamesGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the revenue from each product.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the revenue from final products produced. If the manufacturing facilities produce more than one category of product, only weight using revenue data specific to the product category in question.
Calculate B2 as the revenue from final products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total revenue from final products, then multiply by 100. For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardGreenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Software and Video GamesPackaging Raw Material SourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Pre-consumer recycled material: “Material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Renewable material: “Material that is composed of biomass from a living source and that can be continually replenished. To be defined as renewable, virgin materials shall come from sources which are replenished at a rate equal to or greater than the rate of depletion.” (FTC Green Guides:2012)

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably-sourced material: Material for which it can be demonstrated through second- or third-party verification that the virgin raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities. Materials such as paper can be included in this definition if the source of the packaging content comes from sustainably-managed forests with no deforestation.
Software and Video GamesSustainable Packaging Design and ProductionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

EPA Energy Benefits Calculator: Use the EPA Energy Benefits Calculator to help quantify environmental impact reductions for packaging design choices. https://www.epa.gov/lmop/landfill-gas-energy-benefits-calculator

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

Recycle Now: Recycle Now is the national recycling effort in England. The website contains examples of recycling labels that may be used on packaging and how to interpret them. http://www.recyclenow.com/recycle/packaging-symbols-explained

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: Material efficiency is the ratio between the material input and the benefits derived. Resource conservation (source reduction) of material inputs and/or improving the functionality of the packaging can positively impact material efficiency. Process efficiency is the ratio between the time spent on production steps to the output. Opportunities to improve material and process efficiency include process improvement, product redesign, and technology changes to packaging equipment. It should be noted that continual source reduction has benefits, but there are trade-offs that must be assessed.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
Software and Video GamesTransportation to RetailersInclude shipments of your product from final manufacturing facilities to downstream retailers or distributors. Include both company-owned and contracted fleet. Exclude data for return trips. If retailers are responsible for the transportation of some or all of your final product, the retailer may hold the information necessary to calculate your response. It may be made available in a public report or by request.
Calculate B1 as the volume of product transported by carriers that reported emissions, divided by total volume of product transported, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If a supplier completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, you may count that as compliance with this question. Examples of other compliant standards are provided in the Certifications, Standards, & Tools section below.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

THESIS Help Center Video: Transportation to Retailers KPI: Short video tutorial on the Transportation to Retailers KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/529545735

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Transportation and Air Quality: SmartWay: This program provides information about how to improve fuel efficiency in trucking. Carriers can use the SmartWays carbon emission calculator to track and publicly report emissions associated with their trucking operations. https://www.epa.gov/smartway
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsN/A
Software and Video GamesVolatile organic compounds (VOCs) - PrintingExamples of alternatives to traditional solvents and ink chemistries are isopropyl alcohol (IPA) reducers, vegetable- and citrus-based blanket, roller, and general washes, vegetable oil-based offset inks, and water-based flexo and gravure inks.N/AN/AVolatile organic compounds: Volatile organic compounds are defined as those which participate in atmospheric photochemical reactions. Specific exclusions, including carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides or carbonates, ammonium carbonate, and others, are provided by federal and state regulations United States 40 CFR 51.100, United States 40 CFR 59.203, and Title 17 of the California Code of Regulations, Division 3, Chapter 1, Subchapter 8.5, Article 2, Consumer Products, Sections 94507-94517.
Software and Video GamesWorker health and safety - ManufacturingThis question aligns with the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Injury and Illness rate. This rate can be normalized for global applicability.
Calculate B1 according to OSHA's injury and illness rate by multiplying the number of recordable injuries and illnesses by 200,000. Divide this number by the total employee hours worked to produce your final product. If multiple facilities manufacture the final product, the injury and illness rate will need to be adjusted using a weighted average based on each facility's percentage of total production. Include all employees at a facility that participate in the production of the final product. This includes both full-time and contracted employees.
Calculate B2 as the revenue from your final product for which you were able to obtain data divided by the total revenue from your final product, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS General Guidance document provides guidance to calculate the weighted average. See Background Information for access to this document.
The Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool is an online calculator that will compute your injury and illness rate. The OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses provides forms and information for computing your facility injury and illness rate.
Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool: This tool calculates the injury and illness incidence rate for employers. https://data.bls.gov/iirc/

OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses: This webpage contains information on how to record workplace injuries and illnesses and provides the worksheets needed to correctly do so. https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/forms

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520108472
How to Compute a Firm's Incidence Rate for Safety Management: This website from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics provides in-depth guidance on computing injury and illness numbers. https://www.bls.gov/iif/osheval.htm

Phosgene - Chemical Weapons Convention: Phosgene is listed as an Annex Three chemical in the Chemical Weapons Convention, implemented by the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), due to its high human toxicity. However, annual reporting of aggregate production volumes required under the convention creates a highly regulated space for this chemical internationally, bringing focus on its production and use. https://www.opcw.org/chemical-weapons-convention

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

TSC General Guidance for Key Performance Indicators: The General Guidance Document for Key Performance Indicators (KPI) provides essential guidance to complement the specific guidance provided for each KPI. TSC recommends reading this document before you begin your first questionnaire and revisiting it as often as necessary for clarification and additional information. https://www.sustainabilityconsortium.org/tsc-downloads/general-guidance-document/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Software and Video GamesWorker health and safety - Polycarbonate supply chainTo be included in B1-B5, risk assessments, training programs, safety plans, performance monitoring systems, and audits must be verifiable and address health and safety issues such as worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. The assessments and audits must be conducted by second or third parties. The risk assessment must be conducted once per year while the audit must have been conducted at least once every three years, both using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles such as International Labour Organization Occupational Safety and Health Conventions (e.g., No. 155). The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions, which can inform your responses. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for examples of initiatives that meet these requirements.
Calculate B1 as the mass of your polycarbonate supply that came from operations that have performed a risk assessment to identify high risk areas for health and safety, divided by the total mass of your polycarbonate supply, then multiply by 100.
To determine if an operation is high risk for health and safety, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic review assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. It must be conducted at least once per year. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your polycarbonate supply that came from operations that train workers on health and safety procedures, divided by the total mass of your polycarbonate supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B2, the training on health and safety procedures must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and must be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for workers on health and safety procedures and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional worker training may be required to perform job duties. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your polycarbonate supply that came from operations that implement a verifiable worker health and safety plan, divided by the total mass of your polycarbonate supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B3, a worker health and safety plan must be verifiable and must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and be prominently displayed in the workplace where employees normally report. The plan should include best practices specific to ergonomics; repetitive motions; chemical and particulate exposure; appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE); and proper use of tools, machinery, and the handling of animals (if applicable). On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B4 as the mass of your polycarbonate supply that came from operations that have a worker health and safety performance monitoring system in place, divided by the total mass of your polycarbonate supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B4, a worker health and safety performance monitoring system should include metrics on issues including, but not limited to, incidence of worker injuries and prevalence of diseases. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B5 as the mass of your polycarbonate supply that came from operations that were audited in the last three years on worker health and safety issues, divided by the total mass of your polycarbonate supply, then multiply by 100. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
To be included in B5, the audits must be verifiable and address preventive measures, freely provided personal protective equipment, identification of worker health and safety hazards and effects on the exposed people, statistics and reasons behind injuries, design of work area, processes, installations, machinery/work equipment, operating processes and work organization, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Standards on Occupational Health and Safety.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Recommended Practices for Safety and Health Programs: Defines and enforces standards for the safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women. OHSA also provides training, outreach education, and assistance. The OSHA tools can be used for self-evaluations, to compare elements and actions of different health and safety standards, to track implemented actions, identify remaining weaknesses, and strategies for continued improvement. https://www.osha.gov/shpguidelines/explore-tools.html

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit: Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit is an auditing system that aligns with Ethical Trading Initiative's Base Code as well International Labour Organization Conventions. It has been developed to provide a public auditing methodology and format for companies to use to assess compliance. https://www.sedex.com/our-services/smeta-audit/
International Organization for Standardization - ISO 26000 Guidance on Social Responsibility: The ISO 26000 standard promotes common understanding in the field of social responsibility and addresses seven core subjects of social responsibility: human rights, labor practices, the environment, fair operating practices, consumer issues, and community involvement and development. Suppliers can demonstrate worker health and safety by developing programs and systems to monitor and control worker health and safety risks. Programs should include management oversight, removal or control of safety risks, safety training and equipment, recording and investigating safety incidents, access to water and toilet facilities, monitoring of risks to new and expectant mothers, and safe and clean dormitory spaces where applicable. https://www.iso.org/iso-26000-social-responsibility.html

Social Accountability International Guidance Document for Social Accountability 8000: According to Social Accountability International, "this guidance document provides various tools and information for users of the Social Accountability 8000 standard, including definitions, background information, and examples." https://sa-intl.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/SA8000-2014-Guidance-Document.pdf

United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9
Corrective actions: Prompt actions taken to eliminate the causes of a problem, thus preventing their recurrence.

First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Video MediaConflict mineralsCalculate D1 as the total number of validated smelters, divided by the total number of smelters, then multiply by 100. Include all smelters identified as supplying some portion of the tin, tungsten, tantalum, or gold in your products.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
To be considered conflict-free, smelters must have a valid certification established or confirmed in the previous 12-month period as defined above.
Smelters may be validated through any internationally recognized body, such as the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI), Responsible Jewellery Council, ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group, or the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA).
ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group: The International Tin Association (ITA) has convened the Responsible Tin Supply Group (RTS) to enable organizations to source cassiterite (ore from which tin is derived) from responsible supply chain actors in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and surrounding countries while meeting due diligence guidance developed by the UN and OECD and required by national laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act. https://www.internationaltin.org/rts-group/

OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas: Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) has developed due diligence guidelines for organizations to implement when sourcing minerals from conflict regions, including but not limited to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. These guidelines have become normative in the industry and can be used to demonstrate due diligence under national and regional laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act in the U.S. and the European Commission draft proposal for supply chain due diligence for conflict minerals. http://www.oecd.org/daf/inv/mne/mining.htm

Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC) chain-of-custody certification: The Responsible Jewellery Council is a standard-setting and certification organization that has developed an ISEAL-accredited chain-of-custody certification program for use by the jewellery industry and manufacturers, which applies to gold and platinum group metals. https://www.responsiblejewellery.com/rjc-certification/

Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI): Formerly known as the Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative, the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI) is a joint effort between the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) and GeSI to establish supply chain transparency tools, resources and training to assist organizations in responsibly sourcing conflict-free minerals from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. Of note is their Responsible Minerals Assurance Process, which enables auditing and assessment of smelters for responsible ore sourcing and provides a centralized database for tracking smelter performance. http://www.responsiblemineralsinitiative.org/

THESIS Help Center Video: Conflict minerals KPI: Short video tutorial on the Conflict minerals KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017273

The London Bullion Market Association Good Delivery Lists: According to their website, the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA) produces "Good Delivery Lists for gold and silver bars; detailing the names of accredited refiners, their listing date and the marking details of their bars." http://www.lbma.org.uk/the-good-delivery-list

World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard: As part of their activities to support socially-responsible gold mining, the World Gold Council has developed the World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard to provide guidance to companies on responsible mining practices. https://www.gold.org/about-gold/gold-supply/responsible-gold/conflict-free-gold-standard
Better Sourcing Program: The Better Sourcing Program (BSP) provides a technology-based communications solution to allow global organizations to source artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) ores through upstream due diligence, auditing and risk management. https://www.rcsglobal.com/bettersourcing/

Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade: According to the website, "The Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade (PPA) is a joint initiative among governments, companies, and civil society to support supply chain solutions to conflict minerals challenges in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and the Great Lakes Region (GLR) of Central Africa." http://www.resolv.org/site-ppa/
Conflict minerals: Conflict minerals are defined per "Section 1502(e)(4) of the [Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform] Act as (A) columbite-tantalite, also known as coltan (the metal ore from which tantalum is extracted); cassiterite (the metal ore from which tin is extracted); gold; wolframite (the metal ore from which tungsten is extracted); or their derivatives; or (B) any other mineral or its derivatives determined by the Secretary of State to be financing conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo or an adjoining country." (US Securities and Exchange Commission, 17 CFR Parts 240 and 249b, RIN: 3235-AK84, Conflict Minerals Final Rule)
Video MediaGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the revenue from each product.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the revenue from final products produced. If the manufacturing facilities produce more than one category of product, only weight using revenue data specific to the product category in question.
Calculate B2 as the revenue from final products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total revenue from final products, then multiply by 100. For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardGreenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Video MediaPackaging Raw Material SourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Pre-consumer recycled material: “Material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Renewable material: “Material that is composed of biomass from a living source and that can be continually replenished. To be defined as renewable, virgin materials shall come from sources which are replenished at a rate equal to or greater than the rate of depletion.” (FTC Green Guides:2012)

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably-sourced material: Material for which it can be demonstrated through second- or third-party verification that the virgin raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities. Materials such as paper can be included in this definition if the source of the packaging content comes from sustainably-managed forests with no deforestation.
Video MediaSustainable Packaging Design and ProductionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

EPA Energy Benefits Calculator: Use the EPA Energy Benefits Calculator to help quantify environmental impact reductions for packaging design choices. https://www.epa.gov/lmop/landfill-gas-energy-benefits-calculator

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

Recycle Now: Recycle Now is the national recycling effort in England. The website contains examples of recycling labels that may be used on packaging and how to interpret them. http://www.recyclenow.com/recycle/packaging-symbols-explained

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: Material efficiency is the ratio between the material input and the benefits derived. Resource conservation (source reduction) of material inputs and/or improving the functionality of the packaging can positively impact material efficiency. Process efficiency is the ratio between the time spent on production steps to the output. Opportunities to improve material and process efficiency include process improvement, product redesign, and technology changes to packaging equipment. It should be noted that continual source reduction has benefits, but there are trade-offs that must be assessed.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
Video MediaTransportation to RetailersInclude shipments of your product from final manufacturing facilities to downstream retailers or distributors. Include both company-owned and contracted fleet. Exclude data for return trips. If retailers are responsible for the transportation of some or all of your final product, the retailer may hold the information necessary to calculate your response. It may be made available in a public report or by request.
Calculate B1 as the volume of product transported by carriers that reported emissions, divided by total volume of product transported, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If a supplier completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, you may count that as compliance with this question. Examples of other compliant standards are provided in the Certifications, Standards, & Tools section below.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

THESIS Help Center Video: Transportation to Retailers KPI: Short video tutorial on the Transportation to Retailers KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/529545735

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Transportation and Air Quality: SmartWay: This program provides information about how to improve fuel efficiency in trucking. Carriers can use the SmartWays carbon emission calculator to track and publicly report emissions associated with their trucking operations. https://www.epa.gov/smartway
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsN/A
Video MediaVolatile organic compounds (VOCs) - PrintingExamples of alternatives to traditional solvents and ink chemistries are isopropyl alcohol (IPA) reducers, vegetable- and citrus-based blanket, roller, and general washes, vegetable oil-based offset inks, and water-based flexo and gravure inks.N/AN/AVolatile organic compounds: Volatile organic compounds are defined as those which participate in atmospheric photochemical reactions. Specific exclusions, including carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, carbonic acid, metallic carbides or carbonates, ammonium carbonate, and others, are provided by federal and state regulations United States 40 CFR 51.100, United States 40 CFR 59.203, and Title 17 of the California Code of Regulations, Division 3, Chapter 1, Subchapter 8.5, Article 2, Consumer Products, Sections 94507-94517.
Video MediaWorker health and safety - ManufacturingThis question aligns with the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Injury and Illness rate. This rate can be normalized for global applicability.
Calculate B1 according to OSHA's injury and illness rate by multiplying the number of recordable injuries and illnesses by 200,000. Divide this number by the total employee hours worked to produce your final product. If multiple facilities manufacture the final product, the injury and illness rate will need to be adjusted using a weighted average based on each facility's percentage of total production. Include all employees at a facility that participate in the production of the final product. This includes both full-time and contracted employees.
Calculate B2 as the revenue from your final product for which you were able to obtain data divided by the total revenue from your final product, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS General Guidance document provides guidance to calculate the weighted average. See Background Information for access to this document.
The Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool is an online calculator that will compute your injury and illness rate. The OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses provides forms and information for computing your facility injury and illness rate.
Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool: This tool calculates the injury and illness incidence rate for employers. https://data.bls.gov/iirc/

OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses: This webpage contains information on how to record workplace injuries and illnesses and provides the worksheets needed to correctly do so. https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/forms

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520108472
How to Compute a Firm's Incidence Rate for Safety Management: This website from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics provides in-depth guidance on computing injury and illness numbers. https://www.bls.gov/iif/osheval.htm

Phosgene - Chemical Weapons Convention: Phosgene is listed as an Annex Three chemical in the Chemical Weapons Convention, implemented by the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), due to its high human toxicity. However, annual reporting of aggregate production volumes required under the convention creates a highly regulated space for this chemical internationally, bringing focus on its production and use. https://www.opcw.org/chemical-weapons-convention

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

TSC General Guidance for Key Performance Indicators: The General Guidance Document for Key Performance Indicators (KPI) provides essential guidance to complement the specific guidance provided for each KPI. TSC recommends reading this document before you begin your first questionnaire and revisiting it as often as necessary for clarification and additional information. https://www.sustainabilityconsortium.org/tsc-downloads/general-guidance-document/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Video MediaWorker health and safety - Polycarbonate supply chainTo be included in B1-B5, risk assessments, training programs, safety plans, performance monitoring systems, and audits must be verifiable and address health and safety issues such as worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. The assessments and audits must be conducted by second or third parties. The risk assessment must be conducted once per year while the audit must have been conducted at least once every three years, both using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles such as International Labour Organization Occupational Safety and Health Conventions (e.g., No. 155). The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions, which can inform your responses. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for examples of initiatives that meet these requirements.
Calculate B1 as the mass of your polycarbonate supply that came from operations that have performed a risk assessment to identify high risk areas for health and safety, divided by the total mass of your polycarbonate supply, then multiply by 100.
To determine if an operation is high risk for health and safety, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic review assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. It must be conducted at least once per year. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your polycarbonate supply that came from operations that train workers on health and safety procedures, divided by the total mass of your polycarbonate supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B2, the training on health and safety procedures must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and must be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for workers on health and safety procedures and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional worker training may be required to perform job duties. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your polycarbonate supply that came from operations that implement a verifiable worker health and safety plan, divided by the total mass of your polycarbonate supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B3, a worker health and safety plan must be verifiable and must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and be prominently displayed in the workplace where employees normally report. The plan should include best practices specific to ergonomics; repetitive motions; chemical and particulate exposure; appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE); and proper use of tools, machinery, and the handling of animals (if applicable). On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B4 as the mass of your polycarbonate supply that came from operations that have a worker health and safety performance monitoring system in place, divided by the total mass of your polycarbonate supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B4, a worker health and safety performance monitoring system should include metrics on issues including, but not limited to, incidence of worker injuries and prevalence of diseases. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B5 as the mass of your polycarbonate supply that came from operations that were audited in the last three years on worker health and safety issues, divided by the total mass of your polycarbonate supply, then multiply by 100. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
To be included in B5, the audits must be verifiable and address preventive measures, freely provided personal protective equipment, identification of worker health and safety hazards and effects on the exposed people, statistics and reasons behind injuries, design of work area, processes, installations, machinery/work equipment, operating processes and work organization, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Standards on Occupational Health and Safety.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Recommended Practices for Safety and Health Programs: Defines and enforces standards for the safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women. OHSA also provides training, outreach education, and assistance. The OSHA tools can be used for self-evaluations, to compare elements and actions of different health and safety standards, to track implemented actions, identify remaining weaknesses, and strategies for continued improvement. https://www.osha.gov/shpguidelines/explore-tools.html

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit: Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit is an auditing system that aligns with Ethical Trading Initiative's Base Code as well International Labour Organization Conventions. It has been developed to provide a public auditing methodology and format for companies to use to assess compliance. https://www.sedex.com/our-services/smeta-audit/
International Organization for Standardization - ISO 26000 Guidance on Social Responsibility: The ISO 26000 standard promotes common understanding in the field of social responsibility and addresses seven core subjects of social responsibility: human rights, labor practices, the environment, fair operating practices, consumer issues, and community involvement and development. Suppliers can demonstrate worker health and safety by developing programs and systems to monitor and control worker health and safety risks. Programs should include management oversight, removal or control of safety risks, safety training and equipment, recording and investigating safety incidents, access to water and toilet facilities, monitoring of risks to new and expectant mothers, and safe and clean dormitory spaces where applicable. https://www.iso.org/iso-26000-social-responsibility.html

Social Accountability International Guidance Document for Social Accountability 8000: According to Social Accountability International, "this guidance document provides various tools and information for users of the Social Accountability 8000 standard, including definitions, background information, and examples." https://sa-intl.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/SA8000-2014-Guidance-Document.pdf

United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9
Corrective actions: Prompt actions taken to eliminate the causes of a problem, thus preventing their recurrence.

First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
TileGreenhouse gas emissions - Mineral supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the mass purchased from mineral suppliers that reported emissions divided by total mass purchased from all mineral suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
TileGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the revenue from each product.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the revenue from final product produced. If the manufacturing facilities produce more than one category of product, only weight using revenue data specific to the product category in question.
Calculate B2 as the revenue from final products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total revenue from final products, then multiply by 100. For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardGreenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
TileProduct designThis question does not address packaging materials. Product design strategies may include design for lightweighting, durability, disassembly, reuse, recycled content, and recyclability. N/AAutodesk - Design for Sustainability: Autodesk® Sustainability Workshop provides resources, tools and online learning opportunities to teach the principles of sustainable design. https://academy.autodesk.com/sustainable-design

Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™: Cradle to Cradle Product Certification™ provides a standard of performance for manufacturers regarding product sustainability and material safety. Individual product assessments are performed by independent and trained third parties and certifications are made by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute. https://c2ccertified.org/get-certified

ISO 14040: ISO 14040 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Principles and Framework" document for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/37456.html

ISO 14044: ISO 14044 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Requirements and Guidelines" standard for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/38498.html

UN Environment Design for Sustainability: Materials Efficiency: One example of a tool and protocol for material efficiency is included in the Design for Sustainability report published by UN Environment. https://wedocs.unep.org/handle/20.500.11822/7961

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Safer Choice - Alternatives Assessments: The EPA's Safer Choice [formerly Design for the Environment (DfE)] partnership program provides guidance for informed decision-making regarding the hazards posed by different materials used in consumer goods. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice
End-of-life: A product life cycle phase that begins at the end of a product’s useful life, including reuse and refurbishment cycles.

Material and process efficiency: Material efficiency is the ratio between the material input and the benefits derived. Resource conservation (source reduction) of material inputs and/or improving the functionality of the packaging can positively impact material efficiency. Process efficiency is the ratio between the time spent on production steps to the output. Opportunities to improve material and process efficiency include process improvement, product redesign, and technology changes to packaging equipment. It should be noted that continual source reduction has benefits, but there are trade-offs that must be assessed.

Public disclosure: Manufacturer-based acts of making information available and readily accessible to the public through one or more forms of media (e.g., online, print, telephone). Print media includes product labels and also includes, but is not limited to, books, magazines, newspapers, and readily accessible journal articles. Online disclosure includes, but is not limited to, publicly accessible websites (desktop or mobile) as well as making information electronically available through reporting platforms or mobile apps.

Resource conservation: Practices that reduce the consumption and waste of energy and natural resources.
TileRecycled content - Ceramics?Recycled ceramic materials can include both pre-consumer and post-consumer recycled material, but should exclude materials recycled from ceramics manufacturing facilities.
Calculate B1 as the mass of recycled ceramic used divided by the total mass of ceramic used across all product units manufactured, then multiply by 100. ’In the past year’ means perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the completion date of this question.
N/AFTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdfPost-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))
TileTransportation to RetailersInclude shipments of your product from final manufacturing facilities to downstream retailers or distributors. Include both company-owned and contracted fleet. Exclude data for return trips. If retailers are responsible for the transportation of some or all of your final product, the retailer may hold the information necessary to calculate your response. It may be made available in a public report or by request.
Calculate B1 as the volume of product transported by carriers that reported emissions, divided by total volume of product transported, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If a supplier completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, you may count that as compliance with this question. Examples of other compliant standards are provided in the Certifications, Standards, & Tools section below.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

THESIS Help Center Video: Transportation to Retailers KPI: Short video tutorial on the Transportation to Retailers KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/529545735

United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): Transportation and Air Quality: SmartWay: This program provides information about how to improve fuel efficiency in trucking. Carriers can use the SmartWays carbon emission calculator to track and publicly report emissions associated with their trucking operations. https://www.epa.gov/smartway
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsN/A
TileWater use intensity - ManufacturingYou may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's water use intensity, weighted by the revenue from each product.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's water use intensity, weighted by the revenue from final product produced. If the manufacturing facilities produce more than one category of product, only weight using revenue data specific to the product category in question.
Calculate B2 as the revenue from final products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total revenue from final products, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.
The data required for the CDP Water Security Questionnaire can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 303-3 Water withdrawal" in GRI 303: Water and Effluents can also be used to calculate your response.
CDP Water Information Request: The CDP Water Information Request provides questions that assess a company's water use, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. CDP can be contacted to respond to the Water Information Request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/
N/AWater use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.
TileWorker health and safety - ManufacturingThis question aligns with the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Injury and Illness rate. This rate can be normalized for global applicability.
Calculate B1 according to OSHA's injury and illness rate by multiplying the number of recordable injuries and illnesses by 200,000. Divide this number by the total employee hours worked to produce your final product. If multiple facilities manufacture the final product, the injury and illness rate will need to be adjusted using a weighted average based on each facility's percentage of total production. Include all employees at a facility that participate in the production of the final product. This includes both full-time and contracted employees.
Calculate B2 as the revenue from your final product for which you were able to obtain data divided by the total revenue of your final product, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS General Guidance document provides guidance to calculate the weighted average. See Background Information for access to this document.
The Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool is an online calculator that will compute your injury and illness rate. The OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses provides forms and information for computing your facility injury and illness rate.
THESIS Help Center Video: Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520108472How to Compute a Firm's Incidence Rate for Safety Management: This website from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics provides in-depth guidance on computing injury and illness numbers. https://www.bls.gov/iif/osheval.htm

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

TSC General Guidance for Key Performance Indicators: The General Guidance Document for Key Performance Indicators (KPI) provides essential guidance to complement the specific guidance provided for each KPI. TSC recommends reading this document before you begin your first questionnaire and revisiting it as often as necessary for clarification and additional information. https://www.sustainabilityconsortium.org/tsc-downloads/general-guidance-document/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
TileWorker health and safety - Mineral supply chainTo be included in B1-B5, risk assessments, training programs, safety plans, performance monitoring systems, and audits must be verifiable and address health and safety issues such as worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. The assessments and audits must be conducted by second or third parties. The risk assessment must be conducted once per year while the audit must have been conducted at least once every three years, both using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles such as International Labour Organization Occupational Safety and Health Conventions (e.g., No. 155). The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions, which can inform your responses. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for examples of initiatives that meet these requirements.
Calculate B1 as the mass of your minerals supply that came from operations that have performed a risk assessment to identify high risk areas for health and safety, divided by the total mass of your minerals supply, then multiply by 100.
To determine if an operation is high risk for health and safety, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic review assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. It must be conducted at least once per year. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your minerals supply that came from operations that train workers on health and safety procedures, divided by the total mass of your minerals supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B2, the training on health and safety procedures must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and must be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for workers on health and safety procedures and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional worker training may be required to perform job duties. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your minerals supply that came from operations that implement a verifiable worker health and safety plan, divided by the total mass of your minerals supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B3, a worker health and safety plan must be verifiable and must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and be prominently displayed in the workplace where employees normally report. The plan should include best practices specific to ergonomics; repetitive motions; chemical and particulate exposure; appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE); and proper use of tools, machinery, and the handling of animals (if applicable). On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B4 as the mass of your minerals supply that came from operations that have a worker health and safety performance monitoring system in place, divided by the total mass of your minerals supply, then multiply by 100. To be included in B4, a worker health and safety performance monitoring system should include metrics on issues including, but not limited to, incidence of worker injuries and prevalence of diseases. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B5 as the mass of your minerals supply that came from operations that were audited in the last three years on worker health and safety issues, divided by the total mass of your minerals supply, then multiply by 100. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
To be included in B5, the audits must be verifiable and address preventive measures, freely provided personal protective equipment, identification of worker health and safety hazards and effects on the exposed people, statistics and reasons behind injuries, design of work area, processes, installations, machinery/work equipment, operating processes and work organization, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Standards on Occupational Health and Safety.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Recommended Practices for Safety and Health Programs: Defines and enforces standards for the safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women. OHSA also provides training, outreach education, and assistance. The OSHA tools can be used for self-evaluations, to compare elements and actions of different health and safety standards, to track implemented actions, identify remaining weaknesses, and strategies for continued improvement. https://www.osha.gov/shpguidelines/explore-tools.html

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit: Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit is an auditing system that aligns with Ethical Trading Initiative's Base Code as well International Labour Organization Conventions. It has been developed to provide a public auditing methodology and format for companies to use to assess compliance. https://www.sedex.com/our-services/smeta-audit/
International Organization for Standardization - ISO 26000 Guidance on Social Responsibility: The ISO 26000 standard promotes common understanding in the field of social responsibility and addresses seven core subjects of social responsibility: human rights, labor practices, the environment, fair operating practices, consumer issues, and community involvement and development. Suppliers can demonstrate worker health and safety by developing programs and systems to monitor and control worker health and safety risks. Programs should include management oversight, removal or control of safety risks, safety training and equipment, recording and investigating safety incidents, access to water and toilet facilities, monitoring of risks to new and expectant mothers, and safe and clean dormitory spaces where applicable. https://www.iso.org/iso-26000-social-responsibility.html

Social Accountability International Guidance Document for Social Accountability 8000: According to Social Accountability International, "this guidance document provides various tools and information for users of the Social Accountability 8000 standard, including definitions, background information, and examples." https://sa-intl.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/SA8000-2014-Guidance-Document.pdf

United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9
Corrective actions: Prompt actions taken to eliminate the causes of a problem, thus preventing their recurrence.

First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Fluorescent BulbsConflict mineralsCalculate D1 as the total number of validated smelters, divided by the total number of smelters, then multiply by 100. Include all smelters identified as supplying some portion of the tin, tungsten, tantalum, or gold in your products.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
To be considered conflict-free, smelters must have a valid certification established or confirmed in the previous 12-month period as defined above.
Smelters may be validated through any internationally recognized body, such as the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI), Responsible Jewellery Council, ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group, or the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA).
OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas: Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) has developed due diligence guidelines for organizations to implement when sourcing minerals from conflict regions, including but not limited to the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. These guidelines have become normative in the industry and can be used to demonstrate due diligence under national and regional laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act in the U.S. and the European Commission draft proposal for supply chain due diligence for conflict minerals. http://www.oecd.org/daf/inv/mne/mining.htm

Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC) chain-of-custody certification: The Responsible Jewellery Council is a standard-setting and certification organization that has developed an ISEAL-accredited chain-of-custody certification program for use by the jewellery industry and manufacturers, which applies to gold and platinum group metals. https://www.responsiblejewellery.com/rjc-certification/

Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI): Formerly known as the Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative, the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI) is a joint effort between the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) and GeSI to establish supply chain transparency tools, resources and training to assist organizations in responsibly sourcing conflict-free minerals from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. Of note is their Responsible Minerals Assurance Process, which enables auditing and assessment of smelters for responsible ore sourcing and provides a centralized database for tracking smelter performance. http://www.responsiblemineralsinitiative.org/

THESIS Help Center Video: Conflict minerals KPI: Short video tutorial on the Conflict minerals KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017273

The London Bullion Market Association Good Delivery Lists: According to their website, the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA) produces "Good Delivery Lists for gold and silver bars; detailing the names of accredited refiners, their listing date and the marking details of their bars." http://www.lbma.org.uk/the-good-delivery-list

World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard: As part of their activities to support socially-responsible gold mining, the World Gold Council has developed the World Gold Council Conflict-Free Gold Standard to provide guidance to companies on responsible mining practices. https://www.gold.org/about-gold/gold-supply/responsible-gold/conflict-free-gold-standard
Better Sourcing Program: The Better Sourcing Program (BSP) provides a technology-based communications solution to allow global organizations to source artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) ores through upstream due diligence, auditing and risk management. https://www.rcsglobal.com/bettersourcing/

ITA Responsible Tin Supply Group: The International Tin Association (ITA) has convened the Responsible Tin Supply Group (RTS) to enable organizations to source cassiterite (ore from which tin is derived) from responsible supply chain actors in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and surrounding countries while meeting due diligence guidance developed by the UN and OECD and required by national laws such as the Dodd-Frank Act. https://www.internationaltin.org/rts-group/

Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade: According to the website, "The Public-Private Alliance for Responsible Minerals Trade (PPA) is a joint initiative among governments, companies, and civil society to support supply chain solutions to conflict minerals challenges in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and the Great Lakes Region (GLR) of Central Africa." http://www.resolv.org/site-ppa/
Conflict minerals: Conflict minerals are defined per "Section 1502(e)(4) of the [Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform] Act as (A) columbite-tantalite, also known as coltan (the metal ore from which tantalum is extracted); cassiterite (the metal ore from which tin is extracted); gold; wolframite (the metal ore from which tungsten is extracted); or their derivatives; or (B) any other mineral or its derivatives determined by the Secretary of State to be financing conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo or an adjoining country." (US Securities and Exchange Commission, 17 CFR Parts 240 and 249b, RIN: 3235-AK84, Conflict Minerals Final Rule)
Fluorescent BulbsElectricity consumption - Compact fluorescent useCalculate on the basis of compact fluorescent lamps manufactured alone. Calculate B1 as the total number of product units sold that had ENERGY STAR® certification divided by the total number of product units sold in this category, then multiply by 100. If unwilling to report, answer 0%.
Include only products certified to the version of the ENERGY STAR standard that was in force when the product was manufactured.
In markets not actively participating in the ENERGY STAR program (i.e., the United States and countries listed as ENERGY STAR International Partners), products may be counted toward this percentage if they meet the criteria in the appropriate ENERGY STAR standard, even if they are not “ENERGY STAR-certified”.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
ENERGY STAR® Product Specification for Lamps: Effective September 30, 2014, this specification defines the criteria for qualifying integrally-ballasted LED and CFL lamps for ENERGY STAR certification and replaces prior, separate specifications for the two lamp types. https://www.energystar.gov/products/lighting_fansENERGY STAR International Partners: The EPA enters into agreements with foreign governments to use and/or recognize the ENERGY STAR standards and mark to help unify voluntary energy-efficiency initatives globally. https://www.energystar.gov/partner_resources/international_partners

ENERGY STAR® Qualified Products: According to their website, "The ENERGY STAR label was established to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and other pollutants caused by the inefficient use of energy and make it easy for consumers to identify and purchase energy-efficient products that offer savings on energy bills without sacrificing performance, features, and comfort." Standards are established by ENERGY STAR through a multi-stakeholder process and administered under the US EPA. https://www.energystar.gov/products
Product efficiency: The performance of a product with respect to the use of energy, water, or materials.
Fluorescent BulbsElectricity consumption - Linear fluorescent useCalculate on the basis of linear fluorescent lamps manufactured alone. If unwilling to report, answer 0%.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
N/AHong Kong Green Label Scheme: According to the Green Council website, "The HKGLS is an independent, non-profit-making and voluntary scheme for the certification of environmentally preferable products launched in December 2000 by Green Council (GC). The scheme sets environmental standards and awards "Green Label" to products that are qualified regarding their environment performance...HKGLS is an ISO (International Organization for Standardization) 14024 Type 1 label, which involves a third-party certification requiring considerations of life cycle impacts." https://www.greencouncil.org/hkgls

IES LM-9-09: This document describes the Illuminating Engineering Society's test method for electrical and photometric measurements of linear fluorescent lamps and all U- and circular-shaped fluorescent lamps. https://webstore.ansi.org/standards/iesna/ieslm09
N/A
Fluorescent BulbsGreenhouse gas emissions - Electronic componentsScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the total spend on electronic component suppliers that reported emissions divided by total spend on electronic component suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Fluorescent BulbsGreenhouse gas emissions - Metal componentsScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the total spend on metal component suppliers that reported emissions divided by total spend on metal component suppliers, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/
Greenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Fluorescent BulbsPackaging Raw Material SourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

ISO 18604: ISO 18604 (Packaging and the environment -- Material recycling) provides measurement standards for determining how recyclable a particular product is. https://www.iso.org/standard/55872.html

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Pre-consumer recycled material: “Material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Renewable material: “Material that is composed of biomass from a living source and that can be continually replenished. To be defined as renewable, virgin materials shall come from sources which are replenished at a rate equal to or greater than the rate of depletion.” (FTC Green Guides:2012)

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably-sourced material: Material for which it can be demonstrated through second- or third-party verification that the virgin raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities. Materials such as paper can be included in this definition if the source of the packaging content comes from sustainably-managed forests with no deforestation.
Fluorescent BulbsProduct designThis question does not address packaging materials. Product design strategies may include design for lightweighting, durability, disassembly, reuse, recycled content, and recyclability. N/AAutodesk - Design for Sustainability: Autodesk® Sustainability Workshop provides resources, tools and online learning opportunities to teach the principles of sustainable design. https://academy.autodesk.com/sustainable-design

ISO 14040: ISO 14040 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Principles and Framework" document for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/37456.html

ISO 14044: ISO 14044 is the International Organization for Standardization's "Requirements and Guidelines" standard for conducting life cycle assessments. https://www.iso.org/standard/38498.html

UN Environment Design for Sustainability: Materials Efficiency: One example of a tool and protocol for material efficiency is included in the Design for Sustainability report published by UN Environment. https://wedocs.unep.org/handle/20.500.11822/7961
End-of-life: A product life cycle phase that begins at the end of a product’s useful life, including reuse and refurbishment cycles.

Material and process efficiency: Material efficiency is the ratio between the material input and the benefits derived. Resource conservation (source reduction) of material inputs and/or improving the functionality of the packaging can positively impact material efficiency. Process efficiency is the ratio between the time spent on production steps to the output. Opportunities to improve material and process efficiency include process improvement, product redesign, and technology changes to packaging equipment. It should be noted that continual source reduction has benefits, but there are trade-offs that must be assessed.

Public disclosure: Manufacturer-based acts of making information available and readily accessible to the public through one or more forms of media (e.g., online, print, telephone). Print media includes product labels and also includes, but is not limited to, books, magazines, newspapers, and readily accessible journal articles. Online disclosure includes, but is not limited to, publicly accessible websites (desktop or mobile) as well as making information electronically available through reporting platforms or mobile apps.

Resource conservation: Practices that reduce the consumption and waste of energy and natural resources.
Fluorescent BulbsSustainable Packaging Design and ProductionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

EPA Energy Benefits Calculator: Use the EPA Energy Benefits Calculator to help quantify environmental impact reductions for packaging design choices. https://www.epa.gov/lmop/landfill-gas-energy-benefits-calculator

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

Recycle Now: Recycle Now is the national recycling effort in England. The website contains examples of recycling labels that may be used on packaging and how to interpret them. http://www.recyclenow.com/recycle/packaging-symbols-explained

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: Material efficiency is the ratio between the material input and the benefits derived. Resource conservation (source reduction) of material inputs and/or improving the functionality of the packaging can positively impact material efficiency. Process efficiency is the ratio between the time spent on production steps to the output. Opportunities to improve material and process efficiency include process improvement, product redesign, and technology changes to packaging equipment. It should be noted that continual source reduction has benefits, but there are trade-offs that must be assessed.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
Fluorescent BulbsWorker health and safety - ManufacturingThis question aligns with the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Injury and Illness rate. This rate is calculated using the Days Away, Restricted, or Transferred (DART) formula. This formula can be normalized for global applicability.
Calculate B1 according to OSHA's injury and illness rate by multiplying the number of recordable injuries and illnesses by 200,000. Divide this number by the total employee hours worked to produce your final product. If multiple facilities manufacture the final product, the injury and illness rate will need to be adjusted using a weighted average based on each facility's percentage of total production. Include all employees at a facility that participate in the production of the final product. This includes both full-time and contracted employees.
Calculate B2 as the units of your final product for which you were able to obtain data divided by the total units of your final product, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS General Guidance document provides guidance to calculate the weighted average. See Background Information for access to this document.
Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool: This tool calculates the injury and illness incidence rate for employers. https://data.bls.gov/iirc/

OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses: This webpage contains information on how to record workplace injuries and illnesses and provides the worksheets needed to correctly do so. https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/forms

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520108472
How to Compute a Firm's Incidence Rate for Safety Management: This website from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics provides in-depth guidance on computing injury and illness numbers. https://www.bls.gov/iif/osheval.htm

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

TSC General Guidance for Key Performance Indicators: The General Guidance Document for Key Performance Indicators (KPI) provides essential guidance to complement the specific guidance provided for each KPI. TSC recommends reading this document before you begin your first questionnaire and revisiting it as often as necessary for clarification and additional information. https://www.sustainabilityconsortium.org/tsc-downloads/general-guidance-document/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Bed Frames and HeadboardsCertification - Paper and wood sourcingCalculate C1 as the dry mass of your paper and wood supply that only underwent third-party legality verification, divided by the total dry mass of your paper and wood supply, then multiply by 100. Do not include in this calculation any supply that is included under one of the other response options.
Calculate C2 as the dry mass of your paper and wood supply that had FSC Controlled Wood certification, divided by the total dry mass of your paper or wood supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the dry mass of your paper and wood supply that was certified to the SFI Fiber Sourcing Standard or sourced under a PEFC-Due Diligence System, divided by the total dry mass of your paper and wood supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the dry mass of your paper and wood supply that was FSC-certified, divided by the total dry mass of your paper and wood supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C5 as the dry mass of your paper and wood supply that was SFI-certified or certified under another PEFC-endorsed program, divided by the total dry mass of your paper and wood supply, then multiply by 100.
The sum of C1, C2, C3, C4, and C5 must not exceed 100%. Do not include the same paper or wood supply in the calculation of more than one response option. The last day of the 12-month reporting period must be within 12 months of the completion date of this question.
CERFLOR - Brazilian Forest Certification Program: This organization is an independent, third-party certification program that focuses on sustainable management of natural and planted Amazonian tropical forests. CERFLOR is a PEFC-endorsed certification. https://www.pefc.org/discover-pefc/our-pefc-members/national-members/brazilian-forest-certification-programme-cerflor

CSA - Canadian Standards Association: CSA Group is an internationally-accredited standards development and testing and certification organization that provides consumer product evaluation, education, and training services dedicated to advancing safety, sustainability, and social good. Some programs include environmental product performance, management systems and processes, registry services, worker and workplace safety, energy efficiency verification, and greenhouse gas clean projects. Programs specific to wood sourcing are outlined in Canada's National Standard for Sustainable Forest Management. CSA is a PEFC-endorsed program. http://www.csagroup.org/

EU Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade Volunteer Partnership Agreement: Voluntary Partnership Agreements (VPAs) are a central element of the EU's strategy in the fight against illegal logging. A VPA is a bilateral trade agreement between the EU and a timber-exporting country outside the EU. https://www.euflegt.efi.int/vpa

FSC Controlled Wood: The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) Controlled Wood is non-certified material subject to controlled conditions that can be mixed with FSC-certified material during manufacturing FSC-Mix products. This has enabled manufacturers to manage low and fluctuating supplies of FSC certified forest products, while creating demand for FSC certified wood. https://us.fsc.org/en-us/certification/controlled-wood

FSC Forest Certification: Products with FSC certification come from responsibly managed forests that provide environmental, social, and economic benefits. The following website provides more information related to the principles that guide the certification process. https://us.fsc.org/en-us/certification

Forest Legality Alliance's Risk Tool: This tool is designed to present useful information about the sourcing of forest products. You can search the tool's content by country or by species to find specific information.? https://forestlegality.org/risk-tool/

PEFC - Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification Due Diligence System: The PEFC DDS is an integral part of the PEFC Chain of Custody standard and is the mechanism that avoids the inclusion of timber from controversial sources in products with a PEFC claim. https://www.pefc.org/for-business/supply-chain-companies

PEFC - Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification: The Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC) provides guidance for integrating best practices for the entire forest supply chain to ensure that timber and non-timber forest products are produced with consideration of ecological, social, and ethical standards. http://www.pefc.org

SFI - Sustainable Forestry Initiative - Fiber Sourcing Standard: The SFI Fiber Sourcing Standard is for organizations that do not own or manage land but do procure wood directly from forests. Program Participants must show that the raw material in their supply chain comes from legal and responsible sources, whether the forests are certified or not. Primary producers must be third-party audited and certified to the SFI 2015-2019 Fiber Sourcing Standard. SFI is a PEFC-endorsed program. https://forests.org/fibersourcingstandard/

SFI - Sustainable Forestry Initiative - Standard: The SFI Standard addresses sustainable forest management and responsible sourcing. SFI also has a chain of custody standard to track wood and paper flow through the supply chain. SFI is a PEFC-endorsed program. https://forests.org/sficertifiedsourcingstandard/
N/AN/A
Bed Frames and HeadboardsGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the spend on materials, ingredients, and components from suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total spend on all materials, ingredients, and components, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
N/A
Bed Frames and HeadboardsGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, including product assembly and the manufacture of any materials, ingredients, and components purchased directly by your organization for inclusion in your products, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total revenue of produced product.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total revenue of produced product.
Calculate B2 as the revenue of produced products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total revenue of produced products, then multiply by 100.
For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardGreenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Bed Frames and HeadboardsLeather impacts - Supply chainCalculate C1 as the mass of your leather supply that was traced to the slaughterhouse operation of origin, divided by the total mass of your leather supply, then multiply by 100.

Calculate C2 as the mass of leather materials that came from suppliers that either maintain a current comprehensive animal welfare certification or verifiable, regularly conducted animal welfare audits, divided by the total mass of our leather material supply, then multiply by 100.

Verifiable, regularly conducted audits should be performed by a second party or third party. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain can initiate these audits. Regulations, audits, and certifications that align with the animal welfare standards as described in Section 7 of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Terrestrial/Aquatic Animal Health Code and are well-enforced by the implementation of auditing systems can be included in your calculation.
Farm stage:
Minimization of pain, risk of injury, and transmission of diseases or parasites to animals; a physical environment in which the air or water quality, temperature, and humidity supports good animal health; a structural and social environment that allows animals to rest comfortably, provides opportunities for physical and cognitive activity, and allows for the opportunity to perform all beneficial natural, individual, and social behaviors.
Animals should have access to sufficient water and appropriate feed, so as to be free from hunger and thirst. The handling of animals should foster a positive relationship between humans and animals and should not cause injury, panic, lasting fear, or avoidable stress.
Genetic selection should take into account the health and welfare of animals.
Transportation stage:
Animals should not be transported if they are not fit to travel. For those animals fit to travel, the number of journeys and the length of time should be minimized. Loading and unloading procedures should minimize animal stress, prevent injury, and use facilities that promote calm and safe animal movement. Protection from extreme temperatures and other extreme weather conditions is provided. Adequate feed and water is available when required.
Slaughter stage:
Animals should be treated humanely before and during all slaughter procedures, including pre-slaughter stunning for non-ritual slaughter. The pre-slaughter stunning must render the animal insensible to pain until death occurs. The minimization of fear, stress, and pain is included in humane treatment.
TSC provides a list of animal welfare certifications, standards, and programs to assist users in choosing a program that aligns with their needs. See Background Information for more details.

Calculate C3 as the mass of your leather supply that came from tannery operations that either maintain a current comprehensive environmental impact certification or verifiable, regularly conducted environmental impact audit, divided by the total mass of your leather supply, then multiply by 100.
The certification or audits should address all material environmental impacts including, but not limited to, chemical use, energy consumption, water usage, air and noise emissions, and waste and effluent management. Material audited by The Leather Working Group may be included in the calculation of C3.

Calculate C4 as the mass of your leather supply that came from tannery operations that regularly and verifiably conducted audits for worker health and safety, divided by the total mass of your leather supply, then multiply by 100.
The audits should address all worker health and safety concerns, including, but not limited to, equipment training, chemical exposure, noise exposure, dust exposure, and accident record keeping.

To be included in C2, C3 and C4, verifiable, regularly conducted audits should be performed by a second party or third party. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain can initiate these audits.

Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
N/AN/AN/A
Bed Frames and HeadboardsPackaging Raw Material SourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Pre-consumer recycled material: “Material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Renewable material: “Material that is composed of biomass from a living source and that can be continually replenished. To be defined as renewable, virgin materials shall come from sources which are replenished at a rate equal to or greater than the rate of depletion.” (FTC Green Guides:2012)

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably-sourced material: Material for which it can be demonstrated through second- or third-party verification that the virgin raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities. Materials such as paper can be included in this definition if the source of the packaging content comes from sustainably-managed forests with no deforestation.
Bed Frames and HeadboardsPriority chemicals - DisclosureFor this question, a priority chemical is one that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis.
Relevant criteria in the US EPA Safer Choice Program and Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals, listed below, may be used to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment.to health or the environment from multiple agents or stressors” (EPA, 2003).
Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Disclosure KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Disclosure KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750684
N/APriority chemical: A chemical that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis.
Bed Frames and HeadboardsProduct stewardshipThis question addresses takeback programs that an organization may fund, contract, or physically operate, in whole or in part, to enable consumers to return products for responsible end-of-life management. Include only products and materials for which an organization has the ability to decide or influence the handling, treatment, and disposal of returned devices, components, and materials. These calculations should be made at the program level rather than category level. The same percentage can be reported across multiple product categories if the products are collected and managed in the same program within the organization. Separate programs require separate percentage calculations when reported in different product category questionnaires. If products under the same category are collected in separate programs, average the recycling performance of the two programs and report that value in D1.
Calculate D1 as the number of product units returned through the program(s) for recycling divided by the total number of product units sold, then multiply by 100. If this number exceeds 100, report it as 100.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Data for both the unit volume returned and unit volume sold should come from the same year, even though units may be returned in a different year than they were sold.
Examples of stewardship programs include extended producer responsibility programs and product takeback programs. Such programs should ensure that materials are recycled or disposed of in an environmentally sensitive manner.
THESIS Help Center Video: Product Stewardship KPI: Short video tutorial on the Product Stewardship KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750712N/AN/A
Bed Frames and HeadboardsRecycled contentThis question covers materials, such as metals, plastics, and wood, as well as ingredients, such as motor oil and refrigerants. Calculate B1 by dividing the mass of post-consumer recycled materials or ingredients in the final product by the total mass of the final product, then multiply by 100. If multiple product configurations are sold, perform this calculation for each configuration, then calculate B1 and the sales-weighted average across all configurations. Treat refurbished goods as 100% post-consumer recycled material. Some materials and ingredients will have no available recycling stream, but the masses of these should still be included in the final product's mass.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS Help Center Video: Recycled Content KPI: Short video tutorial on the Recycled Content KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017179FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Prospector: This searchable database from UL allows product designers to search for materials and ingredients that meet a set of user-defined specifications, including those that contain some amount of recycled content. https://www.ulprospector.com/en/na
N/A
Bed Frames and HeadboardsResponsible metals supplyCalculate C1 as the spend on metal suppliers who require site-level assessments from all of their suppliers divided by the total spend on product units manufactured in this product category, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
An assessment should include an on-site audit of environmental and social sustainability performance by a second or third party, or a systematic risk assessment against a standard or set of principles to determine risk based on conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors. Examples of standards or sets of principles include those developed by the International Council on Mining & Metals (ICMM) and the Initiative for Responsible Mining Assurance (IRMA).
N/ABetter Sourcing Program: The Better Sourcing Program (BSP) provides a technology-based communications solution to allow global organizations to source artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) ores through upstream due diligence, auditing and risk management. https://www.rcsglobal.com/bettersourcing/

Responsible Cobalt Initiative (RCI): An initiative under the Chinese Chamber of Commerce for Metals, Minerals & Chemicals (CCCMC), in collaboration with OECD, to bring importers and exporters of cobalt together with supply chain stakeholders to address social and environmental risks in the cobalt supply chain. http://en.cccmc.org.cn/news/58372.htm

Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC) chain-of-custody certification: The Responsible Jewellery Council is a standard-setting and certification organization that has developed an ISEAL-accredited chain-of-custody certification program for use by the jewellery industry and manufacturers, which applies to gold and platinum group metals. https://www.responsiblejewellery.com/rjc-certification/

Responsible Mica Initiative: A multi-stakeholder focused on responsible sourcing of mica in Indiay through the development and deployment of fair, responsible and sustainable practices, local community empowerment, and building a legal and liveable environment in local communities. https://responsible-mica-initiative.com/

Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI): Formerly known as the Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative, the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI) is a joint effort between the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) and GeSI to establish supply chain transparency tools, resources and training to assist organizations in responsibly sourcing conflict-free minerals from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. Of note is their Responsible Minerals Assurance Process, which enables auditing and assessment of smelters for responsible ore sourcing and provides a centralized database for tracking smelter performance. http://www.responsiblemineralsinitiative.org/

Responsible Steel: A multi-stakeholder initative bringing together organizations across the steel supply chain to develop a standard for responsible steel supply and related certifications. https://www.responsiblesteel.org/
Corrective actions: Prompt actions taken to eliminate the causes of a problem, thus preventing their recurrence.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.
Bed Frames and HeadboardsSustainable Packaging Design and ProductionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

EPA Energy Benefits Calculator: Use the EPA Energy Benefits Calculator to help quantify environmental impact reductions for packaging design choices. https://www.epa.gov/lmop/landfill-gas-energy-benefits-calculator

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

Recycle Now: Recycle Now is the national recycling effort in England. The website contains examples of recycling labels that may be used on packaging and how to interpret them. http://www.recyclenow.com/recycle/packaging-symbols-explained

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: Material efficiency is the ratio between the material input and the benefits derived. Resource conservation (source reduction) of material inputs and/or improving the functionality of the packaging can positively impact material efficiency. Process efficiency is the ratio between the time spent on production steps to the output. Opportunities to improve material and process efficiency include process improvement, product redesign, and technology changes to packaging equipment. It should be noted that continual source reduction has benefits, but there are trade-offs that must be assessed.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
Bed Frames and HeadboardsTransportation to RetailersInclude shipments of your product from final manufacturing facilities to downstream retailers or distributors. Include both company-owned and contracted fleet. Exclude data for return trips. If retailers are responsible for the transportation of some or all of your final product, the retailer may hold the information necessary to calculate your response. It may be made available in a public report or by request.
Calculate B1 as the volume of product transported by carriers that reported emissions, divided by total volume of product transported, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If a supplier completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, you may count that as compliance with this question. Examples of other compliant standards are provided in the Certifications, Standards, & Tools section below.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

Clean Shipping Index: According to their website, "Clean Shipping Index is a tool for cargo owners to select clean ships and quality ship operators" to minimize environmental footprint and identify areas for environmental improvement. https://www.cleanshippingindex.com/

Clear Cargo: The Clean Cargo Working group is a business initiative created by BSR to collaboratively address the environmental impacts of shipping and transportation. https://www.clean-cargo.org/data-methods

EN 16258: The European Committee for Standardization's EN 16258 standard deals with the methodology for calculation and reporting of energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of freight and passenger transport services. https://shop.bsigroup.com/ProductDetail/?pid=000000000030241098

Ecotransit: EcotransIT World calculates and quantifies environmental impacts of different carriers across the world in terms of direct energy usage and emissions during the operation of vehicles during the transport of products. http://www.ecotransit.org/

IATA CO2 Emissions Measurement Methodology: This document includes a methodology for measuring CO2 emissions from air cargo. https://www.iata.org/en/programs/cargo/sustainability/carbon-footprint/

THESIS Help Center Video: Transportation to Retailers KPI: Short video tutorial on the Transportation to Retailers KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/529545735
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsN/A
Bed Frames and HeadboardsWastewater generation - Supply chainCalculate B1 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for COD, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B2 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for BOD, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B3 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for TSS, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B4 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met the standard for pH, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B5 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met the standard for temperature, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Audits should include verification that discharged wastewater is meeting the standards set forth by the American Apparel & Footwear Association Global Textile Effluent Guidelines for 95% of the sampling period:
- Measurements for BOD and TSS should be below or equal to 30 ppm.
- Measurements for COD should be below or equal to 100 ppm.
- Measurements for temperature should be below or equal to 37 degrees Celsius.
- Measurements for pH should be between 6.0 - 9.0.
Testing should follow a rigorous and internationally accepted methodology and frequency. Local or corporate standards may be stricter. The water quality metrics ideally approach ambient conditions.
Information required by the Higg Index Facility Environment Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Wastewater - Level 2, Question 7" may be used in responding to B1-B5 if the chosen wastewater standard meets or exceeds the values listed above, or if the values of the parameters listed in the detection table meet or exceed the values listed above. The information reported to the FEM is at the facility level; if your products are produced in multiple facilities you may aggregate the data to represent the entirety of final product produced.
AWS International Water Stewardship Standard: The International Water Stewardship Standard is a globally-applicable framework that helps water users understand their water use and impacts. Developed by the Alliance for Water Stewardship, the standard addresses 1) sustainable water balance, 2) good water quality, 3) healthy important water-related areas, and 4) good water governance. https://a4ws.org/the-aws-standard-2-0/

American Apparel & Footwear Association (AAFA) - Restricted Substance List: The AAFA provides guidelines for restricted chemicals and substances. https://www.aafaglobal.org/AAFA/Solutions_Pages/Restricted_Substance_List

BHive: The BHive enables the creation and management of chemical inventories, identifies chemical products that meet sustainability credentials. The BHive enhances supply chain transparency as factories, brands, and retailers can view and compare the safety of chemical products. https://www.thebhive.net/

Detox to Zero by OEKO-TEX: This analysis and assessment tool creates transparency and provides textile and leather producers the ability to control the use of hazardous substances. The tool focuses on continuous improvement and gradual reduction of harmful substances in production processes. https://www.oeko-tex.com/en/our-standards/detox-to-zero-by-oeko-tex

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS): Sustainable Textile Solutions programs support brands, retailers, and industry partners in their efforts to achieve compliance to environmental, health, and safety standards. https://sustexsolutions.com/

THESIS Help Center Video: Wastewater generation - Supply Chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Wastewater generation - Supply Chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/448595442
Roadmap to Zero by ZDHC (Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals): This plan is intended to reduce and eliminate the discharge of hazardous chemicals. https://www.roadmaptozero.com/

Textile Effluent Treatment Technology: The Journal of Cotton Science has produced a document addressing the treatment of textile effluent and specific wastewater management methods. http://www.cotton.org/journal/2007-11/3/upload/jcs11-141.pdf

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - Effluent Limitation Guidelines: This source provides current wastewater discharge guidelines and provides resources for reducing environmental impacts from wastewater discharge. https://www.epa.gov/eg

Wastewater 101 Toolbox: A free online resource for the textile industry to learn, act, and share experiences related to the treatment of wastewater. https://wastewater.sustainabilityconsortium.org/
Biological oxygen demand (BOD): An indicator for the amount of oxygen required/consumed for the microbiological decomposition (oxidation) of organic material in water bodies.

Chemical oxygen demand (COD): An indicator for the amount of oxygen required to oxidize an organic compound to carbon dioxide, ammonia, and water. The measurement is a proxy for the amount of organic compounds in water. Measuring COD in wastewater provides an estimated level of organic pollutants. The standard for measurement can be referenced in ISO 6060.

Total suspended solids (TSS): A water quality measurement that reflects the amount of particulates in a sample. The dry weight of residue in a filter is used to calculate units in milligrams per liter (mg/L).

Water use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.

pH: A measure of a substance's acidity or basicity. The measurement is based upon the molar concentration of hydrogen (H) ions in an aqueous solution of the substance. Pure water is at a neutral pH of 7. For wastewater quality testing, measuring pH allows for benchmarking pH levels to ambient conditions existing naturally in the surrounding environment.
Bed Frames and HeadboardsWorker health and safety - ManufacturingThis question aligns with the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Injury and Illness rate. This rate can be normalized for global applicability.
Calculate C1 according to OSHA's injury and illness rate by multiplying the number of recordable injuries and illnesses by 200,000. Divide this number by the total employee hours worked to produce your final product. If multiple facilities manufacture the final product, the injury and illness rate will need to be adjusted using a weighted average based on each facility's percentage of total production. Include all employees at a facility that participate in the production of the final product. This includes both full-time and contracted employees.
Calculate C2 as the revenue from your final product for which you were able to obtain data divided by the total revenue from your final product, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS General Guidance document provides guidance to calculate the weighted average. See Background Information for access to this document.
The Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool is an online calculator that will compute your injury and illness rate. The OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses provides forms and information for computing your facility injury and illness rate.
Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool: This tool calculates the injury and illness incidence rate for employers. https://data.bls.gov/iirc/

OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses: This webpage contains information on how to record workplace injuries and illnesses and provides the worksheets needed to correctly do so. https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/forms

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520108472
How to Compute a Firm's Incidence Rate for Safety Management: This website from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics provides in-depth guidance on computing injury and illness numbers. https://www.bls.gov/iif/osheval.htm

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

TSC General Guidance for Key Performance Indicators: The General Guidance Document for Key Performance Indicators (KPI) provides essential guidance to complement the specific guidance provided for each KPI. TSC recommends reading this document before you begin your first questionnaire and revisiting it as often as necessary for clarification and additional information. https://www.sustainabilityconsortium.org/tsc-downloads/general-guidance-document/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Bed Frames and HeadboardsWorker health and safety - Supply chainTo be included in B1-B5, risk assessments, training programs, safety plans, performance monitoring systems, and audits must be verifiable and address health and safety issues such as worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. The assessments and audits must be conducted by second or third parties. The risk assessment must be conducted once per year while the audit must have been conducted at least once every three years, both using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles such as International Labour Organization Occupational Safety and Health Conventions (e.g., No. 155). The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions, which can inform your responses. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for examples of initiatives that meet these requirements.
Calculate B1 as the mass of your materials, ingredients, and components that came from operations that have performed a risk assessment to identify high risk areas for health and safety, divided by the total mass of your materials, ingredients, and components, then multiply by 100.
To determine if an operation is high risk for health and safety, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic review assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. It must be conducted at least once per year. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your materials, ingredients, and components that came from operations that train workers on health and safety procedures, divided by the total mass of your materials, ingredients, and components, then multiply by 100. To be included in B2, the training on health and safety procedures must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and must be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for workers on health and safety procedures and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional worker training may be required to perform job duties. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your materials, ingredients, and components that came from operations that implement a verifiable worker health and safety plan, divided by the total mass of your materials, ingredients, and components, then multiply by 100. To be included in B3, a worker health and safety plan must be verifiable and must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and be prominently displayed in the workplace where employees normally report. The plan should include best practices specific to ergonomics; repetitive motions; chemical and particulate exposure; appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE); and proper use of tools, machinery, and the handling of animals (if applicable). On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B4 as the mass of your materials, ingredients, and components that came from operations that have a worker health and safety performance monitoring system in place, divided by the total mass of your materials, ingredients, and components, then multiply by 100. To be included in B4, a worker health and safety performance monitoring system should include metrics on issues including, but not limited to, incidence of worker injuries and prevalence of diseases. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B5 as the mass of your materials, ingredients, and components that came from operations that were audited in the last three years on worker health and safety issues, divided by the total mass of your materials, ingredients, and components, then multiply by 100. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
To be included in B5, the audits must be verifiable and address preventive measures, freely provided personal protective equipment, identification of worker health and safety hazards and effects on the exposed people, statistics and reasons behind injuries, design of work area, processes, installations, machinery/work equipment, operating processes and work organization, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Standards on Occupational Health and Safety.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Recommended Practices for Safety and Health Programs: Defines and enforces standards for the safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women. OHSA also provides training, outreach education, and assistance. The OSHA tools can be used for self-evaluations, to compare elements and actions of different health and safety standards, to track implemented actions, identify remaining weaknesses, and strategies for continued improvement. https://www.osha.gov/shpguidelines/explore-tools.html

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit: Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit is an auditing system that aligns with Ethical Trading Initiative's Base Code as well International Labour Organization Conventions. It has been developed to provide a public auditing methodology and format for companies to use to assess compliance. https://www.sedex.com/our-services/smeta-audit/

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528345
IS0 26000 Social Responsibility: ISO 2600 is not a certification tool, but it offers guidance about social responsibility to all sorts of organizations regardless of their activity, size or location. https://www.iso.org/iso-26000-social-responsibility.html

Social Accountability International Guidance Document for Social Accountability 8000: According to Social Accountability International, "this guidance document provides various tools and information for users of the Social Accountability 8000 standard, including definitions, background information, and examples." https://sa-intl.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/SA8000-2014-Guidance-Document.pdf

United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9
Corrective actions: Prompt actions taken to eliminate the causes of a problem, thus preventing their recurrence.

First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Risk assessment: A systematic process to evaluate potential risks within an operation, system, or supply chain. It can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party or a country risk classification analysis that judges the site risk due to prevailing conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Chairs, Stools, BenchesCertification - Paper and wood sourcingCalculate C1 as the dry mass of your paper and wood supply that only underwent third-party legality verification, divided by the total dry mass of your paper and wood supply, then multiply by 100. Do not include in this calculation any supply that is included under one of the other response options.
Calculate C2 as the dry mass of your paper and wood supply that had FSC Controlled Wood certification, divided by the total dry mass of your paper or wood supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the dry mass of your paper and wood supply that was certified to the SFI Fiber Sourcing Standard or sourced under a PEFC-Due Diligence System, divided by the total dry mass of your paper and wood supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the dry mass of your paper and wood supply that was FSC-certified, divided by the total dry mass of your paper and wood supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C5 as the dry mass of your paper and wood supply that was SFI-certified or certified under another PEFC-endorsed program, divided by the total dry mass of your paper and wood supply, then multiply by 100.
The sum of C1, C2, C3, C4, and C5 must not exceed 100%. Do not include the same paper or wood supply in the calculation of more than one response option. The last day of the 12-month reporting period must be within 12 months of the completion date of this question.
CERFLOR - Brazilian Forest Certification Program: This organization is an independent, third-party certification program that focuses on sustainable management of natural and planted Amazonian tropical forests. CERFLOR is a PEFC-endorsed certification. https://www.pefc.org/discover-pefc/our-pefc-members/national-members/brazilian-forest-certification-programme-cerflor

CSA - Canadian Standards Association: CSA Group is an internationally-accredited standards development and testing and certification organization that provides consumer product evaluation, education, and training services dedicated to advancing safety, sustainability, and social good. Some programs include environmental product performance, management systems and processes, registry services, worker and workplace safety, energy efficiency verification, and greenhouse gas clean projects. Programs specific to wood sourcing are outlined in Canada's National Standard for Sustainable Forest Management. CSA is a PEFC-endorsed program. http://www.csagroup.org/

EU Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade Volunteer Partnership Agreement: Voluntary Partnership Agreements (VPAs) are a central element of the EU's strategy in the fight against illegal logging. A VPA is a bilateral trade agreement between the EU and a timber-exporting country outside the EU. https://www.euflegt.efi.int/vpa

FSC Controlled Wood: The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) Controlled Wood is non-certified material subject to controlled conditions that can be mixed with FSC-certified material during manufacturing FSC-Mix products. This has enabled manufacturers to manage low and fluctuating supplies of FSC certified forest products, while creating demand for FSC certified wood. https://us.fsc.org/en-us/certification/controlled-wood

FSC Forest Certification: Products with FSC certification come from responsibly managed forests that provide environmental, social, and economic benefits. The following website provides more information related to the principles that guide the certification process. https://us.fsc.org/en-us/certification

Forest Legality Alliance's Risk Tool: This tool is designed to present useful information about the sourcing of forest products. You can search the tool's content by country or by species to find specific information.? https://forestlegality.org/risk-tool/

PEFC - Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification Due Diligence System: The PEFC DDS is an integral part of the PEFC Chain of Custody standard and is the mechanism that avoids the inclusion of timber from controversial sources in products with a PEFC claim. https://www.pefc.org/for-business/supply-chain-companies

PEFC - Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification: The Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC) provides guidance for integrating best practices for the entire forest supply chain to ensure that timber and non-timber forest products are produced with consideration of ecological, social, and ethical standards. http://www.pefc.org

SFI - Sustainable Forestry Initiative - Fiber Sourcing Standard: The SFI Fiber Sourcing Standard is for organizations that do not own or manage land but do procure wood directly from forests. Program Participants must show that the raw material in their supply chain comes from legal and responsible sources, whether the forests are certified or not. Primary producers must be third-party audited and certified to the SFI 2015-2019 Fiber Sourcing Standard. SFI is a PEFC-endorsed program. https://forests.org/fibersourcingstandard/

SFI - Sustainable Forestry Initiative - Standard: The SFI Standard addresses sustainable forest management and responsible sourcing. SFI also has a chain of custody standard to track wood and paper flow through the supply chain. SFI is a PEFC-endorsed program. https://forests.org/sficertifiedsourcingstandard/
N/AN/A
Chairs, Stools, BenchesGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the spend on materials, ingredients, and components from suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total spend on all materials, ingredients, and components, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
N/A
Chairs, Stools, BenchesGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, including product assembly and the manufacture of any materials, ingredients, and components purchased directly by your organization for inclusion in your products, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total revenue of produced product.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total revenue of produced product.
Calculate B2 as the revenue of produced products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total revenue of produced products, then multiply by 100.
For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardGreenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Chairs, Stools, BenchesLeather impacts - Supply chainCalculate C1 as the mass of your leather supply that was traced to the slaughterhouse operation of origin, divided by the total mass of your leather supply, then multiply by 100.

Calculate C2 as the mass of leather materials that came from suppliers that either maintain a current comprehensive animal welfare certification or verifiable, regularly conducted animal welfare audits, divided by the total mass of our leather material supply, then multiply by 100.

Verifiable, regularly conducted audits should be performed by a second party or third party. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain can initiate these audits. Regulations, audits, and certifications that align with the animal welfare standards as described in Section 7 of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Terrestrial/Aquatic Animal Health Code and are well-enforced by the implementation of auditing systems can be included in your calculation.
Farm stage:
Minimization of pain, risk of injury, and transmission of diseases or parasites to animals; a physical environment in which the air or water quality, temperature, and humidity supports good animal health; a structural and social environment that allows animals to rest comfortably, provides opportunities for physical and cognitive activity, and allows for the opportunity to perform all beneficial natural, individual, and social behaviors.
Animals should have access to sufficient water and appropriate feed, so as to be free from hunger and thirst. The handling of animals should foster a positive relationship between humans and animals and should not cause injury, panic, lasting fear, or avoidable stress.
Genetic selection should take into account the health and welfare of animals.
Transportation stage:
Animals should not be transported if they are not fit to travel. For those animals fit to travel, the number of journeys and the length of time should be minimized. Loading and unloading procedures should minimize animal stress, prevent injury, and use facilities that promote calm and safe animal movement. Protection from extreme temperatures and other extreme weather conditions is provided. Adequate feed and water is available when required.
Slaughter stage:
Animals should be treated humanely before and during all slaughter procedures, including pre-slaughter stunning for non-ritual slaughter. The pre-slaughter stunning must render the animal insensible to pain until death occurs. The minimization of fear, stress, and pain is included in humane treatment.
TSC provides a list of animal welfare certifications, standards, and programs to assist users in choosing a program that aligns with their needs. See Background Information for more details.

Calculate C3 as the mass of your leather supply that came from tannery operations that either maintain a current comprehensive environmental impact certification or verifiable, regularly conducted environmental impact audit, divided by the total mass of your leather supply, then multiply by 100.
The certification or audits should address all material environmental impacts including, but not limited to, chemical use, energy consumption, water usage, air and noise emissions, and waste and effluent management. Material audited by The Leather Working Group may be included in the calculation of C3.

Calculate C4 as the mass of your leather supply that came from tannery operations that regularly and verifiably conducted audits for worker health and safety, divided by the total mass of your leather supply, then multiply by 100.
The audits should address all worker health and safety concerns, including, but not limited to, equipment training, chemical exposure, noise exposure, dust exposure, and accident record keeping.

To be included in C2, C3 and C4, verifiable, regularly conducted audits should be performed by a second party or third party. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain can initiate these audits.

Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
N/AN/AN/A
Chairs, Stools, BenchesPackaging Raw Material SourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Pre-consumer recycled material: “Material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Renewable material: “Material that is composed of biomass from a living source and that can be continually replenished. To be defined as renewable, virgin materials shall come from sources which are replenished at a rate equal to or greater than the rate of depletion.” (FTC Green Guides:2012)

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably-sourced material: Material for which it can be demonstrated through second- or third-party verification that the virgin raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities. Materials such as paper can be included in this definition if the source of the packaging content comes from sustainably-managed forests with no deforestation.
Chairs, Stools, BenchesPriority chemicals - DisclosureFor this question, a priority chemical is one that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis.
Relevant criteria in the US EPA Safer Choice Program and Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals, listed below, may be used to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment.to health or the environment from multiple agents or stressors” (EPA, 2003).
Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Disclosure KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Disclosure KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750684
N/APriority chemical: A chemical that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis.
Chairs, Stools, BenchesProduct stewardshipThis question addresses takeback programs that an organization may fund, contract, or physically operate, in whole or in part, to enable consumers to return products for responsible end-of-life management. Include only products and materials for which an organization has the ability to decide or influence the handling, treatment, and disposal of returned devices, components, and materials. These calculations should be made at the program level rather than category level. The same percentage can be reported across multiple product categories if the products are collected and managed in the same program within the organization. Separate programs require separate percentage calculations when reported in different product category questionnaires. If products under the same category are collected in separate programs, average the recycling performance of the two programs and report that value in D1.
Calculate D1 as the number of product units returned through the program(s) for recycling divided by the total number of product units sold, then multiply by 100. If this number exceeds 100, report it as 100.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Data for both the unit volume returned and unit volume sold should come from the same year, even though units may be returned in a different year than they were sold.
Examples of stewardship programs include extended producer responsibility programs and product takeback programs. Such programs should ensure that materials are recycled or disposed of in an environmentally sensitive manner.
THESIS Help Center Video: Product Stewardship KPI: Short video tutorial on the Product Stewardship KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750712N/AN/A
Chairs, Stools, BenchesRecycled contentThis question covers materials, such as metals, plastics, and wood, as well as ingredients, such as motor oil and refrigerants. Calculate B1 by dividing the mass of post-consumer recycled materials or ingredients in the final product by the total mass of the final product, then multiply by 100. If multiple product configurations are sold, perform this calculation for each configuration, then calculate B1 and the sales-weighted average across all configurations. Treat refurbished goods as 100% post-consumer recycled material. Some materials and ingredients will have no available recycling stream, but the masses of these should still be included in the final product's mass.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS Help Center Video: Recycled Content KPI: Short video tutorial on the Recycled Content KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017179FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Prospector: This searchable database from UL allows product designers to search for materials and ingredients that meet a set of user-defined specifications, including those that contain some amount of recycled content. https://www.ulprospector.com/en/na
N/A
Chairs, Stools, BenchesResponsible metals supplyCalculate C1 as the spend on metal suppliers who require site-level assessments from all of their suppliers divided by the total spend on product units manufactured in this product category, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
An assessment should include an on-site audit of environmental and social sustainability performance by a second or third party, or a systematic risk assessment against a standard or set of principles to determine risk based on conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors. Examples of standards or sets of principles include those developed by the International Council on Mining & Metals (ICMM) and the Initiative for Responsible Mining Assurance (IRMA).
N/ABetter Sourcing Program: The Better Sourcing Program (BSP) provides a technology-based communications solution to allow global organizations to source artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) ores through upstream due diligence, auditing and risk management. https://www.rcsglobal.com/bettersourcing/

Responsible Cobalt Initiative (RCI): An initiative under the Chinese Chamber of Commerce for Metals, Minerals & Chemicals (CCCMC), in collaboration with OECD, to bring importers and exporters of cobalt together with supply chain stakeholders to address social and environmental risks in the cobalt supply chain. http://en.cccmc.org.cn/news/58372.htm

Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC) chain-of-custody certification: The Responsible Jewellery Council is a standard-setting and certification organization that has developed an ISEAL-accredited chain-of-custody certification program for use by the jewellery industry and manufacturers, which applies to gold and platinum group metals. https://www.responsiblejewellery.com/rjc-certification/

Responsible Mica Initiative: A multi-stakeholder focused on responsible sourcing of mica in Indiay through the development and deployment of fair, responsible and sustainable practices, local community empowerment, and building a legal and liveable environment in local communities. https://responsible-mica-initiative.com/

Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI): Formerly known as the Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative, the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI) is a joint effort between the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) and GeSI to establish supply chain transparency tools, resources and training to assist organizations in responsibly sourcing conflict-free minerals from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. Of note is their Responsible Minerals Assurance Process, which enables auditing and assessment of smelters for responsible ore sourcing and provides a centralized database for tracking smelter performance. http://www.responsiblemineralsinitiative.org/

Responsible Steel: A multi-stakeholder initative bringing together organizations across the steel supply chain to develop a standard for responsible steel supply and related certifications. https://www.responsiblesteel.org/
Corrective actions: Prompt actions taken to eliminate the causes of a problem, thus preventing their recurrence.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.
Chairs, Stools, BenchesSustainable Packaging Design and ProductionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

EPA Energy Benefits Calculator: Use the EPA Energy Benefits Calculator to help quantify environmental impact reductions for packaging design choices. https://www.epa.gov/lmop/landfill-gas-energy-benefits-calculator

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

Recycle Now: Recycle Now is the national recycling effort in England. The website contains examples of recycling labels that may be used on packaging and how to interpret them. http://www.recyclenow.com/recycle/packaging-symbols-explained

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: Material efficiency is the ratio between the material input and the benefits derived. Resource conservation (source reduction) of material inputs and/or improving the functionality of the packaging can positively impact material efficiency. Process efficiency is the ratio between the time spent on production steps to the output. Opportunities to improve material and process efficiency include process improvement, product redesign, and technology changes to packaging equipment. It should be noted that continual source reduction has benefits, but there are trade-offs that must be assessed.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
Chairs, Stools, BenchesTransportation to RetailersInclude shipments of your product from final manufacturing facilities to downstream retailers or distributors. Include both company-owned and contracted fleet. Exclude data for return trips. If retailers are responsible for the transportation of some or all of your final product, the retailer may hold the information necessary to calculate your response. It may be made available in a public report or by request.
Calculate B1 as the volume of product transported by carriers that reported emissions, divided by total volume of product transported, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If a supplier completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, you may count that as compliance with this question. Examples of other compliant standards are provided in the Certifications, Standards, & Tools section below.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

Clean Shipping Index: According to their website, "Clean Shipping Index is a tool for cargo owners to select clean ships and quality ship operators" to minimize environmental footprint and identify areas for environmental improvement. https://www.cleanshippingindex.com/

Clear Cargo: The Clean Cargo Working group is a business initiative created by BSR to collaboratively address the environmental impacts of shipping and transportation. https://www.clean-cargo.org/data-methods

EN 16258: The European Committee for Standardization's EN 16258 standard deals with the methodology for calculation and reporting of energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of freight and passenger transport services. https://shop.bsigroup.com/ProductDetail/?pid=000000000030241098

Ecotransit: EcotransIT World calculates and quantifies environmental impacts of different carriers across the world in terms of direct energy usage and emissions during the operation of vehicles during the transport of products. http://www.ecotransit.org/

IATA CO2 Emissions Measurement Methodology: This document includes a methodology for measuring CO2 emissions from air cargo. https://www.iata.org/en/programs/cargo/sustainability/carbon-footprint/

THESIS Help Center Video: Transportation to Retailers KPI: Short video tutorial on the Transportation to Retailers KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/529545735
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsN/A
Chairs, Stools, BenchesWastewater generation - Supply chainCalculate B1 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for COD, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B2 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for BOD, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B3 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for TSS, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B4 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met the standard for pH, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B5 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met the standard for temperature, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Audits should include verification that discharged wastewater is meeting the standards set forth by the American Apparel & Footwear Association Global Textile Effluent Guidelines for 95% of the sampling period:
- Measurements for BOD and TSS should be below or equal to 30 ppm.
- Measurements for COD should be below or equal to 100 ppm.
- Measurements for temperature should be below or equal to 37 degrees Celsius.
- Measurements for pH should be between 6.0 - 9.0.
Testing should follow a rigorous and internationally accepted methodology and frequency. Local or corporate standards may be stricter. The water quality metrics ideally approach ambient conditions.
Information required by the Higg Index Facility Environment Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Wastewater - Level 2, Question 7" may be used in responding to B1-B5 if the chosen wastewater standard meets or exceeds the values listed above, or if the values of the parameters listed in the detection table meet or exceed the values listed above. The information reported to the FEM is at the facility level; if your products are produced in multiple facilities you may aggregate the data to represent the entirety of final product produced.
AWS International Water Stewardship Standard: The International Water Stewardship Standard is a globally-applicable framework that helps water users understand their water use and impacts. Developed by the Alliance for Water Stewardship, the standard addresses 1) sustainable water balance, 2) good water quality, 3) healthy important water-related areas, and 4) good water governance. https://a4ws.org/the-aws-standard-2-0/

American Apparel & Footwear Association (AAFA) - Restricted Substance List: The AAFA provides guidelines for restricted chemicals and substances. https://www.aafaglobal.org/AAFA/Solutions_Pages/Restricted_Substance_List

BHive: The BHive enables the creation and management of chemical inventories, identifies chemical products that meet sustainability credentials. The BHive enhances supply chain transparency as factories, brands, and retailers can view and compare the safety of chemical products. https://www.thebhive.net/

Detox to Zero by OEKO-TEX: This analysis and assessment tool creates transparency and provides textile and leather producers the ability to control the use of hazardous substances. The tool focuses on continuous improvement and gradual reduction of harmful substances in production processes. https://www.oeko-tex.com/en/our-standards/detox-to-zero-by-oeko-tex

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS): Sustainable Textile Solutions programs support brands, retailers, and industry partners in their efforts to achieve compliance to environmental, health, and safety standards. https://sustexsolutions.com/

THESIS Help Center Video: Wastewater generation - Supply Chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Wastewater generation - Supply Chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/448595442
Roadmap to Zero by ZDHC (Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals): This plan is intended to reduce and eliminate the discharge of hazardous chemicals. https://www.roadmaptozero.com/

Textile Effluent Treatment Technology: The Journal of Cotton Science has produced a document addressing the treatment of textile effluent and specific wastewater management methods. http://www.cotton.org/journal/2007-11/3/upload/jcs11-141.pdf

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - Effluent Limitation Guidelines: This source provides current wastewater discharge guidelines and provides resources for reducing environmental impacts from wastewater discharge. https://www.epa.gov/eg

Wastewater 101 Toolbox: A free online resource for the textile industry to learn, act, and share experiences related to the treatment of wastewater. https://wastewater.sustainabilityconsortium.org/
Biological oxygen demand (BOD): An indicator for the amount of oxygen required/consumed for the microbiological decomposition (oxidation) of organic material in water bodies.

Chemical oxygen demand (COD): An indicator for the amount of oxygen required to oxidize an organic compound to carbon dioxide, ammonia, and water. The measurement is a proxy for the amount of organic compounds in water. Measuring COD in wastewater provides an estimated level of organic pollutants. The standard for measurement can be referenced in ISO 6060.

Total suspended solids (TSS): A water quality measurement that reflects the amount of particulates in a sample. The dry weight of residue in a filter is used to calculate units in milligrams per liter (mg/L).

Water use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.

pH: A measure of a substance's acidity or basicity. The measurement is based upon the molar concentration of hydrogen (H) ions in an aqueous solution of the substance. Pure water is at a neutral pH of 7. For wastewater quality testing, measuring pH allows for benchmarking pH levels to ambient conditions existing naturally in the surrounding environment.
Chairs, Stools, BenchesWorker health and safety - ManufacturingThis question aligns with the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Injury and Illness rate. This rate can be normalized for global applicability.
Calculate C1 according to OSHA's injury and illness rate by multiplying the number of recordable injuries and illnesses by 200,000. Divide this number by the total employee hours worked to produce your final product. If multiple facilities manufacture the final product, the injury and illness rate will need to be adjusted using a weighted average based on each facility's percentage of total production. Include all employees at a facility that participate in the production of the final product. This includes both full-time and contracted employees.
Calculate C2 as the revenue from your final product for which you were able to obtain data divided by the total revenue from your final product, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS General Guidance document provides guidance to calculate the weighted average. See Background Information for access to this document.
The Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool is an online calculator that will compute your injury and illness rate. The OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses provides forms and information for computing your facility injury and illness rate.
Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool: This tool calculates the injury and illness incidence rate for employers. https://data.bls.gov/iirc/

OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses: This webpage contains information on how to record workplace injuries and illnesses and provides the worksheets needed to correctly do so. https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/forms

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520108472
How to Compute a Firm's Incidence Rate for Safety Management: This website from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics provides in-depth guidance on computing injury and illness numbers. https://www.bls.gov/iif/osheval.htm

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

TSC General Guidance for Key Performance Indicators: The General Guidance Document for Key Performance Indicators (KPI) provides essential guidance to complement the specific guidance provided for each KPI. TSC recommends reading this document before you begin your first questionnaire and revisiting it as often as necessary for clarification and additional information. https://www.sustainabilityconsortium.org/tsc-downloads/general-guidance-document/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Chairs, Stools, BenchesWorker health and safety - Supply chainTo be included in B1-B5, risk assessments, training programs, safety plans, performance monitoring systems, and audits must be verifiable and address health and safety issues such as worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. The assessments and audits must be conducted by second or third parties. The risk assessment must be conducted once per year while the audit must have been conducted at least once every three years, both using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles such as International Labour Organization Occupational Safety and Health Conventions (e.g., No. 155). The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions, which can inform your responses. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for examples of initiatives that meet these requirements.
Calculate B1 as the mass of your materials, ingredients, and components that came from operations that have performed a risk assessment to identify high risk areas for health and safety, divided by the total mass of your materials, ingredients, and components, then multiply by 100.
To determine if an operation is high risk for health and safety, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic review assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. It must be conducted at least once per year. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your materials, ingredients, and components that came from operations that train workers on health and safety procedures, divided by the total mass of your materials, ingredients, and components, then multiply by 100. To be included in B2, the training on health and safety procedures must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and must be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for workers on health and safety procedures and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional worker training may be required to perform job duties. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your materials, ingredients, and components that came from operations that implement a verifiable worker health and safety plan, divided by the total mass of your materials, ingredients, and components, then multiply by 100. To be included in B3, a worker health and safety plan must be verifiable and must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and be prominently displayed in the workplace where employees normally report. The plan should include best practices specific to ergonomics; repetitive motions; chemical and particulate exposure; appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE); and proper use of tools, machinery, and the handling of animals (if applicable). On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B4 as the mass of your materials, ingredients, and components that came from operations that have a worker health and safety performance monitoring system in place, divided by the total mass of your materials, ingredients, and components, then multiply by 100. To be included in B4, a worker health and safety performance monitoring system should include metrics on issues including, but not limited to, incidence of worker injuries and prevalence of diseases. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B5 as the mass of your materials, ingredients, and components that came from operations that were audited in the last three years on worker health and safety issues, divided by the total mass of your materials, ingredients, and components, then multiply by 100. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
To be included in B5, the audits must be verifiable and address preventive measures, freely provided personal protective equipment, identification of worker health and safety hazards and effects on the exposed people, statistics and reasons behind injuries, design of work area, processes, installations, machinery/work equipment, operating processes and work organization, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Standards on Occupational Health and Safety.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Recommended Practices for Safety and Health Programs: Defines and enforces standards for the safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women. OHSA also provides training, outreach education, and assistance. The OSHA tools can be used for self-evaluations, to compare elements and actions of different health and safety standards, to track implemented actions, identify remaining weaknesses, and strategies for continued improvement. https://www.osha.gov/shpguidelines/explore-tools.html

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit: Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit is an auditing system that aligns with Ethical Trading Initiative's Base Code as well International Labour Organization Conventions. It has been developed to provide a public auditing methodology and format for companies to use to assess compliance. https://www.sedex.com/our-services/smeta-audit/

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528345
IS0 26000 Social Responsibility: ISO 2600 is not a certification tool, but it offers guidance about social responsibility to all sorts of organizations regardless of their activity, size or location. https://www.iso.org/iso-26000-social-responsibility.html

Social Accountability International Guidance Document for Social Accountability 8000: According to Social Accountability International, "this guidance document provides various tools and information for users of the Social Accountability 8000 standard, including definitions, background information, and examples." https://sa-intl.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/SA8000-2014-Guidance-Document.pdf

United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9
Corrective actions: Prompt actions taken to eliminate the causes of a problem, thus preventing their recurrence.

First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Risk assessment: A systematic process to evaluate potential risks within an operation, system, or supply chain. It can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party or a country risk classification analysis that judges the site risk due to prevailing conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
DesksCertification - Paper and wood sourcingCalculate C1 as the dry mass of your paper and wood supply that only underwent third-party legality verification, divided by the total dry mass of your paper and wood supply, then multiply by 100. Do not include in this calculation any supply that is included under one of the other response options.
Calculate C2 as the dry mass of your paper and wood supply that had FSC Controlled Wood certification, divided by the total dry mass of your paper or wood supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the dry mass of your paper and wood supply that was certified to the SFI Fiber Sourcing Standard or sourced under a PEFC-Due Diligence System, divided by the total dry mass of your paper and wood supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the dry mass of your paper and wood supply that was FSC-certified, divided by the total dry mass of your paper and wood supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C5 as the dry mass of your paper and wood supply that was SFI-certified or certified under another PEFC-endorsed program, divided by the total dry mass of your paper and wood supply, then multiply by 100.
The sum of C1, C2, C3, C4, and C5 must not exceed 100%. Do not include the same paper or wood supply in the calculation of more than one response option. The last day of the 12-month reporting period must be within 12 months of the completion date of this question.
CERFLOR - Brazilian Forest Certification Program: This organization is an independent, third-party certification program that focuses on sustainable management of natural and planted Amazonian tropical forests. CERFLOR is a PEFC-endorsed certification. https://www.pefc.org/discover-pefc/our-pefc-members/national-members/brazilian-forest-certification-programme-cerflor

CSA - Canadian Standards Association: CSA Group is an internationally-accredited standards development and testing and certification organization that provides consumer product evaluation, education, and training services dedicated to advancing safety, sustainability, and social good. Some programs include environmental product performance, management systems and processes, registry services, worker and workplace safety, energy efficiency verification, and greenhouse gas clean projects. Programs specific to wood sourcing are outlined in Canada's National Standard for Sustainable Forest Management. CSA is a PEFC-endorsed program. http://www.csagroup.org/

EU Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade Volunteer Partnership Agreement: Voluntary Partnership Agreements (VPAs) are a central element of the EU's strategy in the fight against illegal logging. A VPA is a bilateral trade agreement between the EU and a timber-exporting country outside the EU. https://www.euflegt.efi.int/vpa

FSC Controlled Wood: The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) Controlled Wood is non-certified material subject to controlled conditions that can be mixed with FSC-certified material during manufacturing FSC-Mix products. This has enabled manufacturers to manage low and fluctuating supplies of FSC certified forest products, while creating demand for FSC certified wood. https://us.fsc.org/en-us/certification/controlled-wood

FSC Forest Certification: Products with FSC certification come from responsibly managed forests that provide environmental, social, and economic benefits. The following website provides more information related to the principles that guide the certification process. https://us.fsc.org/en-us/certification

Forest Legality Alliance's Risk Tool: This tool is designed to present useful information about the sourcing of forest products. You can search the tool's content by country or by species to find specific information.? https://forestlegality.org/risk-tool/

PEFC - Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification Due Diligence System: The PEFC DDS is an integral part of the PEFC Chain of Custody standard and is the mechanism that avoids the inclusion of timber from controversial sources in products with a PEFC claim. https://www.pefc.org/for-business/supply-chain-companies

PEFC - Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification: The Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC) provides guidance for integrating best practices for the entire forest supply chain to ensure that timber and non-timber forest products are produced with consideration of ecological, social, and ethical standards. http://www.pefc.org

SFI - Sustainable Forestry Initiative - Fiber Sourcing Standard: The SFI Fiber Sourcing Standard is for organizations that do not own or manage land but do procure wood directly from forests. Program Participants must show that the raw material in their supply chain comes from legal and responsible sources, whether the forests are certified or not. Primary producers must be third-party audited and certified to the SFI 2015-2019 Fiber Sourcing Standard. SFI is a PEFC-endorsed program. https://forests.org/fibersourcingstandard/

SFI - Sustainable Forestry Initiative - Standard: The SFI Standard addresses sustainable forest management and responsible sourcing. SFI also has a chain of custody standard to track wood and paper flow through the supply chain. SFI is a PEFC-endorsed program. https://forests.org/sficertifiedsourcingstandard/
N/AN/A
DesksGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the spend on materials, ingredients, and components from suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total spend on all materials, ingredients, and components, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
N/A
DesksGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, including product assembly and the manufacture of any materials, ingredients, and components purchased directly by your organization for inclusion in your products, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total revenue of produced product.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total revenue of produced product.
Calculate B2 as the revenue of produced products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total revenue of produced products, then multiply by 100.
For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardGreenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
DesksLeather impacts - Supply chainCalculate C1 as the mass of your leather supply that was traced to the slaughterhouse operation of origin, divided by the total mass of your leather supply, then multiply by 100.

Calculate C2 as the mass of leather materials that came from suppliers that either maintain a current comprehensive animal welfare certification or verifiable, regularly conducted animal welfare audits, divided by the total mass of our leather material supply, then multiply by 100.

Verifiable, regularly conducted audits should be performed by a second party or third party. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain can initiate these audits. Regulations, audits, and certifications that align with the animal welfare standards as described in Section 7 of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Terrestrial/Aquatic Animal Health Code and are well-enforced by the implementation of auditing systems can be included in your calculation.
Farm stage:
Minimization of pain, risk of injury, and transmission of diseases or parasites to animals; a physical environment in which the air or water quality, temperature, and humidity supports good animal health; a structural and social environment that allows animals to rest comfortably, provides opportunities for physical and cognitive activity, and allows for the opportunity to perform all beneficial natural, individual, and social behaviors.
Animals should have access to sufficient water and appropriate feed, so as to be free from hunger and thirst. The handling of animals should foster a positive relationship between humans and animals and should not cause injury, panic, lasting fear, or avoidable stress.
Genetic selection should take into account the health and welfare of animals.
Transportation stage:
Animals should not be transported if they are not fit to travel. For those animals fit to travel, the number of journeys and the length of time should be minimized. Loading and unloading procedures should minimize animal stress, prevent injury, and use facilities that promote calm and safe animal movement. Protection from extreme temperatures and other extreme weather conditions is provided. Adequate feed and water is available when required.
Slaughter stage:
Animals should be treated humanely before and during all slaughter procedures, including pre-slaughter stunning for non-ritual slaughter. The pre-slaughter stunning must render the animal insensible to pain until death occurs. The minimization of fear, stress, and pain is included in humane treatment.
TSC provides a list of animal welfare certifications, standards, and programs to assist users in choosing a program that aligns with their needs. See Background Information for more details.

Calculate C3 as the mass of your leather supply that came from tannery operations that either maintain a current comprehensive environmental impact certification or verifiable, regularly conducted environmental impact audit, divided by the total mass of your leather supply, then multiply by 100.
The certification or audits should address all material environmental impacts including, but not limited to, chemical use, energy consumption, water usage, air and noise emissions, and waste and effluent management. Material audited by The Leather Working Group may be included in the calculation of C3.

Calculate C4 as the mass of your leather supply that came from tannery operations that regularly and verifiably conducted audits for worker health and safety, divided by the total mass of your leather supply, then multiply by 100.
The audits should address all worker health and safety concerns, including, but not limited to, equipment training, chemical exposure, noise exposure, dust exposure, and accident record keeping.

To be included in C2, C3 and C4, verifiable, regularly conducted audits should be performed by a second party or third party. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain can initiate these audits.

Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
N/AN/AN/A
DesksPackaging Raw Material SourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Pre-consumer recycled material: “Material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Renewable material: “Material that is composed of biomass from a living source and that can be continually replenished. To be defined as renewable, virgin materials shall come from sources which are replenished at a rate equal to or greater than the rate of depletion.” (FTC Green Guides:2012)

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably-sourced material: Material for which it can be demonstrated through second- or third-party verification that the virgin raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities. Materials such as paper can be included in this definition if the source of the packaging content comes from sustainably-managed forests with no deforestation.
DesksPriority chemicals - DisclosureFor this question, a priority chemical is one that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis.
Relevant criteria in the US EPA Safer Choice Program and Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals, listed below, may be used to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment.to health or the environment from multiple agents or stressors” (EPA, 2003).
Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Disclosure KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Disclosure KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750684
N/APriority chemical: A chemical that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis.
DesksProduct stewardshipThis question addresses takeback programs that an organization may fund, contract, or physically operate, in whole or in part, to enable consumers to return products for responsible end-of-life management. Include only products and materials for which an organization has the ability to decide or influence the handling, treatment, and disposal of returned devices, components, and materials. These calculations should be made at the program level rather than category level. The same percentage can be reported across multiple product categories if the products are collected and managed in the same program within the organization. Separate programs require separate percentage calculations when reported in different product category questionnaires. If products under the same category are collected in separate programs, average the recycling performance of the two programs and report that value in D1.
Calculate D1 as the number of product units returned through the program(s) for recycling divided by the total number of product units sold, then multiply by 100. If this number exceeds 100, report it as 100.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Data for both the unit volume returned and unit volume sold should come from the same year, even though units may be returned in a different year than they were sold.
Examples of stewardship programs include extended producer responsibility programs and product takeback programs. Such programs should ensure that materials are recycled or disposed of in an environmentally sensitive manner.
THESIS Help Center Video: Product Stewardship KPI: Short video tutorial on the Product Stewardship KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750712N/AN/A
DesksRecycled contentThis question covers materials, such as metals, plastics, and wood, as well as ingredients, such as motor oil and refrigerants. Calculate B1 by dividing the mass of post-consumer recycled materials or ingredients in the final product by the total mass of the final product, then multiply by 100. If multiple product configurations are sold, perform this calculation for each configuration, then calculate B1 and the sales-weighted average across all configurations. Treat refurbished goods as 100% post-consumer recycled material. Some materials and ingredients will have no available recycling stream, but the masses of these should still be included in the final product's mass.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS Help Center Video: Recycled Content KPI: Short video tutorial on the Recycled Content KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017179FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Prospector: This searchable database from UL allows product designers to search for materials and ingredients that meet a set of user-defined specifications, including those that contain some amount of recycled content. https://www.ulprospector.com/en/na
N/A
DesksResponsible metals supplyCalculate C1 as the spend on metal suppliers who require site-level assessments from all of their suppliers divided by the total spend on product units manufactured in this product category, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
An assessment should include an on-site audit of environmental and social sustainability performance by a second or third party, or a systematic risk assessment against a standard or set of principles to determine risk based on conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors. Examples of standards or sets of principles include those developed by the International Council on Mining & Metals (ICMM) and the Initiative for Responsible Mining Assurance (IRMA).
N/ABetter Sourcing Program: The Better Sourcing Program (BSP) provides a technology-based communications solution to allow global organizations to source artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) ores through upstream due diligence, auditing and risk management. https://www.rcsglobal.com/bettersourcing/

Responsible Cobalt Initiative (RCI): An initiative under the Chinese Chamber of Commerce for Metals, Minerals & Chemicals (CCCMC), in collaboration with OECD, to bring importers and exporters of cobalt together with supply chain stakeholders to address social and environmental risks in the cobalt supply chain. http://en.cccmc.org.cn/news/58372.htm

Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC) chain-of-custody certification: The Responsible Jewellery Council is a standard-setting and certification organization that has developed an ISEAL-accredited chain-of-custody certification program for use by the jewellery industry and manufacturers, which applies to gold and platinum group metals. https://www.responsiblejewellery.com/rjc-certification/

Responsible Mica Initiative: A multi-stakeholder focused on responsible sourcing of mica in Indiay through the development and deployment of fair, responsible and sustainable practices, local community empowerment, and building a legal and liveable environment in local communities. https://responsible-mica-initiative.com/

Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI): Formerly known as the Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative, the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI) is a joint effort between the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) and GeSI to establish supply chain transparency tools, resources and training to assist organizations in responsibly sourcing conflict-free minerals from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. Of note is their Responsible Minerals Assurance Process, which enables auditing and assessment of smelters for responsible ore sourcing and provides a centralized database for tracking smelter performance. http://www.responsiblemineralsinitiative.org/

Responsible Steel: A multi-stakeholder initative bringing together organizations across the steel supply chain to develop a standard for responsible steel supply and related certifications. https://www.responsiblesteel.org/
Corrective actions: Prompt actions taken to eliminate the causes of a problem, thus preventing their recurrence.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.
DesksSustainable Packaging Design and ProductionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

EPA Energy Benefits Calculator: Use the EPA Energy Benefits Calculator to help quantify environmental impact reductions for packaging design choices. https://www.epa.gov/lmop/landfill-gas-energy-benefits-calculator

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

Recycle Now: Recycle Now is the national recycling effort in England. The website contains examples of recycling labels that may be used on packaging and how to interpret them. http://www.recyclenow.com/recycle/packaging-symbols-explained

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: Material efficiency is the ratio between the material input and the benefits derived. Resource conservation (source reduction) of material inputs and/or improving the functionality of the packaging can positively impact material efficiency. Process efficiency is the ratio between the time spent on production steps to the output. Opportunities to improve material and process efficiency include process improvement, product redesign, and technology changes to packaging equipment. It should be noted that continual source reduction has benefits, but there are trade-offs that must be assessed.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
DesksTransportation to RetailersInclude shipments of your product from final manufacturing facilities to downstream retailers or distributors. Include both company-owned and contracted fleet. Exclude data for return trips. If retailers are responsible for the transportation of some or all of your final product, the retailer may hold the information necessary to calculate your response. It may be made available in a public report or by request.
Calculate B1 as the volume of product transported by carriers that reported emissions, divided by total volume of product transported, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If a supplier completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, you may count that as compliance with this question. Examples of other compliant standards are provided in the Certifications, Standards, & Tools section below.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

Clean Shipping Index: According to their website, "Clean Shipping Index is a tool for cargo owners to select clean ships and quality ship operators" to minimize environmental footprint and identify areas for environmental improvement. https://www.cleanshippingindex.com/

Clear Cargo: The Clean Cargo Working group is a business initiative created by BSR to collaboratively address the environmental impacts of shipping and transportation. https://www.clean-cargo.org/data-methods

EN 16258: The European Committee for Standardization's EN 16258 standard deals with the methodology for calculation and reporting of energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of freight and passenger transport services. https://shop.bsigroup.com/ProductDetail/?pid=000000000030241098

Ecotransit: EcotransIT World calculates and quantifies environmental impacts of different carriers across the world in terms of direct energy usage and emissions during the operation of vehicles during the transport of products. http://www.ecotransit.org/

IATA CO2 Emissions Measurement Methodology: This document includes a methodology for measuring CO2 emissions from air cargo. https://www.iata.org/en/programs/cargo/sustainability/carbon-footprint/

THESIS Help Center Video: Transportation to Retailers KPI: Short video tutorial on the Transportation to Retailers KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/529545735
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsN/A
DesksWastewater generation - Supply chainCalculate B1 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for COD, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B2 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for BOD, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B3 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for TSS, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B4 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met the standard for pH, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B5 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met the standard for temperature, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Audits should include verification that discharged wastewater is meeting the standards set forth by the American Apparel & Footwear Association Global Textile Effluent Guidelines for 95% of the sampling period:
- Measurements for BOD and TSS should be below or equal to 30 ppm.
- Measurements for COD should be below or equal to 100 ppm.
- Measurements for temperature should be below or equal to 37 degrees Celsius.
- Measurements for pH should be between 6.0 - 9.0.
Testing should follow a rigorous and internationally accepted methodology and frequency. Local or corporate standards may be stricter. The water quality metrics ideally approach ambient conditions.
Information required by the Higg Index Facility Environment Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Wastewater - Level 2, Question 7" may be used in responding to B1-B5 if the chosen wastewater standard meets or exceeds the values listed above, or if the values of the parameters listed in the detection table meet or exceed the values listed above. The information reported to the FEM is at the facility level; if your products are produced in multiple facilities you may aggregate the data to represent the entirety of final product produced.
AWS International Water Stewardship Standard: The International Water Stewardship Standard is a globally-applicable framework that helps water users understand their water use and impacts. Developed by the Alliance for Water Stewardship, the standard addresses 1) sustainable water balance, 2) good water quality, 3) healthy important water-related areas, and 4) good water governance. https://a4ws.org/the-aws-standard-2-0/

American Apparel & Footwear Association (AAFA) - Restricted Substance List: The AAFA provides guidelines for restricted chemicals and substances. https://www.aafaglobal.org/AAFA/Solutions_Pages/Restricted_Substance_List

BHive: The BHive enables the creation and management of chemical inventories, identifies chemical products that meet sustainability credentials. The BHive enhances supply chain transparency as factories, brands, and retailers can view and compare the safety of chemical products. https://www.thebhive.net/

Detox to Zero by OEKO-TEX: This analysis and assessment tool creates transparency and provides textile and leather producers the ability to control the use of hazardous substances. The tool focuses on continuous improvement and gradual reduction of harmful substances in production processes. https://www.oeko-tex.com/en/our-standards/detox-to-zero-by-oeko-tex

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS): Sustainable Textile Solutions programs support brands, retailers, and industry partners in their efforts to achieve compliance to environmental, health, and safety standards. https://sustexsolutions.com/

THESIS Help Center Video: Wastewater generation - Supply Chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Wastewater generation - Supply Chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/448595442
Roadmap to Zero by ZDHC (Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals): This plan is intended to reduce and eliminate the discharge of hazardous chemicals. https://www.roadmaptozero.com/

Textile Effluent Treatment Technology: The Journal of Cotton Science has produced a document addressing the treatment of textile effluent and specific wastewater management methods. http://www.cotton.org/journal/2007-11/3/upload/jcs11-141.pdf

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - Effluent Limitation Guidelines: This source provides current wastewater discharge guidelines and provides resources for reducing environmental impacts from wastewater discharge. https://www.epa.gov/eg

Wastewater 101 Toolbox: A free online resource for the textile industry to learn, act, and share experiences related to the treatment of wastewater. https://wastewater.sustainabilityconsortium.org/
Biological oxygen demand (BOD): An indicator for the amount of oxygen required/consumed for the microbiological decomposition (oxidation) of organic material in water bodies.

Chemical oxygen demand (COD): An indicator for the amount of oxygen required to oxidize an organic compound to carbon dioxide, ammonia, and water. The measurement is a proxy for the amount of organic compounds in water. Measuring COD in wastewater provides an estimated level of organic pollutants. The standard for measurement can be referenced in ISO 6060.

Total suspended solids (TSS): A water quality measurement that reflects the amount of particulates in a sample. The dry weight of residue in a filter is used to calculate units in milligrams per liter (mg/L).

Water use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.

pH: A measure of a substance's acidity or basicity. The measurement is based upon the molar concentration of hydrogen (H) ions in an aqueous solution of the substance. Pure water is at a neutral pH of 7. For wastewater quality testing, measuring pH allows for benchmarking pH levels to ambient conditions existing naturally in the surrounding environment.
DesksWorker health and safety - ManufacturingThis question aligns with the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Injury and Illness rate. This rate can be normalized for global applicability.
Calculate C1 according to OSHA's injury and illness rate by multiplying the number of recordable injuries and illnesses by 200,000. Divide this number by the total employee hours worked to produce your final product. If multiple facilities manufacture the final product, the injury and illness rate will need to be adjusted using a weighted average based on each facility's percentage of total production. Include all employees at a facility that participate in the production of the final product. This includes both full-time and contracted employees.
Calculate C2 as the revenue from your final product for which you were able to obtain data divided by the total revenue from your final product, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS General Guidance document provides guidance to calculate the weighted average. See Background Information for access to this document.
The Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool is an online calculator that will compute your injury and illness rate. The OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses provides forms and information for computing your facility injury and illness rate.
Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool: This tool calculates the injury and illness incidence rate for employers. https://data.bls.gov/iirc/

OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses: This webpage contains information on how to record workplace injuries and illnesses and provides the worksheets needed to correctly do so. https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/forms

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520108472
How to Compute a Firm's Incidence Rate for Safety Management: This website from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics provides in-depth guidance on computing injury and illness numbers. https://www.bls.gov/iif/osheval.htm

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

TSC General Guidance for Key Performance Indicators: The General Guidance Document for Key Performance Indicators (KPI) provides essential guidance to complement the specific guidance provided for each KPI. TSC recommends reading this document before you begin your first questionnaire and revisiting it as often as necessary for clarification and additional information. https://www.sustainabilityconsortium.org/tsc-downloads/general-guidance-document/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
DesksWorker health and safety - Supply chainTo be included in B1-B5, risk assessments, training programs, safety plans, performance monitoring systems, and audits must be verifiable and address health and safety issues such as worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. The assessments and audits must be conducted by second or third parties. The risk assessment must be conducted once per year while the audit must have been conducted at least once every three years, both using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles such as International Labour Organization Occupational Safety and Health Conventions (e.g., No. 155). The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions, which can inform your responses. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for examples of initiatives that meet these requirements.
Calculate B1 as the mass of your materials, ingredients, and components that came from operations that have performed a risk assessment to identify high risk areas for health and safety, divided by the total mass of your materials, ingredients, and components, then multiply by 100.
To determine if an operation is high risk for health and safety, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic review assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. It must be conducted at least once per year. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your materials, ingredients, and components that came from operations that train workers on health and safety procedures, divided by the total mass of your materials, ingredients, and components, then multiply by 100. To be included in B2, the training on health and safety procedures must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and must be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for workers on health and safety procedures and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional worker training may be required to perform job duties. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your materials, ingredients, and components that came from operations that implement a verifiable worker health and safety plan, divided by the total mass of your materials, ingredients, and components, then multiply by 100. To be included in B3, a worker health and safety plan must be verifiable and must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and be prominently displayed in the workplace where employees normally report. The plan should include best practices specific to ergonomics; repetitive motions; chemical and particulate exposure; appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE); and proper use of tools, machinery, and the handling of animals (if applicable). On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B4 as the mass of your materials, ingredients, and components that came from operations that have a worker health and safety performance monitoring system in place, divided by the total mass of your materials, ingredients, and components, then multiply by 100. To be included in B4, a worker health and safety performance monitoring system should include metrics on issues including, but not limited to, incidence of worker injuries and prevalence of diseases. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B5 as the mass of your materials, ingredients, and components that came from operations that were audited in the last three years on worker health and safety issues, divided by the total mass of your materials, ingredients, and components, then multiply by 100. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
To be included in B5, the audits must be verifiable and address preventive measures, freely provided personal protective equipment, identification of worker health and safety hazards and effects on the exposed people, statistics and reasons behind injuries, design of work area, processes, installations, machinery/work equipment, operating processes and work organization, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Standards on Occupational Health and Safety.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Recommended Practices for Safety and Health Programs: Defines and enforces standards for the safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women. OHSA also provides training, outreach education, and assistance. The OSHA tools can be used for self-evaluations, to compare elements and actions of different health and safety standards, to track implemented actions, identify remaining weaknesses, and strategies for continued improvement. https://www.osha.gov/shpguidelines/explore-tools.html

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit: Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit is an auditing system that aligns with Ethical Trading Initiative's Base Code as well International Labour Organization Conventions. It has been developed to provide a public auditing methodology and format for companies to use to assess compliance. https://www.sedex.com/our-services/smeta-audit/

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528345
IS0 26000 Social Responsibility: ISO 2600 is not a certification tool, but it offers guidance about social responsibility to all sorts of organizations regardless of their activity, size or location. https://www.iso.org/iso-26000-social-responsibility.html

Social Accountability International Guidance Document for Social Accountability 8000: According to Social Accountability International, "this guidance document provides various tools and information for users of the Social Accountability 8000 standard, including definitions, background information, and examples." https://sa-intl.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/SA8000-2014-Guidance-Document.pdf

United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9
Corrective actions: Prompt actions taken to eliminate the causes of a problem, thus preventing their recurrence.

First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Risk assessment: A systematic process to evaluate potential risks within an operation, system, or supply chain. It can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party or a country risk classification analysis that judges the site risk due to prevailing conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Equipment StandsCertification - Paper and wood sourcingCalculate C1 as the dry mass of your paper and wood supply that only underwent third-party legality verification, divided by the total dry mass of your paper and wood supply, then multiply by 100. Do not include in this calculation any supply that is included under one of the other response options.
Calculate C2 as the dry mass of your paper and wood supply that had FSC Controlled Wood certification, divided by the total dry mass of your paper or wood supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the dry mass of your paper and wood supply that was certified to the SFI Fiber Sourcing Standard or sourced under a PEFC-Due Diligence System, divided by the total dry mass of your paper and wood supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the dry mass of your paper and wood supply that was FSC-certified, divided by the total dry mass of your paper and wood supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C5 as the dry mass of your paper and wood supply that was SFI-certified or certified under another PEFC-endorsed program, divided by the total dry mass of your paper and wood supply, then multiply by 100.
The sum of C1, C2, C3, C4, and C5 must not exceed 100%. Do not include the same paper or wood supply in the calculation of more than one response option. The last day of the 12-month reporting period must be within 12 months of the completion date of this question.
CERFLOR - Brazilian Forest Certification Program: This organization is an independent, third-party certification program that focuses on sustainable management of natural and planted Amazonian tropical forests. CERFLOR is a PEFC-endorsed certification. https://www.pefc.org/discover-pefc/our-pefc-members/national-members/brazilian-forest-certification-programme-cerflor

CSA - Canadian Standards Association: CSA Group is an internationally-accredited standards development and testing and certification organization that provides consumer product evaluation, education, and training services dedicated to advancing safety, sustainability, and social good. Some programs include environmental product performance, management systems and processes, registry services, worker and workplace safety, energy efficiency verification, and greenhouse gas clean projects. Programs specific to wood sourcing are outlined in Canada's National Standard for Sustainable Forest Management. CSA is a PEFC-endorsed program. http://www.csagroup.org/

EU Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade Volunteer Partnership Agreement: Voluntary Partnership Agreements (VPAs) are a central element of the EU's strategy in the fight against illegal logging. A VPA is a bilateral trade agreement between the EU and a timber-exporting country outside the EU. https://www.euflegt.efi.int/vpa

FSC Controlled Wood: The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) Controlled Wood is non-certified material subject to controlled conditions that can be mixed with FSC-certified material during manufacturing FSC-Mix products. This has enabled manufacturers to manage low and fluctuating supplies of FSC certified forest products, while creating demand for FSC certified wood. https://us.fsc.org/en-us/certification/controlled-wood

FSC Forest Certification: Products with FSC certification come from responsibly managed forests that provide environmental, social, and economic benefits. The following website provides more information related to the principles that guide the certification process. https://us.fsc.org/en-us/certification

Forest Legality Alliance's Risk Tool: This tool is designed to present useful information about the sourcing of forest products. You can search the tool's content by country or by species to find specific information.? https://forestlegality.org/risk-tool/

PEFC - Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification Due Diligence System: The PEFC DDS is an integral part of the PEFC Chain of Custody standard and is the mechanism that avoids the inclusion of timber from controversial sources in products with a PEFC claim. https://www.pefc.org/for-business/supply-chain-companies

PEFC - Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification: The Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC) provides guidance for integrating best practices for the entire forest supply chain to ensure that timber and non-timber forest products are produced with consideration of ecological, social, and ethical standards. http://www.pefc.org

SFI - Sustainable Forestry Initiative - Fiber Sourcing Standard: The SFI Fiber Sourcing Standard is for organizations that do not own or manage land but do procure wood directly from forests. Program Participants must show that the raw material in their supply chain comes from legal and responsible sources, whether the forests are certified or not. Primary producers must be third-party audited and certified to the SFI 2015-2019 Fiber Sourcing Standard. SFI is a PEFC-endorsed program. https://forests.org/fibersourcingstandard/

SFI - Sustainable Forestry Initiative - Standard: The SFI Standard addresses sustainable forest management and responsible sourcing. SFI also has a chain of custody standard to track wood and paper flow through the supply chain. SFI is a PEFC-endorsed program. https://forests.org/sficertifiedsourcingstandard/
N/AN/A
Equipment StandsGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the spend on materials, ingredients, and components from suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total spend on all materials, ingredients, and components, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
N/A
Equipment StandsGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, including product assembly and the manufacture of any materials, ingredients, and components purchased directly by your organization for inclusion in your products, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total revenue of produced product.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total revenue of produced product.
Calculate B2 as the revenue of produced products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total revenue of produced products, then multiply by 100.
For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardGreenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Equipment StandsLeather impacts - Supply chainCalculate C1 as the mass of your leather supply that was traced to the slaughterhouse operation of origin, divided by the total mass of your leather supply, then multiply by 100.

Calculate C2 as the mass of leather materials that came from suppliers that either maintain a current comprehensive animal welfare certification or verifiable, regularly conducted animal welfare audits, divided by the total mass of our leather material supply, then multiply by 100.

Verifiable, regularly conducted audits should be performed by a second party or third party. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain can initiate these audits. Regulations, audits, and certifications that align with the animal welfare standards as described in Section 7 of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Terrestrial/Aquatic Animal Health Code and are well-enforced by the implementation of auditing systems can be included in your calculation.
Farm stage:
Minimization of pain, risk of injury, and transmission of diseases or parasites to animals; a physical environment in which the air or water quality, temperature, and humidity supports good animal health; a structural and social environment that allows animals to rest comfortably, provides opportunities for physical and cognitive activity, and allows for the opportunity to perform all beneficial natural, individual, and social behaviors.
Animals should have access to sufficient water and appropriate feed, so as to be free from hunger and thirst. The handling of animals should foster a positive relationship between humans and animals and should not cause injury, panic, lasting fear, or avoidable stress.
Genetic selection should take into account the health and welfare of animals.
Transportation stage:
Animals should not be transported if they are not fit to travel. For those animals fit to travel, the number of journeys and the length of time should be minimized. Loading and unloading procedures should minimize animal stress, prevent injury, and use facilities that promote calm and safe animal movement. Protection from extreme temperatures and other extreme weather conditions is provided. Adequate feed and water is available when required.
Slaughter stage:
Animals should be treated humanely before and during all slaughter procedures, including pre-slaughter stunning for non-ritual slaughter. The pre-slaughter stunning must render the animal insensible to pain until death occurs. The minimization of fear, stress, and pain is included in humane treatment.
TSC provides a list of animal welfare certifications, standards, and programs to assist users in choosing a program that aligns with their needs. See Background Information for more details.

Calculate C3 as the mass of your leather supply that came from tannery operations that either maintain a current comprehensive environmental impact certification or verifiable, regularly conducted environmental impact audit, divided by the total mass of your leather supply, then multiply by 100.
The certification or audits should address all material environmental impacts including, but not limited to, chemical use, energy consumption, water usage, air and noise emissions, and waste and effluent management. Material audited by The Leather Working Group may be included in the calculation of C3.

Calculate C4 as the mass of your leather supply that came from tannery operations that regularly and verifiably conducted audits for worker health and safety, divided by the total mass of your leather supply, then multiply by 100.
The audits should address all worker health and safety concerns, including, but not limited to, equipment training, chemical exposure, noise exposure, dust exposure, and accident record keeping.

To be included in C2, C3 and C4, verifiable, regularly conducted audits should be performed by a second party or third party. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain can initiate these audits.

Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
N/AN/AN/A
Equipment StandsPackaging Raw Material SourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Pre-consumer recycled material: “Material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Renewable material: “Material that is composed of biomass from a living source and that can be continually replenished. To be defined as renewable, virgin materials shall come from sources which are replenished at a rate equal to or greater than the rate of depletion.” (FTC Green Guides:2012)

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably-sourced material: Material for which it can be demonstrated through second- or third-party verification that the virgin raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities. Materials such as paper can be included in this definition if the source of the packaging content comes from sustainably-managed forests with no deforestation.
Equipment StandsPriority chemicals - DisclosureFor this question, a priority chemical is one that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis.
Relevant criteria in the US EPA Safer Choice Program and Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals, listed below, may be used to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment.to health or the environment from multiple agents or stressors” (EPA, 2003).
Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Disclosure KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Disclosure KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750684
N/APriority chemical: A chemical that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis.
Equipment StandsProduct stewardshipThis question addresses takeback programs that an organization may fund, contract, or physically operate, in whole or in part, to enable consumers to return products for responsible end-of-life management. Include only products and materials for which an organization has the ability to decide or influence the handling, treatment, and disposal of returned devices, components, and materials. These calculations should be made at the program level rather than category level. The same percentage can be reported across multiple product categories if the products are collected and managed in the same program within the organization. Separate programs require separate percentage calculations when reported in different product category questionnaires. If products under the same category are collected in separate programs, average the recycling performance of the two programs and report that value in D1.
Calculate D1 as the number of product units returned through the program(s) for recycling divided by the total number of product units sold, then multiply by 100. If this number exceeds 100, report it as 100.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Data for both the unit volume returned and unit volume sold should come from the same year, even though units may be returned in a different year than they were sold.
Examples of stewardship programs include extended producer responsibility programs and product takeback programs. Such programs should ensure that materials are recycled or disposed of in an environmentally sensitive manner.
THESIS Help Center Video: Product Stewardship KPI: Short video tutorial on the Product Stewardship KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750712N/AN/A
Equipment StandsRecycled contentThis question covers materials, such as metals, plastics, and wood, as well as ingredients, such as motor oil and refrigerants. Calculate B1 by dividing the mass of post-consumer recycled materials or ingredients in the final product by the total mass of the final product, then multiply by 100. If multiple product configurations are sold, perform this calculation for each configuration, then calculate B1 and the sales-weighted average across all configurations. Treat refurbished goods as 100% post-consumer recycled material. Some materials and ingredients will have no available recycling stream, but the masses of these should still be included in the final product's mass.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS Help Center Video: Recycled Content KPI: Short video tutorial on the Recycled Content KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017179FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Prospector: This searchable database from UL allows product designers to search for materials and ingredients that meet a set of user-defined specifications, including those that contain some amount of recycled content. https://www.ulprospector.com/en/na
N/A
Equipment StandsResponsible metals supplyCalculate C1 as the spend on metal suppliers who require site-level assessments from all of their suppliers divided by the total spend on product units manufactured in this product category, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
An assessment should include an on-site audit of environmental and social sustainability performance by a second or third party, or a systematic risk assessment against a standard or set of principles to determine risk based on conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors. Examples of standards or sets of principles include those developed by the International Council on Mining & Metals (ICMM) and the Initiative for Responsible Mining Assurance (IRMA).
N/ABetter Sourcing Program: The Better Sourcing Program (BSP) provides a technology-based communications solution to allow global organizations to source artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) ores through upstream due diligence, auditing and risk management. https://www.rcsglobal.com/bettersourcing/

Responsible Cobalt Initiative (RCI): An initiative under the Chinese Chamber of Commerce for Metals, Minerals & Chemicals (CCCMC), in collaboration with OECD, to bring importers and exporters of cobalt together with supply chain stakeholders to address social and environmental risks in the cobalt supply chain. http://en.cccmc.org.cn/news/58372.htm

Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC) chain-of-custody certification: The Responsible Jewellery Council is a standard-setting and certification organization that has developed an ISEAL-accredited chain-of-custody certification program for use by the jewellery industry and manufacturers, which applies to gold and platinum group metals. https://www.responsiblejewellery.com/rjc-certification/

Responsible Mica Initiative: A multi-stakeholder focused on responsible sourcing of mica in Indiay through the development and deployment of fair, responsible and sustainable practices, local community empowerment, and building a legal and liveable environment in local communities. https://responsible-mica-initiative.com/

Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI): Formerly known as the Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative, the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI) is a joint effort between the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) and GeSI to establish supply chain transparency tools, resources and training to assist organizations in responsibly sourcing conflict-free minerals from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. Of note is their Responsible Minerals Assurance Process, which enables auditing and assessment of smelters for responsible ore sourcing and provides a centralized database for tracking smelter performance. http://www.responsiblemineralsinitiative.org/

Responsible Steel: A multi-stakeholder initative bringing together organizations across the steel supply chain to develop a standard for responsible steel supply and related certifications. https://www.responsiblesteel.org/
Corrective actions: Prompt actions taken to eliminate the causes of a problem, thus preventing their recurrence.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.
Equipment StandsSustainable Packaging Design and ProductionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

EPA Energy Benefits Calculator: Use the EPA Energy Benefits Calculator to help quantify environmental impact reductions for packaging design choices. https://www.epa.gov/lmop/landfill-gas-energy-benefits-calculator

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

Recycle Now: Recycle Now is the national recycling effort in England. The website contains examples of recycling labels that may be used on packaging and how to interpret them. http://www.recyclenow.com/recycle/packaging-symbols-explained

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: Material efficiency is the ratio between the material input and the benefits derived. Resource conservation (source reduction) of material inputs and/or improving the functionality of the packaging can positively impact material efficiency. Process efficiency is the ratio between the time spent on production steps to the output. Opportunities to improve material and process efficiency include process improvement, product redesign, and technology changes to packaging equipment. It should be noted that continual source reduction has benefits, but there are trade-offs that must be assessed.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
Equipment StandsTransportation to RetailersInclude shipments of your product from final manufacturing facilities to downstream retailers or distributors. Include both company-owned and contracted fleet. Exclude data for return trips. If retailers are responsible for the transportation of some or all of your final product, the retailer may hold the information necessary to calculate your response. It may be made available in a public report or by request.
Calculate B1 as the volume of product transported by carriers that reported emissions, divided by total volume of product transported, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If a supplier completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, you may count that as compliance with this question. Examples of other compliant standards are provided in the Certifications, Standards, & Tools section below.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

Clean Shipping Index: According to their website, "Clean Shipping Index is a tool for cargo owners to select clean ships and quality ship operators" to minimize environmental footprint and identify areas for environmental improvement. https://www.cleanshippingindex.com/

Clear Cargo: The Clean Cargo Working group is a business initiative created by BSR to collaboratively address the environmental impacts of shipping and transportation. https://www.clean-cargo.org/data-methods

EN 16258: The European Committee for Standardization's EN 16258 standard deals with the methodology for calculation and reporting of energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of freight and passenger transport services. https://shop.bsigroup.com/ProductDetail/?pid=000000000030241098

Ecotransit: EcotransIT World calculates and quantifies environmental impacts of different carriers across the world in terms of direct energy usage and emissions during the operation of vehicles during the transport of products. http://www.ecotransit.org/

IATA CO2 Emissions Measurement Methodology: This document includes a methodology for measuring CO2 emissions from air cargo. https://www.iata.org/en/programs/cargo/sustainability/carbon-footprint/

THESIS Help Center Video: Transportation to Retailers KPI: Short video tutorial on the Transportation to Retailers KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/529545735
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsN/A
Equipment StandsWastewater generation - Supply chainCalculate B1 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for COD, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B2 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for BOD, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B3 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for TSS, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B4 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met the standard for pH, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B5 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met the standard for temperature, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Audits should include verification that discharged wastewater is meeting the standards set forth by the American Apparel & Footwear Association Global Textile Effluent Guidelines for 95% of the sampling period:
- Measurements for BOD and TSS should be below or equal to 30 ppm.
- Measurements for COD should be below or equal to 100 ppm.
- Measurements for temperature should be below or equal to 37 degrees Celsius.
- Measurements for pH should be between 6.0 - 9.0.
Testing should follow a rigorous and internationally accepted methodology and frequency. Local or corporate standards may be stricter. The water quality metrics ideally approach ambient conditions.
Information required by the Higg Index Facility Environment Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Wastewater - Level 2, Question 7" may be used in responding to B1-B5 if the chosen wastewater standard meets or exceeds the values listed above, or if the values of the parameters listed in the detection table meet or exceed the values listed above. The information reported to the FEM is at the facility level; if your products are produced in multiple facilities you may aggregate the data to represent the entirety of final product produced.
AWS International Water Stewardship Standard: The International Water Stewardship Standard is a globally-applicable framework that helps water users understand their water use and impacts. Developed by the Alliance for Water Stewardship, the standard addresses 1) sustainable water balance, 2) good water quality, 3) healthy important water-related areas, and 4) good water governance. https://a4ws.org/the-aws-standard-2-0/

American Apparel & Footwear Association (AAFA) - Restricted Substance List: The AAFA provides guidelines for restricted chemicals and substances. https://www.aafaglobal.org/AAFA/Solutions_Pages/Restricted_Substance_List

BHive: The BHive enables the creation and management of chemical inventories, identifies chemical products that meet sustainability credentials. The BHive enhances supply chain transparency as factories, brands, and retailers can view and compare the safety of chemical products. https://www.thebhive.net/

Detox to Zero by OEKO-TEX: This analysis and assessment tool creates transparency and provides textile and leather producers the ability to control the use of hazardous substances. The tool focuses on continuous improvement and gradual reduction of harmful substances in production processes. https://www.oeko-tex.com/en/our-standards/detox-to-zero-by-oeko-tex

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS): Sustainable Textile Solutions programs support brands, retailers, and industry partners in their efforts to achieve compliance to environmental, health, and safety standards. https://sustexsolutions.com/

THESIS Help Center Video: Wastewater generation - Supply Chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Wastewater generation - Supply Chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/448595442
Roadmap to Zero by ZDHC (Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals): This plan is intended to reduce and eliminate the discharge of hazardous chemicals. https://www.roadmaptozero.com/

Textile Effluent Treatment Technology: The Journal of Cotton Science has produced a document addressing the treatment of textile effluent and specific wastewater management methods. http://www.cotton.org/journal/2007-11/3/upload/jcs11-141.pdf

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - Effluent Limitation Guidelines: This source provides current wastewater discharge guidelines and provides resources for reducing environmental impacts from wastewater discharge. https://www.epa.gov/eg

Wastewater 101 Toolbox: A free online resource for the textile industry to learn, act, and share experiences related to the treatment of wastewater. https://wastewater.sustainabilityconsortium.org/
Biological oxygen demand (BOD): An indicator for the amount of oxygen required/consumed for the microbiological decomposition (oxidation) of organic material in water bodies.

Chemical oxygen demand (COD): An indicator for the amount of oxygen required to oxidize an organic compound to carbon dioxide, ammonia, and water. The measurement is a proxy for the amount of organic compounds in water. Measuring COD in wastewater provides an estimated level of organic pollutants. The standard for measurement can be referenced in ISO 6060.

Total suspended solids (TSS): A water quality measurement that reflects the amount of particulates in a sample. The dry weight of residue in a filter is used to calculate units in milligrams per liter (mg/L).

Water use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.

pH: A measure of a substance's acidity or basicity. The measurement is based upon the molar concentration of hydrogen (H) ions in an aqueous solution of the substance. Pure water is at a neutral pH of 7. For wastewater quality testing, measuring pH allows for benchmarking pH levels to ambient conditions existing naturally in the surrounding environment.
Equipment StandsWorker health and safety - ManufacturingThis question aligns with the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Injury and Illness rate. This rate can be normalized for global applicability.
Calculate C1 according to OSHA's injury and illness rate by multiplying the number of recordable injuries and illnesses by 200,000. Divide this number by the total employee hours worked to produce your final product. If multiple facilities manufacture the final product, the injury and illness rate will need to be adjusted using a weighted average based on each facility's percentage of total production. Include all employees at a facility that participate in the production of the final product. This includes both full-time and contracted employees.
Calculate C2 as the revenue from your final product for which you were able to obtain data divided by the total revenue from your final product, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS General Guidance document provides guidance to calculate the weighted average. See Background Information for access to this document.
The Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool is an online calculator that will compute your injury and illness rate. The OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses provides forms and information for computing your facility injury and illness rate.
Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool: This tool calculates the injury and illness incidence rate for employers. https://data.bls.gov/iirc/

OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses: This webpage contains information on how to record workplace injuries and illnesses and provides the worksheets needed to correctly do so. https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/forms

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520108472
How to Compute a Firm's Incidence Rate for Safety Management: This website from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics provides in-depth guidance on computing injury and illness numbers. https://www.bls.gov/iif/osheval.htm

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

TSC General Guidance for Key Performance Indicators: The General Guidance Document for Key Performance Indicators (KPI) provides essential guidance to complement the specific guidance provided for each KPI. TSC recommends reading this document before you begin your first questionnaire and revisiting it as often as necessary for clarification and additional information. https://www.sustainabilityconsortium.org/tsc-downloads/general-guidance-document/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Equipment StandsWorker health and safety - Supply chainTo be included in B1-B5, risk assessments, training programs, safety plans, performance monitoring systems, and audits must be verifiable and address health and safety issues such as worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. The assessments and audits must be conducted by second or third parties. The risk assessment must be conducted once per year while the audit must have been conducted at least once every three years, both using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles such as International Labour Organization Occupational Safety and Health Conventions (e.g., No. 155). The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions, which can inform your responses. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for examples of initiatives that meet these requirements.
Calculate B1 as the mass of your materials, ingredients, and components that came from operations that have performed a risk assessment to identify high risk areas for health and safety, divided by the total mass of your materials, ingredients, and components, then multiply by 100.
To determine if an operation is high risk for health and safety, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic review assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. It must be conducted at least once per year. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your materials, ingredients, and components that came from operations that train workers on health and safety procedures, divided by the total mass of your materials, ingredients, and components, then multiply by 100. To be included in B2, the training on health and safety procedures must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and must be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for workers on health and safety procedures and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional worker training may be required to perform job duties. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your materials, ingredients, and components that came from operations that implement a verifiable worker health and safety plan, divided by the total mass of your materials, ingredients, and components, then multiply by 100. To be included in B3, a worker health and safety plan must be verifiable and must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and be prominently displayed in the workplace where employees normally report. The plan should include best practices specific to ergonomics; repetitive motions; chemical and particulate exposure; appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE); and proper use of tools, machinery, and the handling of animals (if applicable). On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B4 as the mass of your materials, ingredients, and components that came from operations that have a worker health and safety performance monitoring system in place, divided by the total mass of your materials, ingredients, and components, then multiply by 100. To be included in B4, a worker health and safety performance monitoring system should include metrics on issues including, but not limited to, incidence of worker injuries and prevalence of diseases. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B5 as the mass of your materials, ingredients, and components that came from operations that were audited in the last three years on worker health and safety issues, divided by the total mass of your materials, ingredients, and components, then multiply by 100. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
To be included in B5, the audits must be verifiable and address preventive measures, freely provided personal protective equipment, identification of worker health and safety hazards and effects on the exposed people, statistics and reasons behind injuries, design of work area, processes, installations, machinery/work equipment, operating processes and work organization, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Standards on Occupational Health and Safety.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Recommended Practices for Safety and Health Programs: Defines and enforces standards for the safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women. OHSA also provides training, outreach education, and assistance. The OSHA tools can be used for self-evaluations, to compare elements and actions of different health and safety standards, to track implemented actions, identify remaining weaknesses, and strategies for continued improvement. https://www.osha.gov/shpguidelines/explore-tools.html

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit: Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit is an auditing system that aligns with Ethical Trading Initiative's Base Code as well International Labour Organization Conventions. It has been developed to provide a public auditing methodology and format for companies to use to assess compliance. https://www.sedex.com/our-services/smeta-audit/

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528345
IS0 26000 Social Responsibility: ISO 2600 is not a certification tool, but it offers guidance about social responsibility to all sorts of organizations regardless of their activity, size or location. https://www.iso.org/iso-26000-social-responsibility.html

Social Accountability International Guidance Document for Social Accountability 8000: According to Social Accountability International, "this guidance document provides various tools and information for users of the Social Accountability 8000 standard, including definitions, background information, and examples." https://sa-intl.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/SA8000-2014-Guidance-Document.pdf

United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9
Corrective actions: Prompt actions taken to eliminate the causes of a problem, thus preventing their recurrence.

First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Risk assessment: A systematic process to evaluate potential risks within an operation, system, or supply chain. It can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party or a country risk classification analysis that judges the site risk due to prevailing conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Hammocks, Cots, SwingsCertification - Paper and wood sourcingCalculate C1 as the dry mass of your paper and wood supply that only underwent third-party legality verification, divided by the total dry mass of your paper and wood supply, then multiply by 100. Do not include in this calculation any supply that is included under one of the other response options.
Calculate C2 as the dry mass of your paper and wood supply that had FSC Controlled Wood certification, divided by the total dry mass of your paper or wood supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the dry mass of your paper and wood supply that was certified to the SFI Fiber Sourcing Standard or sourced under a PEFC-Due Diligence System, divided by the total dry mass of your paper and wood supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the dry mass of your paper and wood supply that was FSC-certified, divided by the total dry mass of your paper and wood supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C5 as the dry mass of your paper and wood supply that was SFI-certified or certified under another PEFC-endorsed program, divided by the total dry mass of your paper and wood supply, then multiply by 100.
The sum of C1, C2, C3, C4, and C5 must not exceed 100%. Do not include the same paper or wood supply in the calculation of more than one response option. The last day of the 12-month reporting period must be within 12 months of the completion date of this question.
CERFLOR - Brazilian Forest Certification Program: This organization is an independent, third-party certification program that focuses on sustainable management of natural and planted Amazonian tropical forests. CERFLOR is a PEFC-endorsed certification. https://www.pefc.org/discover-pefc/our-pefc-members/national-members/brazilian-forest-certification-programme-cerflor

CSA - Canadian Standards Association: CSA Group is an internationally-accredited standards development and testing and certification organization that provides consumer product evaluation, education, and training services dedicated to advancing safety, sustainability, and social good. Some programs include environmental product performance, management systems and processes, registry services, worker and workplace safety, energy efficiency verification, and greenhouse gas clean projects. Programs specific to wood sourcing are outlined in Canada's National Standard for Sustainable Forest Management. CSA is a PEFC-endorsed program. http://www.csagroup.org/

EU Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade Volunteer Partnership Agreement: Voluntary Partnership Agreements (VPAs) are a central element of the EU's strategy in the fight against illegal logging. A VPA is a bilateral trade agreement between the EU and a timber-exporting country outside the EU. https://www.euflegt.efi.int/vpa

FSC Controlled Wood: The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) Controlled Wood is non-certified material subject to controlled conditions that can be mixed with FSC-certified material during manufacturing FSC-Mix products. This has enabled manufacturers to manage low and fluctuating supplies of FSC certified forest products, while creating demand for FSC certified wood. https://us.fsc.org/en-us/certification/controlled-wood

FSC Forest Certification: Products with FSC certification come from responsibly managed forests that provide environmental, social, and economic benefits. The following website provides more information related to the principles that guide the certification process. https://us.fsc.org/en-us/certification

Forest Legality Alliance's Risk Tool: This tool is designed to present useful information about the sourcing of forest products. You can search the tool's content by country or by species to find specific information.? https://forestlegality.org/risk-tool/

PEFC - Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification Due Diligence System: The PEFC DDS is an integral part of the PEFC Chain of Custody standard and is the mechanism that avoids the inclusion of timber from controversial sources in products with a PEFC claim. https://www.pefc.org/for-business/supply-chain-companies

PEFC - Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification: The Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC) provides guidance for integrating best practices for the entire forest supply chain to ensure that timber and non-timber forest products are produced with consideration of ecological, social, and ethical standards. http://www.pefc.org

SFI - Sustainable Forestry Initiative - Fiber Sourcing Standard: The SFI Fiber Sourcing Standard is for organizations that do not own or manage land but do procure wood directly from forests. Program Participants must show that the raw material in their supply chain comes from legal and responsible sources, whether the forests are certified or not. Primary producers must be third-party audited and certified to the SFI 2015-2019 Fiber Sourcing Standard. SFI is a PEFC-endorsed program. https://forests.org/fibersourcingstandard/

SFI - Sustainable Forestry Initiative - Standard: The SFI Standard addresses sustainable forest management and responsible sourcing. SFI also has a chain of custody standard to track wood and paper flow through the supply chain. SFI is a PEFC-endorsed program. https://forests.org/sficertifiedsourcingstandard/
N/AN/A
Hammocks, Cots, SwingsGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the spend on materials, ingredients, and components from suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total spend on all materials, ingredients, and components, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
N/A
Hammocks, Cots, SwingsGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, including product assembly and the manufacture of any materials, ingredients, and components purchased directly by your organization for inclusion in your products, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total revenue of produced product.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total revenue of produced product.
Calculate B2 as the revenue of produced products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total revenue of produced products, then multiply by 100.
For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardGreenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
Hammocks, Cots, SwingsLeather impacts - Supply chainCalculate C1 as the mass of your leather supply that was traced to the slaughterhouse operation of origin, divided by the total mass of your leather supply, then multiply by 100.

Calculate C2 as the mass of leather materials that came from suppliers that either maintain a current comprehensive animal welfare certification or verifiable, regularly conducted animal welfare audits, divided by the total mass of our leather material supply, then multiply by 100.

Verifiable, regularly conducted audits should be performed by a second party or third party. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain can initiate these audits. Regulations, audits, and certifications that align with the animal welfare standards as described in Section 7 of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Terrestrial/Aquatic Animal Health Code and are well-enforced by the implementation of auditing systems can be included in your calculation.
Farm stage:
Minimization of pain, risk of injury, and transmission of diseases or parasites to animals; a physical environment in which the air or water quality, temperature, and humidity supports good animal health; a structural and social environment that allows animals to rest comfortably, provides opportunities for physical and cognitive activity, and allows for the opportunity to perform all beneficial natural, individual, and social behaviors.
Animals should have access to sufficient water and appropriate feed, so as to be free from hunger and thirst. The handling of animals should foster a positive relationship between humans and animals and should not cause injury, panic, lasting fear, or avoidable stress.
Genetic selection should take into account the health and welfare of animals.
Transportation stage:
Animals should not be transported if they are not fit to travel. For those animals fit to travel, the number of journeys and the length of time should be minimized. Loading and unloading procedures should minimize animal stress, prevent injury, and use facilities that promote calm and safe animal movement. Protection from extreme temperatures and other extreme weather conditions is provided. Adequate feed and water is available when required.
Slaughter stage:
Animals should be treated humanely before and during all slaughter procedures, including pre-slaughter stunning for non-ritual slaughter. The pre-slaughter stunning must render the animal insensible to pain until death occurs. The minimization of fear, stress, and pain is included in humane treatment.
TSC provides a list of animal welfare certifications, standards, and programs to assist users in choosing a program that aligns with their needs. See Background Information for more details.

Calculate C3 as the mass of your leather supply that came from tannery operations that either maintain a current comprehensive environmental impact certification or verifiable, regularly conducted environmental impact audit, divided by the total mass of your leather supply, then multiply by 100.
The certification or audits should address all material environmental impacts including, but not limited to, chemical use, energy consumption, water usage, air and noise emissions, and waste and effluent management. Material audited by The Leather Working Group may be included in the calculation of C3.

Calculate C4 as the mass of your leather supply that came from tannery operations that regularly and verifiably conducted audits for worker health and safety, divided by the total mass of your leather supply, then multiply by 100.
The audits should address all worker health and safety concerns, including, but not limited to, equipment training, chemical exposure, noise exposure, dust exposure, and accident record keeping.

To be included in C2, C3 and C4, verifiable, regularly conducted audits should be performed by a second party or third party. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain can initiate these audits.

Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
N/AN/AN/A
Hammocks, Cots, SwingsPackaging Raw Material SourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Pre-consumer recycled material: “Material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Renewable material: “Material that is composed of biomass from a living source and that can be continually replenished. To be defined as renewable, virgin materials shall come from sources which are replenished at a rate equal to or greater than the rate of depletion.” (FTC Green Guides:2012)

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably-sourced material: Material for which it can be demonstrated through second- or third-party verification that the virgin raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities. Materials such as paper can be included in this definition if the source of the packaging content comes from sustainably-managed forests with no deforestation.
Hammocks, Cots, SwingsPriority chemicals - DisclosureFor this question, a priority chemical is one that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis.
Relevant criteria in the US EPA Safer Choice Program and Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals, listed below, may be used to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment.to health or the environment from multiple agents or stressors” (EPA, 2003).
Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Disclosure KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Disclosure KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750684
N/APriority chemical: A chemical that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis.
Hammocks, Cots, SwingsProduct stewardshipThis question addresses takeback programs that an organization may fund, contract, or physically operate, in whole or in part, to enable consumers to return products for responsible end-of-life management. Include only products and materials for which an organization has the ability to decide or influence the handling, treatment, and disposal of returned devices, components, and materials. These calculations should be made at the program level rather than category level. The same percentage can be reported across multiple product categories if the products are collected and managed in the same program within the organization. Separate programs require separate percentage calculations when reported in different product category questionnaires. If products under the same category are collected in separate programs, average the recycling performance of the two programs and report that value in D1.
Calculate D1 as the number of product units returned through the program(s) for recycling divided by the total number of product units sold, then multiply by 100. If this number exceeds 100, report it as 100.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Data for both the unit volume returned and unit volume sold should come from the same year, even though units may be returned in a different year than they were sold.
Examples of stewardship programs include extended producer responsibility programs and product takeback programs. Such programs should ensure that materials are recycled or disposed of in an environmentally sensitive manner.
THESIS Help Center Video: Product Stewardship KPI: Short video tutorial on the Product Stewardship KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750712N/AN/A
Hammocks, Cots, SwingsRecycled contentThis question covers materials, such as metals, plastics, and wood, as well as ingredients, such as motor oil and refrigerants. Calculate B1 by dividing the mass of post-consumer recycled materials or ingredients in the final product by the total mass of the final product, then multiply by 100. If multiple product configurations are sold, perform this calculation for each configuration, then calculate B1 and the sales-weighted average across all configurations. Treat refurbished goods as 100% post-consumer recycled material. Some materials and ingredients will have no available recycling stream, but the masses of these should still be included in the final product's mass.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS Help Center Video: Recycled Content KPI: Short video tutorial on the Recycled Content KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017179FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Prospector: This searchable database from UL allows product designers to search for materials and ingredients that meet a set of user-defined specifications, including those that contain some amount of recycled content. https://www.ulprospector.com/en/na
N/A
Hammocks, Cots, SwingsResponsible metals supplyCalculate C1 as the spend on metal suppliers who require site-level assessments from all of their suppliers divided by the total spend on product units manufactured in this product category, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
An assessment should include an on-site audit of environmental and social sustainability performance by a second or third party, or a systematic risk assessment against a standard or set of principles to determine risk based on conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors. Examples of standards or sets of principles include those developed by the International Council on Mining & Metals (ICMM) and the Initiative for Responsible Mining Assurance (IRMA).
N/ABetter Sourcing Program: The Better Sourcing Program (BSP) provides a technology-based communications solution to allow global organizations to source artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) ores through upstream due diligence, auditing and risk management. https://www.rcsglobal.com/bettersourcing/

Responsible Cobalt Initiative (RCI): An initiative under the Chinese Chamber of Commerce for Metals, Minerals & Chemicals (CCCMC), in collaboration with OECD, to bring importers and exporters of cobalt together with supply chain stakeholders to address social and environmental risks in the cobalt supply chain. http://en.cccmc.org.cn/news/58372.htm

Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC) chain-of-custody certification: The Responsible Jewellery Council is a standard-setting and certification organization that has developed an ISEAL-accredited chain-of-custody certification program for use by the jewellery industry and manufacturers, which applies to gold and platinum group metals. https://www.responsiblejewellery.com/rjc-certification/

Responsible Mica Initiative: A multi-stakeholder focused on responsible sourcing of mica in Indiay through the development and deployment of fair, responsible and sustainable practices, local community empowerment, and building a legal and liveable environment in local communities. https://responsible-mica-initiative.com/

Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI): Formerly known as the Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative, the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI) is a joint effort between the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) and GeSI to establish supply chain transparency tools, resources and training to assist organizations in responsibly sourcing conflict-free minerals from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. Of note is their Responsible Minerals Assurance Process, which enables auditing and assessment of smelters for responsible ore sourcing and provides a centralized database for tracking smelter performance. http://www.responsiblemineralsinitiative.org/

Responsible Steel: A multi-stakeholder initative bringing together organizations across the steel supply chain to develop a standard for responsible steel supply and related certifications. https://www.responsiblesteel.org/
Corrective actions: Prompt actions taken to eliminate the causes of a problem, thus preventing their recurrence.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.
Hammocks, Cots, SwingsSustainable Packaging Design and ProductionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

EPA Energy Benefits Calculator: Use the EPA Energy Benefits Calculator to help quantify environmental impact reductions for packaging design choices. https://www.epa.gov/lmop/landfill-gas-energy-benefits-calculator

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. https://bo.citeo.com/sites/default/files/2019-07/20190617_Guide_Info-tri_Citeo_EN.pdf

On-Pack Recycling Label: Used in the UK, the On-Pack Recycling Label details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. http://www.oprl.org.uk/

The Association of Postconsumer Plastic Recyclers (APR): The APR is an international national trade association representing the plastics recycling industry. https://plasticsrecycling.org/about

The Triman: Used in France, the Triman is a recycling symbol in e-commerce that sells and ships to France. https://www.msl.io/uploads/downloads/Triman-Users-handbook-english-V21.pdf

Woolworths Recycling Labels: Used in South Africa, the Woolworths Recycling Labels detail how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.woolworths.co.za/content/howto/good-business-journey/how-to-read-our-recycling-labels/_/A-cmp201960
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

Recycle Now: Recycle Now is the national recycling effort in England. The website contains examples of recycling labels that may be used on packaging and how to interpret them. http://www.recyclenow.com/recycle/packaging-symbols-explained

Walmart Sustainable Packaging Playbook: Walmart provides an overview of sustainable packaging best practices for suppliers interested in improving and innovating packaging. https://www.walmartsustainabilityhub.com/climate/project-gigaton/packaging
Goals: Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound.

Material and process efficiency: Material efficiency is the ratio between the material input and the benefits derived. Resource conservation (source reduction) of material inputs and/or improving the functionality of the packaging can positively impact material efficiency. Process efficiency is the ratio between the time spent on production steps to the output. Opportunities to improve material and process efficiency include process improvement, product redesign, and technology changes to packaging equipment. It should be noted that continual source reduction has benefits, but there are trade-offs that must be assessed.

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Weight or volume optimization: "Process for the achievement of a minimum adequate weight or volume (source reduction) for meeting the necessary requirements of primary or secondary or transport packaging, when performance and user/consumer acceptability remain unchanged or adequate, thereby reducing the impact on the environment.” (ISO 18601:2013 - Packaging and the environment--General requirements for the use of ISO standards in the field of packaging and the environment)
Hammocks, Cots, SwingsTransportation to RetailersInclude shipments of your product from final manufacturing facilities to downstream retailers or distributors. Include both company-owned and contracted fleet. Exclude data for return trips. If retailers are responsible for the transportation of some or all of your final product, the retailer may hold the information necessary to calculate your response. It may be made available in a public report or by request.
Calculate B1 as the volume of product transported by carriers that reported emissions, divided by total volume of product transported, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If a supplier completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, you may count that as compliance with this question. Examples of other compliant standards are provided in the Certifications, Standards, & Tools section below.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

Clean Shipping Index: According to their website, "Clean Shipping Index is a tool for cargo owners to select clean ships and quality ship operators" to minimize environmental footprint and identify areas for environmental improvement. https://www.cleanshippingindex.com/

Clear Cargo: The Clean Cargo Working group is a business initiative created by BSR to collaboratively address the environmental impacts of shipping and transportation. https://www.clean-cargo.org/data-methods

EN 16258: The European Committee for Standardization's EN 16258 standard deals with the methodology for calculation and reporting of energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of freight and passenger transport services. https://shop.bsigroup.com/ProductDetail/?pid=000000000030241098

Ecotransit: EcotransIT World calculates and quantifies environmental impacts of different carriers across the world in terms of direct energy usage and emissions during the operation of vehicles during the transport of products. http://www.ecotransit.org/

IATA CO2 Emissions Measurement Methodology: This document includes a methodology for measuring CO2 emissions from air cargo. https://www.iata.org/en/programs/cargo/sustainability/carbon-footprint/

THESIS Help Center Video: Transportation to Retailers KPI: Short video tutorial on the Transportation to Retailers KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/529545735
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsN/A
Hammocks, Cots, SwingsWastewater generation - Supply chainCalculate B1 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for COD, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B2 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for BOD, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B3 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met or exceeded the standard for TSS, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B4 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met the standard for pH, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Calculate B5 as the mass of textile fabric from wet processing facilities that have undergone supplier audits and met the standard for temperature, divided by the total textile fabric from all wet processing facilities, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Audits should include verification that discharged wastewater is meeting the standards set forth by the American Apparel & Footwear Association Global Textile Effluent Guidelines for 95% of the sampling period:
- Measurements for BOD and TSS should be below or equal to 30 ppm.
- Measurements for COD should be below or equal to 100 ppm.
- Measurements for temperature should be below or equal to 37 degrees Celsius.
- Measurements for pH should be between 6.0 - 9.0.
Testing should follow a rigorous and internationally accepted methodology and frequency. Local or corporate standards may be stricter. The water quality metrics ideally approach ambient conditions.
Information required by the Higg Index Facility Environment Module 3.0 (Higg FEM) "Wastewater - Level 2, Question 7" may be used in responding to B1-B5 if the chosen wastewater standard meets or exceeds the values listed above, or if the values of the parameters listed in the detection table meet or exceed the values listed above. The information reported to the FEM is at the facility level; if your products are produced in multiple facilities you may aggregate the data to represent the entirety of final product produced.
AWS International Water Stewardship Standard: The International Water Stewardship Standard is a globally-applicable framework that helps water users understand their water use and impacts. Developed by the Alliance for Water Stewardship, the standard addresses 1) sustainable water balance, 2) good water quality, 3) healthy important water-related areas, and 4) good water governance. https://a4ws.org/the-aws-standard-2-0/

American Apparel & Footwear Association (AAFA) - Restricted Substance List: The AAFA provides guidelines for restricted chemicals and substances. https://www.aafaglobal.org/AAFA/Solutions_Pages/Restricted_Substance_List

BHive: The BHive enables the creation and management of chemical inventories, identifies chemical products that meet sustainability credentials. The BHive enhances supply chain transparency as factories, brands, and retailers can view and compare the safety of chemical products. https://www.thebhive.net/

Detox to Zero by OEKO-TEX: This analysis and assessment tool creates transparency and provides textile and leather producers the ability to control the use of hazardous substances. The tool focuses on continuous improvement and gradual reduction of harmful substances in production processes. https://www.oeko-tex.com/en/our-standards/detox-to-zero-by-oeko-tex

SAC Higg Index: The Sustainable Apparel Coalition has developed indicator-based assessment tools called the Higg Index, which evaluates the sustainable practices associated with production of apparel and footwear. https://apparelcoalition.org/the-higg-index/

Sustainable Textile Solutions (STS): Sustainable Textile Solutions programs support brands, retailers, and industry partners in their efforts to achieve compliance to environmental, health, and safety standards. https://sustexsolutions.com/

THESIS Help Center Video: Wastewater generation - Supply Chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Wastewater generation - Supply Chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/448595442
Roadmap to Zero by ZDHC (Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals): This plan is intended to reduce and eliminate the discharge of hazardous chemicals. https://www.roadmaptozero.com/

Textile Effluent Treatment Technology: The Journal of Cotton Science has produced a document addressing the treatment of textile effluent and specific wastewater management methods. http://www.cotton.org/journal/2007-11/3/upload/jcs11-141.pdf

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - Effluent Limitation Guidelines: This source provides current wastewater discharge guidelines and provides resources for reducing environmental impacts from wastewater discharge. https://www.epa.gov/eg

Wastewater 101 Toolbox: A free online resource for the textile industry to learn, act, and share experiences related to the treatment of wastewater. https://wastewater.sustainabilityconsortium.org/
Biological oxygen demand (BOD): An indicator for the amount of oxygen required/consumed for the microbiological decomposition (oxidation) of organic material in water bodies.

Chemical oxygen demand (COD): An indicator for the amount of oxygen required to oxidize an organic compound to carbon dioxide, ammonia, and water. The measurement is a proxy for the amount of organic compounds in water. Measuring COD in wastewater provides an estimated level of organic pollutants. The standard for measurement can be referenced in ISO 6060.

Total suspended solids (TSS): A water quality measurement that reflects the amount of particulates in a sample. The dry weight of residue in a filter is used to calculate units in milligrams per liter (mg/L).

Water use: Water use is defined as total withdrawals from municipal and private water providers, surface water, groundwater, or wells.

pH: A measure of a substance's acidity or basicity. The measurement is based upon the molar concentration of hydrogen (H) ions in an aqueous solution of the substance. Pure water is at a neutral pH of 7. For wastewater quality testing, measuring pH allows for benchmarking pH levels to ambient conditions existing naturally in the surrounding environment.
Hammocks, Cots, SwingsWorker health and safety - ManufacturingThis question aligns with the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Injury and Illness rate. This rate can be normalized for global applicability.
Calculate C1 according to OSHA's injury and illness rate by multiplying the number of recordable injuries and illnesses by 200,000. Divide this number by the total employee hours worked to produce your final product. If multiple facilities manufacture the final product, the injury and illness rate will need to be adjusted using a weighted average based on each facility's percentage of total production. Include all employees at a facility that participate in the production of the final product. This includes both full-time and contracted employees.
Calculate C2 as the revenue from your final product for which you were able to obtain data divided by the total revenue from your final product, then multiply by 100.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS General Guidance document provides guidance to calculate the weighted average. See Background Information for access to this document.
The Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool is an online calculator that will compute your injury and illness rate. The OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses provides forms and information for computing your facility injury and illness rate.
Incidence Rate Calculator and Comparison Tool: This tool calculates the injury and illness incidence rate for employers. https://data.bls.gov/iirc/

OSHA Forms for Recording Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses: This webpage contains information on how to record workplace injuries and illnesses and provides the worksheets needed to correctly do so. https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/forms

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker Health and Safety - Manufacturing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/520108472
How to Compute a Firm's Incidence Rate for Safety Management: This website from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics provides in-depth guidance on computing injury and illness numbers. https://www.bls.gov/iif/osheval.htm

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

TSC General Guidance for Key Performance Indicators: The General Guidance Document for Key Performance Indicators (KPI) provides essential guidance to complement the specific guidance provided for each KPI. TSC recommends reading this document before you begin your first questionnaire and revisiting it as often as necessary for clarification and additional information. https://www.sustainabilityconsortium.org/tsc-downloads/general-guidance-document/
Company-owned or contract manufacturing facilities: Facilities responsible for manufacturing and assembly of final products, whether these facilities are internal or external to the respondent’s organization.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
Hammocks, Cots, SwingsWorker health and safety - Supply chainTo be included in B1-B5, risk assessments, training programs, safety plans, performance monitoring systems, and audits must be verifiable and address health and safety issues such as worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. The assessments and audits must be conducted by second or third parties. The risk assessment must be conducted once per year while the audit must have been conducted at least once every three years, both using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles such as International Labour Organization Occupational Safety and Health Conventions (e.g., No. 155). The standards and websites listed in Background Information below may be helpful for conducting your risk assessment(s) and for understanding appropriate corrective actions, which can inform your responses. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for examples of initiatives that meet these requirements.
Calculate B1 as the mass of your materials, ingredients, and components that came from operations that have performed a risk assessment to identify high risk areas for health and safety, divided by the total mass of your materials, ingredients, and components, then multiply by 100.
To determine if an operation is high risk for health and safety, you may utilize a country risk analysis tool. The tool should measure the strength of a country's ability to govern and enforce laws, regulations, and internationally recognized principles. The country risk assessment may be a first party systematic review assessment, or external risk analyses tools may be utilized. It must be conducted at least once per year. The country risk assessment can be complemented with risks associated with specific activities, regions, and suppliers.
Calculate B2 as the mass of your materials, ingredients, and components that came from operations that train workers on health and safety procedures, divided by the total mass of your materials, ingredients, and components, then multiply by 100. To be included in B2, the training on health and safety procedures must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and must be renewed as appropriate to maintain competency and implementation of good practices for workers on health and safety procedures and to prevent training exhaustion. Additional worker training may be required to perform job duties. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B3 as the mass of your materials, ingredients, and components that came from operations that implement a verifiable worker health and safety plan, divided by the total mass of your materials, ingredients, and components, then multiply by 100. To be included in B3, a worker health and safety plan must be verifiable and must be available in the language of the employee, including migratory and seasonal workers, and be prominently displayed in the workplace where employees normally report. The plan should include best practices specific to ergonomics; repetitive motions; chemical and particulate exposure; appropriate use of personal protective equipment (PPE); and proper use of tools, machinery, and the handling of animals (if applicable). On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B4 as the mass of your materials, ingredients, and components that came from operations that have a worker health and safety performance monitoring system in place, divided by the total mass of your materials, ingredients, and components, then multiply by 100. To be included in B4, a worker health and safety performance monitoring system should include metrics on issues including, but not limited to, incidence of worker injuries and prevalence of diseases. On-site audits, where necessary, should be conducted by second or third parties and must be conducted at least once every three years using a standard based on internationally-recognized principles.
Calculate B5 as the mass of your materials, ingredients, and components that came from operations that were audited in the last three years on worker health and safety issues, divided by the total mass of your materials, ingredients, and components, then multiply by 100. Audits should be conducted by second or third parties at least once every three years, or more often depending on the requirements of the standard organization. See the Certifications, Standards & Tools for more information. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain may initiate these audits.
To be included in B5, the audits must be verifiable and address preventive measures, freely provided personal protective equipment, identification of worker health and safety hazards and effects on the exposed people, statistics and reasons behind injuries, design of work area, processes, installations, machinery/work equipment, operating processes and work organization, as outlined by internationally-recognized labor principles. Examples include, but are not limited to, principles outlined by the United Nations Global Compact, the International Labour Organization Standards on Occupational Health and Safety.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Audits must have been conducted in the 36 months prior to the end of the 12-month period.
Amfori Country Risk Classification: This list classifies countries' risk of social injustice in an effort to assist companies in determining high and low risk for their sourcing and operations. http://duediligence.amfori.org/CountryRiskClassification

Recommended Practices for Safety and Health Programs: Defines and enforces standards for the safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women. OHSA also provides training, outreach education, and assistance. The OSHA tools can be used for self-evaluations, to compare elements and actions of different health and safety standards, to track implemented actions, identify remaining weaknesses, and strategies for continued improvement. https://www.osha.gov/shpguidelines/explore-tools.html

SA8000® Standard: Social Accountability International (SAI) is a global non-governmental organization that aims to advance human rights at work via the SA8000® Standard. SA 8000 measures social performance in eight areas that are relevant for workplaces in factories and organizations worldwide. https://sa-intl.org/programs/sa8000/

Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit: Sedex Members Ethical Trade Audit is an auditing system that aligns with Ethical Trading Initiative's Base Code as well International Labour Organization Conventions. It has been developed to provide a public auditing methodology and format for companies to use to assess compliance. https://www.sedex.com/our-services/smeta-audit/

THESIS Help Center Video: Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI: Short video tutorial on the Worker health and safety - Supply chain KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/536528345
IS0 26000 Social Responsibility: ISO 2600 is not a certification tool, but it offers guidance about social responsibility to all sorts of organizations regardless of their activity, size or location. https://www.iso.org/iso-26000-social-responsibility.html

Social Accountability International Guidance Document for Social Accountability 8000: According to Social Accountability International, "this guidance document provides various tools and information for users of the Social Accountability 8000 standard, including definitions, background information, and examples." https://sa-intl.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/SA8000-2014-Guidance-Document.pdf

United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum: United Nations Global Compact Human Rights and Business Dilemmas Forum present an introduction to, analysis of, and business recommendations for minimizing social sustainability risks in the supply chain. https://www.unglobalcompact.org/library/9
Corrective actions: Prompt actions taken to eliminate the causes of a problem, thus preventing their recurrence.

First party systematic risk assessment: A first party systematic risk assessment is conducted by the organization itself for management review and other internal purposes and may form the basis for an organization’s declaration of conformity.

Risk assessment: A systematic process to evaluate potential risks within an operation, system, or supply chain. It can include an on-site audit by a second party or third party or a country risk classification analysis that judges the site risk due to prevailing conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.

Worker exposure to harmful elements: Contact with potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological elements that occurs as a result of one's job-related activities. Examples include chronic interaction with chemicals, dusts, radiation, environmental elements, allergens, noise, and vibrations.

Worker health and safety: Worker health and safety consists of worker injury and worker exposure to harmful elements. Please see the corresponding terms.

Worker injury: Physical damage to an individual due to a single act that causes immediate damage or repetitive acts that cause damage over time. Examples of causes of injury include repetitive motions, non-ergonomic motions, damage from use of tools and machinery, falls, and burns.
LuggageCertification - Paper and wood sourcingCalculate C1 as the dry mass of your paper and wood supply that only underwent third-party legality verification, divided by the total dry mass of your paper and wood supply, then multiply by 100. Do not include in this calculation any supply that is included under one of the other response options.
Calculate C2 as the dry mass of your paper and wood supply that had FSC Controlled Wood certification, divided by the total dry mass of your paper or wood supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the dry mass of your paper and wood supply that was certified to the SFI Fiber Sourcing Standard or sourced under a PEFC-Due Diligence System, divided by the total dry mass of your paper and wood supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C4 as the dry mass of your paper and wood supply that was FSC-certified, divided by the total dry mass of your paper and wood supply, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C5 as the dry mass of your paper and wood supply that was SFI-certified or certified under another PEFC-endorsed program, divided by the total dry mass of your paper and wood supply, then multiply by 100.
The sum of C1, C2, C3, C4, and C5 must not exceed 100%. Do not include the same paper or wood supply in the calculation of more than one response option. The last day of the 12-month reporting period must be within 12 months of the completion date of this question.
CERFLOR - Brazilian Forest Certification Program: This organization is an independent, third-party certification program that focuses on sustainable management of natural and planted Amazonian tropical forests. CERFLOR is a PEFC-endorsed certification. https://www.pefc.org/discover-pefc/our-pefc-members/national-members/brazilian-forest-certification-programme-cerflor

CSA - Canadian Standards Association: CSA Group is an internationally-accredited standards development and testing and certification organization that provides consumer product evaluation, education, and training services dedicated to advancing safety, sustainability, and social good. Some programs include environmental product performance, management systems and processes, registry services, worker and workplace safety, energy efficiency verification, and greenhouse gas clean projects. Programs specific to wood sourcing are outlined in Canada's National Standard for Sustainable Forest Management. CSA is a PEFC-endorsed program. http://www.csagroup.org/

EU Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade Volunteer Partnership Agreement: Voluntary Partnership Agreements (VPAs) are a central element of the EU's strategy in the fight against illegal logging. A VPA is a bilateral trade agreement between the EU and a timber-exporting country outside the EU. https://www.euflegt.efi.int/vpa

FSC Controlled Wood: The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) Controlled Wood is non-certified material subject to controlled conditions that can be mixed with FSC-certified material during manufacturing FSC-Mix products. This has enabled manufacturers to manage low and fluctuating supplies of FSC certified forest products, while creating demand for FSC certified wood. https://us.fsc.org/en-us/certification/controlled-wood

FSC Forest Certification: Products with FSC certification come from responsibly managed forests that provide environmental, social, and economic benefits. The following website provides more information related to the principles that guide the certification process. https://us.fsc.org/en-us/certification

Forest Legality Alliance's Risk Tool: This tool is designed to present useful information about the sourcing of forest products. You can search the tool's content by country or by species to find specific information.? https://forestlegality.org/risk-tool/

PEFC - Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification Due Diligence System: The PEFC DDS is an integral part of the PEFC Chain of Custody standard and is the mechanism that avoids the inclusion of timber from controversial sources in products with a PEFC claim. https://www.pefc.org/for-business/supply-chain-companies

PEFC - Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification: The Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC) provides guidance for integrating best practices for the entire forest supply chain to ensure that timber and non-timber forest products are produced with consideration of ecological, social, and ethical standards. http://www.pefc.org

SFI - Sustainable Forestry Initiative - Fiber Sourcing Standard: The SFI Fiber Sourcing Standard is for organizations that do not own or manage land but do procure wood directly from forests. Program Participants must show that the raw material in their supply chain comes from legal and responsible sources, whether the forests are certified or not. Primary producers must be third-party audited and certified to the SFI 2015-2019 Fiber Sourcing Standard. SFI is a PEFC-endorsed program. https://forests.org/fibersourcingstandard/

SFI - Sustainable Forestry Initiative - Standard: The SFI Standard addresses sustainable forest management and responsible sourcing. SFI also has a chain of custody standard to track wood and paper flow through the supply chain. SFI is a PEFC-endorsed program. https://forests.org/sficertifiedsourcingstandard/
N/AN/A
LuggageGreenhouse gas emissions - Supply chainScope 1 and 2 emissions are defined by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard.
Calculate B1 as the spend on materials, ingredients, and components from suppliers that reported emissions, divided by total spend on all materials, ingredients, and components, then multiply by 100.
Reporting can occur through public disclosure or private disclosure from the supplier to your organization directly or through another party.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
If suppliers completed the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire, refer to their answers to determine if they report emissions.
Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-toolsCDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standard
N/A
LuggageGreenhouse gas emissions intensity - ManufacturingIncluded in the scope of this question are fuels combusted and electricity used in facilities that perform final manufacturing activities, including product assembly and the manufacture of any materials, ingredients, and components purchased directly by your organization for inclusion in your products, as well as trace gases released during manufacture. This may include some or all of your organization's corporate scope 1 and 2 emissions, as well as scope 1 and 2 emissions from any final manufacturing facilities not within your organization's financial or operational control (e.g., contract manufacturers). Excluded from the scope of this question are GHG allowances, offsets, and credits.
You may calculate B1 using product-specific data or estimate intensity via facility data that is not product specific. If using product-specific data, calculate B1 as the average of each product's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total revenue of produced product.
If using facility data, calculate B1 as the average of each final manufacturing facility's greenhouse gas emissions intensity, weighted by the total revenue of produced product.
Calculate B2 as the revenue of produced products for which you are able to obtain data, divided by total revenue of produced products, then multiply by 100.
For each final manufacturing facility, follow the instructions in the Greenhouse Gas Protocol Corporate Standard to calculate scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions generated from electricity purchased or produced, fuels combusted, and trace gases released, and then add them together. Worksheets are available on the GHG Protocol web site to facilitate these calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
The data required for the CDP Climate Change Questionnaire combined with production data can be used to calculate your response . The data required for "Disclosure 302-1 Energy consumption within the organization" in GRI 302: Energy or "Disclosure 305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions" and "Disclosure 305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions" in GRI 305: Emissions can also be used to calculate your response.
CDP Climate Change Questionnaire: The CDP Climate Change Questionnaire provides questions that assess a company's greenhouse gas emissions, goals, and management. The report provided by CDP provides the overview of the results from companies responding to the request. https://www.cdp.net/en/guidance/guidance-for-companies

GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines: The GRI G4 Sustainability Reporting Guidelines provide a standard set of metrics for companies to report on material environmental, social, and economic impacts, actions, and outcomes. https://www.globalreporting.org/standards/

Greenhouse Gas Protocol: Calculation Tools: This site provides a list of sector toolsets developed by GHG Protocol, third-party databases, and other tools based on the GHG Protocol standards that can be used to calculate greenhouse gas inventories for use in emissions calculations. https://ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools

THESIS Calculation Tool - GHG emissions intensity KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/calculation-tool-for-greenhouse-gas-emissions-intensity-manufacturing/

THESIS Help Center Video: GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. This is a step-by-step video on how to use the GHG emissions intensity Calculation Tool. https://vimeo.com/863813590
Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol Corporate Standard: The Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Protocol provides guidance and is a useful resource published by the World Resources Institute with the World Business Council for Sustainable Development as a guide for monitoring and accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. https://ghgprotocol.org/corporate-standardGreenhouse gas: Gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation in the atmosphere, e.g., carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons.
LuggageLeather impacts - Supply chainCalculate C1 as the mass of your leather supply that was traced to the slaughterhouse operation of origin, divided by the total mass of your leather supply, then multiply by 100.

Calculate C2 as the mass of leather materials that came from suppliers that either maintain a current comprehensive animal welfare certification or verifiable, regularly conducted animal welfare audits, divided by the total mass of our leather material supply, then multiply by 100.

Verifiable, regularly conducted audits should be performed by a second party or third party. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain can initiate these audits. Regulations, audits, and certifications that align with the animal welfare standards as described in Section 7 of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Terrestrial/Aquatic Animal Health Code and are well-enforced by the implementation of auditing systems can be included in your calculation.
Farm stage:
Minimization of pain, risk of injury, and transmission of diseases or parasites to animals; a physical environment in which the air or water quality, temperature, and humidity supports good animal health; a structural and social environment that allows animals to rest comfortably, provides opportunities for physical and cognitive activity, and allows for the opportunity to perform all beneficial natural, individual, and social behaviors.
Animals should have access to sufficient water and appropriate feed, so as to be free from hunger and thirst. The handling of animals should foster a positive relationship between humans and animals and should not cause injury, panic, lasting fear, or avoidable stress.
Genetic selection should take into account the health and welfare of animals.
Transportation stage:
Animals should not be transported if they are not fit to travel. For those animals fit to travel, the number of journeys and the length of time should be minimized. Loading and unloading procedures should minimize animal stress, prevent injury, and use facilities that promote calm and safe animal movement. Protection from extreme temperatures and other extreme weather conditions is provided. Adequate feed and water is available when required.
Slaughter stage:
Animals should be treated humanely before and during all slaughter procedures, including pre-slaughter stunning for non-ritual slaughter. The pre-slaughter stunning must render the animal insensible to pain until death occurs. The minimization of fear, stress, and pain is included in humane treatment.
TSC provides a list of animal welfare certifications, standards, and programs to assist users in choosing a program that aligns with their needs. See Background Information for more details.

Calculate C3 as the mass of your leather supply that came from tannery operations that either maintain a current comprehensive environmental impact certification or verifiable, regularly conducted environmental impact audit, divided by the total mass of your leather supply, then multiply by 100.
The certification or audits should address all material environmental impacts including, but not limited to, chemical use, energy consumption, water usage, air and noise emissions, and waste and effluent management. Material audited by The Leather Working Group may be included in the calculation of C3.

Calculate C4 as the mass of your leather supply that came from tannery operations that regularly and verifiably conducted audits for worker health and safety, divided by the total mass of your leather supply, then multiply by 100.
The audits should address all worker health and safety concerns, including, but not limited to, equipment training, chemical exposure, noise exposure, dust exposure, and accident record keeping.

To be included in C2, C3 and C4, verifiable, regularly conducted audits should be performed by a second party or third party. Government regulations or parties in the supply chain can initiate these audits.

Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
N/AN/AN/A
LuggagePackaging Raw Material SourcingThe scope of this question is the product category’s sales packaging, which is defined as packaging that leaves a store with the consumer. Include the transportation-related packaging for product that is shipped directly to an end consumer.
Calculate C1 as the mass of post-consumer recycled material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. This excludes pre-consumer recycled materials.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sustainably-sourced renewable virgin material in the sales packaging of your final products, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. To be included in C2, the material must be third-party verified (e.g. for paper-based packaging FSC, SFI, PEFC would be examples of certifications for verification).
If data on packaging materials specific to these final products is not available, you may use more aggregated internal data to calculate C1 and C2 (e.g., company-level data for sales packaging of similar products).
The sum of C1 and C2 cannot be greater than 100%.
Please refer to THESIS KPI set for Packaging for more detailed packaging indicators.
Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability: According to this document's introduction, "The Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability was created to provide the consumer goods and packaging industries with a much needed common language with which to discuss and assess the relative sustainability of packaging.  That common language consists of a framework and a measurement system. This report provide a standardized set of response approaches to the range of business questions that may arise concerning packaging sustainability." https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

THESIS Calculation Tool - Packaging KPIs: TSC has created THESIS KPI Calculation Tools to help suppliers in answering specific Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for THESIS. Each tool includes step by step instructions on how to use the tool to generate your KPI response. https://sustainabilityconsortium.org/download/packaging-calculation-tool-2023/

THESIS Help Center Video: Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI: Short video tutorial on the Packaging Raw Material Sourcing KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017161
Circulytics - Measuring circularity: The Ellen Macarthur Foundation's Circulytics assesses a company’s overall circularity. The tool is designed to support a company’s evolution to a circular economy by informing strategy development and decision making, and identifying opportunities to align with circular economy principles including: designing out waste, keeping materials and products in use, and generating environmental benefits. https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/resources/apply/circulytics-measuring-circularity

FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0: The Global Protocol for Packaging Sustainability (GPPS 2.0) is a common set of indicators and metrics for business regarding sustainable packaging. The Consumer Goods Forum condensed the "Sustainable Packaging Indicators and Metrics Framework", developed by GreenBlue's Sustainable Packaging Coalition, into GPPS 2.0. https://www.theconsumergoodsforum.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/CGF-Global-Protocol-on-Packaging.pdf

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/
Post-consumer recycled material: "Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end?users of the product that can no longer be used for its intended purpose. This includes returns of materials from the distribution chain.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Pre-consumer recycled material: “Material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it.” (ISO 14021:2016 - Environmental labels and declarations — Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labelling))

Renewable material: “Material that is composed of biomass from a living source and that can be continually replenished. To be defined as renewable, virgin materials shall come from sources which are replenished at a rate equal to or greater than the rate of depletion.” (FTC Green Guides:2012)

Sales packaging: "Packaging that leaves a store with the consumer". (Global Protocol on Packaging Sustainability 2.0:2011)

Sustainably-sourced material: Material for which it can be demonstrated through second- or third-party verification that the virgin raw material has been harvested or produced legally and in a way that minimizes damage to the environment, workers, and communities. Materials such as paper can be included in this definition if the source of the packaging content comes from sustainably-managed forests with no deforestation.
LuggagePriority chemicals - DisclosureFor this question, a priority chemical is one that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis.
Relevant criteria in the US EPA Safer Choice Program and Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals, listed below, may be used to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment.to health or the environment from multiple agents or stressors” (EPA, 2003).
Safer Choice (EPA): In order to identify scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health and the environment, organizations should reference relevant criteria in the U.S. EPA Safer Choice Program. https://www.epa.gov/saferchoice

THESIS Help Center Video: Priority Chemicals - Disclosure KPI: Short video tutorial on the Priority Chemicals - Disclosure KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750684
N/APriority chemical: A chemical that meets the criteria for classification as a carcinogen, mutagen, reproductive toxicant, or is persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic; or any chemical for which there is "scientific evidence of probable serious effects to human health or the environment which give rise to an equivalent level of concern" (REACH Title VII, Chapter 1, Article 57). Priority chemicals are identified on a case-by-case basis.
LuggageProduct stewardshipThis question addresses takeback programs that an organization may fund, contract, or physically operate, in whole or in part, to enable consumers to return products for responsible end-of-life management. Include only products and materials for which an organization has the ability to decide or influence the handling, treatment, and disposal of returned devices, components, and materials. These calculations should be made at the program level rather than category level. The same percentage can be reported across multiple product categories if the products are collected and managed in the same program within the organization. Separate programs require separate percentage calculations when reported in different product category questionnaires. If products under the same category are collected in separate programs, average the recycling performance of the two programs and report that value in D1.
Calculate D1 as the number of product units returned through the program(s) for recycling divided by the total number of product units sold, then multiply by 100. If this number exceeds 100, report it as 100.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question. Data for both the unit volume returned and unit volume sold should come from the same year, even though units may be returned in a different year than they were sold.
Examples of stewardship programs include extended producer responsibility programs and product takeback programs. Such programs should ensure that materials are recycled or disposed of in an environmentally sensitive manner.
THESIS Help Center Video: Product Stewardship KPI: Short video tutorial on the Product Stewardship KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/533750712N/AN/A
LuggageRecycled contentThis question covers materials, such as metals, plastics, and wood, as well as ingredients, such as motor oil and refrigerants. Calculate B1 by dividing the mass of post-consumer recycled materials or ingredients in the final product by the total mass of the final product, then multiply by 100. If multiple product configurations are sold, perform this calculation for each configuration, then calculate B1 and the sales-weighted average across all configurations. Treat refurbished goods as 100% post-consumer recycled material. Some materials and ingredients will have no available recycling stream, but the masses of these should still be included in the final product's mass.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
THESIS Help Center Video: Recycled Content KPI: Short video tutorial on the Recycled Content KPI. Use case-sensitive password 'thesis' when prompted. https://vimeo.com/531017179FTC Green Guide's Recyclability Definition: In the United States, the Federal Trade Commission defines when a product or packaging can be claimed recyclable. Please refer these guidelines when determining recyclability. https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/attachments/press-releases/ftc-issues-revised-green-guides/greenguides.pdf

Prospector: This searchable database from UL allows product designers to search for materials and ingredients that meet a set of user-defined specifications, including those that contain some amount of recycled content. https://www.ulprospector.com/en/na
N/A
LuggageResponsible metals supplyCalculate C1 as the spend on metal suppliers who require site-level assessments from all of their suppliers divided by the total spend on product units manufactured in this product category, then multiply by 100.
Perform this calculation using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
An assessment should include an on-site audit of environmental and social sustainability performance by a second or third party, or a systematic risk assessment against a standard or set of principles to determine risk based on conditions, controls, or other mitigating factors. Examples of standards or sets of principles include those developed by the International Council on Mining & Metals (ICMM) and the Initiative for Responsible Mining Assurance (IRMA).
N/ABetter Sourcing Program: The Better Sourcing Program (BSP) provides a technology-based communications solution to allow global organizations to source artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) ores through upstream due diligence, auditing and risk management. https://www.rcsglobal.com/bettersourcing/

Responsible Cobalt Initiative (RCI): An initiative under the Chinese Chamber of Commerce for Metals, Minerals & Chemicals (CCCMC), in collaboration with OECD, to bring importers and exporters of cobalt together with supply chain stakeholders to address social and environmental risks in the cobalt supply chain. http://en.cccmc.org.cn/news/58372.htm

Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC) chain-of-custody certification: The Responsible Jewellery Council is a standard-setting and certification organization that has developed an ISEAL-accredited chain-of-custody certification program for use by the jewellery industry and manufacturers, which applies to gold and platinum group metals. https://www.responsiblejewellery.com/rjc-certification/

Responsible Mica Initiative: A multi-stakeholder focused on responsible sourcing of mica in Indiay through the development and deployment of fair, responsible and sustainable practices, local community empowerment, and building a legal and liveable environment in local communities. https://responsible-mica-initiative.com/

Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI): Formerly known as the Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative, the Responsible Minerals Initiative (RMI) is a joint effort between the Responsible Business Alliance (RBA) and GeSI to establish supply chain transparency tools, resources and training to assist organizations in responsibly sourcing conflict-free minerals from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. Of note is their Responsible Minerals Assurance Process, which enables auditing and assessment of smelters for responsible ore sourcing and provides a centralized database for tracking smelter performance. http://www.responsiblemineralsinitiative.org/

Responsible Steel: A multi-stakeholder initative bringing together organizations across the steel supply chain to develop a standard for responsible steel supply and related certifications. https://www.responsiblesteel.org/
Corrective actions: Prompt actions taken to eliminate the causes of a problem, thus preventing their recurrence.

Second-party audit: An audit conducted by a party having an interest in the organization, such as customers, or by another entity on their behalf.

Third-party audit: An audit conducted by external, independent auditing organizations, such as those providing certification of conformity to a standard.
LuggageSustainable Packaging Design and ProductionCalculate C1 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that was recyclable, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C2 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for material and process efficiency during packaging manufacturing, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C3 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated progress on goals for weight or volume optimization during packaging design, divided by the total mass of sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100.
Goals must be quantitative and time-bound and progress must be reported publicly. Public reporting may include voluntary corporate reporting, sustainability reporting programs, or reporting as part of regulatory compliance.
Calculate C4 as the mass of sales packaging used for your final products that has demonstrated quantified environmental impact reductions, divided by the total mass sales packaging used for your final products, then multiply by 100. Include sales packaging with demonstrated impact reductions since the inception of the product or since purchase of the brand, if post-inception.
Methods for demonstrating quantified environmental impact reduction include, but are not limited to, life cycle impact assessment, or assessment against ISO Standard 18602 \(Packaging and the environment - Optimization of the packaging system\), or EN 13428 \(Packaging: Requirements specific to manufacturing and composition - Prevention by source reduction\).
Calculate C5 as the number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled with How2Recycle divided by the total number of units sold in the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100.
Calculate C6 as the number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging labeled according to an established third-party standard divided by the total number of units sold in regions outside the US and Canada that had sales packaging, then multiply by 100. Third party standards include those listed in the Certifications, Standards & Tools section of this KPI. Only include regions outside the US and Canada that are covered by the referenced third-party standards in your calculations.
Perform these calculations using data from a 12-month period that ended within 12 months of the date you respond to this question.
Australasian Recycling Label (ARL): Used in Australia and New Zealand, the ARL details how best to label packaging for recycling to assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://recyclingnearyou.com.au/arl/

EN 13428: Prevention by packaging source reduction: European standard 13428:2004 outlines a method for evaluating if packaging material weight and/or volume have been sufficiently minimized while also taking into consideration other packaging performance parameters. The standard also includes recommended methodology for identifying heavy metals and dangerous substances in packaging formats. http://ec.europa.eu/growth/single-market/european-standards/harmonised-standards/packaging/index_en.htm

EPA Energy Benefits Calculator: Use the EPA Energy Benefits Calculator to help quantify environmental impact reductions for packaging design choices. https://www.epa.gov/lmop/landfill-gas-energy-benefits-calculator

Ecoembes Recycling Symbols: Used in Spain, the Ecoembes recycling symbols provide information to consumers for the recycling of packaging up to six different colors: blue for paper and cardboard, yellow for plastics and cans, green for glass, orange for organic materials, red for hazardous waste, and grey for everything else. https://www.ecoembes.com/en/home

European Certification of Plastics Recycling (EUCertPlast): The EuCertPlast Certification is a European wide certification program for companies that recycle post-consumer plastic waste. https://www.eucertplast.eu/

How2Recycle Certification: The How2Recycle Label provides guidance to consumers on how to recycle packaging for consumable goods. The label is intended to be used on all types of packaging and to provide instruction regarding how and where various raw materials can be recycled. http://www.how2recycle.info/

ISO 18602: ISO 18602 provides criteria for optimization of packaging systems. It outlines a procedure for reduction of packaging material weight or volume while taking into consideration packaging function. It also provides assessment methodology for substances hazardous to the environment and heavy metals. https://www.iso.org/standard/55870.html

Japanese Recycling Symbols: Used in Japan, Japanese recycling symbols tell in a glance to consumers what is recyclable and what is not recyclable, and assist consumers in recycling correctly. https://www.jcpra.or.jp/Portals/0/resource/eng/JCPRAdocuments202012.pdf

Le Guide du TRI (Citeo Sorting Guide): sed in France, the Citeo Sorting Guide provides information to companies about which product components should be recycled and which should be disposed. ht